Application Notes for Live and Stored Streaming Video

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  • 1. Page 1 of 30 Application Notes for Live and Stored Streaming Video Issue: 1.2 Date: Aug. 17, 2007 Abstract: This application note describes the steps needed to configure and use a VBrick EtherneTV system in conjunction with 3Com networking equipment for educational institutions like K – 12 school systems and Colleges and Universities. 3Com Open Network™ Solutions Lab Application Notes Authors: Sherman Schlar and Bob Blair
  • 2. Page 2 of 30 Table of Contents Revision History ....................................................................................................3 References ...........................................................................................................3 Objective...............................................................................................................4 VBrick Systems: Company and Product Details ...................................................4 VBrick Systems Overview .................................................................................5 Configuration Technical Details ............................................................................6 How it Works .....................................................................................................6 3rd Party Streaming Service Provider ..............................................................12 Hardware Revisions............................................................................................13 Software Revisions .............................................................................................13 Installation Overview...........................................................................................13 Network Topology ...............................................................................................16 Testing Observations ..........................................................................................18 Configuration Details...........................................................................................20 5500G Configuration file..................................................................................20 TV and DVD Configuration Details......................................................................22 Verification Tests ................................................................................................23 Product Support ..................................................................................................24 3COM product support: ...................................................................................24 VBrick Systems product support: ....................................................................24 Conclusion ..........................................................................................................25 Appendix A .........................................................................................................26 3Com Open Network™ Solutions Lab Application Notes Authors: Sherman Schlar and Bob Blair
  • 3. Page 3 of 30 Revision History Revision Date Author Reason for change 1.0 July 24, Sherman Schlar, Initial version. 2007 VBrick Systems 1.1 Aug 14, Pat Cassella VBExpress image update 2007 1.2 Aug. 14, Bob Blair Formatting and document 3COM Configuration details 2007 References Date Document Name Revision Company July 2007 Portal Server v4.1 User Guide v4.1 VBrick Systems July 2007 Portal Server v4.1 Admin Guide v4.1 VBrick Systems July 2007 Portal Server v4.1 Release Notes v4.1 VBrick Systems May 2006 VOD-WM v3.3 VOD Server Quick Start Guide v3.3 VBrick Systems May 2006 VOD-WM v3.3 VOD Server Release Notes v3.3 VBrick Systems January 2007 VB6000 WM Appliance v4.0 Admin Guide v4.0 VBrick Systems January 2007 VB6000 WM Appliance v4.0 Quick Start Guide v4.0 VBrick Systems January 2007 VB6000 WM Appliance v4.0 Release Notes v4.0 VBrick Systems June 2007 WM-IPR Admin Guide V4.1.0 VBrick Systems July 2007 WM-IPR ReleaseNotes V4.1.0 VBrick Systems 3Com Open Network™ Solutions Lab Application Notes Authors: Sherman Schlar and Bob Blair
  • 4. Page 4 of 30 Objective Document the configuration and validation steps necessary to install a VBrick EtherneTV streaming video system operating in conjunction with 3Com network equipment in an educational setting. VBrick Systems: Company and Product Details VBrick Systems has been delivering high quality, reliable live and stored streaming video to Educational, Corporate, and Government customers for over ten years. As a recognized leader in the areas of quality, performance, and innovation, VBrick products deliver streaming video over a wide variety of IP networks, including LANs, WANs, wireless networks, and the Internet. VBrick products have received numerous industry awards from leading associations like Educause, Networld + Interop, Supercomm, Frost & Sullivan, and NAB. • Technical Summary http://www.vbrick.com/edu/ • Datasheet http://www.vbrick.com/docs/VBrick_Edu_VerticalGuide.pdf • Features, Functions, and Benefits http://www.vbrick.com/products/ethernetv.asp http://www.vbrick.com/products/appliances.asp 3Com Open Network™ Solutions Lab Application Notes Authors: Sherman Schlar and Bob Blair
  • 5. Page 5 of 30 Picture 1: VBrick EtherneTV System VBrick Systems Overview VBrick Systems is an industry-leading manufacturer of turnkey systems for video distribution across IP networks. These systems operate over a wide variety of networks and are designed to require a minimal amount of configuration while delivering high reliability and availability. Founded in 1997, VBrick has installed more than 20,000 video appliances worldwide across thousands of IP networks. VBrick has enjoyed rapid growth by helping its customers successfully introduce a diverse variety of mission critical video applications across their enterprise networks. 3Com Open Network™ Solutions Lab Application Notes Authors: Sherman Schlar and Bob Blair
  • 6. Page 6 of 30 Configuration Technical Details VBrick’s EtherneTV system is a modular streaming video system that is comprised of several main components. These components include the following: Core Components • A Windows Media appliance, used to encode analog video from a camera into a Windows Media compressed video stream and transmit this over an IP network. • A EtherneTV Portal Server, a web-based portal for accessing live streams and on-demand audio and video assets for PC, Mac, and Linux clients and IP receivers. • An EtherneTV Windows Media video-on-demand server, used to store and stream recorded video assets. Accessories • EtherneTV Scheduler, a software module on the EtherneTV Portal which allows scheduling of live broadcasts, stored events, recordings, and two-way conferences. • An EtherneTV IP Receiver, a Windows Media compatible set top box for playing live and stored ETV videos on a television set or monitor. • A VBCast Express kit, a fully contained, portable streaming video broadcast center for live event broadcasting to LAN and Internet connected viewers. • EtherneTV Network Video Recorder, a dedicated platform for the recording of large numbers of simultaneous video streams. • StreamPlayer Plus, a standalone media player for PCs How it Works Windows Media Appliance VBrick’s Windows Media appliance is the origination point for any live video feed on the network. The unit is available with either composite or S-video inputs. Stereo or mono balanced or unbalanced audio is supported through a pair of mini phone jacks. The WM appliance takes in analog video and compresses it into standard Windows Media video format. This video is then transmitted on the unit’s Ethernet interface as either unicast or multicast IP traffic. A built-in RTSP 3Com Open Network™ Solutions Lab Application Notes Authors: Sherman Schlar and Bob Blair
  • 7. Page 7 of 30 server is used to handle direct unicast connections to the unit, with up to 200 concurrent unicast connections supported. The WM appliance may be also be ordered with an optional built-in hard drive for local recording and video storage. The WM appliance periodically transmits stream announcements on the network using the Session Announcement Protocol or SAP format. The WM appliance can be monitored and managed from a standard Element Management System using the SNMP protocol. Picture 2: Windows Media Appliance – Rear Panel EtherneTV Portal Server The EtherneTV Portal Server is the focal point on the network for live, stored, and scheduled video on the network. The ETV Portal Server provides an access control mechanism for all users on the system, with user authentication taking place either on a local internal database or an external LDAP or Active Directory server. Access to specific live or stored video assets on the system can be controlled down to the user or group level. Once logged onto the system, the user is presented with a simple, intuitive interface for selecting Live Broadcasts originating from VBrick encoders or stored videos from the Video Library. 3Com Open Network™ Solutions Lab Application Notes Authors: Sherman Schlar and Bob Blair
  • 8. Page 8 of 30 Picture 3: EtherneTV Client Interface If given permission, users also have the ability to add their own recorded video content to the system or to schedule events such as Live or Stored Broadcasts, Conferences, Recordings, or Scripted events. An emergency broadcast feature also allows the transmission of critical event messages to VBrick WM IP Receivers and PCs in an organization. Individuals viewing live video streams on the ETV Portal Server have the ability of record these video for later viewing. Recording takes place on the ETV Portal Server. When completed, the recorded video is then automatically transferred to the ETV Windows Media Server for storage and playback. The ETV Portal Server maintains its own internal database of all video streams and assets on the ETV system. Optional metadata information associated with a 3Com Open Network™ Solutions Lab Application Notes Authors: Sherman Schlar and Bob Blair
  • 9. Page 9 of 30 particular stored video asset, like Description or Keyword fields is searchable and customizable and is stored in the local database as well. The ETV Portal Server maintains a usage log of all viewing activity on the entire ETV system. Raw log files can be turned into easily readable usage and management reports using an optional reporting software package from VBrick. EtherneTV Scheduler The ETV Scheduler is an optional software component that resides on the ETV Portal Server. The Scheduler software allows administrators, media specialists, and end users to schedule event using an easy-to-understand calendar style interface. A wide variety of events can be set up using this software package, including live and stored broadcasts, recordings, conferences, scripts, and emergency broadcasts. EtherneTV Windows Media Server The ETV Windows Media Server is the repository for all recorded and stored video content in an EtherneTV system. The WM Server is fully integrated with the ETV Portal Server and can stream both unicast and multicast Windows Media video-on-demand files. The EtherneTV Portal Server supports multiple WM Servers for redundancy, with content from any WM server appearing in the system’s video library. The WM Server is available in two different throughput versions: 125Mbps or 300Mbps of streaming bandwidth and delivers full VCR-like controls to the client, including stop, pause, play, and seek. On-board internal storage capacity ranges from 146GB to 1.2TB of storage with the larger WM 300 version providing hot- swappable, fault tolerant RAID 5 internal storage. Customers requiring additional online video file storage can purchase high performance, expandable SATA storage in 1TB or 2TB capacities. The WM Server also includes a full set of management and monitoring tools, including the number of connected clients, peak client usage, current and peak bandwidth usage, and client logging. 3Com Open Network™ Solutions Lab Application Notes Authors: Sherman Schlar and Bob Blair
  • 10. Page 10 of 30 EtherneTV WM IPR The EtherneTV WM IPR is a low cost standalone digital IP receiver that decodes live or on-demand Windows Media video streams for display on a TV or other large monitor. The WM IPR includes a built-in browser interface to the ETV Portal Server so that viewers can select the live channels or stored content they want to watch using a handheld infrared remote control. The WM IPR is available with two different video outputs, either composite video output and or higher resolution VGA output. The WM IPR is ideally suited for settings that don’t require a PC such as classrooms, conference rooms, and information kiosks. In addition to high quality video, the WM IPR provides stereo audio outputs. Picture 4: Windows Media IPR back panel EtherneTV Network Video Recorder The ETV NVR is an optional component in an EtherneTV system that provides a dedicated platform to perform multiple simultaneous recordings of live streams originating from VBrick encoders. Depending on a customer’s recording requirements, the NVR is available in one of two versions, a NVR 10 supporting 10 simultaneous recordings and a NVR 40 supporting 40 simultaneous recordings. Recorded content is protected with a RAID 5 array for both versions, with storage capacity of 584GB or 1200GB respectively. 3Com Open Network™ Solutions Lab Application Notes Authors: Sherman Schlar and Bob Blair
  • 11. Page 11 of 30 VBCast Express The VBCast Express is a fully contained streaming broadcast center packaged in a hard, durable travel case. Included in the VBCast Express are all the components needed to begin streaming live videos and presentations out to LAN and Internet connected viewers. These components include a WM appliance, VBPresenter presentation software, a high quality video camera and tripod, Ethernet network switch, and a prepaid, time limited account on an Internet streaming service provider. In the educational marketplace, VBCast Express is ideal where portability is important, such as live sports events, off campus seminars, and other mobile applications. Picture 5: VBCast Express with carrying case 3Com Open Network™ Solutions Lab Application Notes Authors: Sherman Schlar and Bob Blair
  • 12. Page 12 of 30 StreamPlayer Plus StreamPlayer Plus is a standalone desktop software application for playing live and on-demand video on Windows PCs. Clients who log onto an EtherneTV system do not need to install StreamPlayer Plus, but it is useful as a diagnostic tool for new system installations. It can automatically receive and decode the program announcements generated by VBrick encoders and builds a dynamic program guide based on this information. StreamPlayer Plus can receive and decode Windows Media as well as MPEG-1. 2, and 4 video streams. Picture 6: StreamPlayer Plus Live Channel Guide 3rd Party Streaming Service Provider To support live video and presentation streaming out to Internet connected users, an external streaming service provider is required. Purchasers of the VBCast Express receive a time limited demo account with a streaming service provider which allows them to test and demonstrate this service to live Internet-connected users located anywhere in the world. 3Com Open Network™ Solutions Lab Application Notes Authors: Sherman Schlar and Bob Blair
  • 13. Page 13 of 30 Hardware Revisions • Not applicable for EtherneTV equipment Software Revisions EtherneTV Product Software Revision VB6000 WM Appliance v4.0 ETV Portal Server v4.1 VOD-WM VOD Server v3.3 VOD-WM IPR v4.1.0 ETV Network Video Recorder v4.0 StreamPlayer Plus v.4.4.0 Installation Overview For best results, the equipment in an EtherneTV system should be installed and configured following a methodical approach. To simplify the configuration of EtherneTV equipment, it is recommended that all ETV devices be given static IP addresses, although this is left to the discretion of the system administrator. 1. At the heart of an EtherneTV system is the VBrick encoder, in this case the Windows Media appliance. By default, the WM appliance supports DHCP addressing, so it will obtain an IP address automatically once plugged into an Ethernet network. For non-DHCP enabled environments, the unit can be given a static IP address using the supplied remote control and front panel LCD interface. Once an IP address is obtained, any network attached PC can log onto the unit’s web interface (referred to as IWS by VBrick) by typing the IP address into a web browser and entering the username and password = admin. On a Windows Media appliance, the administrator will then configure the unit’s network values, video/audio parameters and bandwidth, and program announcement information (SAPs). From there, the unit should be connected to a video and audio source like a camera or DVD player. Once configured, the unit’s built-in Windows Media server can be used to verify unicast video playback to a client PC. From a client PC, logon to the 3Com Open Network™ Solutions Lab Application Notes Authors: Sherman Schlar and Bob Blair
  • 14. Page 14 of 30 IWS page, then go to the Configuration: Encoder: Server page. Go into Edit mode, and click the link named “Click here to play HTTP” to view the live stream using Windows Media player on your PC. For more information on configuring the WM appliance, see the VB6000 WM Appliance v4.0 Quick Start Guide and VB6000 WM Appliance v4.0 Admin Guide. 2. The next device to be configured is the EtherneTV Portal Server. The mouse, keyboard, and Ethernet cable for this unit should be connected, then the unit attached to a monitor and powered up. After logging on to the Windows Server, the system should be given a static IP address and the network connectivity verified. The administrator can then launch Internet Explorer to perform the preliminary ETV Portal Server configuration. This configuration is customer site specific and varies depending on the number of Windows Media servers and Network Video Recorders used. In a typical scenario, the IP address of the Windows Media server is defined in the ETV Portal next. From the ETV Portal Admin page, this information is defined under Global Settings, Servers. After entering the IP address of the WM server, the Server Type pull-down menu for VOD-WM Standard or Advanced is selected. The recommended name of the Windows Media publishing point is “VBP”. This configuration information is automatically applied to the system. For the details on setting up the ETV Portal Server, please refer to the “Portal Server v4.1 Admin Guide”. To logon on to the ETV Portal Server, a PC user simply enters the IP address of the ETV Portal in their web browser (either Internet Explorer or Firefox). After the page loads, the portal server will automatically “push” a set of ActiveX components and software codecs down to the client PC. Under Live Broadcasts, the name of the active Windows Media appliance will appear under the channel listing. To view this video stream, simply click on the channel name. Once active, the viewer can use the play, stop, record, and volume controls to watch the video. Similarly, clicking on the Video Library tab will bring up a listing of stored video content after the EtherneTV Windows Media Server is configured and brought online. For more information on using the ETV Portal Server’s client interface, refer to the “Portal Server v4.1 User Guide”. 3Com Open Network™ Solutions Lab Application Notes Authors: Sherman Schlar and Bob Blair
  • 15. Page 15 of 30 3. To enable stored video-on-demand playback, the Windows Media VOD server is configured next. As with the ETV Portal Server, the keyboard, mouse, monitor, and Ethernet cable are plugged in. The unit is powered up and given an IP address. From within the Windows Media Services application, a Publishing Point named “VBP” should be there. The location of video content associated with this publishing point is C:WMPubWMRoot. The Windows Media Server only supports video files in the Windows Media format (.wmv) and not any MPEG video content. Any .wmv files in this location will automatically appear in the ETV Portal’s on demand content listing and will be ready for playback. For more information on the VOD WM Server, refer to the “VOD-WM v3.3 VOD Server Quick Start Guide”. 4. The next device to be configured is the WM IP Receiver or IPR. The WM IPR can operate in one of three modes: Portal Server, Local (standalone), or Local-Fullscreen (standalone). As part of a larger EtherneTV system, the device will be configured in Portal Server mode. The WM IPR is configured from a standard web browser and should be connected to a TV monitor, Ethernet cable, USB keyboard and mouse. After powering up the unit, a few minimal network parameters are configured. When the unit is given an IP address, you can log onto the unit’s Integrated Web Server (IWS) and remotely configure it from any PC web browser. For the details on this process, see the WM-IPR AdminGuide. 3Com Open Network™ Solutions Lab Application Notes Authors: Sherman Schlar and Bob Blair
  • 16. Page 16 of 30 Network Topology Picture 7: Logical Topology Picture 8: Network Topology as tested 3Com Open Network™ Solutions Lab Application Notes Authors: Sherman Schlar and Bob Blair
  • 17. Page 17 of 30 Within a Local Area Network as well as some regional, national, or international private Wide Area Networks, VBrick’s EtherneTV equipment can utilize the efficient multicast protocol for streaming live video to remote clients. Multicasting dramatically reduces the amount of bandwidth traversing the LAN or WAN backbone by replicating the video stream with the network’s routers and switches. The standard protocol used for multicasting is the Internet Group- Membership Protocol (IGMP). IGMP is used to dynamically register individual hosts in a multicast group with a Class D address. Hosts identify group memberships by sending IGMP messages, and traffic is sent to all members of that multicast group. Within IGMP, there are several variations of the protocol, the most efficient being Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) sparse mode. In a LAN, live video from camera is typically sent using multicast. In contrast to multicast is the unicast protocol, where each streaming video client sets up their own network connection back to the encoder, server, or host. If each client is receiving a 1Mbps video stream and there are 100 clients, then 100Mbps of bandwidth is required to support this volume of traffic. For clients on a high speed gigabit Ethernet LAN, this may not be a problem, but this amount of bandwidth often presents issues when traversing a WAN. In cases where the client is connected via the Internet, unicasting is the only option as the Internet does not support multicasting. For private enterprise networks, VBrick offers a Windows Media reflector product to significantly reduce WAN video traffic to remote branch offices. 3Com Open Network™ Solutions Lab Application Notes Authors: Sherman Schlar and Bob Blair
  • 18. Page 18 of 30 Testing Observations The logical streaming video network topology show above in Picture 2 supports a variety of typical educational use cases. These use cases include the following: 1. TV-Tape-DVD distribution 2. Classroom recording and distribution 3. Live Webcasting TV-Tape-DVD distribution A common application for school systems and colleges is the distribution of live cable or off-the-air TV channels over the institution’s private LAN for TV viewing in classrooms and dormitory rooms. This method uses a VCR tuner to convert the cable TV feed into composite video. This signal is then fed as the input into a VBrick encoder, which then can multicast the video stream for viewing anywhere in the LAN. These live TV broadcasts can also be easily recorded and stored for later playback using the ETV Portal Server’s recording capability. A second popular application within schools is the conversion of legacy analog video recordings such as VCR tapes and DVDs into a digital compressed format for server storage and on-demand video viewing. The analog output of a DVD player connects to the composite video input of the VBrick Windows Media appliance where the video is encoded and streamed over an IP network. Client PCs connected to the EtherneTV Portal server can see this video stream in the program guide and watch the video as it is encoded. The client can also choose to record this DVD video for storage on the VOD Windows Media server. Once the DVD recording is completed, clients request this video on an on-demand basis for viewing either on a PC or television (using the Windows Media IP Receiver). 3Com Open Network™ Solutions Lab Application Notes Authors: Sherman Schlar and Bob Blair
  • 19. Page 19 of 30 Classroom recording and distribution Use a video camera to simulate the recording of a teacher or professor, encode this video into Windows Media format and record it on the Network Video Recorder. Validate that encoding, recording, and playback all function normally. Use the VBCast Express kit to simulate a video recording in the field which can then be loaded onto the WM VOD server for on-demand viewing. Using the VBPresenter software which is supplied with VBCast, deliver a live rich-media presentation (live video with slides) to both Intranet and Internet connected clients. Live Webcasting The VBCast Express kit can be used to unicast and multicast a live webcast out to viewers connected to either the local LAN or the public Internet. In the latter case, the VBrick WM appliance is configured to send a single unicast stream out to a public streaming service provider, who then replicates this video stream to N number of clients viewing the live stream. This replication is a usage based service which depends on the amount of stream bandwidth, connection time, and the number of clients. The VBCast Express kit also includes VBPresenter software which delivers a rich media presentation (live video and PowerPoint slides) to remote viewers and also includes features like chat, polling, and recording. 3Com Open Network™ Solutions Lab Application Notes Authors: Sherman Schlar and Bob Blair
  • 20. Page 20 of 30 Configuration Details The following configuration details represent the configuration under test. The tested configuration utilized 3COM 8800 and 5500G Ethernet Switches. The switches were configured with a VLAN to carry the vBrick content. A Quality of Service rule was defined so that the vBrick content is properly prioritized. Since the Server equipment is commodity Dell servers. The QoS rules defined included the MAC address OID range for vBrick and the IP addresses of the vBrick Servers. The entire configuration of the switch in the test is included in Appendix A. 5500G Configuration file First create the Access Control List (ACL). One ACL for the IP address of the servers and a second ACL for the MAC address for the vBrick OID. Add rules to ACL 3000 for each vBrick Server within your network topology. The testbed only contained 2 servers for this test. # acl number 3000 rule 1 permit IP source 192.168.201.57 0 rule 2 permit IP source 192.168.201.56 0 # acl number 4000 rule 0 permit source 0007-df00-0000 ffff-ff00-0000 # Define the Quality of Service (QoS) Profile. The Class of Service (COS) Video is a predefined COS. # qos-profile v-brick traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 1 dscp ef cos video traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 2 dscp ef cos video traffic-priority inbound link-group 4000 rule 0 dscp ef cos video # 3Com Open Network™ Solutions Lab Application Notes Authors: Sherman Schlar and Bob Blair
  • 21. Page 21 of 30 Apply the ACL to the vlan. Perform the following commands to apply the ACL. [5500G-EI]traffic-priority vlan 2 inbound ip-group 3000 cos video [5500G-EI]traffic-priority vlan 2 inbound link-group 4000 cos video And the ACL will be assigned to each port associated to the vlan #2 an example is as follows. Acl 3000 rule 1 has been applied!(GigabitEthernet2/0/1) Acl 4000 rule 0 has been applied!(GigabitEthernet2/0/1) The port configuration for each port assigned to the vlan will now have the following parameters associated to them. # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/1 port access vlan 2 The video vlan is #2 traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 1 cos video vBrick Server IP address traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 2 cos video vBrick Server IP address traffic-priority inbound link-group 4000 rule 0 cos video vBrick OID range # 3Com Open Network™ Solutions Lab Application Notes Authors: Sherman Schlar and Bob Blair
  • 22. Page 22 of 30 TV and DVD Configuration Details For TV distribution in a classroom or campus environment, the most economical approach is to connect a standard VCR to the head-end VBrick WM appliance and use the VCR’s tuner to receive over-the-air broadcast TV. The VCR tuner can be fed from either a cable TV feed or an external antenna. For DVD video recording and encoding, a separate DVD player is connected to the VBrick WM appliance which then encodes the DVD’s output into a high quality, compressed Windows Media video file. 3Com Open Network™ Solutions Lab Application Notes Authors: Sherman Schlar and Bob Blair
  • 23. Page 23 of 30 Verification Tests 1. From a client PC, logon to the ETV Portal and verify that you can view the WM encoder’s live video from the camera. 2. While viewing this video, click on the record button and verify that the recording is started. 3. Wait several minutes, then click on the recording button again to stop the recording. Wait several minutes and goto the Video Library (On Demand) section of the ETV Portal server. Verify that the live camera video you just recorded appears in the listing with the current date/time stamp as the name. Click on this link and verify that you can watch this VOD content. 4. From the WM IPR, use the remote control to bring up the user interface on the television. 5. Click on the WM appliance live stream to watch the live camera feed. 6. Click on the Video Library listing to view the recorded camera feed. Use the player controls to verify that you can control the playback. 7. On the laptop PC, load your desired PowerPoint presentation. In the VBPresenter toolbar, upload this presentation to the streaming service provider’s web/FTP site. 8. Within VBPresenter, go to online mode. Verify that you can view the rich media presentation (live video and slides) from the streaming service provider’s site. 3Com Open Network™ Solutions Lab Application Notes Authors: Sherman Schlar and Bob Blair
  • 24. Page 24 of 30 Product Support Product support can be obtained from the respective product suppliers. 3COM product support: Main 3COM Support link: http://www.3com.com/products/en_US/support/index.html <3COM Product Specific Link> <Insert Hyperlink> Asia Pacific Telephone: +65 6543 6645 Fax: +65 6543 6518 E-mail: ap_service@3com.com Europe, Middle East and Africa Telephone: +44 (0)1442 435529 (Option 4) Fax : +44 (0)1442 435811 E-mail: focalpoint_services@3com.com North America and Latin America Telephone: 866-326-6222 (Option 3) Fax : 408-326-7140 E-mail: ecso_contracts@3com.com VBrick Systems product support: http://www.vbrick.com/ VBrick Systems Support Web page: http://www.vbrick.com/support/ Support: 203-303-0222. supportservices@vbrick.com 3Com Open Network™ Solutions Lab Application Notes Authors: Sherman Schlar and Bob Blair
  • 25. Page 25 of 30 Conclusion The integration of VBrick’s award winning EtherneTV system with 3Com’s feature-rich, fault tolerant Enterprise class routers and switches comprises a great turnkey solution for both small and large scale educational institutions. Products from these industry-leading vendors deliver exceptional reliability, ease- of-use, and performance in an affordable, cost effective manner. Compliance with international standards, the avoidance of proprietary protocols, and regular feature enhancements and software updates means that customers will get high value returns on their network and streaming video investments. Unlike some competitor’s products which get discontinued or quickly become obsolete, the 3Com-VBrick product suite can be easily expanded and upgraded as new applications arise and the demand for live and stored video increases. 3Com Open Network™ Solutions Lab Application Notes Authors: Sherman Schlar and Bob Blair
  • 26. Page 26 of 30 Appendix A 5500G Switch Complete Configuration <5500G-EI>display current-configuration # sysname 5500G-EI # undo password-control aging enable undo password-control length enable undo password-control history enable password-control length 4 password-control login-attempt 3 exceed lock-time 120 # local-server nas-ip 127.0.0.1 key 3com # poe legacy enable # igmp-snooping enable # multicast routing-enable # mirroring-group 1 local # radius scheme system # domain system # local-user admin password simple pword service-type telnet terminal level 3 service-type ftp local-user manager password simple manager service-type telnet terminal level 2 local-user monitor password simple monitor service-type telnet terminal level 1 # acl number 3000 rule 1 permit IP source 192.168.201.57 0 rule 2 permit IP source 192.168.201.56 0 acl number 3997 rule 0 permit IP dscp ef rule 1 permit TCP destination-port eq www rule 2 permit UDP destination-port eq snmp rule 3 permit UDP destination-port eq snmptrap rule 4 permit IP dscp cs6 rule 5 permit IP dscp cs7 # acl number 4000 rule 0 permit source 0007-df00-0000 ffff-ff00-0000 acl number 4999 rule 0 permit type 8868 ffff rule 1 permit source 00e0-bb00-0000 ffff-ff00-0000 rule 2 permit source 0003-6b00-0000 ffff-ff00-0000 rule 3 permit source 00e0-7500-0000 ffff-ff00-0000 rule 4 permit source 00d0-1e00-0000 ffff-ff00-0000 rule 5 permit source 0001-e300-0000 ffff-ff00-0000 rule 6 permit source 000f-e200-0000 ffff-ff00-0000 rule 7 permit source 0006-b900-0000 ffff-ff00-0000 rule 8 deny dest 0000-0000-0000 ffff-ffff-ffff 3Com Open Network™ Solutions Lab Application Notes Authors: Sherman Schlar and Bob Blair
  • 27. Page 27 of 30 # qos-profile default packet-filter inbound link-group 4999 rule 8 traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3997 rule 0 cos voice traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3997 rule 4 cos network-management traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3997 rule 5 cos network-management traffic-priority inbound link-group 4999 rule 0 dscp ef cos voice traffic-priority inbound link-group 4999 rule 1 dscp ef cos voice traffic-priority inbound link-group 4999 rule 2 dscp ef cos voice traffic-priority inbound link-group 4999 rule 3 dscp ef cos voice traffic-priority inbound link-group 4999 rule 4 dscp ef cos voice traffic-priority inbound link-group 4999 rule 5 dscp ef cos voice traffic-priority inbound link-group 4999 rule 6 dscp ef cos voice traffic-priority inbound link-group 4999 rule 7 dscp ef cos voice qos-profile v-brick traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 1 dscp ef cos video traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 2 dscp ef cos video traffic-priority inbound link-group 4000 rule 0 dscp ef cos video # vlan 1 to 2 # vlan 3500 description MANAGEMENT # interface Vlan-interface3500 ip address 158.101.76.24 255.255.255.0 # interface Aux2/0/0 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/1 port access vlan 2 traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 1 cos video traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 2 cos video traffic-priority inbound link-group 4000 rule 0 cos video # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/2 port access vlan 2 traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 1 cos video traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 2 cos video traffic-priority inbound link-group 4000 rule 0 cos video # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/3 port access vlan 2 traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 1 cos video traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 2 cos video traffic-priority inbound link-group 4000 rule 0 cos video # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/4 port access vlan 2 traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 1 cos video traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 2 cos video traffic-priority inbound link-group 4000 rule 0 cos video # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/5 port access vlan 2 traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 1 cos video traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 2 cos video traffic-priority inbound link-group 4000 rule 0 cos video # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/6 port access vlan 2 traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 1 cos video traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 2 cos video traffic-priority inbound link-group 4000 rule 0 cos video # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/7 3Com Open Network™ Solutions Lab Application Notes Authors: Sherman Schlar and Bob Blair
  • 28. Page 28 of 30 port access vlan 2 traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 1 cos video traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 2 cos video traffic-priority inbound link-group 4000 rule 0 cos video # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/8 port access vlan 2 traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 1 cos video traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 2 cos video traffic-priority inbound link-group 4000 rule 0 cos video # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/9 port access vlan 2 traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 1 cos video traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 2 cos video traffic-priority inbound link-group 4000 rule 0 cos video # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/10 port access vlan 2 traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 1 cos video traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 2 cos video traffic-priority inbound link-group 4000 rule 0 cos video # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/11 port access vlan 2 traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 1 cos video traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 2 cos video traffic-priority inbound link-group 4000 rule 0 cos video # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/12 port access vlan 2 traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 1 cos video traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 2 cos video traffic-priority inbound link-group 4000 rule 0 cos video # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/13 port access vlan 2 traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 1 cos video traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 2 cos video traffic-priority inbound link-group 4000 rule 0 cos video # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/14 port access vlan 2 traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 1 cos video traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 2 cos video traffic-priority inbound link-group 4000 rule 0 cos video # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/15 port access vlan 2 traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 1 cos video traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 2 cos video traffic-priority inbound link-group 4000 rule 0 cos video # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/16 port access vlan 2 traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 1 cos video traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 2 cos video traffic-priority inbound link-group 4000 rule 0 cos video # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/17 port access vlan 2 traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 1 cos video traffic-priority inbound ip-group 3000 rule 2 cos video traffic-priority inbound link-group 4000 rule 0 cos video # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/18 3Com Open Network™ Solutions Lab Application Notes Authors: Sherman Schlar and Bob Blair
  • 29. Page 29 of 30 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/19 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/20 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/21 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/22 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/23 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/24 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/25 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/26 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/27 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/28 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/29 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/30 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/31 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/32 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/33 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/34 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/35 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/36 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/37 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/38 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/39 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/40 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/41 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/42 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/43 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/44 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/45 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/46 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/47 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/48 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/49 shutdown # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/50 shutdown 3Com Open Network™ Solutions Lab Application Notes Authors: Sherman Schlar and Bob Blair
  • 30. Page 30 of 30 # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/51 shutdown # interface GigabitEthernet2/0/52 shutdown # interface Cascade2/2/1 # interface Cascade2/2/2 # interface NULL0 # remote-ping-agent enable # info-center loghost 158.101.76.17 info-center logbuffer channel 2 size 1024 info-center trapbuffer channel 2 size 1024 # voice vlan mac-address 0001-e300-0000 mask ffff-ff00-0000 description Siemens AG phone voice vlan mac-address 0006-b900-0000 mask ffff-ff00-0000 description Philips and NEC AG phone # ip route-static 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 158.101.76.254 preference 60 # snmp-agent snmp-agent local-engineid 8000002B000FCBB827006877 snmp-agent community read public snmp-agent community write private snmp-agent sys-info version all snmp-agent target-host trap address udp-domain 158.101.76.226 params securityname monitor undo snmp-agent trap enable configuration undo snmp-agent trap enable system undo snmp-agent trap enable standard undo snmp-agent trap enable vrrp undo snmp-agent trap enable ospf undo snmp-agent trap enable bgp undo snmp-agent trap enable flash # user-interface aux 0 7 authentication-mode password user-interface vty 0 4 authentication-mode scheme # return <5500G-EI> 3Com Open Network™ Solutions Lab Application Notes Authors: Sherman Schlar and Bob Blair