Cinema divina

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Cinema divina can be an authentic encounter with God through the scriptures and film. When communities share the lectio, and by extension cinema divina, the Holy Spirit opens minds and hearts allowing genuine spiritual growth to happen. (c) Daughters of St. Paul/Sr. Rose Pacatte

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Cinema divina

  1. 1. SIGNIS  Catholic  Communicator  Forum   Charlotte,  NC   June  20,  2014   WHAT  IS  CINEMA  DIVINA?  
  2. 2. Cinema  Divina  :     -­‐  Drawn  from  ancient  practice   of  lectio  divina   -­‐  A  sure  portal  through  which  to   engage  our  noisy,  over   stimulated,  hyper  techno   world   -­‐  Can  lead  us  to  spiritual  growth   -­‐  Sharing  our  light  with  the   world   -­‐  Discover  the  face  of  God    
  3. 3. When  communities  share  the  lectio,  and  by  extension  cinema  divina,  the  Holy   Spirit  opens  minds  and  hearts  allowing  genuine  spiritual  growth  to  happen.   CINEMA  DIVINA  CAN  BE  AN  AUTHENTIC   ENCOUNTER  WITH  GOD  THROUGH  THE  SCRIPTURES  
  4. 4. -­‐  Lectio:    reading;  basic  literary  analysis:   context,  words,  images,  characters,  for,   genre,  structure  of  the  Scriptures   -­‐  Meditatio:  the  content  of  the  passage  and   present  dispositions  of  the  person:  the   reader  does  not  choose  the  passage  or  word   he  likes  best  but  says  the  word  or  phrase   that  chose  him   -­‐  Oratio:  spontaneous  prayer  that  Mlows  from   the  reading   -­‐  Contemplatio:  relish  and  savor  the   experience  and  praising  God  for  it     -­‐  Actio:  discerning  a  course  of  action  beyond   oneself  into  the  world   Lectio  Divina  
  5. 5.     goes  beyond  the  simple  narrative   or  how  we  feel  at  the  end  of  the   Milm     -­‐  What  it  says  (narrative)     -­‐  How  it  makes  us  feel     -­‐  Discovering  the  seeds  of  the   Gospel   -­‐  The  face  of  God  in  humanity   and  creation     -­‐  Chooses  us     Cinema   divina      
  6. 6. Cinema  Divina   Lectio    -­‐  reading,  listening,  attending  to   the  Milm;  involves  basic  cinematic   analysis:  context,  words,  images,   characters,  form,  genre,  motifs,   cinematography,  structure,  music,   sound   Mediatatio  –  takes  into  account  the   content  of  the  Milm,  your  present   dispositions;  instead  of  choosing  the   part  you  liked  best,  or  the  “message”   you  like,  you  are  grasped  by  the   experience   Oratio  –  spontaneous  pryer  Mlows  from   experiencing  and  meditating  on  the  Milm   Contemplatio  –  relishing  the   experiencing,  the  spiritual,  praising  God   for  it   Actio  –  discerning  a  course  of  action   beyond  oneself  into  the  world   “The  cinema  has  always  been   interested  in  God”  –  Andre  Bazin  
  7. 7. -­‐  Cinema  Divina  is  to   experience  the   ineffability  of  grace   in  the  world  
  8. 8. -­‐  Theme     -­‐  Lectio  divina     -­‐  View  Milm     -­‐  Break  for  refreshments     -­‐  Gather  in  a  circle     -­‐  Questions  for  reMlection  and  conversation     -­‐  Closing  prayer  (provided  or  spontaneous)  
  9. 9.                                                       A  Reading  from  the  Letter  of  James   Therefore  confess  your  sins  to  one  another,  and   pray  for  one  another,  so  that  you  may  be  healed.   The  prayer  of  the  righteous  is  powerful  and   effective.  Elijah  was  a  human  being  like  us,  and  he   prayed  fervently  that  it  might  not  rain,  and  for   three  years  and  six  months  it  did  not  rain  on  the   earth.  18Then  he  prayed  again,  and  the  heaven   gave  rain  and  the  earth  yielded  its  harvest.     My  brothers  and  sisters,*  if  anyone  among  you   wanders  from  the  truth  and  is  brought  back  by   another,  you  should  know  that  whoever  brings   back  a  sinner  from  wandering  will  save  the   sinner’s*  soul  from  death  and  will  cover  a   multitude  of  sins.                                  Smoke  Signals                                                      Blessed  are  the      Poor  in  Spirit                            James  5:  16-­‐20                        
  10. 10. For  Re'lection  and  Conversation     1.  Does  this  Milm  match  your  understanding  of  Native  Americans  in  our  country?  Victor  and   Thomas  often  joke  about  “white”  perceptions  of  them.  What  are  your  perceptions?       2.  How  did  the  two  young  men  in  the  movie  portray  poverty  of  spirit?  Does  material   poverty  have  any  bearing  on  spiritual  poverty?  How  are  these  realities  the  same  yet   different?       3.  What  impressed  you  about  the  “pilgrimage”  to  and  from  Arizona  for  Victor  and  Thomas?   Did  they  discover  a  new  understanding  of  Arnold  Joseph?       4.  How  does  the  Letter  of  James  shed  meaning  on  the  Milm  when,  at  the  end,  Victor  scatters   Arnold’s  ashes  from  the  bridge.  The  poem  is  about  forgiving  our  fathers.  It  ends,  “If  we   forgive  our  fathers,  what  is  left?”  Does  Victor  really  forgive  his  father?  Does  he  withhold   forgiveness?       5.  Which  characters  in  the  Milm  seem  to  be  poor  in  spirit,  that  is,  rich  in  spirit?  How  does   he/she  manifest  this  richness  of  spirit?             Prayer   Lord,  bless  families  who  suffer  and  grieve,  who  feel  poor  in  spirit.  Give  them  your  gifts  of   hope  and  peace.  Amen.      

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