TRADE‐OFF, POSITIONING, AND CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE: Why Some Products Are Hits And 
Others Aren't 
 
REVIEW of "Trade‐Off," a...
 
Sure, the Fidelity Belly is not a place for any product, service, or business to be. But what can 
businesses, which are...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

TRADE-OFF, POSITIONING, AND CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE: Why Some Products Are Hits And Others Aren't

2,060 views
2,010 views

Published on

The above topic refers to an in-depth review of Kevin Maney's new book, "TRADE-OFF: Why some things catch on and others don't."

Trade-off is a concept that every executive, manager, entrepreneur, strategist, designer, and employee should master. The success and failure of businesses depend on trade-offs that customers make. Kevin Maney's new book, "Trade-Off," is the first book that uses trade-off to convincingly explain why some products are hits and others are not.

Published in: Business
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,060
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
38
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

TRADE-OFF, POSITIONING, AND CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE: Why Some Products Are Hits And Others Aren't

  1. 1. TRADE‐OFF, POSITIONING, AND CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE: Why Some Products Are Hits And  Others Aren't    REVIEW of "Trade‐Off," a New Book by Kevin Maney    I've been deeply fascinated with and studying the concept of trade‐off for over 10 years. I dove  into trade‐off when I was trying to invent a software application that invents magic tricks. But,  that's another story. Suffice it to say that the design of a hit magic trick involves a conjuring  method that has almost zero trade‐off. But again, I digress from the purpose of this article  which is to review Kevin Maney's new book, "Trade‐Off: Why Some Things Catch On and Others  Don't."    Less than two weeks ago, I received a galley copy of Maney’s "Trade‐Off" and I couldn't put it  down until I finished it. I'm glad that I did. Given the universality and importance of the trade‐ off concept, trade‐off has largely been neglected especially in the literature on business. The  concept of trade‐off literally relates to everything in our universe: evolution, competition,  design, positioning, customer experience, strategy, innovation, marketing, product/business  success (and failure), decision‐making, impact analysis, negotiation, and conflict resolution.  Consequently, focus is needed when dealing with the trade‐off concept. I therefore commend  Maney on his decision to focus on ‘Categories Of Trade‐Off (COTO)' as principal causes as well  as predictors of a product's success or failure. But, how did he exactly achieve that?     In the Trade‐Off book, Maney introduces the concepts of "Fidelity" and "Convenience" as  fundamental components of trade‐off. Ideally, customers desire zero trade‐off, that is, products  and services that have super‐fidelity and super‐convenience. In practice and with limited  resources, however, businesses and customers typically go for a trade‐off or swap between  fidelity and convenience. Nevertheless, there is a strong polarity in types of trade‐offs. On the  one hand, undesirable trade‐offs lie in what Maney calls the ‘Fidelity Belly.’ Products and  services that have trade‐offs in the Fidelity Belly generally struggle, flop, or fail. On the other  hand, desirable trade‐offs lie in what I’m calling the ‘Hit Zone’ especially in the ‘Luxury Spot’  and ‘Disruption Spot.’ The most successful products and services in a market or an industry  focus on either the Disruption Spot (featuring super‐convenience) or the Luxury Spot (featuring  super‐fidelity).     According to Maney, Fidelity refers to the quality of a customer's experience. Convenience, in  contrast, refers to the ease of getting and paying for a product. The interplay between forces of  Fidelity and Convenience determines a product's positioning, brand, and value as well as quality  of customer experience. It's amazing how Maney uses Fidelity and Convenience ‐ together with  the concepts of "tech effect (innovation)" and "social accelerants (value)" ‐ to explain the  success and failure of products as well as services. Numerous examples throughout the book  illustrate cases of successful trade‐offs (Hit Zone) and cases of unsuccessful trade‐offs (Fidelity  Belly). The Hit Zone contains products such as Apple’s iPhone, Google Search, and ATM  machines as well as services such as in Disneyland, Singapore Airlines, Cirque du Soleil,  Southwest Airlines, and Wal‐Mart. Currently in the Fidelity Belly are products such as the  Segway transporter, Yugo car, Webvan, General Magic’s Telescript, and Starbucks. Many  businesses in service sectors such as traditional newspapers and movie theaters are in the  Fidelity Belly. 
  2. 2.   Sure, the Fidelity Belly is not a place for any product, service, or business to be. But what can  businesses, which are trapped in the Fidelity Belly, do to move to the Hit Zone? Maney suggests  one of two competitive strategies: either Maximize Fidelity or Maximize Convenience. Maney  seems to be against simultaneously maximizing Fidelity and Convenience. In fact, he refers to  such actions as pursuing a ‘Fidelity Mirage’ or ‘going on a fool’s errand.’ At this point, the  philosophy of Maney and I diverge, for I generally believe in a simultaneous pursuit of Fidelity  and Convenience that is consistent with the brand and positioning of a business. Google and  Amazon are good examples of companies that strive to simultaneously maximize Fidelity and  Convenience.    To be fair, Maney is not totally against the simultaneous pursuit of Fidelity and Convenience. In  fact, he cites the example of digital cameras as providing a positive ‘wrecking‐ball moment’ in  achieving super‐fidelity and super‐convenience. The entire photography industry is being  disrupted by digital cameras and Kodak, a former leader, found itself as one of the victims  initially lying in the Fidelity Belly. My understanding of Maney’s caution is that a ‘super‐fidelity +  super‐convenience’ (aka Blue Ocean) strategy typically seems to be highly expensive, risky, and  resource intensive. A ‘super‐fidelity + super‐convenience’ strategy or project is also highly  susceptible to disruptive technological innovation which may be hard to foresee. In short, a  ‘super‐fidelity + super‐convenient’ project involves a high risk‐high reward strategy that may  not be worth it, especially against the backdrop of other spots in the Hit Zone. Maney’s  examples of a failed ‘super‐fidelity + super‐convenience’ strategy include Teledesic and General  Magic’s Telescript. The jury is still out on Amazon’s electronic book reader, the Kindle.    Now, for the final question: Should one buy the “Trade‐Off” book? What better way to answer  this question than to use Maney’s Fidelity/Convenience or ‘Fidelity Swap’ framework. I find the  Fidelity of the “Trade‐Off” book to be high. The book’s contents, examples, and suggestions are  rich, insightful, and entertaining. The book ‐ even before its public release ‐ has a high social  aura and cachet. Top‐notch people and cognoscenti in business such as Marc Andreessen,  Esther Dyson, Marissa Mayer, and Ted Leonsis belong to Facebook ‘Fans’ of the Trade‐Off book.  Consequently, the book is developing a kind of ‘gotta‐know‐about‐this’ coolness and identity.  On the Convenience axis, the book is lower priced than a typical business book. By being  available in leading bookstores (both online and offline) as well as on Amazon’s Kindle, “Trade‐ Off” would be also widely available and accessible. Finally, “Trade‐Off” is simpler, fun, and  breezier to read than a typical business book. To summarize, “Trade‐Off” is in a Sweet Spot.  And in my view, Kevin Maney’s “Trade‐Off” book is well positioned to be in the Hit Zone. In  language of the book, “Trade‐Off” will catch on. But as with all other things in life, time will give  its own verdict.    Dr. Rod King  August 20, 2009    rodkuhnking@sbcglobal.net  http://tradeoffmap.ning.com  http://twitter.com/RodKuhnKing   

×