• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Context-specific ROLE visions: Formal higher education, Life Long Learning, .. PLE conference 2010
 

Context-specific ROLE visions: Formal higher education, Life Long Learning, .. PLE conference 2010

on

  • 970 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
970
Views on SlideShare
970
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
2
Downloads
3
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via SlideShare as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Context-specific ROLE visions: Formal higher education, Life Long Learning, .. PLE conference 2010 Context-specific ROLE visions: Formal higher education, Life Long Learning, .. PLE conference 2010 Presentation Transcript

    • Context-specific ROLE visions: Formal higher education workplace learning Lifelong learning Sylvana Kroop PLE 2010 conference, Barcelona © www.role-project.eu
    • Content: → The ROLE approach → The current use of Web 2.0 tools & learning activities in higher education → The future ROLE challenge in higher education07.07.2010 © www.role-project.eu
    • The ROLE approach07.07.2010 © www.role-project.eu
    • Discussion on the ROLE vision: tag cloud formal higher education, informal learning workplace learning, lifelong learning, social learning highly adaptable to individual needs openness, intelligent Recommender system based on social interactions, responsiveness self-directed learning, freedom & guidance mash-up of widgets, usabilityImpressions of the first ROLE Vision Sharing Workshop in Vienna (May 2009): http://www.role-project.eu/Videos 07.07.2010 © www.role-project.eu
    • The ROLE approach Lifelong learning → is not seen as a program but as a concept that is based on social interaction: someone is learning all time while s/he has to deal with the consequences of his/her actions.The ROLE approach: Openness: It is an open source system for everyone to use. Everyone can join to give his/her input, develop and extend the system. Responsiveness: The system supports a quick intelligent response (individually-adapted recommendations, content, elements and tools) related to the learner’s individual needs. The response is essentially created from the users’ interactions with the system.Impressions of the first ROLE Vision Sharing Workshop in Vienna (May 2009): http://www.role-project.eu/Videos 07.07.2010 © www.role-project.eu
    • The ROLE approach A user can individually select and aggregate their favourite tools & content. This should help to empower the learner in taking control over their own learning processes - as well as stimulating self-directed learning.Survey of learning-related services (July 2009): http://www.role-project.eu/Deliverables 07.07.2010 © www.role-project.eu
    • The ROLE approach Self-directed learning: • A mission of our project is to not only target gifted learners, whose personal attitude is already based on self-directed and self-organized learning. • Self-directed learning is seen as something that can be inspired and supported by an appropriate learning environment.Survey of learning-related services (July 2009): http://www.role-project.eu/Deliverables 07.07.2010 © www.role-project.eu
    • The current use of Web 2.0 tools & learning activities in higher education07.07.2010 © www.role-project.eu
    • The current Web 2.0 use in higher education What are the most used Web 2.0 tools of students? Literature / Study review: “Learning with Web 2.0” (www.hisbus.de)07.07.2010 © www.role-project.eu
    • The current Web 2.0 use in higher education What are the most used Web 2.0 tools of students? Literature / Study review: “Learning with Web 2.0” (www.hisbus.de)Online-panel:- 4.400 students (= 40% response rate)- enquiry period: 09/2008-10/2008- only German students- students have been recruited offline- representative study for the basic population of students in Germany 07.07.2010 © www.role-project.eu
    • The current Web 2.0 use in higher education Web 2.0 learning activities & their usage: → How often do you use the following possibilities in Wikipedia? Literature / Study review: “Learning with Web 2.0” (www.hisbus.de) often neverOnline-panel:- 4.400 students (= 40% response rate)- enquiry period: 09/2008-10/2008- only German students- students have been recruited offline- representative study for the basic population of students in Germany reading writing reworking contributing to articles new articles existing articles discussions on articles 07.07.2010 © www.role-project.eu
    • The current Web 2.0 use in higher education How reliable do you think are the information of the following online-lexica? Literature / Study review: “Learning with Web 2.0” (www.hisbus.de)Online-panel:- 4.400 students (= 40% response rate)- enquiry period: 09/2008-10/2008- only German students- students have been recruited offline- representative study for the basic population of students in Germany 07.07.2010 © www.role-project.eu
    • The current Web 2.0 use in higher education Conclusion: • Most used and considered most reliable information resources are … → Web 2.0 applications (everyone can participate) → they are popular worldwide Potential: • Web 2.0 provides a lot of (social innovative) learning activities which are most welcome to stimulate self-directed learning & reflection as well as critical thinking • A user is invited to not just remain in a passive consumer-mode, reading articles, but more over to become active through disputing, revising, reviewing, assessing and producing articles Problem: • these Web 2.0 learning activities are barely used: → there is little reflection about the reliability of information resources → the popularity (of a Web 2.0 tool) seems to be decisive in order to be attributed as most reliable resource • no critical thinking07.07.2010 © www.role-project.eu
    • The current Web 2.0 use in higher education Boundaries in formal higher education: • Web 2.0 learning activities are barely supported in formal higher education • The usage of Web 2.0 tools is mostly learned informal • Web 2.0 learning activities are in general not accredited at universities • Although every student should be educated in self-directed learning, which includes learning to distinguish between good and bad knowledge resources, Wikipedia is mostly rejected a-priori. • Although Wikipedia is forbidden at universities every student is reading and using it Reasons: • For teaching staff it is mostly unclear how to deal with Wikipedia → the simplest way is to ban it → “Students need simple & clear rules! To not use the Wikipedia is a simple rule!” • Traditional learning activities are: read given learning material, writing sth. → students are not used to review and assess the work of peers • There is no system that motivates & appreciates Web 2.0 learning activities07.07.2010 © www.role-project.eu
    • The future ROLE challenge in higher education07.07.2010 © www.role-project.eu
    • The future ROLE challenge in higher educationExisting formal HE ROLE challenge: Overall learning objectives at → openness, responsiveness universities are: Use the Web 2.0 potential: • reflection, critical thinking, self- • Learners should not only aggregate directed & self-organised learning widgets, tools & services but also be → these are even more important support and empowered to collaborate, competencies in a society with a discuss, reflect, and think critical. continuously growing amount of • Learners should know how to deal and accessible information assess the quality of information in a Use of Web 2.0 learning activities: knowledge society. • Web 2.0 has the potential to • The interactions between learners are support these learning objectives, becoming more important than ever. but this potential is not used. • The creation and usage of desirable learning activities should be stimulated by an pedagogically well founded incentive system. ROLE Recommender system: the recommendation of learning activities differs between experts & novices, between freedom & guidancelearner should understand and ROLE infrastructure shouldcontrol own learning process provide adaptive guidance07.07.2010 © www.role-project.eu