0
design alchemy
transforming the way we think about
teaching and learning
roderick sims, phd
online learning specialist
lea...
a metaphor
transformation of teaching and learning
the
alchemist
… conversion of base
metals into metals of
greater value
… magical powers of
transmutation
… metaphor for
ed...
http://www.fanpop.com/clubs/the-four-elements/images/28674988/title/four-elements-fanart-fanart
earth air water fire
histo...
history
education & technology
flashback
history
time
visibility
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/94/Gartner_Hype_Cycle.svg/300px-Gartner_Hype_Cycle.s...
programmed
instruction
1960s
computer-
assisted
instruction
1970s
hypermedia
1980s
multimedia
1990s
online
learning
2000s
...
history
old wine, new bottles
2013: MOOCs are catalyzing institutions to rethink the “rules” of
higher education … large-s...
learning
theory
design
theory
instructional
theory
human
computer
interaction
foundations
history
our history
history
theoretical
foundations
technology
these are catalysts for alchemy
research &
professional
history pedagogy design alchemy
elements of transformation
pedagog
y
what is your pedagogy?
“the art of teaching and learning”
pedagog
y
what is an online pedagogy?
how can we cater for
online, blended, flexible
and distance modes
pedagog
y
learner-
centred
active
contextual
problem-
based
social
emergent
an [online?] pedagogy
Sims, R. (2012). Reappra...
pedagog
y
active
interactions artifact
learners as creators and producers
pedagog
y
contextual
me
culture
world-
view
meaningreality
situation
pedagog
y
problem-based
thinking
critically
hypothesise
modify
experiment
manipulate
compare
choose
pedagog
y
social
collaborative
roles
teacher
writer
learner
builder
designer
pedagog
y
emergent
local
bottom-up
interactional
knowledge
generating
Johnson, S. (2001). Emergence: The connected lives o...
pedagog
y
learner-
centred
active
contextual
problem-
based
social
emergent
LEARNER-CENTRED ACTIVITY
A recent OLT report h...
pedagog
y
learner-
centred
active
contextual
problem-
based
social
emergent
IF
we want to transform teaching and learning
...
history pedagogy design alchemy
elements of transformation
design
how do we create these
transformative experiences?
http://cosmiccowgirlsmagazine.wordpress.com/2012/06/14/creativit...
design
• Biggs, J and Tang C. (2011). Teaching for Quality Learning at University.
McGraw-Hill and Open University Press, ...
design
Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency Act 2011
The provider ensures there are safe, well-maintained facil...
design Bachelor Degree
Purpose
apply a broad and coherent body of knowledge in a range of contexts to
undertake profession...
design Bachelor Degree
Purpose
apply a broad and coherent body of knowledge in a range of contexts to
undertake profession...
design Bachelor Degree
Purpose
apply a broad and coherent body of knowledge in a range of contexts to
undertake profession...
design Bachelor
Purpose
apply a broad and coherent body of knowledge in a range of contexts to
undertake professional work...
design
do our course specifications align
with these standards and models?
how can we transform our courses
to align with ...
design
knowledge
application
learning
outcomes
assessment
learning
activities
resources
a design architecture
but what doe...
a common design
Week Activity Resources
1 Read
Post and Discuss x 2
Quiz
Textbook Chapters 1 - 7
2 Read
Post and Discuss x...
the transformation
knowledge application:
use knowledge of business law to establish a commercial business structure opera...
design
knowledge
application
learning
outcomes
assessment
learning
activities
resources
design influences
sustainability
c...
sustainability
activities
assessment
outcomes
resourcesresources
design From UNSUSTAINABLE to SUSTAINABLE
Read Smith & Jon...
continuous improvement
design
a) modify
resources, activi
ties and/or
strategies based
on stakeholder
feedback
a) collabor...
stakeholders
teachers
students
administrators
evaluators
technicians
designers
design
roles
teacher as
designer
teacher as
learner
learner as
teacher
learner as
designer
designer as
teacher
designer as
learne...
design
knowledge
application
learning
outcomes
assessment
learning
activities
resources
a design architecture
IF
we want t...
history pedagogy design alchemy
elements of transformation
program
course
strategy
activity
alchemy
program-based design
compliance (before)
alchemy
course title
Fraud and Corruption Training
Creating A Safer Workplace
iii. Keeping us free from fraud and corruption
compl...
learning outcomes / assessment
1. discriminate fraud and corruption
– given a behaviour the student will be able to correc...
Keeping us free
from fraud and
corruption
Managers Professional
Discriminate
Locate and
Interpret
Independently
Recognise
...
strategy-based design
alchemy
activity-based design
alchemy
history pedagogy design alchemy
elements of transformation
pedagogy
teacher-centred learner-centred
content-based outcomes-
based
learning
consumption production
watching creating
t...
130627 edmedia-invited
130627 edmedia-invited
130627 edmedia-invited
130627 edmedia-invited
130627 edmedia-invited
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130627 edmedia-invited

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Design Alchemy
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  • Hi Debbie - what I argue is that IDs can be unproductive because people are often employed as IDs but actually have no specific educational experience or qualifications. However what is needed is a Design Alchemist - a transformer! I would argue that yes, the design alchemst is the architect, but that the builder must be someone who knows how to build - and the majority of faculty an support staff I have encountered simply do not have these skills. However a skilled builder will provide an environment in which the 'residents'- learners and teachers - can manipulate their surroundings to meet their specific (learning) needs.
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  • Ah, the only place I would disagree is the need for an instructional designer; especially in higher ed. As some, not all, faculty are experts in their field, they are not always experts in education or instruction. The ID then acts as the architect and the faculty as the supplier or visionary. I utilize the analogy of constructing a new home; the faculty (home builder) articulates to me (the architect) they want and we work together to complete a home that is welcoming to all that enter! :-)
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  • Thanks for sharing. Enjoyed your presentation at Ed-Media
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  • Great talk and great to get to hear your musical talents on the waterfront in Victoria:)
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  • Please remember that many of these slides relied on animations and transitions and therefore some content may be overwritten.
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  • I added a title, but you could just say it too-- Taking the key elements from the alchemist, and using them as a metaphor for the key elements of effective learning..we can understand the infrastructure needs….(blah, blah)
  • Let’s examine the elements one by one…
  • I like your idea of fading out each previous when adding a new… sad that the reality is that each generation of learners has not seen a gradual elevation of the baseline following each new peak, vs a return to baseline as we shift gears?
  • Consider following this one with another brief bridge slide…reinforcing the objective, and setting the stage for the design ‘element’
  • Consider following this one with another brief bridge slide…reinforcing the objective, and setting the stage for the design ‘element’
  • Great slide! You are excellent with the graphics…
  • Look at you, right there…
  • Your idea to highlight words is good. Alternatively you could break it out into sections on subsequent slides and highlight the same words, but that might be too repetitive if the audience understands the text well
  • Your idea to highlight words is good. Alternatively you could break it out into sections on subsequent slides and highlight the same words, but that might be too repetitive if the audience understands the text well
  • Your idea to highlight words is good. Alternatively you could break it out into sections on subsequent slides and highlight the same words, but that might be too repetitive if the audience understands the text well
  • Your idea to highlight words is good. Alternatively you could break it out into sections on subsequent slides and highlight the same words, but that might be too repetitive if the audience understands the text well
  • Great slide! You are excellent with the graphics…
  • a mention of the types of learning discussed here (online, blended, distance, flexible…)? Or too remedial?
  • This slide demonstrates how the template might be completed.
  • One form of sustainability comes from externalising the course resources.Rather than referring to specific resource information (e.g. web sites, textbook chapter) within the syllabus, the designer’s task is to ask the student to explore and locate the required information. For example:UnsustainableRead Smith & Jones (2nd edition) pages 75-108.SustainableUse the course textbook or an equivalent resource and review the section(s) on “leadership skills”In this way resources can be changed as required, without the need for editing of the syllabus.
  • The build-enhance-maintain process is recommended as a key success-factor, with the initial focus on pedagogical integrity rather than expensive, and often unnecessary, technological elements.
  • Within any design process there will be a range of stakeholders. (consider brief bridge slide from design to futures)It is important to ensure their needs and interests have been polled during the design process.Communicating with stakeholders, and encouraging their input to the design process, can eliminate problems that can occur when assumptions are made by the design team.For example, the design may assume that all students can read and write English, and proceed with development based on that assumption. If, however, the administration had planned for the course to be delivered in non-English-speaking countries then there is a clear disconnect. While this would suggest a communication issue between administration and design, it highlights the problems that could occur.
  • Within any design process there will be a range of stakeholders. (consider brief bridge slide from design to futures)It is important to ensure their needs and interests have been polled during the design process.Communicating with stakeholders, and encouraging their input to the design process, can eliminate problems that can occur when assumptions are made by the design team.For example, the design may assume that all students can read and write English, and proceed with development based on that assumption. If, however, the administration had planned for the course to be delivered in non-English-speaking countries then there is a clear disconnect. While this would suggest a communication issue between administration and design, it highlights the problems that could occur.
  • a mention of the types of learning discussed here (online, blended, distance, flexible…)? Or too remedial?
  • Are the next few slides examples of those 4 types of learning (online, blended, distance, and flexible)…would that be helpful for continuity or too obvious?
  • YEAH
  • Truly effective (***) learning…
  • Transcript of "130627 edmedia-invited"

    1. 1. design alchemy transforming the way we think about teaching and learning roderick sims, phd online learning specialist learning and teaching support university of southern queensland rod.sims@usq.edu.au Design Alchemy by Roderick Sims is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
    2. 2. a metaphor transformation of teaching and learning
    3. 3. the alchemist … conversion of base metals into metals of greater value … magical powers of transmutation … metaphor for education … and the roles we play as the teacher, the learner or the designer
    4. 4. http://www.fanpop.com/clubs/the-four-elements/images/28674988/title/four-elements-fanart-fanart earth air water fire history pedagogy design alchemy elements of transformation
    5. 5. history education & technology
    6. 6. flashback history
    7. 7. time visibility http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/94/Gartner_Hype_Cycle.svg/300px-Gartner_Hype_Cycle.svg.png hype cycle maturity, adoption and social application of specific technologies technology trigger peak of inflated expectations trough of disillusionment slope of enlightenment plateau of productivity history
    8. 8. programmed instruction 1960s computer- assisted instruction 1970s hypermedia 1980s multimedia 1990s online learning 2000s personal learning 2010s edtech-hype open learning 2020s history
    9. 9. history old wine, new bottles 2013: MOOCs are catalyzing institutions to rethink the “rules” of higher education … large-scale online learning is reshaping pedagogy, delivery systems, business models, and credentialing, challenging what it means to be a university. (Educause Webinars) 1983: Control Data PLATO is changing how the world learns … A new mainframe technology serving up to 1000 simultaneous learners … two decades before the World Wide Web, PLATO pioneered online forums, message boards, email, chat rooms, instant messaging, remote screen sharing, multiplayer games – the worlds first online community. (www.science.uva.nl/museum/PLATO.php) (thinkofit.com/plato/dwplato.htm)
    10. 10. learning theory design theory instructional theory human computer interaction foundations history
    11. 11. our history history theoretical foundations technology these are catalysts for alchemy research & professional
    12. 12. history pedagogy design alchemy elements of transformation
    13. 13. pedagog y what is your pedagogy? “the art of teaching and learning”
    14. 14. pedagog y what is an online pedagogy? how can we cater for online, blended, flexible and distance modes
    15. 15. pedagog y learner- centred active contextual problem- based social emergent an [online?] pedagogy Sims, R. (2012). Reappraising design practice, in Holt, D., Segrave, S. & Cybulski, J. (Eds.), Professional Education Using e-Simulations: Benefits of Blended Learning Design. IGI Global. Sims, R. (2009). From three-phase to proactive learning design: Creating effective online teaching and learning environments, in J. Willis (ed.) Constructivist Instructional Design (C-ID): Foundations, Models, and Practical Examples. Information Age (pp. 379-391).
    16. 16. pedagog y active interactions artifact learners as creators and producers
    17. 17. pedagog y contextual me culture world- view meaningreality situation
    18. 18. pedagog y problem-based thinking critically hypothesise modify experiment manipulate compare choose
    19. 19. pedagog y social collaborative roles teacher writer learner builder designer
    20. 20. pedagog y emergent local bottom-up interactional knowledge generating Johnson, S. (2001). Emergence: The connected lives of ants, brains, cities, and software. New York: Scribner.
    21. 21. pedagog y learner- centred active contextual problem- based social emergent LEARNER-CENTRED ACTIVITY A recent OLT report has suggested that all courses with online learning were “pedagogically deficient”. Using your own workplace as a case study, what interventions would you adopt to resolve this deficiency? Ideas that challenge existing practice or propose contentious solutions are encouraged. Working collaboratively with one or two peers, develop a substantiated, evidence-based response. Your response should be [criteria]. LEARNER-CENTRED ACTIVITY A recent OLT report has suggested that all courses with online learning were “pedagogically deficient”. Using your own workplace as a case study, what interventions would you adopt to resolve this deficiency? Ideas that challenge existing practice or propose contentious solutions are encouraged. Working collaboratively with one or two peers, develop a substantiated, evidence-based response. Your response should be [criteria]. problem based contextual emergent social an online pedagogy active
    22. 22. pedagog y learner- centred active contextual problem- based social emergent IF we want to transform teaching and learning THEN we must adopt a pedagogy that is active AND contextual AND problem-based AND social AND emergent an online pedagogy
    23. 23. history pedagogy design alchemy elements of transformation
    24. 24. design how do we create these transformative experiences? http://cosmiccowgirlsmagazine.wordpress.com/2012/06/14/creativity-as-spiritual-practice-creating-sacred-art-matters/
    25. 25. design • Biggs, J and Tang C. (2011). Teaching for Quality Learning at University. McGraw-Hill and Open University Press, Maidenhead. • Laurillard, D. (2012). Teaching as a Design Science: Building Pedagogical Patterns for Learning and Technology. Routledge. • Sims, R. (2012). Reappraising design practice, in Holt, D., Segrave, S. & Cybulski, J. (Eds.), Professional Education Using e-Simulations: Benefits of Blended Learning Design. IGI Global. • Wiggins, G. & McTighe, J.(2005). Understanding by Design. (2nd Ed). USA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. design drivers
    26. 26. design Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency Act 2011 The provider ensures there are safe, well-maintained facilities sufficient to achieve expected student learning and research outcomes, as appropriate to the scale, scope, location, mode of delivery and nature of its courses of study Assessment is effective and expected student learning outcomes are achieved The course of study is designed to ensure equivalent student learning outcomes regardless of a student’s place or mode of study.
    27. 27. design Bachelor Degree Purpose apply a broad and coherent body of knowledge in a range of contexts to undertake professional work and as a pathway for further learning
    28. 28. design Bachelor Degree Purpose apply a broad and coherent body of knowledge in a range of contexts to undertake professional work and as a pathway for further learning Knowledge broad and coherent … with depth in the underlying principles and concepts as a basis for independent lifelong learning
    29. 29. design Bachelor Degree Purpose apply a broad and coherent body of knowledge in a range of contexts to undertake professional work and as a pathway for further learning Knowledge broad and coherent … with depth in the underlying principles and concepts as a basis for independent lifelong learning Skills • cognitive skills to review critically, analyse, consolidate and synthesise knowledge • cognitive and technical skills to demonstrate a broad understanding of knowledge with depth in some areas • cognitive and creative skills to exercise critical thinking and judgement in identifying and solving problems with intellectual independence • communication skills to present a clear, coherent and independent exposition of knowledge and ideas
    30. 30. design Bachelor Purpose apply a broad and coherent body of knowledge in a range of contexts to undertake professional work and as a pathway for further learning Knowledge broad and coherent … with depth in the underlying principles and concepts as a basis for independent lifelong learning Skills • cognitive skills to review critically, analyse, consolidate and synthesise knowledge • cognitive and technical skills to demonstrate a broad understanding of knowledge with depth in some areas • cognitive and creative skills to exercise critical thinking and judgement in identifying and solving problems with intellectual independence • communication skills to present a clear, coherent and independent exposition of knowledge and ideas Application of Knowledge and Skills • with initiative and judgement in planning, problem solving and decision making in professional practice and/or scholarship • to adapt knowledge and skills in diverse contexts • with responsibility and accountability for own learning and professional practice and in collaboration with others within broad parameters
    31. 31. design do our course specifications align with these standards and models? how can we transform our courses to align with these standards? design drivers
    32. 32. design knowledge application learning outcomes assessment learning activities resources a design architecture but what does this look like? and what does it not look like!
    33. 33. a common design Week Activity Resources 1 Read Post and Discuss x 2 Quiz Textbook Chapters 1 - 7 2 Read Post and Discuss x 2 Quiz Textbook Chapters 8 - 14 3 Read Post and Discuss x 2 Quiz Textbook Chapters 15 - 21 4 Read Post and Discuss x 2 Quiz Textbook Chapters 22 - 28 5 Read Post and Discuss x 2 Exam Textbook Chapters 29 - 35 Quiz Question: What percentage of the ozone layer is said to be depleted? design
    34. 34. the transformation knowledge application: use knowledge of business law to establish a commercial business structure operating legally and ethically Outcome Assessment Activity Resources apply the principles of business law legislation to develop a proposal to establish a commercial business 1. justify compare business types identify stakeholders textbook 2. contract and property laws ask question solve problem textbook legislation 3. hr, tax, liability laws ask question solve problem textbook legislation 4. international, federal, state laws ask question solve problem textbook legislation 5. ethics debate ethics justify legal change textbook design
    35. 35. design knowledge application learning outcomes assessment learning activities resources design influences sustainability continuous improvement stakeholders roles
    36. 36. sustainability activities assessment outcomes resourcesresources design From UNSUSTAINABLE to SUSTAINABLE Read Smith & Jones (2nd edition) pages 75-108. Use the course textbook or an equivalent resource and review the section(s) on “leadership skills”. From UNSUST SUSTAINABLE From UNSUSTAINABLE to SUSTAINABLE Referring to the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency Act 2011, identify the key implications for the University. Referring to the current legislation relating to quality in higher education, identify the key implications for the University.
    37. 37. continuous improvement design a) modify resources, activi ties and/or strategies based on stakeholder feedback a) collaborate with stakeholders to assess outcomes b) adjust delivery environment and/or scaffold online learning behaviours a) functional components for learning environment b) targeted professional development (scaffolding) build1 enhanc e2 maintai n3 Sims, R. & Jones, D. (2003). Where practice informs theory: Reshaping instructional design for academic communities of practice in online teaching and learning. Information Technology, Education and Society, 4(1), 3-20.
    38. 38. stakeholders teachers students administrators evaluators technicians designers design
    39. 39. roles teacher as designer teacher as learner learner as teacher learner as designer designer as teacher designer as learner design
    40. 40. design knowledge application learning outcomes assessment learning activities resources a design architecture IF we want to transform teaching and learning THEN we must adopt a design architecture that is outcome/assessment based AND is sustainable AND continuously improves AND includes stakeholders AND blurs roles
    41. 41. history pedagogy design alchemy elements of transformation program course strategy activity
    42. 42. alchemy program-based design
    43. 43. compliance (before) alchemy
    44. 44. course title Fraud and Corruption Training Creating A Safer Workplace iii. Keeping us free from fraud and corruption compliance (after) knowledge application use legislation and policy to recognise and respond to fraud or corruption alchemy
    45. 45. learning outcomes / assessment 1. discriminate fraud and corruption – given a behaviour the student will be able to correctly identify whether or not it is an example of fraud or corruption 2. locate and interpret legislation and policy – given a fraudulent or corrupt behaviour, use the correct legislation and/or policy to make an appropriate response 3. independently recognise and respond to fraud and corruption – given a workplace scenario, choose an appropriate response 4. initiate a fraud and/or corruption complaint within policy 5. produce an action plan to minimise fraud and corruption within your workplace compliance (after) alchemy
    46. 46. Keeping us free from fraud and corruption Managers Professional Discriminate Locate and Interpret Independently Recognise Initiate a Complaint Produce Action Plan Academic compliance (after) alchemy
    47. 47. strategy-based design alchemy
    48. 48. activity-based design alchemy
    49. 49. history pedagogy design alchemy elements of transformation
    50. 50. pedagogy teacher-centred learner-centred content-based outcomes- based learning consumption production watching creating teaching presentation elaboration master apprentice the design alchemisttransforming
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