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Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
Former militarysites hop
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Former militarysites hop

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Information about bag loading operations on load lines at Indiana Army Ammunition Plant (INAAP), prior Hoosier Operating Plant (HOP)

Information about bag loading operations on load lines at Indiana Army Ammunition Plant (INAAP), prior Hoosier Operating Plant (HOP)

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  • 1. HOP Load Lines<br />At <br />Indiana Army Ammunition Plant<br />(INAAP)<br />Copyright 2011. FormerMilitarySites.com All rights reserved<br />Charlestown, Indiana<br />
  • 2. Copyright 2011 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />There were 8 Load Line and 4 Igniter Lines built in 1941 as part of the <br />Hoosier Operating Plant (HOP).<br />These facilities were constructed to load bagged charges for large caliber artillery<br />The Igniter Lines were used to load the igniter charges for artillery, and mortar charges <br />The artillery igniters contain black powder and the mortars contain a nitroglycerin<br />based material, both of which are more sensitive than single base propellant. <br />For these reasons, the igniter lines are significantly smaller than the load lines. <br />There is an igniter in each round, the purpose of which is to ignite the <br />propelling charge.<br />When these photos were taken (2008), all igniter lines had already been removed<br />and Load Line 2 was the last of the original load lines still standing. <br />All of the original Load Lines were exactly alike.<br />
  • 3. LL2b – July 2008<br />Copyright 2011 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 4. Copyright 2011 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />Load Lines were built in a modified “W” configuration. <br />When viewed from the canteen, as in the next photo, the left leg of the “W” <br />was called the “a” side; the right leg was called the “b” side of the line. <br />Each side was a mirror image of the other.<br />Each side had a receiving magazine for propellant which was located<br />at the top end of each side of our “W”. <br />A covered walkway led to the loading wing. An igniter service magazine was<br />located between the propellant magazine and the loading wing <br />Powder was moved in drums to the loading wing. <br />It went past the Foreman’s Office on the corner to an elevator for transport <br />to the second floor of the loading wing.<br />Safety was a primary concern. Signs posted in each area defined the <br />type and quantity of powder and the maximum number of personnel <br />allowed there at any one time.<br />
  • 5. Shipping Magazine<br />Receiving Magazine<br />Receiving Magazine<br />Crating Shed<br />Igniter<br />Service Magazine<br />Igniter <br />Service Magazine<br />Loading<br />Covered Walkways<br />Loading<br />Assembly<br />Assembly<br />Canteen<br />Copyright 2011. FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 6. LL2b - Igniter Magazine<br />Copyright 2011 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 7. LL2b - Walkway – Receiving Magazine to LL<br />Copyright 2011 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 8. LL2b – Foreman’s Office<br />Copyright 2011 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 9. Copyright 2008. All rights reserved<br />LL2b Elevator<br />Copyright 2011 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 10. Copyright 2008. All rights reserved<br />Limits<br />Copyright 2011 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 11. Copyright 2011. FormerMilitarySites.com<br />When powder reached the second floor it was dumped into a hopper. <br />The first floor of the load line contained a series of rooms called loading booths.<br />There was one hopper to serve each load booth.<br />The configuration of the load booths was changed for each type of charge loaded. <br />Many families of charges (105mm, 155mm) consist of several increments, which <br />are individual bags of different sizes that , in total, comprise a single charge.<br />Only one family of charges was produced at one time on a Load Line or Igniter Line.<br />In the event of danger, the operator was told to immediately exit the building<br />and use the escape chute to get to the ground.<br />
  • 12. Copyright 2008. All rights reserved<br />2nd Floor Hallway Hopper<br />Copyright 2011 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 13. Copyright 2008. All rights reserved<br />LL2b Escape Chute<br />Copyright 2011 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 14. LL2b – Second Floor Walkway<br /> and Emergency Exit<br />Copyright 2011 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 15. Copyright 2011. FormerMilitarSites.com<br />The first floor of each load line consisted of 8 load booths (rooms).<br />There were 4 load booths on each side of the building, with a center aisle <br />between the load booths.<br />The load booths would be set up as required for the product being produced. <br />They typically contained tables, scales, and sewing machines. In later years a rapid <br />reacting deluge system was installed.<br />Bags, produced in the Bag Room, were delivered to each booth and filled with powder.<br />The powder was manufactured in the Propellant and Explosives (P&E) manufacturing<br /> area, originally the Indiana Ordnance Works (IOW). The filled increment<br /> was weighed twice and then sewn shut.<br />Great care was taken to prevent the propagation of fire from any area to adjacent <br />areas in the event of accidental ignition, so a series of interlocking doors with a transfer <br />surface connected each load booth to the center aisle. <br />The operator would place a finished charge in the transfer surface and close the door. <br />This action opened the door in the center aisle, allowing an operator there to remove the <br />finished charge and place it on a conveyor for transport to the assembly wing.<br />
  • 16. LL2b – Scales (Storage in Maintenance Shop))<br />Copyright 2008. All rights reserved<br />LL2 Scales in Storage<br />Copyright 2011 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 17. LL2 – Doors to Loading Booths<br />Copyright 2011 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 18. LL2 – Load Booth<br />Copyright 2011 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 19. LL2 – Chutes from Load Booth to Center Aisle<br />Copyright 2011 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 20. LL2b - Center Aisle<br />Copyright 2010 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 21. Copyright 2011 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />The center aisle conveyor transported finished increments to the assembly wing,<br />located at the bottom of the “W”.<br />There they were assembled into a finished charge and placed into a cans.<br />A drawing of the 155mm M3A1 finished charge is included to illustrate.<br />A covered walkway ran up the center legs of the “W” to the crating shed, with a <br />conveyor located under the roof but separated from the walkway.<br />The cans were transported to the crating shed on the conveyor where they <br />were sealed, the air evacuated, leak tested to ensure a good seal, and palletized.<br />Sealed cans were transported to the shipping magazine for pick up.<br />If the finished charges were stored on site instead of shipped out, they were <br />placed in one of the underground igloos until needed. <br />
  • 22. Components of a Propelling Charge<br />
  • 23. LL2b - Assembly<br />Copyright 2011. All rights reserved<br />
  • 24. LL2b - Assembly<br />Copyright 2011 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 25. Copyright 2008. All rights reserved<br />Covered Walkway to Packout<br />Copyright 2011 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 26. Copyright 2008. All rights reserved<br />LL2b Finished Charge Walkway<br />Copyright 2010 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 27. LL2b – Packout<br />Copyright 2011 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 28. LL2 – Vacuum Machine to Evacuate Air from Cans<br />Copyright 2011 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 29. LL2 – Shipping Magazine<br />Copyright 2011 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 30. Copyright 2011 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />Each side of a load line also had restrooms and a break room.<br />At the bottom center of our “W” was a covered walkway to the canteen which <br />served both the “a” and “b” sides of the Load Line. Employees ate their lunch <br />in the canteen. <br />The back part of the canteen housed a scale repair shop and the mechanical <br />Equipment required for the Load Line: boiler, air compressor, etc.<br />
  • 31. LL2b – Break Room<br />Copyright 2011 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 32. LL2 - Walkway from Canteen to Load Lines<br />Copyright 2011 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 33. LL2 – Safety Sign<br />Copyright 2010 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 34. LL2 – Safety Sign 2<br />Copyright 2011 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 35. LL2 Canteen<br />Copyright 2011 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 36. Copyright 2008. All rights reserved<br />LL2 Air Compressor<br />Copyright 2011 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 37. Copyright 2010 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />Explosive facilities are assumed to always be contaminated with explosive particles. <br />The following categories, which are no longer used, formerly defined explosives <br />contamination levels and were in effect when the plant was active:<br />• 1X – (X) Substantial contamination (explosive residue) exists.<br />• 3X - (XXX) Cleaning has removed surface contamination, but significant amounts <br />may remain in less obvious places. <br />• 5X - (XXXXX) This level applies when no significant amounts of contaminants remain<br />• 0 – (zero) Articles, equipment or buildings were never contaminated,<br />The ground and buildings remains at INAAP are being transferred to the Clark<br />County Reuse Authority. Before transfer, they must be cleaned to the equivalent <br />of the former 5X status. The traditional method for achieving this was to apply <br />high heat via open flame for an extended period. That method was used on some <br />facilities; alternate methods are currently being utilized<br />
  • 38. Copyright 2008. All rights reserved<br />LL3 – Thermal Decontamination<br />Photo courtesy US Army<br />
  • 39. LL4 – After Decontamination<br />Copyright 2011 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 40. LL4 – After Decontamination<br />Copyright 2011 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 41. LL4 – After Decontamination<br />Copyright 2011 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 42. Copyright 2008. All rights reserved<br />Copyright 2011 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 43. There were once many of these facilities in the US. They produced the materials <br />used to defeat the Axis powers in World War II. Creating these facilities necessitated <br />the displacement of the prior land owners. They were built on a rapid timetable<br />and required the labor of many workers to build and operate.<br />The IOW and HOP were combined into the Indiana Army Ammunition Plant (INAAP, <br />Pronounced IN’-app) and produced materials used in WWII, Korea, Vietnam, and <br />Operation Iraqi Freedom. Many of the materials produced at INAAP are still in the<br />active inventory. <br />We salute the displaced landowners, the people that built and operated the facility, <br />the taxpayers that funded the effort, and most of all the military personnel that <br />fought our country’s wars to secure and hold our freedom.<br />May we never forget.<br />Copyright 2011. FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 44. Copyright 2010 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />Large sections of the former load line area have been redeveloped as the <br />River Ridge Commerce Center. The following photographs show what the area <br />looks like today.<br />Thanks to Kerry Dupaquier, David Hackel and the River Ridge Commerce Center.<br />
  • 45. Copyright 2008. All rights reserved<br />Copyright 2010 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />
  • 46. Copyright 2008. All rights reserved<br />Copyright 2010 FormerMilitarySites.com<br />

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