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Workhouses presentation
Workhouses presentation
Workhouses presentation
Workhouses presentation
Workhouses presentation
Workhouses presentation
Workhouses presentation
Workhouses presentation
Workhouses presentation
Workhouses presentation
Workhouses presentation
Workhouses presentation
Workhouses presentation
Workhouses presentation
Workhouses presentation
Workhouses presentation
Workhouses presentation
Workhouses presentation
Workhouses presentation
Workhouses presentation
Workhouses presentation
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Workhouses presentation

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Useful sites for researching Workhouses

Useful sites for researching Workhouses

Published in: Self Improvement
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Transcript

  • 1. byTony Sadler
  • 2.  Excellent starting point; massive detail arranged in easily accessible ‘tabs’ Act for the Relief of the Poor 1601: parish grants of money, clothing, fuel, food (out-relief) First OED reference to a Workhouse 1652 in Exeter Workhouse Test Act 1723: parish option of denying out-relief in favour of workhouse 1834 Poor Law Amendment Act: 15000+ parishes formed Unions with purpose- built workhouses Intended as threat to able-bodied pauper Improved conditions by end 19th century System ended 1 April 1930 – Public
  • 3.  Up to 1834 workhouses at Wellingboro’ (70 inmates in 1777), Earls Barton (36), Bozeat (10), Wollaston (10), Finedon (36), Irchester (10), Irthlingboro’ (100), Rushden (18) After 1834 Wellingboro’ Poor Law Union covered 27 parishes New Wellingboro’ Union workhouse built 1836/7 1930 Public Assistance Institution Isebrook Hospital Workhouse buildings now residential
  • 4. Wellingborough Union workhousePoor Law Union map
  • 5.  Admission: reasons & procedure Uniforms Inside workhouses and typical routine Rules & punishment Food Work Medical care Workhouse memories Tramps and vagrants
  • 6.  Excellent review of origins Starts with medieval times – Poor Law Act 1388 – response to Black Death – fear of social disorder forced state to be responsible for support of poor Poor Relief Act 1576 – able- bodied needing support had to work for it – legal distinction between genuinely unemployed and the idler Many useful links See also article on ‘Pauperism’
  • 7.  Short textual history Describes life, work, food, behaviour Focuses on Stratford-on-Avon union workhouse – an noteworthy exception from usual gloomy establishments Newspaper article published on retirement of master and matron Links to individual workhouses and general sites
  • 8.  NT property open to 28 October – audio tours Wednesday to Sunday 11 a.m guided Welcome Tour Group guided tours Mondays
  • 9.  Brief history of the union workhouse in Canterbury Site mainly comprises photos of buildings illustrating development Link to article on Poor Priest’s Hospital
  • 10.  Workhouse children – pauper apprentices in textile trade Apprentice House George Courtauld Punishment in factories 1834 Poor Law – details of the act Poverty in Tudor times
  • 11.  10% sample index of inmates (total 14200) Full index on microfiche Workhouse returns to Parliament Surname alphabetically Details location, reason, term Complements 1861 census
  • 12.  Free download of some correspondence from selected Poor Law Unions Example of inspector’s report on Southwell Workhouse
  • 13.  Separately details history of Epsom and Ewell workhouses Census returns for Epsom 1851 – 1901 Some more general information
  • 14.  Workhouses at bursting point during great Irish famine 1845-51 Workhouse orphans – paupers sent abroad under 1834 act Australia – girls and young women to provide domestic service and needed to redress gender imbalance

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