Hannalie Bekker - Telkom Media
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  • Entering the broad media and entertainment space at this moment in time means having to both respond to a context that has undergone rapid and fundamental shifts in recent times, and anticipate future directions. This section outlines a handful of phenomena, all related, that will impact substantially on the way Telkom Media’s content offerings are shaped. TIME Magazine’s “Person of the Year 2006” is “YOU”, i.e. ordinary consumers who are irrevocably shifting the way media is produced, consumed and distributed [1] . These shifts are manifest in a number of recent media trends: Reality TV, interactive TV: the advent of reality television some years ago meant on the one hand that ordinary people could “be on tv” and even become stars, and on the other, that the ordinary people who had stayed at home could, by various mechanisms, participate in programmes and influence their outcome. This has changed consumers’ relationship to television. Unprecedented access to the means of production and distribution and the proliferation of platforms : ordinary people can not only participate in mainstream media, but can also make and publish content themselves. YouTube is undoubtedly the flag bearer of this particular revolution, but it also includes the appearance of citizen journalism, blogging, podcasts, Wikipedia, and the pervasive consumer reviews on Amazon, travel sites, etc. What I want when I want it : The web, Tivo / PVR, Apple’s iTune store, download services, iPods, mobile television and a host of other portable devices are driving an ever-increasing move away from reliance on linear television schedules and other traditional ways of offering content. Instead of one way to access content (eg a scheduled broadcast; a trip to the music store), consumers have a multitude of ways to purchase (or otherwise acquire) what they want, when they want it. In addition they are able to access any kind of content they want, with any degree of niching supported by the web and other sources of long-tail content. This leads to the fragmentation of mass viewing. e-Democracy : Socio-political shifts have brought about lower dependency on as well as less trust in traditional sources of authority: politicians, churches, the media, the US. At the same time, ordinary people have acquired an unprecedented “voice” in all spheres of life. While audience voting in Idol constitutes a kind of e-democracy, it also takes a far more overtly political form. Avaaz.org – which means “voice” in several languages – has been mounting a campaign to bombard G8 leaders with messages urging them to take faster action over climate change [2] ; in the UK the organisation mySociety builds websites to empower people in the civic aspects of their lives [3] ; in South Africa we saw a recent campaign, largely cellphone-based, trying to influence government’s approach to crime. Sometimes the internet turns on itself: a current online campaign is soliciting support for its opposition to child pornography on the web [4] . In the entertainment space, too, media owners are made to pay attention to the will of the people: a discarded pilot, “Nobody’s Watching”, was recently resurrected by NBC after attracting enthusiastic support on YouTube; the US networks are considering posting pilots on the web at the same time as they are being considered by executives, and are taking note of opinions expressed by bloggers and on community sites [5] . A need for connection: As mass behaviour becomes less common, consumption patterns fracture, and trust in centralised authority diminishes, the need for connection with like-minded people increases: peers (both locally and globally) are increasingly important as sources of connection, information, entertainment and opinions. YouTube and consumer reviews are manifestations of this; so is Wikipedia; but MySpace is most prominent here. In fact the star brands of the moment are the ones that not only connect to consumers, but enable consumers to connect with each other. [1] See http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1569514,00.html [2] “Wakey-wakey”, The Economist February 17th -23rd 2007 p59. [3] “Eurovision and the future of e-politics”, The Sunday Times (UK), February 18, 2007 . Some of the sites mySociety has built are WriteToThem.com, TheyWorkForYou.com and HearFromYourMP.com. [4] See www. lightamillioncandles.com [5] It’s important to note that networks’ embrace of the views expressed online is tempered by concerns about representivity: relying on the younger, male-skewed internet community to shape broadcast television might mean pandering to an increasingly absent audience…
  • The movements above create a seductive picture of an increasingly active consumer, who is ripping, burning, sharing and mashing his or her way through the contemporary media scene. However, evidence has been emerging to suggest that it would be as unwise to overestimate the change – or rather the rate of change - as to underestimate it. A comprehensive study by IBM, “The end of television as we know it”, talks about “bi-modal” consumption of media, and convincingly argues that for the mid-term future (circa 2012) active or “advanced” consumers will be vastly outnumbered by the “massive passives”, those for whom entertainment is still primarily a lean-back experience: Our analysis indicates that market evolution hinges on two key market drivers: openness of access channels and levels of consumer involvement with media. For the next 5-7 years, there will be change on both fronts – but not uniformly. The industry instead will be stamped by consumer bimodality, a coexistence of two types of users with disparate channel requirements. While one consumer segment remains passive in the living room, the other will force radical change in business models in a search for anytime, anywhere content through multiple channels.
  • Our approach to content is underpinned by the following imperatives: Creating an offering that locates Telkom Media in its geographical and social context and resonates with a broad South African audience; Balancing high entertainment value, commercial viability, desirability and social responsiveness Delivering a content proposition characterised by range, diversity and high entertainment value Introducing a tiering structure that democratises access to pay-tv by ensuring affordability and broad reach; Ensuring viewer reflection, acknowledgement and participative programming Investing substantially, but strategically, to ensure sustainability
  • Our approach to content is underpinned by the following imperatives: Creating an offering that locates Telkom Media in its geographical and social context and resonates with a broad South African audience; Balancing high entertainment value, commercial viability, desirability and social responsiveness Delivering a content proposition characterised by range, diversity and high entertainment value Introducing a tiering structure that democratises access to pay-tv by ensuring affordability and broad reach; Ensuring viewer reflection, acknowledgement and participative programming Investing substantially, but strategically, to ensure sustainability
  • Our approach to content is underpinned by the following imperatives: Creating an offering that locates Telkom Media in its geographical and social context and resonates with a broad South African audience; Balancing high entertainment value, commercial viability, desirability and social responsiveness Delivering a content proposition characterised by range, diversity and high entertainment value Introducing a tiering structure that democratises access to pay-tv by ensuring affordability and broad reach; Ensuring viewer reflection, acknowledgement and participative programming Investing substantially, but strategically, to ensure sustainability

Transcript

  • 1. “… it’s the end of the world as we know it - and I feel fine…” - REM, 1987
  • 2. The global social shifts…
    • TIME magazine’s “Person of the Year 2006” was “YOU” – the ordinary consumer, who is changing the way media is created, distributed & consumed.
    • This indicates some irrevocable social shifts, in which cause & effect are hard to distinguish:
    • Reality tv & interactive tv
    • Access to the means of production & distribution; a proliferation of platforms
    • An increasingly on-demand world
    • E-Democracy
    • The need for both individuality & connection
  • 3.
    • “ For the next 5-7 years…[t]he industry will be stamped by consumer bimodality, a coexistence of two types of users with disparate requirements…”
    • IBM:
    • “ The end of television as we know it” (2006)
    … but not so fast…
  • 4. Some implications for content (1)
    • As platforms increase, viewership fragments. Niche audiences take on new importance; advertisers need alternatives.
    • Diversification of content, genre, style; audiences’ taste for interactivity / participation will continue to drive new forms.
    • Multiple platforms will create new “primetimes”, which, together with “my time”, will fundamentally alter PRIMETIME (& primetime advertising) as we know it.
    • Sport, other live events and participative viewing are best able to generate mass audiences – but have little longevity.
    • TV’s role is more likely to alter than diminish… but viewers’ expectations of it will be high, ito delivering what other platforms can’t.
  • 5. Some implications for content (2)
    • Despite shifting business models, in the medium term future much of the premium content that helps drive the download culture will come from broadcast television.
    • The rights regime will get more complex; rights will be carved up more finely…
    • User-generated content will not displace professional media, but will force new strategies, alliances and business models.
    • The proliferation of choice creates new needs:
    • navigability
    • customisation, personalisation
    • - connection
    • “ Content wants to be free” – to move around…
  • 6. Some opportunities
    • Content deployment across platforms;
    • Life-cycle management of content properties – broadcast is only one outing now
    • New partnerships between advertisers & producers & “broadcasters”
    • Exploring / exploiting an on-demand environment
    • Niche audiences
    • New content-related “services”
  • 7. New opportunities that TM will bring to the Broadcasting industry Advertising Opportunities Clare O’Neil 13 th June 2007
  • 8. A few thoughts on convergence     Technology – BC / ISP / IPTV / Triple Play Content wants “to be free” – cross platform aggregation Audience Fragmentation / Effects on business models Advertiser Opportunities in this environment
  • 9. Advertiser Opportunities
    • We can’t overestimate yet / but should not underestimate now!
      • New Media technologies bring about convergence as well as content delivery from linear to non-linear platforms
      • We constantly hear about “the demise of…”
        • Free to air broadcasting (free to pay)
        • Linear TV (PVR to IPTV)
        • The 30” commercial (viewer zipping, zapping, skipping)
  • 10. Advertiser Opportunities
    • What do we need to start thinking about?
      • Green-fields Environment!
      • Global trends that inform us; as well as the S.A. reality.
      • Encourage S.A. Advertisers / Media Planners and Buyers to follow these trends.
      • Encourage the S.A. Production industry to “get closer” as the lines between “content and advertising” become blurred.
  • 11. Advertiser Opportunities
    • What do we see for Advertisers in the “converged” space:
      • IPTV will bring:
        • Highly targeted, addressable advertising.
        • Advertisers pay for interested viewers.
        • TV advertising will become personalised.
        • Viewers will watch the same content offerings.
        • Ads played out will vary according to demo’s; shopping habits; personal preferences – making advertising messaging a lot more relevant!
        • TV Ads then, will have nothing in common with TV Ads now!
        • Viewers will “engage” & “interact” with more relevant “advertising content”!
  • 12. Advertising Opportunities
    • The SEISMIC shift that will happen in “our industry”
      • Production of adverts
      • Pricing structures
      • Ad avails
      • Ad insertion (the move to dynamic ad insertion)
    • Technologically we will move from:-
      • “ One size” fits all to;
      • Personalised “one to one” messaging
      • Dynamic ad insertion & all its’ technology – not as simple as ad splicer & ad server in our conventional broadcast systems.
  • 13. Advertising Opportunities
    • Connection between Internet & TV services
      • Interactivity allows for the use of remote controls to interact with TV websites -
        • Whereby viewers:
          • Press a button,
          • Visit relevant websites for more info,
          • See further “long form” video of the ad,
          • Buy product!
  • 14. Advertising Opportunities
    • IPTV offers network that is “Bidirectional”
      • Viewer responses to ads can be collected “in real time” if desired.
      • Monitor who is watching, when.
      • Improving audience measurement – “real time” ad monitoring!
  • 15. Advertiser Opportunities
    • We can’t overestimate yet / but can’t underestimate now!
      • Monetisation of Content / Advertiser trends!
        • What we need to think about now!
        • Advertiser Funded Content
        • Branded Content
        • 30” Ads “imbedded” into the “content” (stop ad zapping)
        • We encourage you to think with us!
  • 16. Thank you