Carrier Ethernet Access Technology Shoot-Out

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  • COPPER, FIBER, EPON, WIRELESS, COAX CABLE
  • Table style This sample shows table with cells in rows and columns, with headers and highlight.
  • Carrier Ethernet Access Technology Shoot-Out

    1. 1. Carrier Ethernet Access Technology Shoot-Out Copper PDH vs. Active Fiber vs. PON
    2. 2. Panelists: Dr. Michael Ritter Vice President Business Management Ethernet Access [email_address] Wolfgang Fischer Senior Manager, Business Development [email_address] Gerlinde Bedö Head of Broadband Access Marketing Gerlinde.bedoe@nsn.com Ralph Santitoro Chair, MEF Web Marketing Committee Director of Carrier Ethernet Solutions [email_address]
    3. 3. Access Shoot Out Introduction Panel Moderator: Greg Poggi Vice President of Sales [email_address]
    4. 4. Carrier Ethernet in the Access, Metro & Global Networks <ul><li>Carrier Ethernet Services operate independently of the physical networks they run across making expansion to new technologies easy </li></ul><ul><li>Creates a single service connection from Enterprise or business office, in a single person office, or home or on the road. </li></ul><ul><li>In the Metro and First Mile, Ethernet is becoming the network of choice with migration from Frame Services </li></ul>
    5. 5. Ethernet over Different Access Network Technologies EoCopper 10/100BT PON PON Coax GigE Service Provider Network (Hybrid of Ethernet and TDM) HFC: Hybrid Fiber and Coax 10/100BT GBE or 100FX (Standard or WDM) GBE or 100FX (Standard or WDM) EoPDH 10/100BT WiFi / WiMax
    6. 6. Carrier Ethernet Scope and Reach HD TV, TVoD, VoD, Content Providers Video Source Gaming, DR, ERP Voice/Video Telephony Internet information & Software apps Host applications, Consolidated Servers SoHo & Residential Triple-Play Small/Medium Business Enterprise Clients Mobile data/video Carrier Ethernet Carrier Ethernet wire-line and mobile backhaul with copper, fiber , cable, wireless access network delivery
    7. 7. Carrier Ethernet in Access Networks <ul><li>Active areas in Carrier Ethernet development </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ethernet Access for Mobile Backhaul </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ethernet over Active Fiber </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ethernet over Passive Fiber (PON) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ethernet over Copper PDH (E1/DS1) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ethernet over Copper DSL </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ethernet over Hybrid Fiber Coax (HFC) </li></ul></ul>
    8. 8. Converged Ethernet/IP Services over Copper PDH Access Networks Ralph Santitoro Chair, MEF Web Marketing Committee Director of Carrier Ethernet Solutions [email_address]
    9. 9. Delivering Ubiquitous Ethernet Services - The Access Network Challenge <ul><li>Ethernet over Fiber (EoF) access networks </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The optimal technology for delivery of Ethernet services </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Unfortunately, not all Enterprise sites have fiber access </li></ul><ul><ul><li>However, they all have access to copper/PDH circuits </li></ul></ul>How does a service provider deliver Ethernet services to all Enterprise locations? Fiber Fiber Fiber Fiber Ethernet Service Provider
    10. 10. What is Ethernet over PDH (EoPDH)? <ul><li>Technology that enables delivery of Ethernet services over PDH (E1/DS1, E3/DS3) access networks </li></ul><ul><li>Service Bandwidth Granularity </li></ul><ul><ul><li>N x 2Mbps (N bonded E1s), N x 1.5Mbps (N bonded DS1s) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>N x 32Mbps (N bonded E3s), N x 45Mbps (N bonded DS3s) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Example: 5 bonded E1s provide a 10Mbps Ethernet service </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Supports same MEF service attributes as EoF services </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ethernet UNI to subscriber </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Granular bandwidth and QoS per service </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fault Management and Performance Management for SLAs </li></ul></ul>PDH (Plesiochronous Digital Hierarchy): Term to collectively refer to E1/E3 and DS1/DS3 copper access network circuits EoPDH enables a common Ethernet service offering and SLA over both copper and fiber access networks
    11. 11. How does EoPDH work? <ul><li>Ethernet Frames enter UNI on EoPDH CLE and encapsulated in GFP </li></ul><ul><li>Access Network multiplexes E1s into channelized STM-1 circuits </li></ul><ul><li>E1s in STM-1 circuits terminated on EoPDH Aggregator </li></ul><ul><ul><li>GFP terminated, Ethernet frames reconstructed </li></ul></ul><ul><li>EoPDH Aggregator adds S-VLAN tag (QinQ) and passes Ethernet Service Frames to Ethernet Transport Network </li></ul>Copper PDH Access Network EoPDH CLE EoPDH Aggregator Enterprise Subscriber Ethernet Frame at UNI ETH IP S-VLAN Tagged Ethernet Frame (EVC) ETH IP Ethernet Transport Network Channelized STM-1 IP ETH GFP Bonded E1s IP ETH GFP
    12. 12. Ethernet L2 Services and Ethernet Access to IP Services over E1s PDH circuits: PMO CE Ethernet over E1s Ethernet handoff to customer Customer Premise Ethernet Ethernet Ethernet over E1s in Channelized STM-1s L2 switch PE Router IP Service Edge DCS Ethernet over E1s in Channelized STM-1s EoPDH CLE PDH Aggregation Router SDH ADM Local Switching Office (LSO) SDH SDH ADM PDH/SDH Access Network TDM PDH circuits from Customer Premise to IP Service Edge TDM
    13. 13. FMO Step 1 in Network Evolution to Carrier Ethernet CE Ethernet over E1s Ethernet handoff to customer Customer Premise Local Switching Office (LSO) SDH EoPDH CLE <ul><li>EoPDH aggregator terminates PDH circuits and provides Ethernet to backhaul network resulting in improved bandwidth utilization </li></ul><ul><li>DCS and PDH Aggregation Router eliminated at IP Service Edge since PDH circuits terminated at LSO </li></ul>SDH ADM SDH ADM PDH/SDH Access Network EoPDH Aggregator Ethernet Ethernet over E1s in Channelized STM-1s Ethernet Ethernet L2 switch PE Router IP Service Edge DCS Ethernet over E1s in Channelized STM-1s PDH Aggregation Router Ethernet over SDH Carrier Ethernet TDM Ethernet PE Router IP Service Edge L2 switch
    14. 14. FMO Step 2 in Network Evolution to Carrier Ethernet CE Ethernet over E1s Ethernet handoff to customer Customer Premise Local Switching Office (LSO) <ul><li>SDH ADMs / Transport replaced by Ethernet Transport </li></ul><ul><li>Shortest possible Ethernet over E1 (PDH) loops </li></ul><ul><li>CLE at customer premise enables converged Ethernet and IP services </li></ul>EoPDH Aggregator Managed CLE PDH/SDH Access Network Ethernet Ethernet over E1s in Channelized STM-1s EoPDH CLE Carrier Ethernet TDM Ethernet PE Router IP Service Edge L2 switch SDH Ethernet over SDH SDH ADM SDH ADM Ethernet <ul><li>Converged Services </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ethernet L2 VPNs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>MEF E-Line, E-LAN </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Internet Access </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>VoIP </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>IP VPN </li></ul></ul>
    15. 15. Ethernet over PDH Benefits <ul><li>Simplifies Enterprise subscriber’s WAN connectivity </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provides “IT friendly” Ethernet (UNI) instead of E1 TDM circuit </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Simplifies Provider’s Access/Aggregation Network </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Terminates TDM PDH circuits as close to subscriber as possible </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>“ Media conversion” (Ethernet  TDM  Ethernet) performed between EoPDH CLE and Aggregation Device </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Improves backhaul bandwidth utilization </li></ul></ul>EoPDH enables ubiquitous, global Ethernet services over existing copper PDH access network facilities
    16. 16. Ethernet Point-to-Point Wolfgang Fischer Senior Manager, Business Development [email_address]
    17. 17. A technology fairy tale <ul><li>Once upon a time in the last century... </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fiber was expensive and had to be shared </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Optical transceivers were expensive and had to be shared </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Few 10s of Mbit/s were considered more than enough to satisfy everybody’s bandwidth appetite </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ITU-T and IEEE developed various flavours of PON </li></ul></ul><ul><li>In the world as we know it today... </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fiber is cheap </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Optical transceivers for FE and GE are cheap </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Typical access bitrates grow 50% YoY reaching 100Mbit/s before the end of this decade and 1Gbit/s before the end of the next decade </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Compelling reason for PON? </li></ul></ul>
    18. 18. What is Ethernet Point-to-Point? <ul><li>Direct star connectivity between POP and subscriber </li></ul><ul><ul><li>topology similar to telephone access network </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Using standard Ethernet technology (FE, GE, ...) over single strand of single-mode fiber </li></ul>PE-AGG Access Switch N-PE STB FTTx Access Network E-FTTH IP/MPLS Edge/core Ethernet/MPLS Aggregation Network
    19. 19. Benefits of Ethernet point-to-point <ul><li>Simplicity </li></ul><ul><li>Virtually unlimited bitrate per subscriber </li></ul><ul><li>Fiber is neutral with respect to transmission technology </li></ul><ul><li>Migration to higher speeds or new technologies on a per-customer basis </li></ul><ul><li>Pay as you grow </li></ul><ul><li>Open Access to fiber inherently embedded in the architecture </li></ul><ul><li>Flexible, Future Proof </li></ul>
    20. 20. What about fiber management / space? <ul><li>ODF for 2304 fiber terminations </li></ul><ul><li>Rack for 1502 active fiber interfaces </li></ul><ul><ul><li>50% take rate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>up to 100% take rate achievable with second switch rack </li></ul></ul>Source: Huber & Suhner
    21. 21. What about OPEX? Complex: shared medium, subscribers mutually dependent, # of customers on tree varies Simple: dedicated fiber Resource planning in access / engineering rules Shorter in the feeder part (less fibers to splice), longer in the drop part (difficult diagnostics) Longer in the feeder part (more fibers to splice), shorter in the drop part (easier diagnostics) Outage after cable break Config of OLT Patch at ODF and config of switch, compensated by initial capex savings Connecting a new subscriber Complex: replacement of all active equipment at once or wavelength overlay Simple: can be done on a per-customer basis Bandwidth / technology upgrade Required Not needed Encryption key management Complex: location of failure behind splitter difficult to identify Simple: failure uniquely located through reflection measurements Fiber troubleshooting PON Point-to-Point Issue
    22. 22. But I want to share fiber! <ul><li>Most natural way of sharing a fiber is in wavelength-domain </li></ul><ul><li>DWDM-PON </li></ul><ul><ul><li>technology available </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>economically viable within 2 years </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Ethernet Point-to-Point per wavelength </li></ul><ul><li>Combines best of both worlds </li></ul>
    23. 23. Ethernet over WDM-PON Dr. Michael Ritter Vice President Business Management Ethernet Access [email_address]
    24. 24. WDM PON network architecture FTTC FTTC FTTB FTTH VDSL Ethernet Central Office  1 . . .  n  1  2  3  n Passive Remote Node
    25. 25. Benefits of WDM PON technology <ul><li>Scalability through bitrate and protocol independency </li></ul><ul><li>Upgrade path on a per service level </li></ul><ul><li>High degree of security and privacy </li></ul><ul><li>Simple and straightforward network planning </li></ul><ul><li>Geographical flexibility with long reach capability </li></ul><ul><li>Architecture supporting open access networking </li></ul><ul><li>Standard Ethernet technology and inter-working </li></ul>
    26. 26. WDM PON options <ul><li>Power splitters vs. filters in remote node </li></ul><ul><li>Lambda grid options – DWDM, CWDM, … </li></ul><ul><li>Bit rate per wavelength – 1G, 2G5, 4G3, 10G </li></ul><ul><li>Colored or colorless ONU design </li></ul><ul><li>Underlying TDM scheme for high fan out </li></ul><ul><li>Protection options for highest availability </li></ul><ul><li>Optional amplification for extended reach </li></ul>
    27. 27. Optical access applications active Ethernet E/GPON all access technologies need efficient high-capacity backhaul residential services access business services access infrastructure backhaul FTTC FTTB FTTH optical backhaul optical backhaul active Ethernet passive WDM FTTO FTTB optical backhaul FTTN optical backhaul
    28. 28. Eliminating active equipment and freeing up real estate CO VDSL DSLAM LO Curb CP passive optical splitter FTTC/VDSL 25…50 Mbps per user FTTB/H GPON <100 Mbps per user FTTB Passive WDM 1++ Gbps per user aggregation switch aggregation switch aggregation switch aggregation switch optical transport optical transport optical transport passive WDM OLT
    29. 29. Smart service termination Application Application OJ - Loop <ul><li>Potential demarcation layers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>fiber availability </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>optical performance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>coding integrity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>protocol statistics </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ethernet virtual circuit statistics </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Loop: passive pilot tone </li></ul><ul><li>Plug: active intelligent transceiver </li></ul><ul><li>Device: active demarcation unit </li></ul>OJ - Plug Application SFP SFP OJ - Device Optojack - loop, plug, device SFP SFP SFP
    30. 30. Summary <ul><li>Simple, open and dedicated point-to-point connectivity </li></ul><ul><li>Efficient and future-proof transport architecture optimized for access networks </li></ul><ul><li>Utilized leading edge technology to reduce both capital and operational cost </li></ul>
    31. 31. Ethernet over PON Gerlinde Bedö Head of Broadband Access Marketing Gerlinde.bedoe@nsn.com
    32. 32. There is no doubt: World goes fiber <ul><li>“ The results [of the research evaluating the sustainability and environmental impact of fiber networks] clearly demonstrate the overall service and environmental benefits of FTTH. The findings stand as testament that fiber is a sustainable and future-proof technology for the 21st century.” </li></ul><ul><li>Joeri Van Bogaert, president FTTH Council, 2008 </li></ul>“ Fiber right now is not just a means to get bits to the subscriber, it is also a potentially effective marketing tool.” Telecom Strategy Partners, 2008
    33. 33. But which technology fulfills best all requirements? GEPON GPON FTTC / VDSL Active Ethernet Fiber <ul><ul><li>Which technology addresses better IPTV and VoIP? What about legacy & TDM? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Bandwidth availability & flexibility, capacity upgrade possibilities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Maintenance & fault isolation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Interoperability & multi-vendor networks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>SLA assurance, service protection, and their associated costs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How to maximize the use of existing infrastructure? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The access network and future applications: network dimension & bandwidth simulation </li></ul></ul>
    34. 34. PON is becoming a leading fibre technology GPON will dominate in the US, since it is now certain to be used by both the major ILECs and many independent telcos. Active Ethernet has some limited support in the US, but it will remain a minority technology, taking declining share in the overall market FTTH Worldwide technology update & market forecast Because GE-PON is currently the technology of choice in Japan, it will dominate overall global FTTH deployments over next few years. FTTH Worldwide technology update & market forecast
    35. 35. All over the world operators go for PON PON subscribers will dominate ptp subscribers Worldwide fiber deployments Source: Broadbandtrends, 10/2007 Subscribers (000) - 10.000 20.000 30.000 40.000 50.000 60.000 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 PON P2P
    36. 36. What is PON? <ul><li>Created by the FSAN organization (driven by service providers & operators); Standardized by ITU-T (A/BPON, GPON) or IEEE (EPON) </li></ul><ul><li>Bandwidth >100Mbit/s per subscriber through DBA </li></ul><ul><li>PON optimized for multicast and „downstream intensive“ traffic </li></ul><ul><li>Cost-optimized support of multiple (legacy and new) services through various subscriber interfaces: VoIP (SIP, H.248), video (IPTV, cable TV), data </li></ul><ul><li>Support of all types on in-house cabling: copper TP, CAT5, fiber </li></ul><ul><li>Real multi-service platform: in the 1st mile and in the CO </li></ul><ul><li>Easy upgrade to more subscribers and higher bandwidth </li></ul><ul><li>Clear migration path to NG-PON </li></ul><ul><li>PON is a „green“ technology </li></ul>Carrier Network Passive Optical splitter 1:16 Optical splitter Metro MPLS / VPLS TDM Network FTTH ONT SFU FTTB Multi-Dwelling Unit Passive Optical splitter 2.5Gbps DS 1.25Gbps US
    37. 37. PON is the ideal solution to backhaul mobile traffic Node-B/BTS E1/TDM STM 1/4 Mobile core SDH TDMoIP E1/TDM <ul><li>GPON is the ideal platform to backhaul mobile traffic (from 2G to LTE) </li></ul><ul><li>Through built in synchronization capabilities in OLT </li></ul><ul><li>Support of all relevant BTS interfaces: E1, Ethernet </li></ul><ul><li>Sufficient bandwidth for LTE traffic </li></ul>Ethernet 1/10 GE RNC
    38. 38. The TCO advantage of GPON Point-to-point Ethernet GPON <ul><li>Realistic deployment </li></ul><ul><li>5000 subscribers connected to CO </li></ul><ul><li>PON splitting ratio 1:32 </li></ul><ul><li>Fibre terminations per ODF rack: 1,440 (10 shelves holding 144 fibres) </li></ul><ul><li>Power consumption figures and ports per cage based on real product specs </li></ul>Ethernet GPON Power [kW] CO Space [M 2 ] Patch cords 38 10 19.6 2.9 5000 157 x 3.6 x 6.7 x 31.8
    39. 39. Active Ethernet vs. GPON FTTx Natural support of Ethernet rings Service protection Cost Including existing building infra. Support of existing infra. QoS & SLA guarantee Important for business services Bandwidth flexibility Ethernet support through CES TDM and legacy support Total evaluation OpEx Integrated with Ethernet rings CapEx Both provide same possibilities Bandwidth availability OAM tools VoIP/POTS, video, multicast Residential services handle Comments GPON ETTx Technical Requirement
    40. 40. Q and A “Shootout” Dr. Michael Ritter Vice President Business Management Ethernet Access [email_address] Wolfgang Fischer Senior Manager, Business Development [email_address] Ralph Santitoro Chair, MEF Web Marketing Committee Director of Carrier Ethernet Solutions [email_address] Greg Poggi Vice President of Sales [email_address] Gerlinde Bedö Head of Broadband Access Marketing Gerlinde.bedoe@nsn.com

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