Learn Spanish By Using   Dog Training Principles
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Learn Spanish By Using Dog Training Principles

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If you have ever trained a dog, even to the most basic level, you know some things that can help you with your own process of learning Spanish. This article includes four.

If you have ever trained a dog, even to the most basic level, you know some things that can help you with your own process of learning Spanish. This article includes four.

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  • 1. Learn Spanish By Using Dog Training Principles By Rosana Hart LearnSpanishRapidly.com   If you have ever trained a dog, even to the most basic  level, you know some things that can help you with  your own process of learning Spanish. Here are four:    [1] Repetition is essential. If you want your dog to  come when called, you will need to practice over and  over and over. If you want Spanish verbs to slip off  your tongue naturally, you will need to practice over  and over and over.    In both cases, review is a necessary part of the  repetition. If you don’t call your dog for a year, what  are the chances that he will come immediately when  you do? If you haven’t used your Spanish verbs in a  long time and you go to a Spanish‐speaking country  for a trip, they are unlikely to be right at the tip of  your tongue.    [2] You need to practice with dogs in different  places. Something they know perfectly well in the  1
  • 2. kitchen they may hesitate on if you try it in the living  room. Now, actually, we humans are less location‐ dependent in our learning than dogs are, but just  because you can say everything you have learned  from a CD, you still may find yourself tongue‐tied   when you arrive at the Mexico City airport.    [3] A little bit at a time is better than long sessions.  Not only will you be more likely to do short training  sessions for either canine or human lessons, but you  won’t run into mental fatigue or overload.    [4] Rewards are necessary. It’s amazing what my  dogs will do for 1/100th of a hot dog. (I cut them into  tiny pieces and keep them handy in the freezer.)     I wouldn’t do anything for that, but the rewards of  being able to chat with my Mexican friends keep me  at my flashcards. I also like the intrinsic reward in a  flash card of getting them right. I bet it does  something with endorphins!    For more out-of-the-box thinking, visit Rosana's blog on learning Spanish or her blog on dog training, depending on your interests! 2