anti-bullying

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  • It's good to know that a lot of students are now aware and are truly against bullying. Yet, not everyone is strong enough to fight against these bullies. I am a parent and I'm worried that any kid can just be a victim. As a way of helping everyone especially the parents, who find it quite hard to manage time, I found this great application which featured a safety app which gets me connected to a Safety Network or escalate my call to the nearest 911 when needed, it has other cool features that are helpful for your kids with just a press of a Panic Button. Check it here: http://safekidzone.com/eMail/ProtectorPlus/SafeKidZone/
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  • The following presentation has been collaboratively developed by AEA consultants who are Olweus Bullying Prevention Program trainers and the Iowa Department of Education. We thank IPTV for their support in broadcasting this important information.
  • The key components here are that bullying is an aggressive, intentional behavior, usually repeated over time, and with an imbalance of power so that the student who is bullied has difficulty defending himself or herself.
  • These big ideas were adapted from Sue Limber’s “10 components of a quality bully prevention program.” Sue is an Olweus lead trainer from Clemson University. We are going to address each of these in turn as we hear from our guest presenters. Each guest presenter is from an Iowa school currently implementing the Olweus program. The focus of this presentation is not so much on the program itself as it is implementing these core components across multiple levels of the school environment (school, classroom, individual, larger community, and parents) with fidelity.
  • These are NOT the same as curriculum lessons. Rather, they are designed to establish communication among the whole class. Although you have information you will want to share with students, a class meeting is designed to establish communication among all members of your class. You will want to provide time for students to share their opinions and allow students to guide the discussion when appropriate. From the beginning, work with students to develop some basic ground rules for the class meetings. Sample rules: • We raise our hands when we want to say something. • Everyone has the right to be heard. • We let others speak without interrupting (certain time limits). • Everyone has the right to pass. • We can disagree without being disagreeable or saying mean things. No “put-downs.” • When talking about bullying or other problems between students, we don’t mention names.
  • Teachers vary in their experience and comfort level with class meetings. There is no one right way to lead a class meeting. Some teachers prefer to have a very clear idea of what is going to be discussed. Other teachers desire a more open ended style that provides flexibility to discuss issues as they come up. Either way is fine. The teacher is more in the role of a facilitator than an instructor. Allow the students to guide the discussion when it is appropriate. Your class meetings might initially focus on bullying, but they should also include other related topics so students don’t get bored. These are “class meetings” not “bullying meetings.” Also vary the activities and the methods used, such as using student literature, audiovisual materials, group or pairs work, role-playing, and making connections between bullying themes and academic themes taught in the classroom.
  • Dan Olweus and F.D. Alsaker, “Assessing Change in a Cohort Longitudinal Study with Hierarchical Data,” in Problems and Methods in Longitudinal Research , ed. D. Magnusson, L. R. Bergman, G. Rudinger, and B. Torestad (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1991), 107-32
  • Class meetings help students become more active bystanders by letting them practice/process outside of the “heat of the moment.” • As they discuss bullying, the rules and related issues, they will build commitment to follow these rules. • This provides them with opportunities to express their personal opinions in a relatively safe and supportive environment. • As a sense of community is built, belonging is established and a set of community norms is developed and shared by a majority of the students. • Not only classroom culture – but the power struggles and relationships among classmates. What goes on in the group. It’s “inner life.” This will help identify bullying relationships and discover bullying tendencies at an early stage before problems develop. • More generally – allow for discussion and possible solution of other problems in the classroom as well as discussing and following up on decisions regarding individual interventions.
  • The key to class meetings is to create an environment where students can feel safe to share their opinions and ideas. This effort will pay big dividends in developing student’s problem-solving skills, communication skills, and in addressing a variety of issues that otherwise disrupt learning. Other topics may include gender issues, cyber-bullying, bus behavior, playground rules, non-verbal communication, listening skills, feelings, friendship, peer pressure, and so much more.
  • This purpose has always been the case. No one would disagree that we should provide a safe and … However, in recent years many people have realized that the significant prevalence of bullying and harassment is having a negative impact on the safety and achievement of our students.
  • The program is also designed to improve overall climate, peer to peer relations, and adult to student relationships.
  • These big ideas were adapted from Sue Limber’s “10 components of a quality bully prevention program.” Sue is an Olweus lead trainer from Clemson University. We are going to address each of these in turn as we hear from our guest presenters. Each guest presenter is from an Iowa school currently implementing the Olweus program. The focus of this presentation is not so much on the program itself as it is implementing these core components across multiple levels of the school environment (school, classroom, individual, larger community, and parents) with fidelity.
  • anti-bullying

    1. 1. Classroom Meetings – Building Relationships and Community May 7, 2009 Facilitated by: Penny Bisignano, State Olweus Coordinator Kathy Lockard, Olweus Trainer AEA 14 Jaymie Randel, Olweus Trainer AEA 267
    2. 2. Objectives… <ul><li>Participants will … </li></ul><ul><li>… learn about the why, what, and how of classroom meetings. </li></ul><ul><li>… learn about resources for classroom meetings. </li></ul><ul><li>… hear from schools who have implemented classroom meetings. </li></ul>
    3. 3. Featuring… <ul><li>Jan Strutzenberg, Professional School Counselor, Treynor Elementary School </li></ul><ul><li>Leona Hoth, Principal, Decorah Middle School </li></ul><ul><li>Barb Sims, Principal, Red Oak Middle School </li></ul><ul><li>La Jean Wehring, Math, Science, Health, Treynor Middle and High School </li></ul><ul><li>Michelle Dohlman, Professional School Counselor, Osage High School </li></ul>
    4. 4. Key Listening Points <ul><li>What do class meetings look like and sound like? </li></ul><ul><li>What topics are covered during initial class meetings? </li></ul><ul><li>Where are you making connections across the curriculum? </li></ul><ul><li>What do students have to say about class meetings? </li></ul>
    5. 5. Class Meetings Defined <ul><li>Watch a short portion of this video from the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program published by Hazelden. </li></ul><ul><li>A copy of this video can be obtained from your AEA Olweus Bullying Prevention Trainer. </li></ul>
    6. 6. Bullying Defined “ A student is being bullied when he or she is exposed, repeatedly and over time, to negative actions on the part of one or more students. Bullying implies an imbalance in power or strength. The student who is bullied has difficulty defending himself/herself .” Dan Olweus (1993)
    7. 7. Four Rules… <ul><li>We will not bully others. </li></ul><ul><li>We will help students who are bullied. </li></ul><ul><li>We will include students who are left out. </li></ul><ul><li>If we know that somebody is being bullied, we will tell an adult at school or at home. </li></ul>
    8. 8. Featured Schools … <ul><li>Treynor Elementary School, Treynor, Iowa </li></ul><ul><li>Jan Strutzenberg will share how Treynor Elementary established classroom meetings, what they do in the sessions, resources they like and use. They will give us some tips that they have found helpful and cautions or challenges they faced or face in their bullying prevention efforts through classroom meetings. </li></ul>
    9. 9. Conducting a Class Meeting <ul><li>Watch a short portion of this video from the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program published by Hazelden. </li></ul><ul><li>A copy of this video can be obtained from your AEA Olweus Bullying Prevention Trainer. </li></ul>
    10. 10. Class Meeting Guidelines <ul><li>If possible, meet once a week at a regular time. 15-30 minutes for lower primary. 30-40 minutes for upper primary and above. </li></ul><ul><li>Students arranged in a circle. </li></ul><ul><li>Conduct an honest open dialog. Focus on solutions. </li></ul><ul><li>No put-downs, accusations or disrespect to others. </li></ul><ul><li>Practice active listening (eyes, polite, hearing other side) and do not interrupt. </li></ul>
    11. 11. Class Meeting Guidelines <ul><li>Use of “I” voice. “I feel this way when (don’t accuse) classmates tease me.” NOT “Johnny is teasing on the playground.” </li></ul><ul><li>Student lead (when skilled) to set up the agenda. </li></ul><ul><li>Teacher is the final agenda arbitrator, but students could alternately facilitate the meeting. </li></ul>
    12. 12. Featured Schools … <ul><li>Decorah and Red Oak Middle Schools </li></ul><ul><li>Leona Hoth from Decorah and Barb Sims from Red Oak will share how they established classroom meetings in their schools, what they do in the sessions, resources they like and use. They will give us some tips that they have found helpful and cautions or challenges they faced or face in their bullying prevention efforts through classroom meetings. </li></ul>
    13. 13. Why Do Classroom Meetings An OBPP research study has shown that teachers who systematically used class meetings in their anti-bullying work obtained larger reductions in bullying problems in one year compared to those who used class meetings to a lesser degree or not at all. Olweus and Alsaker (1991)
    14. 14. Why Do Classroom Meetings <ul><li>Teach students about bullying, rules, related issues </li></ul><ul><li>Help students learn more about themselves, feelings, reactions </li></ul><ul><li>Build a sense of community </li></ul><ul><li>Help the teacher learn more about classroom culture </li></ul><ul><li>Provide a forum for addressing and following up on bullying issues </li></ul>
    15. 15. Featured Schools … <ul><li>Treynor and Osage High Schools </li></ul><ul><li>Michelle Dohlman from Osage and La Jean Wehring from Treynor will share how they established classroom meetings in their schools, what they do in the sessions, resources they like and use. They will give us some tips that they have found helpful and cautions or challenges they faced or face in their bullying prevention efforts through classroom meetings. </li></ul>
    16. 16. Focus classroom time… Summary <ul><li>Class meetings are a key program component and should be held regularly. </li></ul><ul><li>The teacher’s role is more of a facilitator than a teacher. Class meetings are an opportunity for students to share their feelings and opinions, and to suggest solutions as they learn to follow the rules and handle bullying situations appropriately. </li></ul><ul><li>Although class meetings will initially focus on bullying, the meetings should be viewed as a forum to discuss any issues that come up at school, to build cohesiveness and community, and to recognize achievements of the class as a whole. </li></ul>
    17. 17. <ul><li>Iowa is committed to providing all students with a safe and civil school environment in which all members of the school community are treated with dignity and respect. </li></ul>The Law
    18. 18. Program goal is to… Change the norms around bullying behavior and to restructure the school setting itself so that bullying is less likely to occur or be rewarded. Taken from Olweus Bullying Prevention Program Schoolwide Guide
    19. 19. Bullying Prevention Program Guidelines… <ul><li>Getting started with needs assessment and administrator support </li></ul><ul><li>Coordinating committee </li></ul><ul><li>Train all staff </li></ul><ul><li>Kick-off event for students </li></ul><ul><li>Family and community involvement </li></ul>
    20. 20. <ul><li>Establish and enforce school rules </li></ul><ul><li>Focus classroom time on bullying prevention </li></ul><ul><li>Increase adult supervision </li></ul><ul><li>Intervene consistently and appropriately (including follow-up) </li></ul><ul><li>Continue efforts over time </li></ul>Bullying Prevention Program Guidelines…
    21. 21. Classroom Meeting Resources <ul><li>Please refer to the handout provided along with the Power Point from today’s ICN located on the IPTV website. </li></ul>

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