INTRODUCTION TO BASIC ACCOUNTING              BY        SANKAR THAPPA
ACCOUNTANCYIDENTIFYING THE BUSINESS TRANSACTIONS RECORDING THE BUSINESS TRANSACTIONSSUMMARISING THE BUSINESS TRANSACTIONSI...
OBJECTIVES OF ACCOUNTINGMaintaining proper records of businessCalculation of profit or loss.Providing effective control ov...
TERMINOLOGY OF  ACCOUNTANCY
ASSETS• The valuable things owned by the business are  known as assets. These are the properties  owned by the business. A...
FIXED ASSETS• Fixed assets are acquired for long term use in  the business. They are not meant for sale.  These assets inc...
CIRCULATING/CURRENT ASSETS• Current assets change their values constantly.  For example cash in hand changes so many  time...
FICTITIOUS ASSETS• Fictitious assets are those assets, which do not  have physical form. They don’t have any real  value. ...
TANGIBLE ASSETS• Tangible assets are available in physical form,  which can be seen, touched. These assets are  purchased ...
INTANGIBLE ASSETS• These are the assets which are not normally  purchased and sold in the open market such  as goodwill an...
Liability or Equity• Liabilities are the obligations or debts payable by the  enterprise in future in the form of money or...
Fixed or long term liabilities• The liabilities, which are to be paid after a  long period of time exceeding one accountin...
Current liabilities• The liabilities which are payable within a year  are termed as current liabilities
Contingent liability• These are not the real liabilities. Future events  can only decide whether it is really a liability ...
Capital• The amount what is invested to start a  business, to run or operate and expand the  business is called capital. C...
Fixed capital• The amount invested in acquiring fixed assets  is called fixed capital. The money is blocked in  fixed Asse...
Working capital• The part of capital available with the firm for  day-to-day working of the business is known  as working ...
PURCHASES• Purchases include only the purchases of those  goods, which are for the purpose of selling  again. It does not ...
Returns outwards• It is that part of purchase of goods, which is  returned to the seller. This return may be due  to unnec...
Sales• Sales includes the sale of goods only in which  the business organization deals in. The sale of  old fixed assets w...
Return inward• It is that part of sales of goods which is  actually returned to the organization by  purchasers.
Stock• The goods available with the business for sale on a  particular date is termed as stock. In accounting we  use the ...
Revenue• Revenue in accounting means the amount  realized or receivable from the sale of goods.  Amount received from sale...
Expense• Generating revenue is the foremost objective of  every business. The firm has to use certain goods  and services ...
Debtors• The term ‘debtors’ represents the persons or  parties who have purchased goods on credit  from the business and h...
Creditors• In addition to cash purchases the firm has to  make credit purchases also. The sellers of  goods on credit to t...
Proprietors• An individual or group of persons who  undertake the risk of the business are known  as ‘proprietor’. They in...
Drawings• Amount or goods withdrawn by the proprietor  for his private or personal use is termed as  drawing .
Vouchers• Accounting transactions must be supported by  documents. These documentary proofs in  support of the transaction...
Depreciation• Depreciation is the loss in the value and utility  of assets due to constant use and expiry of  times.
Bad debts• The amount what is not recoverable from the  debtors is considered as bad debt
ACCOUNTING CONCEPTS (GAAP• Business Entity Concept• Money Measurement Concept• Going Concern Concept• Cost concept
•   Dual Aspect Concept•   Accounting period Concept•   Revenue recognition Concept•   Matching revenue•   Objective Evide...
ACCOUNTING CONVENTIONS• Consistency concept• Full disclosures• Materiality Concept• Conservatism concept
CLASSIFICATION OF ACCOUNTS• PERSONAL ACCOUNTS-those relating to  persons• REAL ACCOUNTS-those relating to  property(assets...
RULES OF DEBIT AND CREDITS• PERSONAL ACCOUNT:• DEBIT   - THE RECEIVER• CREDIT - THE GIVER
REAL ACCOUNT     :DEBIT- WHAT COMES INCREDIT- WHAT GOES OUT
NOMINAL ACCOUNTDEBIT-    ALL EXPENSES OR LOSSESCREDIT-   ALL INCOMES  OR GAIN
JOURNAL• The word ‘journal’ has been derived from the  French word ‘JOUR’ meaning daily records.  Journal is a daily recor...
FORMAT OF JOURNALDATE   PARTICULAR   LF AMOUNT AMOUNT                       DEBIT  CREDIT
LEDGER• ledger is a book where all accounts relating to  different items are maintained and into which  all journal entrie...
FORMAT OF LEDGERDATE PARTICULAR    JF   AMOUNT   DATE   PARTICULAR   JF   AMOUN                                           ...
TRIAL BALANCE• TRIAL BALANCE IS A STATEMENT PREPARED  WITH THE DEBIT AND CREDIT TOTALS OR  BALANCES OF LEDGER ACCOUNTS TO ...
FORMAT OF TRIAL BALANCEPARTICULAR   DEBIT    CREDIT             AMOUNT   AMOUNT
FINACIAL STATEMENTS• TRADING ACCOUNT• PROFIT & LOSS ACCOUNT• BALANCE SHEET
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Introduction to Basic Accounting. The PPT would help in understanding the accounting process in a very easier way

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Transcript of "Sankar.presentation1.accountancy"

  1. 1. INTRODUCTION TO BASIC ACCOUNTING BY SANKAR THAPPA
  2. 2. ACCOUNTANCYIDENTIFYING THE BUSINESS TRANSACTIONS RECORDING THE BUSINESS TRANSACTIONSSUMMARISING THE BUSINESS TRANSACTIONSINTERPRETING THE BUSINESS TRANSACTIONS
  3. 3. OBJECTIVES OF ACCOUNTINGMaintaining proper records of businessCalculation of profit or loss.Providing effective control over the businessMaking information available to various groups
  4. 4. TERMINOLOGY OF ACCOUNTANCY
  5. 5. ASSETS• The valuable things owned by the business are known as assets. These are the properties owned by the business. Assets are the economic resources of an enterprise which can be expressed in monetary value.
  6. 6. FIXED ASSETS• Fixed assets are acquired for long term use in the business. They are not meant for sale. These assets increase the profit earning capacity of the business. Expenditure on these assets is not regular in nature. Ex. Land & building, Plant & Machinery, Vehicles, furniture etc.
  7. 7. CIRCULATING/CURRENT ASSETS• Current assets change their values constantly. For example cash in hand changes so many times during the day. There is always regular transaction regarding floating assets.
  8. 8. FICTITIOUS ASSETS• Fictitious assets are those assets, which do not have physical form. They don’t have any real value. These assets are the revenue expenditure of capital nature, which are also termed as deferred revenue• Expenditure.
  9. 9. TANGIBLE ASSETS• Tangible assets are available in physical form, which can be seen, touched. These assets are purchased and sold in open market
  10. 10. INTANGIBLE ASSETS• These are the assets which are not normally purchased and sold in the open market such as goodwill and patents . It does not mean that these assets are never purchased and sold. They may be purchased and sold in special circumstances
  11. 11. Liability or Equity• Liabilities are the obligations or debts payable by the enterprise in future in the form of money or goods or services. It is the owner and creditor’s claim against the assets of the business. Creditors may classify as creditors for goods and creditors for expenses. The business should have sufficient current assets to meet its current liabilities and reasonable amount of fixed assets to meet its fixed liability
  12. 12. Fixed or long term liabilities• The liabilities, which are to be paid after a long period of time exceeding one accounting year, are called long term liabilities
  13. 13. Current liabilities• The liabilities which are payable within a year are termed as current liabilities
  14. 14. Contingent liability• These are not the real liabilities. Future events can only decide whether it is really a liability or not. Due their uncertainty these liabilities are termed as contingent (doubtful) liabilities.
  15. 15. Capital• The amount what is invested to start a business, to run or operate and expand the business is called capital. Capital can be classified as fixed capital and working capital
  16. 16. Fixed capital• The amount invested in acquiring fixed assets is called fixed capital. The money is blocked in fixed Assets and not available to meet the current liabilities
  17. 17. Working capital• The part of capital available with the firm for day-to-day working of the business is known as working capital.
  18. 18. PURCHASES• Purchases include only the purchases of those goods, which are for the purpose of selling again. It does not include the purchase of assets.
  19. 19. Returns outwards• It is that part of purchase of goods, which is returned to the seller. This return may be due to unnecessary, excessive, and defective supply of goods.
  20. 20. Sales• Sales includes the sale of goods only in which the business organization deals in. The sale of old fixed assets will not be included in the sale.
  21. 21. Return inward• It is that part of sales of goods which is actually returned to the organization by purchasers.
  22. 22. Stock• The goods available with the business for sale on a particular date is termed as stock. In accounting we use the term stock widely as opening and closing stock. In case of business which is being carried on for the last so many years, the value of goods on the opening day of the accounting year is known as opening stock. In the same way the value of goods on the closing day of the accounting year is known as Closing stock.
  23. 23. Revenue• Revenue in accounting means the amount realized or receivable from the sale of goods. Amount received from sale of assets or borrowing loan is not revenue. Revenue should not be confused with income. Revenue is concerned with receipts or receivables in day-to-day working of the business. Income is calculated by deducting expense from revenue.
  24. 24. Expense• Generating revenue is the foremost objective of every business. The firm has to use certain goods and services to produce articles, sold by it. Payment for these goods and services is called ‘expense’. Cost of raw material for the manufacture of goods or the cost of goods purchased for sale, expenses incurred in manufacturing goods, such as wages, carriage, freight and amount spent for selling and distributing goods such as salaries, rent, advertising and insurance etc. Are known as ‘expense’ in accounting terminology.
  25. 25. Debtors• The term ‘debtors’ represents the persons or parties who have purchased goods on credit from the business and have not paid for the goods sold to them. They still owe to the business
  26. 26. Creditors• In addition to cash purchases the firm has to make credit purchases also. The sellers of goods on credit to the firm are known as its creditors for goods. Creditors are the liability of the business. They will continue to remain the creditors of the firm so far the full payment is not made to them. Creditors may also be known as creditor for loan, creditors for expenses.
  27. 27. Proprietors• An individual or group of persons who undertake the risk of the business are known as ‘proprietor’. They invest their funds into the business as capital
  28. 28. Drawings• Amount or goods withdrawn by the proprietor for his private or personal use is termed as drawing .
  29. 29. Vouchers• Accounting transactions must be supported by documents. These documentary proofs in support of the transactions are termed as vouchers
  30. 30. Depreciation• Depreciation is the loss in the value and utility of assets due to constant use and expiry of times.
  31. 31. Bad debts• The amount what is not recoverable from the debtors is considered as bad debt
  32. 32. ACCOUNTING CONCEPTS (GAAP• Business Entity Concept• Money Measurement Concept• Going Concern Concept• Cost concept
  33. 33. • Dual Aspect Concept• Accounting period Concept• Revenue recognition Concept• Matching revenue• Objective Evidence Concept
  34. 34. ACCOUNTING CONVENTIONS• Consistency concept• Full disclosures• Materiality Concept• Conservatism concept
  35. 35. CLASSIFICATION OF ACCOUNTS• PERSONAL ACCOUNTS-those relating to persons• REAL ACCOUNTS-those relating to property(assets) and• NOMINAL ACCOUNTS-those relating to incomes and expenses
  36. 36. RULES OF DEBIT AND CREDITS• PERSONAL ACCOUNT:• DEBIT - THE RECEIVER• CREDIT - THE GIVER
  37. 37. REAL ACCOUNT :DEBIT- WHAT COMES INCREDIT- WHAT GOES OUT
  38. 38. NOMINAL ACCOUNTDEBIT- ALL EXPENSES OR LOSSESCREDIT- ALL INCOMES OR GAIN
  39. 39. JOURNAL• The word ‘journal’ has been derived from the French word ‘JOUR’ meaning daily records. Journal is a daily record of business transactions. It is also called a ‘Daily Book’ and is used for recording all day-to-day transactions in the order in which they occur
  40. 40. FORMAT OF JOURNALDATE PARTICULAR LF AMOUNT AMOUNT DEBIT CREDIT
  41. 41. LEDGER• ledger is a book where all accounts relating to different items are maintained and into which all journal entries must be posted
  42. 42. FORMAT OF LEDGERDATE PARTICULAR JF AMOUNT DATE PARTICULAR JF AMOUN T
  43. 43. TRIAL BALANCE• TRIAL BALANCE IS A STATEMENT PREPARED WITH THE DEBIT AND CREDIT TOTALS OR BALANCES OF LEDGER ACCOUNTS TO TEST THE ARITHMATICAL ACCURACY OF THE BOOKS.’
  44. 44. FORMAT OF TRIAL BALANCEPARTICULAR DEBIT CREDIT AMOUNT AMOUNT
  45. 45. FINACIAL STATEMENTS• TRADING ACCOUNT• PROFIT & LOSS ACCOUNT• BALANCE SHEET

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