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Rogers Innovation Report: Connected Workplace
Rogers Communications Inc.
November 27, 2013

© Harris/Decima
Toronto

Ottawa

Montreal

2345 Yonge Street
Suite 405
Toronto, Ontario
M4P 2E5

160 Elgin Street
Suite 1820
Ottawa, Ontar...
Table of Contents
Background &
Methodology

Executive
Summary

Background Methodology -

Detailed
Findings
Section 1: Work...
Background and Methodology
Research Methodology
•
•
•

A total of n=1,001 interviews were conducted online (CAWI) in both English and French.
Respons...
Executive Summary
Executive Summary
Although having the ability to work remotely was seen as less of a priority than other factors in choosi...
Executive Summary
Among FT Employed Canadians, landline telephones and desktop computers receive the highest device
penetr...
Detailed Findings
Section 1: Working Remotely
Beyond Base Salary/Benefits; FT Employed Canadians Value
Work/life Balance, a Good Manager and Vacation Days
•

•

Over ni...
Gen Y Cohort Places Greater Importance on Professional
Development Opportunities, Travel and Connectivity
•

•
•

Although...
FT Employed Canadians who are Able to Work
Remotely Wish they could Spend More Time doing so
•

•

Over four-in-ten (44%) ...
About One-Third of Those Who Wish they could Spend More
Time Working Remotely would Make a Sacrifice to do so
•

•

Approx...
Social Interaction and Strong Working Relationships with
Colleagues May Act as Barriers to Working Remotely
•
•

Over nine...
Theme of Workplace Flexibility/Portability Leads Projected
Workplace Priorities In the Next Five Years
•

•

When asked to...
Section 2: Personal & Corporate Technology Usage
Landline Telephone and Desktop Computer Top the
List of Devices Used for Corporate/Work Purposes
•

About two-thirds of FT...
Laptop Considered the Most Versatile Work Device
Among Users
•
•
•

Over four-in-ten FT Employed Canadians who use a lapto...
FT Employed Canadians Want to Spend Less of Their
Day Using Traditional Devices (Desktop, Landline)
•

FT Employed Canadia...
Laptop Computer Regarded as Most Preferred
Workplace Device to Use Over the Next Five Years
•

Four-in-ten (40%) FT Employ...
Collaborative Work Environment and Being Connected
Viewed as Key to Higher Productivity Levels
•

•

•

Keeping with earli...
Those who Use a Laptop, Smartphone and Tablet for
Corporate Purposes Understand their Utility
•
•

Over eight-in-ten (84%)...
Section 3: Attitudes and Perceptions Toward
Workplace Technology Usage & Job Satisfaction
Section 3a: Attitudes and Perceptions Toward
Workplace Technology Usage
High Acceptance of Technology Among FT Employed
Canadians
•

FT Employed Canadians perceive technology as a helpful tool w...
All Age Cohorts Agree that Technology Helps them be
More Efficient and Productive at their Job
•
•

Across all age cohorts...
Forgetting their Corporate Smartphone either ‘At
Home’ or ‘At the Office’ would Likely Induce Stress
•

In today’s workpla...
Being Connected After Normal Business Hours Adds
Stress to the Lives of FT Employed Canadians
•

Almost two-thirds (64%) o...
Section 3b: Job Satisfaction & Technology Usage
Majority of FT Employed Canadians Report Being
Satisfied with Their Current Employment Situation
•
•

Over eight-in-ten (8...
The Ability to Work Remotely Tops the List of Items
that would Positively Impact Workplace Satisfaction
•
•

Two-thirds (6...
Working Remotely, Cloud Computing and Access to Social
Media Likely to Increase Job Satisfaction Among Gen Y
•

FT Employe...
Those who Use a Smartphone or Work Remotely Report Higher
Workplace Satisfaction from having these Benefits
•
•

Almost th...
Section 4: Bring Your Own Device (BYOD)
Minority of FT Employed Canadians Say Their
Employer Offers a BYOD Policy
•

Three-in-ten (30%) FT Employed Canadians indi...
Higher Job Satisfaction Reported Among Employees
who Work for a Company that Offers a BYOD Policy
•

Over one-third (34%) ...
Majority of Smartphone Users have One Smartphone;
Most Use it for Personal Purposes Only
•
•

Almost nine-in-ten (86%) of ...
Most Personal Only Smartphone Users State their Job Doesn’t Require
One; Dual Users want to Keep their Personal Life Separ...
FT Employed Canadians who use One Smartphone for Personal
and Corporate Purposes OK with added Security Policies
•

Six-in...
Appendix
Appendix A: Demographics/Firmographics &
Technology Adoption
Appendix A: Demographics/Firmographics
Demographics

Total
Sample
n=1,001

Gender
Male
Female

Education
53%
47%

Age
18 -...
Majority of FT Employed Canadians are In the Middle
when it comes to Technology Adoption
•

•

Over half (52%) of FT Emplo...
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Rogers Connected Workplace report 2013

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Workplace technology is top of mind for the businesses we work with, so we set out to uncover how Canadians feel about the tools, policies and environment they work in today.

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Transcript of "Rogers Connected Workplace report 2013"

  1. 1. Rogers Innovation Report: Connected Workplace Rogers Communications Inc. November 27, 2013 © Harris/Decima
  2. 2. Toronto Ottawa Montreal 2345 Yonge Street Suite 405 Toronto, Ontario M4P 2E5 160 Elgin Street Suite 1820 Ottawa, Ontario K2P 2P7 1080 Beaver Hall Hill Suite 400 Montreal, Quebec H2Z 1S8 t: (416) 962-2013 f: (416) 962-0505 t: (613) 230-2200 f: (613) 230-9048 t: (514) 288-0037 f: (514) 288-0138 Proprietary Warning The information contained herein is proprietary to Rogers Communications Inc. and may not be used, reproduced or disclosed to others except as specifically permitted in writing by the originator of the information. The recipient of this information, by its retention and use, agrees to protect the same and the information contained therein from loss, theft or compromise. Any material or information provided by Rogers Communications Inc. and all data collected by Harris/Decima will be treated as confidential by Harris/Decima and will be stored securely while on Harris/Decima's premise (adhering to industry standards and applicable laws). © Harris/Decima 2
  3. 3. Table of Contents Background & Methodology Executive Summary Background Methodology - Detailed Findings Section 1: Working Remotely Section 2: Personal & Corporate Usage Section 3: Attitudes and Perceptions Toward Workplace Technology Usage/Job Satisfaction Section 4: BYOD Page 4 Page 6 Appendix Appendix A: Demographics/ Firmographics & Technology Adoption Page 9 Page 41 © Harris/Decima 3
  4. 4. Background and Methodology
  5. 5. Research Methodology • • • A total of n=1,001 interviews were conducted online (CAWI) in both English and French. Responses were collected between October 17th and October 30th, 2013. To qualify for the survey, respondents had to be: – – – • 18 years of age or older, Live in a Canadian province, and be, Employed in a full time position at a company/organization, not those self employed Quotas were placed on region to allow for geographic profiling: Sample Quotas BC Alberta Manitoba/Saskatchewan Ontario Quebec Atlantic Total • Number of interviews (n) 125 100 100 325 250 100 1000 Data was weighted post-field based on age, gender and region to be representative of the online employed Canadian population. © Harris/Decima 5
  6. 6. Executive Summary
  7. 7. Executive Summary Although having the ability to work remotely was seen as less of a priority than other factors in choosing their current employer (e.g. base salary and benefits or vacation days), Full Time (FT) Employed Canadians may place greater consideration toward this factor for future employment opportunities. • As expected, when FT Employed Canadians were asked to identify how important a number of workplace attributes were when deciding to work for their current employer, ‘base salary and benefits’, ‘work/life balance’, a ‘good manager’ and ‘vacation days’ came out on top. However, over half of these respondents also indicated that ‘the ability to work remotely’ was very or somewhat important in their employment choice. • Among those able to work remotely, there is a significant gap between the number of days they are currently able to be out of the workplace and the number of days they would ideally like to be out of the workplace. • When asked to project five years ahead, approximately six-in-ten said either ‘flexible work hours’ or ‘having the ability to work from anywhere’ would be their top priority to have in the workplace – both of which may not be possible without having access to portable devices. – Important to note is that FT Employed Canadians who are able to work remotely report that being able to do so increases their job satisfaction (even if they are not taking advantage of this benefit). A perceived barrier that may prevent FT Employed Canadians from working remotely (other than workplace policy), is the relationships and social interactions that these employees achieve from working with one another. • Specifically, over three-quarters of FT Employed Canadians agree (strongly or somewhat) that ‘having good working relationships with my colleagues increases my job satisfaction’, ‘my overall job morale is positively influenced by the face-to-face social interactions I have at work’, and ‘face-to-face social interaction and working with other colleagues is important to me’. © Harris/Decima 7
  8. 8. Executive Summary Among FT Employed Canadians, landline telephones and desktop computers receive the highest device penetration rates for corporate/work purposes. However, these employees would ideally like to spend less of their day using traditional technology and more time using newer, more portable, devices. • Again, when asked to project forward, four-in-ten FT Employed Canadians identified ‘a laptop’ as the device from which they would primarily like to work. However, almost half of their time is currently spent working from a desktop computer. • FT Employed Canadians who use a laptop, tablet or smartphone for corporate/work purposes are significantly more like than those who do not use these products to indicate it does/would increase their productivity on the job. About three-in-ten FT Employed Canadians state their current employer offers some type of Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policy. Those who benefit from a BYOD policy are more likely than those who don’t to state that having this policy actually increases their job satisfaction. • Almost half of those who have a BYOD policy indicate they are ‘very satisfied’ with their current employment situation (compared to three-in-ten among non-BYOD employees). • Furthermore, FT Employed Canadians who use their smartphone for personal and corporate purposes agree (strongly or somewhat) that ‘they would be OK with their employer enforcing security policies on their device (e.g. a mandatory password, remote wipe of data, device location tracking)’. © Harris/Decima 8
  9. 9. Detailed Findings
  10. 10. Section 1: Working Remotely
  11. 11. Beyond Base Salary/Benefits; FT Employed Canadians Value Work/life Balance, a Good Manager and Vacation Days • • Over nine-in-ten FT Employed Canadians identify ‘base salary and employee benefits’ (95%), ‘work/life balance’ (94%), having a ‘good manager’ (94%), and ‘vacation days’ (91%) as being important factors (very or somewhat) in deciding to work for their current employer. In comparison to other factors, ‘the ability to work remotely’ and other work perks (such as ‘a BYOD Very/ Somewhat policy’ or ‘being provided with a mobile device’) are seen as less important to FT Employed Important Canadians. Base salary and employee benefits (e.g. medical, dental, etc.) 4% Work/life balance 5% Good manager 25% 5% 71% 27% 67% 31% Vacation days 2%7% Opportunities to travel Opportunities to connect your own device to your office network Provided with a mobile device Not at all important © Harris/Decima Not very important 45% 30% 23% 33% 24% 29% 33% 25% 31% Somewhat important 85% 20% 29% 32% 27% 87% 36% 24% 17% 89% 41% 48% 11% 91% 44% 46% Professional development opportunities 4% 12% The ability to work remotely (e.g. from home) 94% 58% 45% Workplace culture 2%11% Access to the latest technology (e.g. laptops, tablets, etc.) 94% 62% 33% Expected number of working hours per week 2% 9% 95% 23% 65% 53% 16% 45% 16% 40% 13% 37% Very important Q2. Using the scale below, please indicate the level of importance you placed on each of the following items when deciding to work for your current employer. Base: All respondents, n=1,001 11
  12. 12. Gen Y Cohort Places Greater Importance on Professional Development Opportunities, Travel and Connectivity • • • Although all age cohorts appear to value ‘base salary and benefits’, ‘work/life balance’, having a ‘good manager’ and ‘vacation days’, those in the Gen Y Cohort (i.e. those aged 18 – 29) are more likely than those aged 30 - 50 to say ‘opportunities to travel’ (25%) and ‘opportunities to connect your own personal device’ (25%) were very important in choosing their current employer. Not surprisingly, the percentage of FT Employed Canadians who say ‘professional development opportunities’ were very important in choosing their employer appears to decline with age (48%; 18-29, 30%; 60+). Interesting is that FT Employed Canadians aged 50 and above are just as likely as their Gen Y counterparts to attribute ‘access to the latest technology (e.g. laptops, tablets, etc.)’ as being very important. Age Top Box % (Very Important) Base salary and employee benefits (e.g. medical, dental, etc.) Work/life balance Good manager Vacation days Expected number of working hours per week Workplace culture Professional development opportunities The ability to work remotely (e.g. from home) Access to the latest technology (e.g. laptops, tablets, etc.) Opportunities to travel Opportunities to connect your own device to your office network Provided with a mobile device © Harris/Decima Total n=1,001 18-29 n=66 (A) 30-39 n=149 (B) 40-49 n=251 (C) 50-59 n=353 (D) 60 plus n=182 (E) 71% 67% 62% 58% 44% 41% 36% 24% 20% 16% 16% 13% 76%B 67% 68% 54% 43% 45% 48%DE 26% 22% 25%BE 25%BC 16% 59% 62% 57% 55% 43% 33% 37% 22% 14% 10% 12% 12% 75%BE 71% 60% 64%E 42% 43%B 36% 24% 18% 16% 11% 11% 77%BE 70% 67%B 61%E 51%CE 43%B 31% 24% 25%BC 18%B 18%C 16% 66% 65% 65% 51% 40% 42% 30% 22% 27%BC 14% 15% 13% Q2. Using the scale below, please indicate the level of importance you placed on each of the following items when deciding to work for your current employer. Base: All respondents, n=1,001 12
  13. 13. FT Employed Canadians who are Able to Work Remotely Wish they could Spend More Time doing so • • Over four-in-ten (44%) FT Employed Canadians state they would be able to conduct their normal workplace responsibilities by working remotely. However, there exists a significant gap between the number of days per week they are currently able to work remotely and the number of days they would ideally like to be working remotely. Specifically, FT Employed Canadians who are able to work remotely are currently able to spend, on average, 2.1 days per week doing so (with most respondents indicating ‘0’, ‘1’ or ‘5 days’ per week), while they would ideally like to spend 3.2 days per week away from their normal workplace (with most wanting to spend ‘2’, ‘3’ or ‘5 days’ working remotely). – Those who are able to spend zero (0) days working remotely would ideally like to spend 2.5 days doing so. Ability to Work Remotely (e.g. from home/out of the office) 44% of full time employed Canadians are able to work remotely Current vs. Ideal Number of Days Spent Working Remotely 0 Days 1 Day 2 Days 35% 18% 13% 12% © Harris/Decima 3 Days 4% 5 Days Current 22% 5% 4 Days 56% of full time employed Canadians are NOT able to work remotely Ideal 6% 21% 8% 18% 24% 6 Days 2% 7 Days 4% MEAN 2.1 Days 2% 4% 3.2 Days Q3. Would you be able conduct your normal workplace responsibilities by working remotely? Base: All respondents, n=1,001 Q3b. How many days per week are you currently able to work remotely? Q4. In your ideal scenario, how many days per week would you like to be working remotely? Base: Employed Canadians who are able to work from home, n=442 13
  14. 14. About One-Third of Those Who Wish they could Spend More Time Working Remotely would Make a Sacrifice to do so • • Approximately one-third (32%) of FT Employed Canadians who want to spend at least one day per week working remotely would sacrifice either their ‘vacation days’, ‘salary’, ‘employee benefits’ or something else in order to make this dream a reality. However, this percentage rises when looking at the Gen Y cohort. Specifically, half (50%) of Gen Y FT Employed Canadians are willing to sacrifice something in order to work remotely more often (compared to 28% of those aged 30 and above). Would you consider sacrificing a portion of the following in order to work remotely? NET Willing to sacrifice something in order to work remotely 32% Vacation days 17% Salary 17% Employee benefits (e.g. medical, dental, etc.) Other 14% 1% None, I would not give up any of these to work remotely © Harris/Decima 68% Q5. Would you consider sacrificing a portion of the following in order to work remotely (e.g. from home/out of the office)? Base: Those who would like to work remotely 1 or more day(s) per week, n=397 14
  15. 15. Social Interaction and Strong Working Relationships with Colleagues May Act as Barriers to Working Remotely • • Over nine-in-ten (91%) FT Employed Canadians agree (strongly or somewhat) that ‘having good working relationships with my colleagues increases my job satisfaction’. Moreover, almost eight-in-ten agree that ‘their job morale is positively influenced by face-to-face social interactions at work’ (78%) and that ‘face-to-face social interaction and working with other colleagues is important to them’ (77%). These agreement levels are equal between those who can work remotely versus those who cannot. There were also no significant demographic differences of opinion. – This positive association with face-to-face social interaction may prevent some employees from making the transition to a remote workplace. However, with the pace at which technology is advancing, these concerns may be mitigated with the relative ease at which you can connect with one-another via various online methods (e.g. skype, facetime, WebEX, etc.). Strongly/ Somewhat Agree Strength of agreement with each of the following statements Having good working relationships with my colleagues increases my job satisfaction 8% 33% 58% 91% My overall job morale is positively influenced by the face-to-face 2% 5%15% social interactions I have at work 42% 36% 78% Face-to-face social interaction and working with other colleagues is 2% 5% 17% important to me 40% 37% 77% Strongly disagree Somewhat disagree Neither agree nor disagree Somewhat agree Strongly agree Q6. How strongly do you agree or disagree with each of the following statements? Base: All respondents, n=1,001 © Harris/Decima 15
  16. 16. Theme of Workplace Flexibility/Portability Leads Projected Workplace Priorities In the Next Five Years • • When asked to project forward, approximately six-in-ten state their top priority for the workplace is related to the idea of having a portable workplace (i.e. flexible work hours, 38%; or, having the ability to work from anywhere, 21%). Interesting is that the order below mimics the relative importance that FT Employed Canadians placed when choosing to work for their current employer (refer to slide 11). However, the gap between ‘professional development opportunities’ and ‘the ability to work from anywhere (e.g. mobile office)’ is a lot smaller. Thus, FT Employed Canadians may perceive the remote workplace to be more important five years from now than it was when they chose their current employer. – – Among FT Employed Canadians who are unsatisfied with their current employment situation, almost three-in-ten (29%) state ‘the ability to work from anywhere’ as their top priority (compared with 21% overall). Women are significantly more likely than men to state ‘flexible work hours’ will be the top priority in the future (47% and 31%, respectively). Thinking five years down the road, which of the following do you anticipate will be the top priority for you to have in the workplace? Flexible work hours 38% Professional development opportunities 22% The ability to work from anywhere (e.g. a mobile office) 21% Access to the newest technology 11% Retirement planning/pension/ability to retire 2% Other <1% Don't know <1% Note: responses under 2% not shown © Harris/Decima Q1. Thinking five years down the road, which of the following do you anticipate will be the top priority for you to have in the workplace? Base: All respondents, n=1,001 16
  17. 17. Section 2: Personal & Corporate Technology Usage
  18. 18. Landline Telephone and Desktop Computer Top the List of Devices Used for Corporate/Work Purposes • About two-thirds of FT Employed Canadians indicate they use a ‘landline telephone’ (66%) or ‘desktop computer’ (64%) for corporate/work purposes. – • Tablets have relatively low penetration across the Canadian work environment with only one-in-ten (10%) FT Employed Canadians indicating they use one for work purposes. Among FT Employed Canadians who are able to work remotely, about half indicate they use a ‘laptop’ (55%) or ‘smartphone’ (45%) for corporate/work purposes (compared to 35% and 30% overall). A landline telephone 14% A desktop computer 49% 19% 35% A laptop computer 27% A tablet device 81% 73% NET Personal or Corporate Use Corporate/Work Purposes Personal Use 60% Neither 61% 30% 10% 64% 70% 30% A smartphone 86% 66% 58% 41% 37% 59% Q7. Which, if any, of the following devices do you typically use on a daily basis for…? Base: All respondents, n=1,001 © Harris/Decima 18
  19. 19. Laptop Considered the Most Versatile Work Device Among Users • • • Over four-in-ten FT Employed Canadians who use a laptop for work purposes use it for every function listed below (except for ‘taking work-related photes and/or videos’). In general, FT Employed Canadians tend to use more traditional technology (e.g. desktop, laptop) for performing more traditional work-related tasks (e.g. read, review and edit documents, access corporate apps, etc.) Tablet and Smartphone users are less likely than Desktop and Laptop users to use their device for ‘access to email and/or calendar’, ‘read, review and edit documents, spreadsheets, or presentations’, ‘access corporate applications (e.g. time-tracking, inventory, reporting)’ and ‘access employee intranet/portal’. – If tablets are to make significant gains in the corporate market, they may need to increase perceptions of functionality/ utility for ‘core work activities’ such as the ability to ‘read, review and edit documents, spreadsheets, or presentations’. Device Used for Work Purposes Desktop n=646 (A) Access to email and/or calendar Read, review and edit documents, spreadsheets, or presentations Access corporate applications (e.g. time-tracking, inventory, reporting) Access employee intranet/portal Watching videos Instant messaging Access social networking sites Participate in virtual meetings Videoconferencing Taking work-related photos and/or videos © Harris/Decima Laptop n=353 (B) Tablet n=89 (C) Smartphone n=316 (D) 89%BCD 85%CD 85%CD 85%CD 67% 48%D 74% 21% 75%CD 70%CD 41%D 15% 74%CD 44%D 31% 31% 31%D 26%D 19% 72%CD 51%AD 43%A 47%AD 55%ACD 43%AD 19% 39%D 48%D 32% 44%AD 33%D 36%AD 41%AB 20% 22% 63%ABC 31% 13% 12% 55%ABC Q8. Thinking about each of the devices you use for your job, please select what functions, if any, you use each of them for. Base: Those who use at least one device for their job (base sizes vary by device) 19
  20. 20. FT Employed Canadians Want to Spend Less of Their Day Using Traditional Devices (Desktop, Landline) • FT Employed Canadians are spending over half (55%) of their workday using traditional workplace devices such as a desktop computer or landline telephone. However, as indicated below, these employees would ideally like to be spending less than half (48%) of their day using these devices and more time using more portable technology like a smartphone, tablet or another device. – Those who work in a traditional office emulate this feeling with a six percentage point gap between the amount of time they spend using a desktop computer (53%) and the amount they would ideally spend using a desktop (47%). 41 A desktop computer 22 21 A laptop computer A landline telephone 7 A smartphone 7 A tablet device Other device Other non-device © Harris/Decima 5 2 3 45 Ideal allocation of time 10 Current allocation of time 5 5 14 15 Q10. Thinking about an average work day, what percent of your time is spent working on each of the following devices? Q11. If you could allocate the time you spend working across each of the following devices in an average work day, what percentage would be spent using…? Base: Respondents who use at least one device for corporate/work purposes, n=886 20
  21. 21. Laptop Computer Regarded as Most Preferred Workplace Device to Use Over the Next Five Years • Four-in-ten (40%) FT Employed Canadians would prefer to use a laptop as their primary device for work purposes over the next five years, with fewer than three-in-ten (26%) stating they’d prefer a desktop computer. – This is essentially a reversal of roles in comparison to what FT Employed Canadians are currently using (45% desktop; 21% laptop – refer to the previous slide) – The percentage of FT Employed Canadians who would prefer a laptop as their primary device is even more prevalent among traditional office workers in comparison to non-office workers (45% and 35%, respectively). – Only one-in-ten (14%) FT Employed Canadians in the Gen Y cohort would like to work primarily from a desktop computer. Age Work Environment Gen Y Those 30 Traditional Non-office Which, if any, of the following devices would you (18 – 29) and older Office Workplace n=66 n=935 n=481 n=503 prefer to use as your primary device for work (A) (B) (A) (B) purposes over the next five years? 40% A desktop computer 26% A tablet device (e.g. Apple iPad, Samsung Galaxy Tab, etc.) 15% A smartphone A landline telephone Other device None of the above © Harris/Decima 8% 3% 1% 6% 45%B 35% 47% 39% 31%B 22% 14% 29%A 14% 15% 6% 16%A 6% 10%A 15%B 6% 2% 6%A 6% 3% <1% A laptop computer 2% 2% 1% 2% 10% 9% 6% A Q16b. Which, if any, of the following devices would you prefer to use as your primary device for work purposes over the next five years? Base: All respondents, n=1,001 21
  22. 22. Collaborative Work Environment and Being Connected Viewed as Key to Higher Productivity Levels • • • Keeping with earlier findings that suggest a collaborative workplace increases job satisfaction, over threequarters (76%) of FT Employed Canadians indicate that a collaborative workplace also makes them more productive at their job. Encouraging is that over half (55%) of FT Employed Canadians agree that having access to your work network from a personal device would increase productivity, which increases to over seven-in-ten (72%) among employees with a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policy. In terms of age differences, almost four-in-ten (36%) FT Employed Gen Y Canadians think access to social media makes them more productive (compared to 19% among those aged 30+). Strongly/ To what extent do you agree or disagree that having access to each of Somewhat the following makes you more productive at your current job? Agree A collaborative workplace environment 6% 2% 3% 14% Internet/WI-FI at work 10%2% 2% 13% Your work network from a personal device (access to email, etc) A company laptop Working at other locations A company smartphone A company tablet Social media Not applicable © Harris/Decima Strongly disagree 35% Somewhat disagree 23% 16% 4%5% 21% 19% 31% 24% 6% 7% 24% 20% 26% 11% Neither agree nor disagree 55% 30% 50% 26% 18% 44% 22% 21% 7% 8% 17% 74% 31% 19% 5% 7% 76% 51% 19% 4% 5% 25% 41% 19% 41% 29% 27% 16% 14% Somewhat agree 9% 25% 7% 22% Strongly agree Q11a. To what extent do you agree or disagree that having access to each of the following makes you more productive at your current job? Base: All respondents, n=1,001 22
  23. 23. Those who Use a Laptop, Smartphone and Tablet for Corporate Purposes Understand their Utility • • Over eight-in-ten (84%) FT Employed Canadians who use a laptop for work purposes agree (strongly or somewhat) that it makes them more productive at their job. This same finding also applies to those who use a smartphone for corporate purposes with close to eight-inten (76%) indicating it makes them more productive. – Overall, these findings suggest that device portability equates to higher levels of productivity. To what extent do you agree or disagree that having access to each of the following makes you more productive at your current job? A Company Laptop USE A company laptop [A] 5%2% 9% n=353 24%B 30%A DO NOT USE A company laptop [B] n=648 60%B 7% 7%A 25%A Strongly/ Somewhat Agree 84%B 18% 32% 14% A Company Smartphone USE A company smartphone [A] DO NOT USE A company smartphone [B] 34%B 7% 3% 13% 33%A n=316 n=685 42%B 9% 8%A 25%A 76%B 16% 9% 25% A Company Tablet USE A company tablet [A] n=89 10% 1% DO NOT USE A company tablet [B] n=912 Not applicable © Harris/Decima Strongly disagree Somewhat disagree 33%A 30%B 26% 7%A 9%A Neither agree nor disagree 31%B 30% 61%B 14% Somewhat agree 7% 21% Strongly agree Q11a. To what extent do you agree or disagree that having access to each of the following makes you more productive at your current job? Base: Refer to chart above for specific base sizes 23
  24. 24. Section 3: Attitudes and Perceptions Toward Workplace Technology Usage & Job Satisfaction
  25. 25. Section 3a: Attitudes and Perceptions Toward Workplace Technology Usage
  26. 26. High Acceptance of Technology Among FT Employed Canadians • FT Employed Canadians perceive technology as a helpful tool with about three-quarters (76%) agreeing (strongly or somewhat) that it ‘helps me be more efficient and productive at my job’ and one-third (66%) agreeing that ‘technology advancements have made it easier for me to stay connected’. Strongly/ Somewhat Agree Technology helps me be more efficient and productive at my job 5% 3% 16% Technology advancements have made it easier for me to stay connected anytime and from anywhere I am My employer gives me access to the technology I want in order to be productive at my job My job satisfaction would increase if my employer provided me with the latest technology tools and services 9% 7% 9% 10% 40% 18% 12% 14% 37% 35% 22% 28% 13% I am expected to stay connected to email after normal business hours and/or on weekends 36% 17% I worry that if I don't stay connected to work during weekends or after normal business hours that I may be seen as less committed… Strongly disagree © Harris/Decima Somewhat disagree 17% 37% Neither agree nor disagree 15% 18% 22% 57% 47% 17% Somewhat agree 13% 35% 19% 11% 30% 18% 17% 25% 21% 66% 21% 30% 37% 29% 32% 36% I regularly check work-related emails when on vacation Being connected 24 hours a day gives me the freedom to enjoy a healthier work/life balance 76% 10% 29% 9% 25% 15% Strongly agree Q13. Using the scale below, please tell me how much you agree or disagree with each of the following statements. Base: All respondents, n=1,001 26
  27. 27. All Age Cohorts Agree that Technology Helps them be More Efficient and Productive at their Job • • Across all age cohorts, at least three-quarters of FT Employed Canadians agree (strongly or somewhat) that ‘technology helps them be more efficient and productive at their job’. Those in the Gen Y Cohort are significantly more likely than their older counterparts to agree that ‘their job satisfaction would increase if their employer provided them with the latest technology tools and services’. – Moreover, there appears to be mounting pressure on the Gen Y cohort to stay connected after normal business hours with over four-in-ten (44%) agreeing with the statement, ‘I worry that if I don’t stay connected to work during weekends or after normal business hours that I may be seen as less committed to my job (compared to 15% among those 60 plus). Top 2 Box % (Strongly / Somewhat Agree) Total n=1,001 18-29 n=66 (A) 30-39 n=149 (B) Age 40-49 n=251 (C) Technology helps me be more efficient and productive at my job Technology advancements have made it easier for me to stay connected anytime and from anywhere I am My employer gives me access to the technology I want in order to be productive at my job My job satisfaction would increase if my employer provided me with the latest technology tools and services I regularly check work-related emails when on vacation I am expected to stay connected to email after normal business hours and/or on weekends Being connected 24 hours a day gives me the freedom to enjoy a healthier work/life balance I worry that if I don’t stay connected to work during weekends or after normal business hours that I may be seen as less committed to my job 76% 76% 77% 77% 74% 79% 66% 68% 61% 70% 69% 62% 57% 59% 60% 52% 58% 60% 47% 59% DE 48% E 47%E 43% 37% 35% 37% 31% 37% 32% 42%BD 30% 39% D 28% 30% 26% 31% 29% 37% D 33% D 26% 22% 26% 25% 44% BCDE 26% DE 22% 17% 15% © Harris/Decima 50-59 n=353 (D) 60 plus n=182 (E) Q13. Using the scale below, please tell me how much you agree or disagree with each of the following statements. Base: All respondents, n=1,001 27
  28. 28. Forgetting their Corporate Smartphone either ‘At Home’ or ‘At the Office’ would Likely Induce Stress • In today’s workplace environment, about seven-in-ten FT Employed Canadians who use a smartphone for corporate purposes agree (strongly or somewhat) that they would be stressed out if they either ‘forgot their phone at home’ (70%) or ‘forgot their phone at work’ (67%). – On the theme of stress, corporate smartphone users are split as to whether ‘being connected 24 hours a day gives me the freedom to enjoy a healthier work/life’ with about 50:50 in agreement (42%) versus not in agreement (38%). Strongly/ Somewhat Agree I would be stressed out if I forgot my smartphone at home when going to work I would be stressed out if I forgot my smartphone at work when going home for the day Strongly disagree © Harris/Decima Somewhat disagree 7% 8% 8% 11% 15% 13% Neither agree nor disagree 34% 35% 70% 31% 36% 67% Somewhat agree Strongly agree Q13. Using the scale below, please tell me how much you agree or disagree with each of the following statements. Base: Those who use a smartphone for work purposes, n=316 28
  29. 29. Being Connected After Normal Business Hours Adds Stress to the Lives of FT Employed Canadians • Almost two-thirds (64%) of FT Employed Canadians indicate that ‘being connected after normal business hours would add stress to their lives’. However, when looking at those who use a smartphone device for corporate/work purposes, the percentage drops to just over half (53%). – • There might be a perception among non-users that being connected to their corporate network after hours increases stress. However, in actuality, the opposite is occurring. Specifically, those who are connected after hours via their smartphone or tablet report less stress. A good sign is that FT Employed Canadians may not be resistant to new technology in the workplace with sixin-ten (60%) indicating ‘tablets and smartphones have a positive effect on workplace communication’. Being connected to my job through a smartphone or tablet after normal business hours adds stress to my life 64% 36% Being connected to my job through a smartphone or tablet after normal business hours reduces stress in my life Personal devices, such as smartphones are a distraction in the workplace 58% 42% Personal devices, such as smartphones encourage higher levels of productivity in the workplace Personal devices, such as tablets and smartphones mean I never really get to “Switch off” my work responsibilities 55% 45% Personal devices, such as tablets and smartphones allow me to stay up-to-date and informed when I’m out of the office Personal devices, such as tablets and smartphones have a negative effect on workplace communication © Harris/Decima 40% 60% Personal devices, such as tablets and smartphones have a positive effect on workplace communication Q15. Now, thinking specifically about new technology in the workplace, please move/drag the slider bar to the left or right for each option depending on the statement you agree with most. Base: All respondents, n=1,001 29
  30. 30. Section 3b: Job Satisfaction & Technology Usage
  31. 31. Majority of FT Employed Canadians Report Being Satisfied with Their Current Employment Situation • • Over eight-in-ten (85%) FT Employed Canadians report being satisfied (very or somewhat) with their current employment situation. Perhaps not surprisingly, the highest levels of employment satisfaction come from those employees who report a healthy work/life balance (i.e. 94% among those who say their work/life balance is ‘right where it needs to be’). How satisfied are you with your current employment situation? Are you…? 4% 11% 51% Not at all satisfied Not very satisfied 34% Somewhat satisfied Very/ Somewhat Satisfied 85% Very satisfied Q12. How satisfied are you with your current employment situation? Are you…? Base: All respondents, n=1,001 © Harris/Decima 31
  32. 32. The Ability to Work Remotely Tops the List of Items that would Positively Impact Workplace Satisfaction • • Two-thirds (66%) of Employed Canadians state they would be more satisfied (much or somewhat more) with their current employment situation if their employer offered them the ability to work remotely. Access to social media appears to have little impact on increasing employment satisfaction with six-in-ten (60%) FT Employed Canadians indicating it has ‘no impact’. Much/ Somewhat More Satisfied Does/would having access to each of the following increase or decrease your level of satisfaction at work, or would it have no impact? Working remotely (e.g. from home) 3% 4% 28% Using a work device for personal use (e.g. 2%2% desktop, laptop, smartphone, etc.) Access to cloud computing (e.g. software that allows you to access 3%4% work specific information from home) A company smartphone 4% 4% Social media Much less satisfied © Harris/Decima Somewhat less satisfied 6% 5% Have no impact 35% 41% 30% 66% 33% 46% 54% 33% 41% 21% 20% 52% 28% 60% Somewhat more satisfied 17% 19% 10% 45% 29% Much more satisfied Q16a. Regardless of whether or not you currently have access to each of the following at work, does/would having access to each of the following increase or decrease your level of satisfaction at work, or would it have no impact? Base: All respondents, n=1,001 32
  33. 33. Working Remotely, Cloud Computing and Access to Social Media Likely to Increase Job Satisfaction Among Gen Y • FT Employed Canadians between the ages of 18 and 29 are significantly more likely than most older cohorts to state they would be more satisfied with their job by being able to work remotely (77%) and by having access to cloud computing (70%) or social media (47%). Does/would having access to each of the following increase or decrease your level of satisfaction at work, or would it have no impact? Age Top 2 Box % (Much / Somewhat More Satisfied) Working remotely (e.g. from home) Using a work device for personal use (e.g. desktop, laptop, smartphone, etc.) Access to cloud computing (e.g. software that allows you to access work specific information from home) A company smartphone Social media © Harris/Decima Total n=1,001 18-29 n=66 (A) 30-39 n=149 (B) 40-49 n=251 (C) 50-59 n=353 (D) 60 plus n=182 (E) 66% 77%CDE 70%DE 63% 58% 57% 54% 61% 55% 48% 54% 55% 52% 70%BCDE 51% 55%DE 43% 42% 45% 29% 54%E 47%BCDE 44% 31%DE 49%E 25% 42% 22% 35% 19% Q16a. Regardless of whether or not you currently have access to each of the following at work, does/would having access to each of the following increase or decrease your level of satisfaction at work, or would it have no impact? Base: All respondents, n=1,001 33
  34. 34. Those who Use a Smartphone or Work Remotely Report Higher Workplace Satisfaction from having these Benefits • • Almost three-quarters (74%) of FT Employed Canadians who use a corporate smartphone report being more satisfied (much or somewhat more) with their current employer by having this benefit. The same finding applies to those who can work remotely with almost nine-in-ten (87%) FT Employed Canadians indicating that the ability to work remotely increases their level of satisfaction at work. Does/would having access to each of the Much/ Somewhat following increase or decrease your level of satisfaction at work, or would it have no impact? More Satisfied A Company Smartphone Those who USE a smartphone for work [A] 1% 40%B 25% 74%B 33%B n=316 Those who DO NOT USE a smartphone for work [B] 6%A 6%A n=685 55%A 23% 10% 33% Working Remotely Those who CAN work remotely [A] 2%11% 41%B 46%B 87%B n=422 Those who CAN NOT work remotely [B] 4% 6% n=579 Much less satisfied © Harris/Decima Somewhat less satisfied Have no impact 41%A 30% Somewhat more satisfied 18% 47% Much more satisfied Q16a. Regardless of whether or not you currently have access to each of the following at work, does/would having access to each of the following increase or decrease your level of satisfaction at work, or would it have no impact? Base: Refer to chart above for specific base sizes 34
  35. 35. Section 4: Bring Your Own Device (BYOD)
  36. 36. Minority of FT Employed Canadians Say Their Employer Offers a BYOD Policy • Three-in-ten (30%) FT Employed Canadians indicate their current employer offers a ‘bring your own device’ (BYOD) policy. – However, those who use a Tablet (47%), Laptop (44%) or Smartphone device (40%) for work purposes are more likely than those who do not use these devices to work for an employer that offers this benefit. Does your current employer allow you to connect your personal laptop, smartphone or tablet device to your firm’s IT network? Don't Know, 15% Device Used for Corporate Purposes Smartphone n=316 Laptop n=353 Tablet n=89 40% Yes, 30% 44% 47% No, 55% © Harris/Decima Q17. To the best of your knowledge, does your current employer allow you to connect your personal laptop, smartphone or tablet device to your firm’s IT network? Base: All respondents, n=1,001 36
  37. 37. Higher Job Satisfaction Reported Among Employees who Work for a Company that Offers a BYOD Policy • Over one-third (34%) of FT Employed Canadians with a BYOD Policy at their workplace indicate that having this benefit improves their job satisfaction (compared to 16% among those who do not have a BYOD policy at their workplace). – Although there could be a number of reasons to explain this difference, one possible explanation is that those who do not have a BYOD policy at their workplace just don’t know how much they would actually enjoy having such a program. How does/would having a bring-your-own-device policy affect your job satisfaction? Does/Would it… 34%B Improve your job satisfaction 60% Not affect your job satisfaction Decrease your job satisfaction © Harris/Decima Those who HAVE a BYOD policy at their workplace [A] 16% 67% 5% 17%A Those who DO NOT HAVE or DON'T KNOW whether their workplace has a BYOD policy [B] Q18. How does/would having a bring-your-own-device policy affect your job satisfaction? Does/Would it… Base: Those who have a BYOD policy, n=317; Those who do not have a BYOD policy, n=551 37
  38. 38. Majority of Smartphone Users have One Smartphone; Most Use it for Personal Purposes Only • • Almost nine-in-ten (86%) of smartphone users indicate they only use one smartphone. Of these, the majority use their smartphone for personal purposes only. Those who use their smartphone for both work and personal purposes are almost equally as likely to have purchased their smartphone independently (22%) as they are to have their company provide one (19%). Which of the following statements most accurately describes your current situation…? You have one smartphone that you use for personal purposes only 45% You have one smartphone that you use for both personal and corporate purposes that you purchased independently 22% You have one smartphone that you use for both personal and corporate purposes that was supplied by your company 19% You have two smartphones (one for personal and one for corporate purposes) Other 14% <1% Q19. Which of the following statements most accurately describes your current situation…? Base: Those who use a smartphone for personal or corporate purposes, n=632 © Harris/Decima 38
  39. 39. Most Personal Only Smartphone Users State their Job Doesn’t Require One; Dual Users want to Keep their Personal Life Separate • • Almost six-in-ten (58%) FT Employed Canadians who use their smartphone exclusively for personal purposes indicate ‘their job doesn’t require a smartphone for work’. However, almost three-quarters (74%) of those with two smartphones (one for work and one for personal purposes) have two because they want to keep their personal phone separate from their work phone. Reasons for only having one smartphone for personal purposes only My job doesn't require a smartphone for work 58% 39% My employer doesn't provide one I'm not eligible for a work smartphone in my current position I chose not to have a smartphone for work Other © Harris/Decima 34% Reasons for having two smartphones (one for work and one for personal purposes) I choose to keep my personal phone separate from my work phone 74% Keeping my work life and personal life separate helps promote a healthier work/life balance My employer puts restrictions on the applications I can download on my corporate phone 52% 36% My personal smartphone is under contract with my provider 9% 1% 33% My employer doesn't allow me connect my personal smartphone to the IT server Other 23% 1% Q20. Which of the following reasons describes why you have one smartphone that you use for personal purposes only? Base: Those who have one smartphone for personal purposes only, n=231 Q21. Which of the following reasons describes why you have two smartphones, one for personal and one for corporate purposes? Base: Those who have two smartphones (one for personal & one for corporate), n=69 39
  40. 40. FT Employed Canadians who use One Smartphone for Personal and Corporate Purposes OK with added Security Policies • Six-in-ten (60%) FT Employed Canadians who use their smartphone for personal and corporate purposes agree (strongly or somewhat) that ‘they would be OK with their employer enforcing security policies on their device (e.g. a mandatory password, remote wipe of data, device location tracking)’. – • This percentage rises to almost one-third (64%) among those who are satisfied (very or somewhat) with their employment situation–potentially indicating higher levels of trust in their employer. Another explanation is that those who use one smartphone for personal and work purposes understand the benefits of using one device (e.g. fewer devices to carry around). Personal only or dual smartphone users are split as to whether or not they would be OK with their employer enforcing these types of policies. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statement: I would be OK with my employer enforcing security policies on my device(s) (e.g. a mandatory password, remote wipe of data, device location tracking). Those who use one smartphone for personal and corporate purposes 22% 19% 36% Strongly/ Somewhat Agree 24% 60% n=328 Those who use one smartphone for personal only OR who use two smartphones 27% 22% 32% 19% 51% n=304 Strongly disagree Somewhat disagree Somewhat agree Strongly agree Q21a. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statement: Base: Refer to chart above for specific base sizes © Harris/Decima 40
  41. 41. Appendix
  42. 42. Appendix A: Demographics/Firmographics & Technology Adoption
  43. 43. Appendix A: Demographics/Firmographics Demographics Total Sample n=1,001 Gender Male Female Education 53% 47% Age 18 - 29 30 - 39 40 - 49 50 - 59 60+ 17% 26% 25% 24% 9% Region BC Alberta Manitoba/Saskatchewan Ontario Quebec Atlantic 13% 13% 7% 39% 23% 6% Region English French Demographics Total Sample n=1,001 81% 19% High School or less Tech/Some Coll/Univ Coll/Univ Grad/Post Grad Prefer not to say Work Setting 14% 17% 69% 1% Number of people in HH 1 2 3 4 5 or more 24% 34% 21% 12% 8% Children in Household? Yes No 28% 72% Work/Life Balance Right where it should be Needs a little improvement Needs a lot of improvement to balance it out Firmographics Total Sample n=1,001 39% 51% Office/office building Hospital, medical or dental office School or educational institution Manufacturing facility/plant Restaurant or retail space Home office Warehouse Construction site Car/truck/bike (for ex: a sales rep, courier etc.) Other 51% 7% 7% 6% 6% 6% 4% 3% 2% 8% Company Tenure Less than 1 year 1 year and less than 3 years 3 years and less than 5 years 5 years and less than 10 years 10 years or longer 11% 18% 15% 19% 38% 10% © Harris/Decima 43
  44. 44. Majority of FT Employed Canadians are In the Middle when it comes to Technology Adoption • • Over half (52%) of FT Employed Canadians are ‘in the middle’ when it comes to technology adoption with a quarter (25%) stating they are either ‘the first’ or ‘among the first’ to try a new technology product (i.e. early adopters). These early adopters tend to be university educated (75%), male (63%) and under the age of 40 (54%). Compared to other people you know, which of the following statements is the best descriptor of yourself? In general, are you… The first to try a new technology product 7% 18% Among the first 25% Early adopters are… 63% Male In the middle 52% Among the last 37% Female 54% are <40 years old The last to try a new technology product 17% 5% 75% Grad Coll/Uni/Post grad Technology Adoption © Harris/Decima Q22. Compared to other people you know, which of the following statements is the best descriptor of yourself? In general, are you… Base: All respondents, n=1,001 44
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