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  • NOTES: In many schools and districts, this is the reality of what the HS curriculum looks like. Each teacher is creating his or her own curriculum, based on his or her own understanding of what students need, with no sense of where a previous course should have left off or the next course needs to pick up. In some lucky schools, an academic department may meet together to create a coherent vertical plan. Rarely is that plan integrated with anyone else’s. And rarely are the curriculum materials constructed tightly enough to ensure that teachers of a particular course are doing more than keeping pace with each other and “covering” similar topics. This creates lots of overlapping and lots of gaps, creating for students quite a lot of chaos. When you add to this picture the reality that students enter HS behind where they should be, in terms of both skills and content knowledge, the low test scores and high dropout rates we see make a lot more sense.
  • NOTES: Obviously, this is what we would all like a school’s program to look like. Coherence from year to year within one subject area, and shared understandings and expectations across subject areas. School looks and feels to students like one thing, rather than a hundred things. They feel as though they are on a clearly thought-through pathway leading them from middle school to independence. They know that they cannot play one teacher off another. They do not have to worry about whether they got the “hard” teacher for a particular course. Can curriculum solve all of the problems in a school? Hardly. But an increase in the sense of coherence, of planned-ness, of school being a single thing instead of a hundred individual things—this can certainly have an effect on the school climate at large.
  • Transcript

    • 1. International Center for Leadership in Education Dr. Willard R. Daggett Preparing Iowa Students for Their Future December 12, 2006
    • 2. Skills Gap
    • 3. Change Process How What Why
    • 4. Challenges
      • Technology
    • 5.
      • Information Technology
        • Processing
        • Communications
    • 6. 1964 IBM System / 360 Mainframe Central Units’ Memory = 8 MB 2004 iPod = 4 GB 2005 iPod = 20 GB 2006 iPod = 80 GB
    • 7. Image source: www.dell.com
    • 8. Image source: http://robota.dem.uc.pt/pda_control/pda2.JPG
    • 9.
      • Information Technology
        • Processing
        • Communications
    • 10.
      • Nano Technology
        • Atom Up
    • 11. SPOT
      • Microsoft
        • Citizen
        • Fossil
        • Suunco
    • 12. SPOT
      • Integrated Projection
      • Projection Keyboard
    • 13. Projection Keyboard
    • 14. Projection Keyboard
    • 15. Projection Keyboard and Projector
    • 16. Language Translation
    • 17. Translation Goggles
    • 18.
      • Information Technology
        • Processing
        • Communications
    • 19.
      • Bio Technology
        • Biological Science
        • Practical Application
    • 20. Challenges
      • Technology
      • Globalization
    • 21. Challenges
      • Technology
      • Globalization
      • Demographics
      • Values / Beliefs
    • 22. Larger Context
      • 1901 – 24 G.I.
      • 1925 – 45 Silent
      • 1946 – 60 Boomers
      • 1961 – 81 Gen X
      • 1982 - Millennial
    • 23. Every generation sees new technology as a threat to the order of things!
    • 24. Research
      • Donald Roberts - Stanford
      • Jordan Grafman – National Institute of Neurological Disorders
      • Hal Pashler – University of California
      • Cheryl Grady – Rothman Research Center, Toronto
      • David Meyer – University of Michigan
      • Claudia Knooz – Duke
    • 25. Multitasking
      • Toggling
      • Prefrontal Cortex
      • Pew Research
    • 26. Today’s Youth
      • Digital Learners
      • Multimedia
      • Find and manipulate data
      • Analyze data and images
    • 27. 1950s School Building
    • 28. 1970s School Building
    • 29. 1990s School Building
    • 30. 2010 School Building ?
    • 31. Change Process How What Why
    • 32. Levels C D A B 1 2 3 4 5 4 5 6 3 2 1 Bloom’s Application
    • 33. Strategies
      • Brainstorming
      • Cooperative Learning
      • Demonstration
      • Guided Practice
      • Inquiry
      • Instructional Technology
      • Lecture
      • Note-taking/Graphic Organizers
      • Memorization
      • Presentations/Exhibitions
      • Research
      • Problem-based Learning
      • Project Design
      • Simulation/Role-playing
      • Socratic Seminar
      • Teacher Questions
      • Work-based Learning
    • 34. Data
    • 35. Essential Skills
    • 36. Grade Equivalent
      • Semantic Difficulty
      • Syntactic Complexity
    • 37. Lexile Framework
      • Semantic Difficulty
      • Syntactic Complexity
    • 38. 2005-06 Lexile Framework ® for Reading Study Summary of Text Lexile Measures 600 800 1000 1400 1600 1200 Text Lexile Measure (L) High School Literature College Literature High School Textbooks College Textbooks Military Personal Use Entry-Level Occupations SAT 1, ACT, AP* * Source of National Test Data: MetaMetrics Interquartile Ranges Shown (25% - 75%)
    • 39. 16 Career Clusters Department of Education
    • 40. Reading Requirements Findings
      • Entry-level
        • Highest in 6/16
        • Second Highest in 7/16
      • Consistent Across Country
    • 41. Human Services  
    • 42. Construction  
    • 43. Manufacturing  
    • 44. On-the Job Lexile Requirements Construction 1,500 1,400 1,300 1,200 1,100 1,000 900 800 Lexile Craftsman Nurse Sales Secretary National Adult Literacy Study 1992 International Center for Leadership in Education 2006
    • 45.  
    • 46. Quantile Framework
      • Numbers and Operations
      • Algebra / Patterns & Functions
      • Data Analysis & Probability
      • Measurement
      • Geometry
    • 47. 500 600 700 900 1000 800 Quantile Measure (Q) Personal Use Employment High School First-Year College 1200 1100 1300 1500 1400 Interquartile Ranges Shown (25% - 75%) 2005-06 Quantile Framework ® for Math Study Summary of Quantile Measures 8th 10th 11th
    • 48. Levels C D A B 1 2 3 4 5 4 5 6 3 2 1 Bloom’s Application
    • 49. Results: Northridge and Sepulveda Percent 8 th Grade Math Students Proficient and Advanced I CAN Learn Math introduced
    • 50. Results: Rural Mississippi Broad Street 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 Highlights… Gentry Greenwood Mount Olive West Bolivar 2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005
    • 51. Results: Oklahoma Oklahoma Core Curriculum Test (OCCT) 8th Grade Percent Proficient
    • 52. Instruction - Structure
    • 53. Curriculum Alignment: The Reality Grade 9 ELA Grade 10 ELA Grade 11 ELA Grade 12 ELA Grade 9 Math Grade 9 Science Grade 9 Social Studies Grade 10 Math Grade 10 Science Grade 10 Social Studies Grade 11 Math Grade 11 Science Grade 11 Social Studies Grade 12 Math Grade 12 Science Grade 12 Social Studies
    • 54. Curriculum Alignment: The Goal Social Studies Science Math ELA Grade 12 Social Studies Science Math ELA Grade 11 Social Studies Science Math ELA Grade 10 Social Studies Science Math ELA Grade 9
    • 55. Transition Years
    • 56. Transition
      • 9 th
        • Looping
        • Electives in 9 th
      • 12 th
        • Dual enrollment
        • Tech prep
        • Middle college
        • Early college
    • 57. Leadership
    • 58. Comprehensive Plan
    • 59. Criteria
        • Core Academic Learning (Achievement in the core subjects of English language arts, math and science and others identified by the school)
        • Stretch Learning (Demonstration of rigorous and relevant learning beyond the minimum requirements)
        • Student Engagement (The extent to which students are motivated and committed to learning; have a sense of belonging and accomplishment; and have relationships with adults, peers, and parents that support learning)
        • Personal Skill Development (Measures of personal, social, service, and leadership skills and demonstrations of positive behaviors and attitudes)
    • 60. Guiding Principles
      • Responsibility
      • Contemplation
      • Initiative
      • Perseverance
      • Optimism
      • Courage
      • Respect
      • Compassion
      • Adaptability
      • Honesty
      • Trustworthiness
      • Loyalty
    • 61. Criteria
        • Core Academic Learning (Achievement in the core subjects of English language arts, math and science and others identified by the school)
        • Stretch Learning (Demonstration of rigorous and relevant learning beyond the minimum requirements)
        • Student Engagement (The extent to which students are motivated and committed to learning; have a sense of belonging and accomplishment; and have relationships with adults, peers, and parents that support learning)
        • Personal Skill Development (Measures of personal, social, service, and leadership skills and demonstrations of positive behaviors and attitudes)
    • 62. Change Process How What Why
    • 63. Network 600 75 25
    • 64. Model Schools Conference June 30 – July 3, 2007 Washington D.C.
    • 65. 1587 Route 146 Rexford, NY 12148 Phone (518) 399-2776 Fax (518) 399-7607 E-mail - info@LeaderEd.com www.LeaderEd.com International Center for Leadership in Education, Inc .