From Moby-Dick to Mash-Ups
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From Moby-Dick to Mash-Ups

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This is a slightly modified version of a presentation made at the American Library Association 2010 Annual Conference in Washington DC, June 28, 2010. ...

This is a slightly modified version of a presentation made at the American Library Association 2010 Annual Conference in Washington DC, June 28, 2010.

Cataloging information is presented as observations on one or more library resources, grouped into as many as four levels or Points Of View.

Resource/description complexes can be linked together by one or more relationships into simple and complex structures that can then be explored or extracted and reordered for presentation.

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  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
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  • Do you have anything written/published on this perspective / direction?

    Re graphs,
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  • Thanks for going through the show!

    If you want to go a bit further down the rabbit hole (there are a few more levels), look at slides #276-289 of our previous slideshow:

    http://www.slideshare.net/RonMurray/frbr-physics-and-the-world-wide-web-revised

    The 'Pippi Longstocking' resource description diagram (RDD) shows how contemporary catalog views and functions can be depicted as operations that select, navigate, and extract for processing and display chunks from a – hopefully – global, articulated, resource description network. The role of the IFLA 'Navigate' function is seen in its proper light in a RDD.

    When Cutter & Panizzi spoke of cross-references in the mid-ish 19th C., the mathematical idea underlying those practices was that of a graph. Too bad that graph theory was not defined by mathematicians until later on in the 19th. Century.

    RDD elements are intended to reduce to elemental, implementable, descriptive statements – *resource description quanta* – and a number of necessary/desirable operations on those statements. A *big* question is whether the folks building IT systems at the quantum-level (W3C) are thinking about what it will take to create large-scale structures like the RDDs you see. BTW: We are not making up these examplars. These are based on actual bibrecs (Pippi) and end-user supplied data (Moby-Dick).

    Hint: Set Theory defines subsets; Graph Theory defines subgraphs. The FRBR diagram elements depict resource description subgraphs, each corresponding to a different POV on the resource.
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  • Fabulous!
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From Moby-Dick to Mash-Ups From Moby-Dick to Mash-Ups Presentation Transcript