NMC-2008-Alberico-FINAL.ppt - nmc - nmc | the new media ...

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  • Over the years VIVA collections have grown at a steady pace. Students at public institutions now have access to a large and diverse online repository of high quality information. Through a cost sharing arrangement students at private, non-profit schools have access to Expanded Academic Index, the largest full-text database offered by VIVA. As common collections have grown so has the sharing of items among libraries. VIVA provides fiscal incentives and a cooperative framework to expedite interlibrary loan transactions among its members. Everyone can take advantage of priority interlibrary loan service.

Transcript

  • 1. Developing a Statewide Video Streaming Service for Virginia Higher Education 2008 NMC Summer Conference Princeton University Ralph Alberico [email_address] James Madison University
  • 2. About VIVA
    • The Virtual Library of Virginia (VIVA)
    • 15 Public Colleges and Universities
    • 24 Public 2-Year Colleges (VCCS)
    • 32 Private Non-Profit Colleges
    • The Library of Virginia
    • ~ 400,000 students, faculty and staff
    • Annual budget > $6M USD
    • More information: www.vivalib.org/
  • 3. VIVA Provides
    • Over 150 databases -- indexing scientific and technical literature, providing access to instructional resources, and supporting nearly every discipline taught at Virginia colleges and universities
    • Access to over 20 journal collections including over 7,000 journals and millions of articles available via the Web to VIVA students and faculty
    • Expedited interlibrary loan
    • Software, systems and databases to improve access to and management of library collections
    • Training and documentation on use of e-resources, integration of resources with curricula, and resource sharing
  • 4. About This Session
    • Why streaming?
    • Best Practices -- Now what?
    • Let’s federate!
    • Promoting learning & discovery.
    • Each part will last 10 minutes followed by 5 minutes for questions and discussion. There will be 2 live demos: 1.) a locally hosted streaming service and 2. ) the centrally hosted service. Extra time will be reserved for discussion at the end.
  • 5. PART 1
    • Why streaming?
  • 6. Opportunities
    • Educational video on demand
    • Multiple viewers at one time
    • Level the playing field across institutions
    • Deliver video to classrooms & public spaces
    • Enhance learning via out-of-class experiences
    • Put videos into broader contexts
  • 7. Challenges
    • New and rapidly changing technology
    • Competing technical standards
    • Uneven infrastructure across campuses
    • General unfamiliarity with policy issues
    • Working across organizations & cultures
  • 8. Streaming Video Scenarios
    • Multimedia licensing as a strategic objective
    • VIVA licenses content, vendor hosts
    • VIVA licenses content and hosts centrally
    • VIVA members host content on a peer-to-peer basis
    • Each VIVA school hosts content locally
    • VIVA contracts with 3 rd party to host content
    • Combination of the above
  • 9. Licensing Considerations - PBS
    • Breadth of coverage, quality of content
    • One-time fee vs. ongoing subscription
    • Term license vs. perpetual license
    • Access via IP domain vs. authentication
    • Downloading vs. stream only
    • Subsidiary rights and stability of content
  • 10. The PBS Collection
    • Content supports learning across schools
    • 498 titles, over 500 hours of video
    • Delivered as MPEG-4 DVDs ~2 mbps
    • Broad subject coverage & high production values, low “volatility”
    • License in perpetuity, one fee, host your own
    • Downloading prohibited
    • User id and password required for authentication and authorization
  • 11. Streaming Video Strategic Goals
    • VIVA Task Force on Multimedia Collections
    • Develop expertise with rich media within the consortium
    • Establish a forum for resource sharing and information exchange
    • Recommend technical specs and technical support structures
    • Recommend approaches to cataloging, resource discovery and preservation
    • Develop models for user support
  • 12. Planning Issues
    • Wide variation in infrastructure and technical expertise among members
    • Bandwidth!!!
    • Server/service management issues
    • Encoding
    • Access control
    • Resource discovery
    • Integration with learning & teaching
    • User support
  • 13. Strategy Elements
    • Emphasize VIVA principles of sharing, equitable access and cost effectiveness
    • University of Virginia provides central hosting under Shibboleth; other schools can opt to host their own content and/or use central host
    • Define and follow best practices
    • Encode files to a standard and share them
    • Divide the labor, avoid duplication of effort
    • Pursue common denominator solutions (e.g. same encoding and cataloging for local and central hosting)
  • 14. PART 2
    • Best Practices -- Now what?
  • 15. Moving forward
    • Survey all VIVA members
    • Analyze responses from 54 campuses
    • Adopt parallel strategy of short term support for local hosting and long term support for central hosting
    • Develop quality assurance process
    • Use Shibboleth as authentication mechanism for centrally hosted content
    • Shibboleth decision drives encoding choices
  • 16. Streaming Video Hosting Experience in VIVA The 64% question: Does your school host online video collections?
  • 17. Server & Player Selection Issues
    • Shibboleth solution requires Darwin Streaming Server (open source equivalent of QuickTime)
    • QuickTime is default player for the project
    • Server and player decisions at each school can be made independently from central service
    • Standalone player offers screen size and random access advantages
    • Plug-in keeps everything in the browser and can be configured to play segments from within longer streams
  • 18. Most Popular Media Players
  • 19. Preferred Encoding Format
  • 20. Preferred Media Servers Shibboleth platform is Darwin
  • 21. Encoding Decision Process
    • Encoding samples developed for each of the major media players
    • Samples prepared with different compression tools, bit rates, resolutions, frame rates etc
    • Samples served from different institutions and tested for quality on different bandwidth networks
    • Decision to go with QuickTime compatible scheme and MPEG-4 with H.264 codec at 300 and 800 kbps
    • Encoding of files outsourced to TapHere!
    • Encoded files distributed on hard drives
  • 22. Encoding Workflow
    • Technical specifications developed and refined within VIVA
    • Various approaches to encoding processes tested within VIVA
    • 1 hour of streaming = 10+ hours of encoding
    • Decision made to outsource encoding
    • RFP developed for outsourcing
    • Key criteria: technical specifications, stream quality, turnaround time on encoding jobs, adherence to QA process, embedded metadata, intellectual property protection, cost
    • Contract awarded to: TapHere Technologies!
  • 23. Bandwidth
    • 6 research universities have 1-10 gigabit per second pipes to edge of campus
    • 50+ campuses have pipes from 45 to 500 megabits per second capacity
    • A few schools have capacity of 10 megabits per second or less
    • Almost all schools have adequate bandwidth to academic buildings on their campuses
  • 24. Bandwidth Issues
    • Bandwidth has been the single most critical issue
    • Incoming pipe capacity is critical for content hosted off campus
    • Packet shaping and other net traffic control measures can be a problem; caching can help
    • Network load is critical; time of day matters
    • On-campus infrastructure is generally adequate for local hosting
    • Schools with greatest need for central hosting are least able to handle incoming streams
    • 45 mbps = entry level for central hosting participation
    • Need to take care on distribution of 800 kbps streams
  • 25. Let’s try it out.
    • James Madison University Library Catalog
    • http://leo.jmu.edu/
    • Keyword Search: VIVA streaming video collection
    • For current JMU students, faculty and staff
  • 26. PART 3
    • Let’s federate!
  • 27. Authentication and Authorization
    • Shibboleth for authorization to VIVA hosted service based on user attributes
    • Local authentication solutions for files hosted on individual campuses (LDAP scripts, EZ Proxy, etc)
    • Authentication often happens in front of release of stream and not at local streaming servers (requires strategies to hide stream URLs)
    • Moving toward authentication at server level for local hosting
  • 28. Shibboleth Definition
    • The Hebrew word used by Jephthah as a test-word by which to distinguish the fleeing Ephraimites (who could not pronounce the sh) from his own men the Gileadites (Judges xii. 4-6).
    • 2. transf. a. A word or sound which a person is unable to pronounce correctly; a word used as a test for detecting foreigners, or persons from another district, by their pronunciation.
    • Source: Oxford English Dictionary, Second Edition, 1989
    • http://dictionary.oed.com/
  • 29. Shibboleth Internet2 Definition
    • “ The Shibboleth System is a standards based, open source software package for web single sign-on across or within organizational boundaries. It allows sites to make informed authorization decisions for individual access of protected online resources in a privacy-preserving manner.”
    • Source: Shibboleth® Web Site
    • http://shibboleth.internet2.edu/
    • Short Definition: Single sign-on access to online services based on assertions about user attributes.
    • The VIVA PBS project offers a low risk, high benefit opportunity to test the technology.
  • 30. Pursue a Federation? N=31 (including VCCS with 24 campuses)
  • 31. Implementation Timetable N=31 (including VCCS with 24 campuses)
  • 32. Shibboleth Steps
    • Establish a federation within VIVA along with a “trust fabric” and policies governing which types of users have access to which types of video streams
    • Implement a Shibboleth Service Provider for video streaming at the University of Virginia
    • Join InCommon federation to manage policies and WAYF (Where are you from?) services
    • Install Shibboleth Identity Provider software at participating campuses
  • 33. Search for a Video I think I will search for the online video my Professor recommended.
  • 34. Request a Video Stream This looks interesting. I think I will watch it now.
  • 35. Request for Shibboleth Streaming Service Hmm… looks like I need to click on the link to see the online video Link to Shibboleth enabled Streaming service
  • 36. WAYF dialog I guess they need to know where I am from before they let me see the video. Where are you from? College of William and Mary George Mason University James Madison University Old Dominion University Sweet Briar College University of Mary Washington University of Richmond University of Virginia Virginia Commonwealth University Virginia Tech University User request is redirected to InCommon Federation WAYF.
  • 37. Login at Home Institution Now they want me to login to JMU. After login, assertion about user attributes is passed to streaming service
  • 38. View Stream After Authentication Hey …this looks a lot better than what I am used to seeing on YouTube. Streaming video in QuickTime player Stream is launched after Shibboleth Service Provider determines that attribute obtained from Identity Provider at home school matches type of person authorized to view the stream.
  • 39. VIVA PBS Shibboleth Splash Screen
  • 40. Let’s try it out.
    • Shibboleth-Enabled Service at University of Virginia
    • https://pbsvid.itc.virginia.edu/
    • For VIVA Members via InCommon
  • 41. Streaming files WAYF (InCommon) Shibboleth Identity Provider Shibboleth Streaming Service Provider Shibboleth Authentication Adapted from Michael Gettes, 2004 3 2 Where Are You From? 4 OK, your request is redirected to the Handle Service of your home org. HS 5 6 I don’t know you. Please authenticate Using WEBLOGIN Attribute 10 Shibbolized Darwin Streaming Server Attributes 1 ACS I don’t know you. Not even which home org you are from. I redirect your request to the WAYF User Database 7 Credentials OK, I know you now. I redirect your request to the target, together with a handle AA Pass user attribute to Service Provider. 9 Handle Handle 8 Ask Attribute Authority for attributes to see if user is eligible to receive service Handle AR
  • 42. PART 4
    • Finding & using video streams
  • 43. Cataloging & Resource Discovery
    • Integrate with existing systems or develop separate repository?
    • Support multiple paths to the streams (OPAC, LMS, repository, links on the web etc)
    • Discovery tools and schema in flux
    • Looked at many schema and tools for enabling search and resource discovery (MARC, Dublin Core, MODS, MPEG-7, PBCore, Blinx)
    • Need to balance metadata quality with a reasonable production timetable
  • 44. Resource Discovery Strategies
    • Produce records for video streams from existing OCLC MARC records
    • Modify OCLC MARC records to suit local needs
    • Prepare records to be imported into local integrated library systems
    • Script iTunes atom level embedded metadata at time of encoding
    • Ingest metadata from file manifest spreadsheet or add manually for use in local file systems and repositories
  • 45. Streaming Video Catalog Record MARC Record in Library Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC)
  • 46. Link to Companion Web Site
  • 47. iTunes Embedded Metadata Embedded Metadata from iTunes Atoms shown in QuickTime Player Display
  • 48. Streaming URL Syntax
  • 49. Referencing Video Clips
    • Parameters may be added to the base name URL for each video title to specify High (H) or Normal (N) bit rate and to specify start and stop times for a clip within a longer video.
    • Example: Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address
    • https://pbsvid.itc.virginia.edu/cgi-bin/secure/viva-pbs?pbs_amx002-5&N&00:27:09:00&00:31:50:00
    • The URL above tells the streaming server to start playback at minute 27 and second 9 and end at minute 31, second 50
    • Try it out in Google Sites
  • 50. Current Status
    • Streaming files encoded at 300 and 800 kbps in QuickTime H.264 format
    • State contract available for subsequent encoding services
    • Cataloging records developed for streaming files
    • Video files and catalog records available from JMU
    • Catalog records available from VIVA FTP site
    • Locally hosted service available at several schools
    • Centrally hosted Shibboleth streaming operational at UVa
    • Contract template for InCommon Federation developed (10 VIVA members have joined)
    • Google Site created for the project; Install Fest being planned
  • 51. Next Steps
    • For central service, pilot test Shibboleth with subset of 10 VIVA schools
    • Sponsor Shibboleth “Install Fest” for VIVA
    • Conduct quality assurance testing; pursue strategies to expand access to smaller schools
    • Develop timecode capture, bookmarking & playlisting capabilities
    • License/identify additional streaming content?
    • Flash service???
    • Integrate online video with teaching and learning systems and practices!
  • 52. What does this mean?
    • Single sign-on solution for web services
    • Quality online video collections for VIVA members without the hassle of managing a streaming service
    • Ability to place online video in educational contexts and reference streams in many ways
    • Federated identity opens possibilities for more sharing across institutions
    • Services based on trust relationships can be differentiated based on user attributes
  • 53. Lessons learned
    • The best solution is not necessarily the quickest or easiest
    • Addressing legal, technical, policy and user support issues across institutional boundaries is a big challenge
    • Establish standards early in the process
    • Someone has to take ownership
    • Patience is a virtue