0
Rosalin Zein
13 Pius
Assignment 5: Extended research
on topics
Topic 1 : Does social deprivation
cause crime?
What you would learn:
 What is social deprivation.
 How it could affect p...
For:
Sociologists:
Left Realists –
 Left realists acknowledge that relative deprivation can occur at any socioeconomic
le...
Comparing the level of deprivation with the level of
crime.
Measuring the level of relative deprivation in
the boroughs wi...
Against:
Sociologists:
Lea and Young – poverty or unemployment do not directly cause crime, as despite the high
employment...
Topic 2: The impact of social media
on culture.
What you would learn:
• The diversity and development of social media
• Th...
What is social media?
Social media refers to the means of interactions among people in which they create, share, and excha...
Pros
Pros: How? Examples:
Social media facilitates political
change.
Social networking sites give social
movements a quick...
Cons:
Cons: How? Examples:
Criminals use social media
to commit and promote
crimes.
Gangs use the sites to recruit younger...
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Assignment 5

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Transcript of "Assignment 5"

  1. 1. Rosalin Zein 13 Pius Assignment 5: Extended research on topics
  2. 2. Topic 1 : Does social deprivation cause crime? What you would learn:  What is social deprivation.  How it could affect people and cause them to turn to crime.  The different theorists who agree and disagree.  Statistics on the crime rate for those who are socially deprived.  Whether it is social deprivation of emotional deprivation that causes people to commit crime. Debate: For: •People who are socially deprived are more likely to turn to crime in order to satisfy basic living necessities •We acquire knowledge of what is right and wrong through education •People feel crime is the only way for their frustrations to be heard Against: •Some of the biggest crimes that affect society are committed by huge multinational companies or wealthy individuals •As we live in a consumerist society the primary cause of crime is greed or desperation to ‘fit in’
  3. 3. For: Sociologists: Left Realists –  Left realists acknowledge that relative deprivation can occur at any socioeconomic level, but that the social structure has left youths in the bottom tier of society without jobs and without hope for improving their situations.  They form subcultures with other disenfranchised young people in their areas, and those subcultures may support delinquent and criminal behaviour. James -  When greater affluence is combined with growing inequality and the rise of what has been called a winner/loser culture, crime has climbed even more steeply. Source: Sociological Theories of Criminal Behavior I: The Social-Structural Approach
  4. 4. Comparing the level of deprivation with the level of crime. Measuring the level of relative deprivation in the boroughs within London. From this we can see that the crime rate is higher in the more deprived areas and lower in the less deprived. Source for table http://www.londonspovertyprofile.org.uk/about/an- overview-of-londons-borough/ Source for crime rate :http://maps.met.police.uk/access.php?area=MPS&sort=rate&order=a
  5. 5. Against: Sociologists: Lea and Young – poverty or unemployment do not directly cause crime, as despite the high employment experienced in the economic depression in Britain from the late 1920’s to the 1930’s, crime rates were considerably lower than they were in the boom years of the 1980’s. Other explanations Albert Cohen, Richard Cloward and Lloyd Ohlin:  They viewed the most serious and pervasive forms of crime and delinquency as generated by a combination of complex experiences born of relative deprivation in a highly competitive, increasingly fragmented social order. Source – British Society of Criminology
  6. 6. Topic 2: The impact of social media on culture. What you would learn: • The diversity and development of social media • The impact social media has already had. • The negative and positive effects • How it has created a global culture. • Social networking sites (Facebook, YoutTube, Twitter, Tumblr) Debate: • Whether social media has had a positive or negative affect on society and culture. • What are the affects it has already had. • Could it change the way in which we interact and communicate with each other even more than it already has. • Will its impact grow. • Is there anything we can do stop it ?
  7. 7. What is social media? Social media refers to the means of interactions among people in which they create, share, and exchange information and ideas in virtual communities and networks. A social networking service is a platform to build social networks or social relations among people who, for example, share interests, activities, backgrounds, or real-life connections. Examples of social media: Users upload their own stories a chapter at a time. A social networking site.Photo and video sharing site. A social networking siteA Video sharing site A blogging + social networking site Social networking service
  8. 8. Pros Pros: How? Examples: Social media facilitates political change. Social networking sites give social movements a quick, no-cost method to organize, disseminate information, and mobilize people. The 2011 Egyptian uprising (part of the Arab Spring), organized largely via social media, motivated tens of thousands of protestors for eighteen days of demonstrations and, ultimately led to the resignation of Egyptian President Mubarak on Feb. 11, 2011. Social media sites empower individuals to make social change and do social good on a community level. Social media allows us to be connected, thus allowing us to share problems, ideas and communicate with others to fix these problems. Nine-year old Scottish student, Martha Payne, and her blog, "Never Seconds," and the formation of "Friends of Never Seconds" charity to feed children globally. Social networking provides academic research to a wider audience, allowing many people access to previously unavailable educational resources We are now able to access a variety of educational resources and information online making it easier to do research. Photos, videos, books, essays, revision resources, the ability to contact others. Social networking sites spread information faster than any other media. Over 50% of people learn about breaking news on social media. 65% of traditional media reporters and editors use sites like Facebook and LinkedIn for story research, and 52% use Twitter. Source: http://socialnetworking.procon.org/
  9. 9. Cons: Cons: How? Examples: Criminals use social media to commit and promote crimes. Gangs use the sites to recruit younger members, coordinate violent crimes, and threaten other gangs. For example during the London riots. Social networking sites facilitate cyber bullying. It allows everyone to communicate with each other meaning that people can message you privately/publically. 49.5% of students reported being the victims of bullying online and 33.7% reported committing bullying behaviour online. Children may endanger themselves by not understanding the public and viral nature of social networking sites. Children might upload statuses/pictures which can be traced back to them. Also, as they are so young children are ignorant to what happens on social networking sites and what could possibly happen if you put out too much ibnformation. Up to 600 Dutch riot police had to be called in to break up a teen's birthday party to which about 30,000 people were accidentally invited after a Facebook post thought to be private went viral (quickly moving on to Twitter and YouTube as well). As a result, at least three people were hurt and 20 people were arrested for vandalism, looting, setting cars on fire, and damaging lampposts.
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