Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Native plants for birds
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Native plants for birds

433

Published on

Considerations for selecting hardiness Zone 4 native plants to invite birds to your yard landscape.

Considerations for selecting hardiness Zone 4 native plants to invite birds to your yard landscape.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
433
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1.  
  • 2. Planting With Natives
  • 3. ADVANTAGES
    • For the Birds
      • Safety
      • Protection from the elements
      • Nesting habitat
      • Food Source
    • For the Environment
      • Low Water Use
      • Not Invasive
  • 4.
    • Diversify
      • Height
        • Remember… little trees grow up
      • Bloom/Production
    • Benefit Type
    • Location[s]
      • Safety
    • Water Use
    CONSIDERATIONS
  • 5. DIVERSITY
  • 6. DIVERSITY
    • Example of a typical rural habitat
    • Birds fill every niche of every habitat
    • Diverse height offers diverse food sources
    • Usage Zones – Natural Habitat
    DIVERSITY
  • 7. DIVERSITY
    • Greater vertical diversity means greater diversity of species
    • Birds fill every niche of every habitat
    • Diverse height offers diverse food sources
    • Usage Zones – Residential Area
        • Vertical Diversity
    DIVERSITY
  • 8. DIVERSITY
    • Try to plant something that will provide benefit during each season.
    • Seasonal Diversity
        • Consider the timing of flowering/fruiting
          • FLOWERS
            • Attracting insects, butterflies, and hummingbirds
          • FRUITING SHRUBS
            • Most fruits produce mid-late summer
            • Some shrubs/trees hold fruit throughout winter
          • SEED-BEARING PLANTS
            • Seeds eaten by finches on the plant, or sparrows on the ground
    DIVERSITY
  • 9. TIMING
    • Hummingbirds move through SW MN quickly in spring, by depart slowly leave in autumn.
    • Find blooms that peak each season.
    • Hummingbird Migration Timing
      • Spring Bloom Peak
        • 2nd week of May
          • Rhododendron, Flowering Crab, Lilac
      • Autumn Bloom Peak
        • Mid-august
          • Trumpet vine, jewelweed, canna
    MIGRATION TIMING EXAMPLE
  • 10. KNOWLEDGE OF BIRDS
  • 11. RESOURCES
    • moumn.org
        • Minnesota Ornithologists’ Union
  • 12. MIGRATION INFORMATION
  • 13. RESOURCES
    • moumn.org
        • Minnesota Ornithologists’ Union
  • 14. MIGRATION DATES
  • 15. NESTING SPECIES Spring Migration Fall Migration POTENTIAL NESTING SPECIES Arrival Departure Arrival Departure Wood Duck 2-Mar Hooded Merganser 1-Mar American Kestrel 21-Mar 20-Oct Eastern Phoebe 21-Mar 31-Oct Purple Martin 5-Apr 15-Sep Tree Swallow 20-Mar 18-Oct House Wren 17-Apr 14-Oct Eastern Bluebird 1-Mar
  • 16. FRUIT EATERS FRUIT EATERS Arrival Departure Arrival Departure Red-eyed Vireo 6-May 3-Oct Gray Catbird 27-Apr 12-Nov Brown Thrasher 13-Apr 22-Dec American Robin 1-Apr 1-Nov Cedar Waxwing 15-Apr 15-Oct WARBLERS 28-Sep Baltimore Oriole 29-Apr 23-Sep
  • 17. SEED EATERS SEED EATERS Arrival Departure Arrival Departure Mourning Dove 15-Apr 2-Oct Red-breasted Nuthatch 23-May 18-Aug Spotted Towhee 3-May 7-May 30-Sep 15-Oct Eastern Towhee 16-Apr 10-Nov Chipping Sparrow 26-Mar 10-Nov Clay-colored Sparrow 21-Apr 14-Oct Fox Sparrow 13-Mar 29-Apr 19-Sep 20-Dec Song Sparrow 21-Mar Lincoln's Sparrow 12-Apr 25-May 31-Aug 9-Nov White-throated Sparrow 20-Mar 27-May 29-Aug 16-Dec Harris's Sparrow 3-Apr 22-May 22-Sep 19-Dec White-crowned Sparrow 21-Apr 21-May 16-Sep 13-Dec Northern Cardinal 1-Apr 15-Dec Rose-breasted Grosbeak 28-Apr 15-Oct Indigo Bunting 4-May 9-Oct House Finch 20-Mar 31-Dec Purple Finch 17-May 27-Aug American Goldfinch 14-May 3-Oct
  • 18. OTHERS OF INTEREST OTHERS Arrival Departure Arrival Departure Sharp-shinned Hawk 3-Mar 10-Aug Cooper's Hawk 5-Mar Ruby-throated Hummingbird 4-May 13-Oct Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 28-Mar 19-Oct Least Flycatcher 1-May 26-Sep Northern Shrike 5-Apr 15-Oct Swainson's Thrush 26-Apr 1-Jun 12-Aug 17-Oct Hermit Thrush 28-Mar 16-May 14-Sep 12-Dec
  • 19. PLANT BENEFIT GROUPINGS
  • 20. Planting With Natives
    • Plant Type Groupings
      • Based on structure and bird use
    • Conifers
    • Fruiting
    • Grasses
    • Nectar
    • Winter persistent
  • 21. CONIFERS
    • Primarily Use –
      • Nesting
      • Shelter (esp. winter)
    • Secondary Use –
      • Food Source
    • Shelter - Nesting Sites
      • Spruce, Pines
    • Food Producing
      • Juniper, Red Cedar
  • 22. FRUITING
    • Possible to provide fruiting plants from June through winter
    • Native plants offer best success
    • Buy locally grown if only hardy to Zone 4
    • Zone 2 and 3 plants are best purchased from local latitude and north
    • Summer-Fall Migration (winter)
      • Dogwood, plum, viburnums,
      • highbush cranberry, chokecherry
      • Mountainash
  • 23. GRASSES
    • Native grass plantings offer nesting cover as well as food.
    • Typically need 5 acres to provide safe and suitable nesting cover
    • Ornamental grasses (non-native) are okay as long as not invasive.
    • Seed benefit for late fall migrants provides the best benefit for birds
    • Cover – Ground Nesters
      • Bluestem, Indian Grass
    • Food Source in Autumn
      • Canada Wild Rye, Switchgrass
  • 24. NECTAR
    • Attracting bugs may be more beneficial than attracting hummingbirds in Southwest Minnesota
    • Non-native plants such as Canna are okay as they are not invasive
    • Full sun, and partial shade combination offers diversity
    • Hummingbirds
      • and butterflies & pollinators
        • often attract insect eating birds
      • Virginia Creeper, Honeysuckle,
      • Touch-me-not
  • 25. WINTER PERSISTENT
    • Many crabapple varieties hold fruit throughout winter.
    • Several winter persistent plants have beneficial spring blossoms for attracting beneficial insects.
    • Nut/Acorn producing shrubs/trees may take decades to rpoduce
    • Fruits and Seeds
      • Crabapples, bittersweet vine, apples
    • Nut-Acorn
      • Hickory, Oak
  • 26. LOCATING PLANTS
  • 27. PROTECTION
    • Birds need safety from predators and distance from “false” flyways
    • Windows :
      • Take a Bird’s Eye View
        • Look for fly-through opportunities
      • Solutions:
        • Silhouettes
        • Netting
        • Feeders Closer to Windows
    • Structures :
      • Place stations/plantings with 10’ flyway to aid in avoiding collisions
    PROTECTION
  • 28. PROTECTION
    • Predators :
      • Opportunity Perches near open areas
      • Ambush locations
        • (cats, etc.)
    • Traffic
      • Do not place stations/landscaping that will require birds to cross traffic
        • Study local current flyways
    PROTECTION
  • 29. SUNLIGHT
    • Think long-term in to the future.
    • Landscape may need to change with the years
    • Bird species will change with the years (benefit?)
    • Consider long-term implications
    CONSIDERATIONS
  • 30. VANTAGE POINTS
    • Your enjoyment is primary and equally beneficial to the habitat you provide.
    CONSIDERATIONS
    • Bird WATCHING is half the fun!
  • 31.  
  • 32.
    • BOOKS
    • LANDSCAPING FOR WILDLIFE
    • – CARROLL HENDERSON
    • PROJECTS FOR THE BIRDER'S GARDEN
    • FERN MARSHALL BRADLEY
    • INTERNET
    • ALL ABOUT BIRDS ( HTTP://WWW.ALLABOUTBIRDS.ORG/ )
    • SINGING WINGS ( HTTP://SINGINGWINGS.ROHAIR.COM/ )
    Resources
  • 33. All About Birds
    • Attracting Birds tab
  • 34. singingwings.rohair.com
    • Plants for Wildlife tab
  • 35. Questions
  • 36. ROGER JAY SCHROEDER [email_address] (507) 531-0856 http://singingwings.rohair.com

×