2014 NAYEN Plenary Update From Secretariat

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An overview of news and updates regarding Rotary Youth Exchange from the RI Secretariat. Presented at the 2014 NAYEN Conference in Cancun, Mexico on 7 March 2014.

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  • Role of SecretariatImplement Board policy under the direction of GS Provide resources and support to Rotarians Serve as a general program contactReview RI staff contacts
  • This slide shows you the overlap between Rotary’s programs for young leaders. We know that everyone in this room is active in Rotary Youth Exchange, and we encourage you to assess how the other programs for young people can be activated in your district. When all programs are active and well-supported—by sponsor clubs and by district leaders—young people have the greatest chance to transition from one program to the next. For instance, a returning Rotary Youth Exchange student may be the charter president of a new Interact club in her school. RYLA can provide leadership training to Rotaract officers while sparking the creation of new Rotaract clubs…or introducing Rotaractors to New Generations Service Exchange. We know that young people under 30 are in a dynamic time of their life—where they relocate for university, work, or family—this transition is a challenge of the club, the district, and Rotary worldwide. But this challenge is also a great opportunity: we estimate that there are almost 500,000 people that have participated in one or more of these programs annually215,000 Interactors330,000 Rotaractors25,000 RYLA participants7,000, Youth Exchange StudentsThis is a conservative estimate of only one year -- think of how many people have participated in these programs over the last ten, twenty, or fifty years!
  • Represents 348 districts and 56 countriesCount of districts includes those whose multidistricts answered on their behalf (ESSEX, North Star, Ohio-Erie, Florida were the ones in North America)Total of exchanges reported is 319 less than last yearHowever:Due to the transition of New Generations exchange to New Generations Service Exchange, we did not collect data on that type. Last year 181 were reported. So, removing New Generations exchanges from the equation, this year’s total is only 138 lower than last year.And this year’s response rate was 11% lower than last year (details on next slide)
  • Worldwide response rate is 11% lower than last yearNorth American response rate is 15% lower than last yearSince the response rate is 11% lower, but the total number of exchanges is only 138 lower (when you don’t count New Generations exchanges), we can safely assume that exchange activity remained the same or even increased
  • *Due to incomplete or illegible records, 11% of 2009-10 inbound student data could not be assigned to any regionNorth America is steady at hosting about 30% of total exchanges (ranges from 29% - 33%)
  • Different view of same data
  • 5,513 long-term exchanges reportedFairly steady number of exchanges reportedHowever, this is a decrease of 78 from last year’s total of 5,591
  • This year we were able to get a more accurate count by country because we enhanced the survey - asked multi-country districts to specify how many were hosted in each country.You’ll see this resulted in a slight decrease in numbers for long-term exchanges hosted in the US, with an increase in Canada and Mexico
  • 2,113 short-term exchanges reportedThis is an increase of 88 from last year’s total of 2,025
  • This graph might be a little confusing because it’s based on number of districts, rather than on number of exchangesIt’s a subset of responding districts – of all responding districts who indicated they hosted short-term exchanges, this percentage indicated they hosted this typeIf a district indicated they hosted more than one type, we included them in calculations for each relevant typeSo, we can say that 66% of districts who hosted short-term exchanges hosted homestay programs – NOT that 66% of short-term exchange participants were in homestay programsOnly one district indicated offering a disabled camp, so it’s less than 1% of the total and barely visible in the graph
  • Only 4% (275) of exchange participants returned home earlyWe look not only at the data reported to us via the annual survey, but also the individual (required) reporting of early returns throughout the year
  • 275 early returns reported – comprising 4% of all exchangesThis is an increase of 7 from last year’s total of 268This graph differs from the next graph - This graph takes all the early returns worldwide and shows us which region hosted them. So, 33% of all the early returns were hosted in North America. However, this does NOT say that 33% of the students hosted in North America returned home early. The next graph addresses that question.
  • This graph shows each region’s early exchanges as a percent of the total exchanges they hostedSo, 4% of the students hosted by North America returned home earlyThis is consistent with the worldwide rate of 4% early returns
  • Top 12 by count of early returns
  • Top 12 by count of early returns
  • Top 12 by early returns as percentage of each country’s total exchanges hostedDoesn’t include “other” because this is not looking at percent of whole – it’s looking at each country’s early returns as a percent of that country’s total exchangesPhilippines and Paraguay are much higher simply because their total hosted is much lower – should not necessarily be interpreted as an indicator of program quality. As we all know, it is possible for early returns to occur in very well run programs.
  • Top 12 by early returns as percentage of each country’s total exchanges hostedIt’s not a pie because it’s not looking at percent of whole – it’s looking at each country’s early returns as a percent of that country’s total exchanges
  • Ordered by the number of times each issue was cited as a cause (regardless of importance)Scale at bottom represents number of districts who indicated each issue as a cause (this question was not required, so not all districts responded)
  • Same data as previous slide, but re-ordered - by the number of times causes were cited as “very important” (dark blue)
  • Cert
  • An Online CommunityThe Board requested seven specific features to support the social business strategy. As part of the redesign of www.rotary.org, an online community will be launched with these new features (from August-December 2013). Profiles: comprehensive individual profiles with the ability to search attributes and interests, a photo, a Rotary “resume,” classification, skills, languages, and contact informationConnect: ability to create and maintain a network of contacts through My RotaryMessaging: capability to contact others through the platform without using external email accounts or sharing contact dataGroups: ability to create private groups based on Rotary business needs. This will be a place for fellowships, RAGS, and others with similar interests to meet and have online discussions.Ideas: implementation of an idea and project matching platform. Rotarians can post an idea or project to request partners for grants, volunteers for projects, and experts or connections. Calendar: creation of a comprehensive Rotary calendar containing local and regional events. Rotarians can add events for their clubs or groups. Rotary International can promote RI meetings such as the convention. Users can search by location, finding events near them, or in locations where they plan to visit.Marketplace: a clearinghouse where Rotarians who are already creating online tools can make them available via link or download to other RotariansAt launch in August 2013, these features will be available to Rotarians and Rotaractors. Future phases will include alumni, program participants, spouses, and non-Rotarians so that we can expand Rotary’s reach through the online community.
  • YEO Directory Youth Exchange Workgroup site via Member AccessResources available on siteAccess is currently only available to district and MD chairsYouth Exchange E-newsletter: bi-monthly, subscribe on www.rotary.org or Member AccessRI Publications: Brochures, handbooks, student/host family guides, posters available at the website or shop.rotary.org Applications are no longer owned by RI – we encourage all districts to use the application forms developed by EEMA and NAYEN, which are available on the YEO Resources site
  • 2014 NAYEN Plenary Update From Secretariat

    1. 1. Update from the Secretariat Kate Hoeppel, Senior Supervisor, Youth Exchange, RI Evanston, IL, USA
    2. 2. Your Team at the Secretariat John Hewko, General Secretary Michele Berg, Chief Officer, Programs and Member Services Victor Barnes, Director, Programs & Grants Sharon Cyr, Manager, Programs Adam Doty, Manager, New Generations Programs Kate Hoeppel, Senior Supervisor, Youth Exchange Tom Woods, Senior Coordinator, Youth Exchange Jessica Borrego, Compliance & Reporting Coordinator, Youth Exchange • Lauren Ribant, Service Coordinator, Youth Exchange • • • • • • • • youthexchange@rotary.org TITLE | 2
    3. 3. Youth Service – The Fifth Avenue of Service TITLE | 3
    4. 4. Our Programs for Young Leaders New Generations Service Exchange Rotary Youth Exchange 15-19 Interact 12-18 Rotaract 18-30 Rotary Youth Leadership Awards (RYLA) TITLE | 4
    5. 5. 2012-13 Youth Exchange Statistics TITLE | 5
    6. 6. Overall Program Participation Type of Exchange Exchanges Reported % of Total Exchanges Long-term 5,513 72% Short-term 2,113 28% TOTAL 7,626 100% Short-term 28% Long-term 72% TITLE | 6
    7. 7. Survey Response Rate Geographic Area Response Rate Africa 75% Asia 68% Europe 70% North America 80% Oceania 61% South America 72% WORLDWIDE 73% TITLE | 7
    8. 8. Historical Analysis of Total Exchanges from 2009-2013 45% 40% % Total Exchanges 35% 30% 2009-10* 25% 2010-11 20% 2011-12 2012-13 15% 10% 5% 0% South America Oceania North America Europe Asia Africa TITLE | 8
    9. 9. Historical Analysis of Total Exchanges from 2009-2013 100% 90% 80% % Total Exchanges 70% Africa 60% Asia Europe 50% North America Oceania 40% South America 30% 20% 10% 0% 2009-10* 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 TITLE | 9
    10. 10. Long-term Exchange TITLE | 1 0
    11. 11. Long-term Exchanges Worldwide 34% 34% 35% % Long-term exchanges 30% 25% 18% 20% 15% 10% 10% 4% 5% 0% 0% Africa Asia Europe North America Oceania South America TITLE | 11
    12. 12. Long-term Exchanges by Country United States 22% Other (36 countries) 26% Brazil 11% Argentina 3% Denmark 4% Taiwan 4% Belgium 4% France 8% Canada 4% Germany 6% Mexico 8% TITLE | 12
    13. 13. Long-term Exchanges by Country Country United States Inbound Long-term Exchanges 1,188 Brazil 616 France 432 Mexico 432 Germany 359 Canada 227 Belgium 220 Taiwan 213 Denmark 194 Argentina 189 Other (36 countries) 1,443 ALL COUNTRIES 5,513 TITLE | 13
    14. 14. Short-term Exchange TITLE | 1 4
    15. 15. Short-term Exchanges Worldwide 56% 60% % Short-term exchanges 50% 40% 30% 20% 20% 10% 10% 8% 4% 2% 0% Africa Asia Europe North America Oceania South America TITLE | 15
    16. 16. Short-term Exchanges by Country United States 15% Other (30 countries) 34% Germany 9% France 7% Brazil 6% Italy 4% South Africa 4% Turkey 4% Korea 5% Finland 6% Denmark 6% TITLE | 16
    17. 17. Short-term Exchanges by Country Country Inbound Short-term Exchanges United States 327 Germany 185 France 144 Brazil 133 Denmark 124 Finland 118 Korea 97 Turkey 96 South Africa 90 Italy 78 Other (30 countries) 721 ALL COUNTRIES 2,113 TITLE | 17
    18. 18. Early Returns TITLE | 1 9
    19. 19. Early Returns as a Percentage of Total Exchanges TITLE | 20
    20. 20. Early Returns by Region 34% 35% 33% 30% % Early Returns 25% 17% 20% 15% 11% 10% 4% 5% 1% 0% Africa Asia Europe North America Oceania South America TITLE | 21
    21. 21. Early Returns as Percentage of Regional Total Exchanges 50% Early Returns as % of Regional Total 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 4% 2% 5% 3% 4% 4% 4% 0% Africa Asia Europe North America Oceania South America TITLE | 22
    22. 22. Early Returns by Country Country Early Returns United States 66 Brazil 30 Germany 22 France 20 Denmark 19 Canada 15 Argentina 12 Japan 11 Mexico 11 Taiwan 10 Australia 7 Switzerland 7 Other (18 countries) 59 ALL COUNTRIES 275 TITLE | 23
    23. 23. Early Returns by Country Other (18 countries) 15% United States 24% Switzerland 3% Australia 3% Taiwan 4% Mexico 4% Brazil 11% Japan 4% Argentina 4% Germany 8% Canada 6% Denmark 7% France 7% TITLE | 24
    24. 24. Early Returns as Percentage of Country Totals Country Early Returns % of Country’s Total Exchanges Philippines 2 12% Paraguay 2 10% Sweden 6 6% Denmark 19 6% Canada 15 6% Japan 11 5% Argentina 12 5% Switzerland 7 5% United States 66 4% Taiwan 10 4% Germany 22 4% Brazil 30 4% TITLE | 25
    25. 25. Early Returns as Percentage of Country Totals 50% % of Country's Total Exchanges 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 12% 10% 6% 6% 6% 5% 5% 5% 4% 4% 4% 4% 0% TITLE | 26
    26. 26. Most Common Reported Causes of Early Returns Homesickness Prior medical or psychological condition Rule violation: other Problems with host family Inactivity in school or the community Rule violation: drug/alcohol use Breach of law Very Important Important Problems with host club Somewhat Important School problems Rule violation: romantic involvement Rule violation: unauthorized travel School requirements in home country Sudden illness or injury Other 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 TITLE | 27
    27. 27. Most Important Causes of Early Returns Homesickness Breach of law Prior medical or psychological condition Rule violation: drug/alcohol use Inactivity in school or the community School problems Sudden illness or injury Very Important Important Rule violation: other Somewhat Important Rule violation: romantic involvement Other Rule violation: unauthorized travel Problems with host family Problems with host club School requirements in home country 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 TITLE | 28
    28. 28. Certification Update TITLE | 29
    29. 29. Youth Exchange Certification – Year 8 • • • • 89% districts certified Annual renewal process and Recertification approx. every 6 years Outbound-only certified districts: • India: 3020, 3051, 3052, 3053, 3281, 3282, • Africa: 9110 (Nigeria), 9212(Ethiopia and Kenya only), 9220 (Comoro Islands, Djibouti, Madagascar, Mauritius, and Seychelles; Reunion and Mayotte are fully certified) • East Timor: 9500 • Newly certified district: 3240 (India) TITLE | 3 0
    30. 30. Required Reporting to RI • Inbound student data – All types of exchanges – Any convenient format: scans of Guarantee Forms, spreadsheets, etc. – Before or shortly after the exchange begins • Any serious student incident – Includes early returns • Annual survey TITLE | 3 1
    31. 31. Program Evaluations • Staff continue to perform 4-5 onsite program evaluations each year • Opportunity to ensure compliance with certification requirements an share best practices and strengthen overall program • Some general findings: – Youth Exchange builds and retains membership – Early communication of problems – Succession planning – Club motivation and compliance TITLE | 3 2
    32. 32. Assistance in Review of Districts’ Students Insurance Policies TITLE | 33
    33. 33. RI Minimum Coverage Amounts for Student Travel Insurance • New regulations for student insurance were adopted by RI board, effective January 2012. – Documented in RCOP 41.060.10 TITLE | 3 4
    34. 34. Evaluation of Insurance Policies • Districts, if asked to purchase partner’s insurance, need to know if partner’s policy meets RI regulations • Difficult to do – Districts are not that familiar with RI regulations • Insurance working group recently established as a resource to help districts TITLE | 3 5
    35. 35. Insurance Working Group Members • • • • Peter Kaye, Chair, Australia Carl Luckenbach, USA Cheryl Combs, USA Erkki Nuotio, Finland Members’ contact information to be included in next delivery of RI RYE directory (April 2014) TITLE | 3 6
    36. 36. Insurance Working Group Procedure • Review policies provided by districts, and: – Respond affirmatively to districts if policy is compliant or – Notify district of perceived shortfalls, and present conclusions to RI Risk Management Group for resolution TITLE | 3 7
    37. 37. RI Risk Management Staff • Evaluate conclusions from Insurance Working Group • When policy is determined not to meet RI regulations: – notify district owning policy to correct policy – obtain evidence of amendments – notify Working Group TITLE | 3 8
    38. 38. Record Management • Insurance Working Group will maintain record of compliant policies to prevent redundant reviews in future • Youth Exchange Committee and RI staff are discussing ways of making this information accessible to YEOs TITLE | 3 9
    39. 39. Rotary’s New Voice and Visual Identity TITLE | 40
    40. 40. New Rotary Website TITLE | 41
    41. 41. My Rotary • • • • • • • Profiles Connect Messaging Groups Ideas Calendar Marketplace/Hub TITLE | 4 2
    42. 42. Strengthening Rotary’s Brand • Voice and Visual Identity Guidelines – Focus on adoption, not enforcement – www.rotary.org/myrotary/en/secure/101751 • For general questions about the new marks: – graphics@rotary.org TITLE | 4 3
    43. 43. What does this mean for Youth Exchange? Survey to collect feedback on potential changes to Youth Exchange logo… Forward the survey to potential, current and former students! TITLE | 4 4
    44. 44. Available Resources • Youth Exchange Workgroup Site – RI publications: – YEO Directory • Youth Exchange Bi-monthly e-Newsletter • www.rotary.org youthexchange@rotary.org TITLE | 4 5
    45. 45. Questions? TITLE | 46
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