Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
213_mlucchin_rev4.ppt
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

213_mlucchin_rev4.ppt

722
views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Education

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
722
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
63
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 1
  • 2. xDSL Technologie & Architectures 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 2
  • 3. Agenda • Basics • Applications • Architecture 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 3
  • 4. The Flavors of DSL • HDSL H = high data rate 384KB–2MB, usually symmetric, one or two lines, 4-5Km • SDSL S = single line Offshoot of HDSL, up to 2 MB, symmetric, one pair, 3-4Km • IDSL I = ISDN Basic rate ISDN service terminated on a dedicated device at the central office 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 4
  • 5. The Flavors of DSL • ADSL A = asymmetric Up to 8 MB downstream and 640 KB upstream, one line, 6Km • RADSL RA = rate-adaptive Nuance of ADSL, data rate adapts to line conditions • VDSL V = very high data rate Up to 52 MB downstream, 2+ MB upstream; 1,5-2Km 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 5
  • 6. Generic xDSL Implementation Central Office Telephone Switch Remote Location POTS xDSL xDSL Modem Corporation Modem Data or ISP Network Single Pair Splitter Telephone Line An Access Solution: Connects Remote User to Central Office as a Dedicated Circuit 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 6
  • 7. HDSL/SDSL HDSL/SDSL HDSL/SDSL Modems Modem Data <> 2 MB Network MDF Advantages Disadvantages • Proven technology • Two MB maximum data rate • Uses in-place copper loops • POTS requires second line • Reduces load on C.O. switch • Few vendor choices 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 7
  • 8. IDSL ISDN T/A Data 2B1Q Network MDF Advantages Disadvantages • Reduces load on C.O. switch • Limited data rate • Uses standard ISDN equipment • Second line for POTS • Inexpensive to deploy 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 8
  • 9. ADSL Terminology • ATU-R: ADSL Transmission Unit, Remote The remote user‘s ADSL modem The CPE • ATU-C: ADSL Transmission Unit, Central The ADSL point of termination in the central office An ADSL modem • DSLAM: DSL Access Multiplexer Central office device that concentrates many ADSL connections into one DSLAM contains ATU-Cs 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 9
  • 10. ADSL Voice Network Splitter DSLAM xDSL Modem (ATU-C) Data 8 Mbps > Network < 640 Kbps Splitter MDF Advantages Disadvantages • Date rate • Expensive modems, today • Uses in-place copper loops • Speed/distance trade-off • POTS on same line • Reduces load on C.O. switch • Emerging as the standard 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 10
  • 11. Connectivity, ADSL Voice Network Ethernet Frames Cells Packet Frame Relay What It will Evolve to • Ethernet frames or cells to the desktop • 1483 or PPP over ATM • Cell, Frame Relay, or packet backhaul • Traffic shaping, per user • Layer 3 service in the C.O. 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 11
  • 12. What Is xDSL? POTS ADSL 0 Hz 4400 Hz 1 MHz New Transmission Techniques That Drive High Data Rates over a Telephone Line‘s Higher Frequencies, Often without Disrupting POTS 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 12
  • 13. CAP and DMT Spectrum POTS Uplink Downlink POTS Uplink Downlink 0 KHz 4 KHz 30 KHz 138 KHz 156 KHz 1 MHz 0 KHz 4 KHz 30 KHz 138 KHz 156 KHz 1 MHz CAP RADSL Frequency Range DMT Frequency Range 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 13
  • 14. ADSL Rates Downstream Upstream Downstream Upstream 7 Mbps 1 Mbps 8 Mbps 640 Kbps 2.5 Mbps 950 Kbps 4 Mbps 160 Kbps 640 kbps 680 Kbps 2 Mbps 64 Kbps CAP RADSL ETSI Annex T1.413 Symmetric Rates Possible 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 14
  • 15. xDSL Comparisons Data Rate Distance Modulation Down/Up Links km Scheme VDSL 25 Mbps/1.6Mbps .9 QAM ADSL 8 Mbps/1.Mbps 5.5 DMT/CAP HDSL 1.5 Mbps/1.5Mbps 4.6 2B1Q SDSL 784kbp/1784Kbps 6.9 2B1Q IDSL 144Kbps/144Kbps 5.5 2B1Q 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 15
  • 16. Application Use xDSL Application ADSL Telecommuting, Remote Office Connectivity, Intense Web Access H/SDSL T1 Replacement, Remote Office Connectivity IDSL Telecommuting, Remote Office Connectivity VDSL Video, V.R., Multimedia 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 16
  • 17. Some Benefits of xDSL • High bandwidth at low cost • Load on C.O. switch is reduced • Enables service providers to create new network services • Facilitates new and better content delivery 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 17
  • 18. Some Implications of xDSL • Demands larger and more robust backbone data networks • Deploying today may require use of immature technology • Effective pricing and service models need to be defined 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 18
  • 19. Agenda • Basics • Applications • Architecture 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 19
  • 20. xDSL Modem Technology Speed vs Port Modulation POTS/ISDN Distance Density Technique Splitters xDSL Modem Technology 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 20
  • 21. Scaleable High Performance Infrastructure xDSL Caching Provisioning Core PoP High Performance Infrastructure xDSL Modem Technology 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 21
  • 22. Differentiated Service Elements The Enabling Technologies Layer 3 Layer 2/3 Internet Multicasting QoS VPNs Service Elements High Performance Infrastructure xDSL Modem Technology 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 22
  • 23. Applications Corporate Distance High-Speed VoIP Entertainment Financial Access Learning Internet VoATM Push Applications Services High Performance Infrastructure xDSL Modem Technology 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 23
  • 24. Service Selection Dynamic Selection Under User Control Service Selection Corporate Distance High-Speed Financial Internet Voice Entertainment Access Learning Push Applications Service Elements High Performance Routing and Switching xDSL Modem Technology 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 24
  • 25. Corporate Intranet Access ATU-R/ ADSL PoP Router VoIP/ POTS/ISDN VoATM Splitter Aggregator Router Splitter ATU-R ADSLAM Authentication 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 25
  • 26. Distance Learning ADSL PoP Education Network ATM Core Live or Stored Aggregator Content Delivery Splitter to Remote Classrooms, Dormitories, Homes ADSLAM Packet Core Cache IP/TV 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 26
  • 27. High-Speed Internet Access ADSL PoP Authentication ISP (a,b,c) Aggregator Splitter ADSLAM Hierarchy of Cache Engines Cache 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 27
  • 28. Entertainment ADSL PoP • 30–120 sec video clips cached, assembled, and pushed based ISP (a,b,c) Aggregator ATM Core on predefined or Splitter user-defined profile • Non-interactive ―personal‖ TV providing video and data clips ADSLAM • Requires IP Multicast and QoS support Variation Is ‗True‘ VoD in Some Niche Markets Cache VoD Such as Hospitality, Medical, Education Sports CNBC CNN Weather Update Report on Headlines CSCO MyTV MyTV MyTV MyTV 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 28
  • 29. Financial Data Distribution ATU-R/ ADSL PoP Router VoIP/ POTS/ISDN VoATM Splitter Router Aggregator Splitter ATU-R ADSLAM Relies on Publish-and-Subscribe Internet Push Technologies—Tibco Network Must Support IP Multicast Stock Info Stock Info Push Stock Info Stock Info Stock Info 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 29
  • 30. ADSL—Data Bypass Central Office CPE SMB/SOHO POTS Splitter ADSL L2/L3 MDF Engine Splitter Residential POTS DSLAM Splitter ADSL Content Providers Copper Loop 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 30
  • 31. Voice Interworking for PSTN Connectivity ATU-R/ ADSL PoP Router VoIP/ POTS/ISDN VoATM Splitter POTS/ISDN ATM Core Router Splitter ATU-R ISP (a,b,c) ADSLAM Aggregator Packet Core Corporate GW (a,b,c) 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 31
  • 32. End-to-End ADSL Architecture PSTN DSLAM ATU-R IP IP ISP ATM/ Frame Relay Network ISP L2/L3 Corporate Services UCP Aggregator ATU-R Content Local Loop Central Office Broadband Network Providers 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 32
  • 33. Agenda • Basics • Applications • Architecture 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 33
  • 34. ADSL Based Architecture IP Backbone SDH or ATM Backbone Access Network • Service delivery network 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 34
  • 35. Multiservice DSL Multiplexer • Support many subscribers ADSL CAP or DMT Adaptive or selective Voice Filter • Line rates OC-3/ • ATM architecture STM-1 • OC-3/STM-1 trunk cards • DS3/E3 trunk cards Voice • External voice filtering Filter • NEBS compliant • WEB-SNMP managed 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 35
  • 36. Digital Off-Hook ADSL Customer 360 56 56 STM-1,E3 or Premise 360 Line NxM xDSL 4xE1 Mux Modem ADSL Cards Switch Pool Loops Off Hook Detect & Switch Controller • Optional modem pooling technology • Enables subscriber concentration up to 10:1 • Lowers cost, power consumption, heat dissipation • Logical pooling increases tariff flexibility 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 36
  • 37. Subtending Network Backbone • Subtend up to (6) 6200e chassis from ATM STM-1, E3 a single 6200e • Scales up to 2,800 users per ATM ATM Network ATM E3 Connection E3 • Fewer ATM switch ports required ATM ATM ATM ATM E3 E3 E3 E3 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 37
  • 38. 6200e System Components Multiplexer Chassis (MC) Line Concentration Chassis (LCC) POTS Splitter Chassis (PSC) 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 38
  • 39. Multiplexer Chassis (MC) 11 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 12131415161718 27 1920212223242526 28293031323334 • 38 slots – Primary / Secondary System Controller Slots (11,27) – Primary / Secondary Network Interface Slots (9,10), switch fabric – 32 Universal Slots for ATU-Cs or LIMs (1-7,12-26,28-34), modem cards – 2 Expansion Slots (8,26) 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 39
  • 40. Subtend Host Modules Expansion Slots 11 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 121314 1516 1718 27 19 20 21 2223 2425 26 282930 3132 3334 • Use Expansion Slots to access ATM switch – 90 Mbps serial connection to its own ATM switch port • Aggregates ATM connections from subtended 6200e‘s 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 40
  • 41. Line Concentration Chassis (LCC) 10 11 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1213 1415 1617 18 19 20 • Extends Line Capacity of MC through Digital Off- Hook • Supports 18 quad port LIMs • MC can electrically support up to 5 LCCs (360 lines maximum) 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 41
  • 42. POTS Splitter Chassis (PSC) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1314 1516 1718 19 20 21 22 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1112 1314 1516 17 18 • Subscriber loops with POTS/RADSL terminate at PSC (18 lines per 50 pin CHAMP) • Provides connections to Voice Switch and 6200e MC/LCC • Supports 18 quad port PSMs • Passive Chassis 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 42
  • 43. POTS Splitter Modules PSM Slots 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1112 1314 1516 17 18 • 4 subscriber ports per PSM • Separates Voice band frequencies from composite signal • Active power options available 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 43
  • 44. 6200e Physical Connections Ethernet and Serial Management STM-1,E3 Interfaces ATM ATM PSTN MC Network Class 5 Switch LCC Data 288 RADSL Interfaces LCC Subscriber Lines 80 POTS LCC Lines LCC 72 ADSL Lines 72 POTS Lines PSC 72 ADSL Lines PSC MDF PSC PSC 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 44
  • 45. Multiservice DSL Aggregator • High-capacity • NEBS and ETSI compliant • Fully redundant • Multi layer ATM-switch • Optional plug-in routers to add L2/L3 services • Multiple slots: • SONET STS3/SDH STM1 90i/s ATM OC-3 trunk • DS3/E3 ATM, DS3/E3 FR 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 45
  • 46. ADSL CPE Requirements • IP routing • Multicast support • Traffic shaping • Network address translation • Data and voice integration • IP over ATM support • Management 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 46
  • 47. Design Considerations • Twisted pair bundle issue • Throughput expectations • Traffic shaping and policing • L3 Breakout at the edge Scalability and value-add services • Network/content design 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 47
  • 48. Multiservice DSL Architecture • Optimized VC budget • Dynamic assignment of IP addresses • Service differentiation • Dynamic service selection • Provisioning flexibility • Existing operational support 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 48
  • 49. ADSL Design • VC management • Bandwidth management Architecture: L2 vs. L3 Value add: Content management • CPE requirements 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 49
  • 50. A Multiservice DSL Solution A A+D B C D D Multiservice Multiservice Multiservice Multiservice Multiservice Access Multiplexing Creation Core Universe 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 50
  • 51. ADSL Ethernet model Ethernet Ethernet Fast Ethernet ADSL Catalyst® Cisco 7200 5xxx Cisco 4xxx Ethernet • Broadcast segmentation ADSL • LAN switches Port fanout VLAN • L3 POP breakout 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 51
  • 52. ADSL Ethernet model — ATM framing and transport ATM VC Ethernet ATM ADSL DSLAM LS1010 7200 • RFC1483 based service • L2 service provisioning at ADSL POP • L3 function CPE Corporate site or ISP 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 52
  • 53. Ethernet to the User • Massive market penetration, low cost, already available • Value add via L3 functions • Easy-of-use • ATM transport on ADSL line • IP over ATM options available 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 53
  • 54. ATM to the User • Multiservice capability • ATM QoS • PPP over ATM for single user solution • ATM shaping required 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 54
  • 55. 626 Data Flow Cells Cell buffers and Cells Management Plane LAN0 WAN0 • All VCs that are not identified as management cells are buffered and switched to WAN port • Cell buffers used for ADSL transmit queue only • 4 unique, configurable VPI,VCI combinations are passed to software SAR for use as management channels 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 55
  • 56. Bandwidth Management: Architecture • L2 end-to-end issue • L3 local termination • Broadcasts segmentation • Bandwidth misused due to bridging architecture • No access content/caching 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 56
  • 57. ―Classic‖ VPN ATM-to-ATM Solution ATM PVC ATM Ethernet • Protocol Transparency • VC between CPE router and ISP central router • Multiple QoS classes and guaranteed levels of QoS • IP services mapped over ATM 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 57
  • 58. PPP over ATM over ADSL with L2TP Tunnel L2TP Tunnel Aggregator ATU-R PPP/ATM ATM AAA DNS/DHCP PPP/L2TP Server Server • Essential operational functions can be delivered using well established features in PPP/L2TP, such as: Authentication (PAP, CHAP, etc.) Address Administration done at the service provider gateway Layer 3 autoconfig (DHCP, DNS, etc.) Dynamic Selection of Multiple Destinations (via multiple PPP Sessions) Encryption 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 58
  • 59. Applying the PPP Model to ADSL ISP / DSLAM Corporate ATU-R PPP Session ATM AAA DNS/DHCP Server • Easy migration for ISP (users look like dial subscribers) • Authentication (PAP, CHAP, etc.) • Dynamic address administration • BUT - Still requires individual PVC for each user, for each destination Different QoS still requires manual PVC reconfiguration Issues for the CPE and client PC 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 59
  • 60. Applying the PPP Model to ADSL Issues for the CPE • PPP to the desktop ADSL NIC ATM25 NIC with ATM25 ADSL Modem • Challenges with Ethernet interface CPE with PPP over ATM over ADSL BMAP (also provides support for USB) Others (direct PPP over Ethernet) 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 60
  • 61. Cisco 675/676 SOHO/Telecommuter ADSL Router Customer Premise Central Office Ethernet RADSL Transport • Router based CPE for managed and L3 services • PPP termination and routing functions • Optional bridging option • ADSL line termination on the router 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 61
  • 62. PPP Routing in 675/676 User Data (IP) PPP AAL5 ATM DSL Transmission Technology 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 62
  • 63. RFC 1483 Bridging in 675/676 User Data (802.3 MAC) LLC/SNAP AAL5 ATM DSL Transmission Technology 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 63
  • 64. Integrated PC solution Cells IP Packets PPP Driver 605 • ADSL line terminated on the PC card • Multiple PPP session • PPP frames into cells 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 64
  • 65. PPP Connections in the 605/606 User Data (IP) PPP AAL5 ATM DSL Transmission Technology 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 65
  • 66. Universal Access Concentrator DSLAM Aggregation • Aggregates traffic from ATM multiple DSLAMs onto Core backbone • Full traffic management • Differentiated services through QoS Cisco Per VC traffic shaping 6400 Control of access speed via ATM Packet Cisco Core • Optimises core bandwidth 6200 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 66
  • 67. Universal Access Concentrator PPP Termination DSLAM 6400 ATU-R PPP Session ATM, Packet AAA Server • Acts as a Broadband Access Server • Terminates PPP sessions Radius authentication • Massive reduction in PVC configuration • Classifies traffic according to user attributes 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 67
  • 68. Universal Access Concentrator Layer 3 QoS / Layer 3 Breakout DSL PoP • Per User / Per Application Cisco AS 5300 QoS Support for mixed IP POTS/ISDN traffic V Voice Switch Multimedia Voice WWW Cisco WWW 6400 Email Email Cisco • VoIP breakout 6200 • Local Content / Caching VoIP Cache • Multicast CCE IP/TV TIBCO 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 68
  • 69. VPN Service: L2 and L3 Corporate A Layer 3 VPN Using GRE or L2TP Network Internet Backbone ATM Backbone Connection to Corporate A Corporate B Network Access Network Connection to Corporate B Layer 2 VPN Using ATM PVC 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 69
  • 70. System Architecture SP Backbones IP PoPs National and Residential International Internet GW PoPs ATM Core Core ADSL PoP Business Global Internet Internet Core 1000 Subscribers n VPN Core Other Services Other ISPs (I.e., VoD) Other Access Technologies 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 70
  • 71. ADSL PoP Contention IP PoP ADSL PoP ATM Core Internet Bandwidth 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 71
  • 72. ATM Core Contention IP PoP ADSL PoP ATM Core Internet Bandwidth 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 72
  • 73. IP PoP Contention IP PoP ADSL PoP ATM Core Internet Bandwidth 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 73
  • 74. Content Networking Architecture Efficient Pull-based Network Migration to Push-based Service ADSL PoP Web Web Web Web Hosting Caching Caching Caching 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 74
  • 75. Content Management Benefits • Optimization bandwidth use • Insertion of local content / ads • Value-add services To end-users, perceived better service To content providers • Traffic shaping and policing required ATM or IP QoS 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 75
  • 76. Universal Access Concentrator Tunneling DSLAM 6400 LNS ATU-R ATM, PPP Session L2TP Tunnel Packet AAA AAA Server DNS/DHCP Server • PPP Session intercepted at 6400, user identified and tunnel established based on login information Address assigned by LNS (Tunnel destination) Service / Destination selection based on login Differentiated Services - tunnel selection based on subscribed QoS • Applications - Virtual Private Networking - Teleworking Application Access to third party services / content 213 Access to third party ISP NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 76
  • 77. Service Selection for the Consumer/Telecommuter Market AAA SSG Server Service A A+B L2TP A L2TP B B Service B • Simultaneous connections to multiple services / service providers 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 77
  • 78. Agenda • Basics • Applications • Architecture • POTS splitter options 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 78
  • 79. Function of CPE Splitter POTS Upstream Downstream • Separates POTS band from composite signal • Roll off frequency is point where pass band is 3dB down from 0 attenuation • 8 kHz and 15 kHz roll off versions available • Standard POTS needs only 8 kHz version. 4 kHz f1 f2 • Centrex (CLASS) services need 15 kHz version to preserve 8 kHz QPSK loop signaling Roll off Frequency 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 79
  • 80. Typical Home Wiring with Splitter Existing Wiring Splitter NID New Wiring (Home Run) 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 80
  • 81. Splitter Options Adjunct NID Interior Wall mount Siecor or Keptel plug-in module 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 81
  • 82. Splitterless Option - EZ-DSL • CPE Splitters are not required! • Lower data rates and microfilters enable complete customer installation of CPE, with no wiring changes and no Telco No new internal truck roll wiring 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 82
  • 83. EZ-DSL Microfilter • 2-pole low pass filter • Isolates telephone load from DSL equalizer • Isolates high frequency components from telephone handset • Inline and wall mount versions available 213 NW’98 © 1998, Cisco Systems, Inc. 83