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Machinery Safety System Selection and Development

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  • 1. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.Rev 5058-CO900DMachinery Safety System Selection & DevelopmentChris BrogliGlobal Business Development Manager for Safety
  • 2. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.AgendaTypes of Safety Logic SystemsSafety Logic System Functionality and PurposeIntroductionMarket SegmentsDifferences in Safety Logic SystemsDetermining the Best Safety System for YouHow Rockwell Automation can Help
  • 3. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.Session Purpose and Intent This session is meant to outline the steps of selecting &developing machinery safety solutions. Additional sessions (SF01, SF02, SF04 & SF05) breakthis process down in more detail.
  • 4. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.AgendaTypes of Safety Logic SystemsSafety Logic System Functionality and PurposeIntroductionMarket SegmentsDifferences in Safety Logic SystemsDetermining the Best Safety System for YouHow Rockwell Automation can Help
  • 5. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 5SENSORCONTROL SYSTEMConnection systemsSensors[e.g. Interlock switch]LOGIC SOLVER ACTUATORLogic Solver [e.g. Modular Relay]Logic Solver [e.g. Programmable Controller]NetworksActuators[e.g. Contactors]Distributed InputsDistributed OutputsActuators[e.g. Servos, Std. Drives]Rockwell Automation has the broadest portfolio of safety sensors,safety logic systems, and safety actuators in the market!Safety System Components
  • 6. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.Safety Logic DevicesSafety Logic DevicesSENSORCONTROL SYSTEMLOGIC SOLVER ACTUATORSafety Logic devices monitor the status of safety input devices,make decisions, and control the safety output devices.
  • 7. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.MonitoringControlDiagnosticsLogic Functionality
  • 8. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.AgendaTypes of Safety Logic SystemsSafety Logic System Functionality and PurposeIntroductionMarket SegmentsDifferences in Safety Logic SystemsDetermining the Best Safety System for YouHow Rockwell Automation can Help
  • 9. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. There are 3 safety logic architecturesthat can be used to provide safetycontrol Dedicated Relay Modular Relay Safety PLC or ControllerSafety PLC &SafetyControllersModular RelayDedicated RelayInputs OutputsBaseSafety Logic Architectures
  • 10. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.Rockwell Automation ScalableSafety SolutionsIntegration ContinuumOffering solution that fit your needs, not ours!Cost-effective Component Solutions Mid-Range Solutions Integrated SolutionsLow HighSimple connectivityMechanical linked machineStand alone machineLow costJust enough controlMulti-axis motionIncreased controller capabilitiesMix of mechanical and electrical controlsLow engineering costsCoordinated multi-axis motionRobotic feedersElectronic line shaftingAdvanced connectivityAdvanced information capabilitiesComponents & Intelligent Motor Control Integrated Architecture ™1010Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 11. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.AgendaTypes of Safety Logic SystemsSafety Logic System Functionality and PurposeIntroductionMarket SegmentsDifferences in Safety Logic SystemsDetermining the Best Safety System for YouHow Rockwell Automation can Help
  • 12. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.Safety Market Segmentation30% of respondents usecontemporary/integratedsafety solutions.Source: Control Design Magazine Survey, June 200930%30%• The largest market for safety products is with the low to mid range OEMs.70%use hard-wired relay-basedsafety systems.
  • 13. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.Cutting & slicingMachinesShrinkWrappersForm Fill & SealMachinesFood & BeverageBottle labelingIntegratedBottling LinesSafety Market SegmentationHigh end safetyLow end safety30% of the marketLow end safetyrelay marketMid-range safety40% of the market 30% of the marketMid level safety relay &controller marketHigh level safetycontroller marketPalletizers &De-palletizersCase PackerSystems
  • 14. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.AgendaTypes of Safety Logic SystemsSafety Logic System Functionality and PurposeIntroductionMarket SegmentsDifferences in Safety Logic SystemsDetermining the Best Safety System for YouHow Rockwell Automation can Help
  • 15. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.Low End Safety SystemsCutting & slicingMachinesShrinkWrappersLow end safetyLow end safetyrelay market40% of the marketTend to use Micro controllers and simple safety relaysolutions with 1 zone of control & little to no motioncontrol:Simple safety input monitoringand power isolationSimple safety inputmonitoring and drive controlBenefits: Low cost Simple installation Just enough control for smallapplications Easy diagnostics at the relay
  • 16. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.Mid-level Safety SystemsRequire more than stand alone control but need lowcost solutions. These systems typically have 25 to 100points of I/O, 2 to 3 zones of safety control, 2 to 6 axesof motion control, and 2-6 screens of visualization.Modular and expandable relaysystems that are capable ofmultiple zones of controlForm Fill &SealMachinesMid-range safety30% of the marketMid-level safety relay & controllermarketPalletizers &De-palletizersCase PackerSystemsSafety Controllers that havenetwork and zone controlcapabilityBenefits: Low to medium cost Simple installation Just enough control for the application Easy diagnostics at the relay and HMI Expandable Networkable Can do some zone control
  • 17. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.High End Safety SystemsFood & BeverageBottle labelingIntegratedBottling LinesHigh end safety30% of the marketHigh level safetycontroller marketSolutions in the high end market tend to be solutions thatare large, complex and integrated. These systems oftenhave multiple zones of control, distributed I/O, multipleaxis of motion control, high I/O counts and complex safetyneeds.Benefits: Scalable Networkable Modular Easy diagnostics via communicationsto a common HMI screen. Expandable Flexible Productivity Gains Efficiency Gains
  • 18. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.Shared assets across standard & safety control drive cost savings andadd significant value throughout the manufacturing process.High End Safety Systems are also known asintegrated & contemporary safety systems!
  • 19. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.9/9/2011Contemporary Safety Solutions that providebetter solutions for customer needs!We use the term contemporary because it is a change in the way safety systems havebeen applied & integrated in the past. Safety was an add-on to the control system.Contemporary safety solutions are embedded into the design thus becoming a part ofhow the machine operates. Examples of contemporary solutions are described below: Safe speed – This allows for minor machine servicing like adjustments, feeding, cleaning& wash-downs without shutting the machine down because the machine is operating at aspeed that deemed to be safe (Less than 250mm per second). Safe direction – This allows for cleaning & adjustments because the hazard has beenremoved by reversing hazard causing motion. Safe position – This allows for interaction with equipment as long as the hazard is in asafe position/location. Zone control – This allows for parts of a machine to operate while other pieces tocontinue operation thus reducing scrap & waste. Advanced diagnostics – Contemporary safety solutions typically have better diagnosticsbecause the standard and safety control are in 1 control system. This allows for betterMTTR (Mean Time To Repair). Distributed I/O – (Both safety and standard). This allows for modular designs that canbe broken down for quick shipping and re-assembly at customer locations.
  • 20. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.Contemporary safety brings things together!ControlLogix chassisPowerFlex 755ArmorBlock I/OEtherNet/IPPV+ EOISafetyRelaySafetyRelayStratix 8000ETAPPOINT I/OSafety SystemAn ethernetswitch maynot berequired.Safetyfunctionalitycan now beintegratedintoGuardLogix.Data &diagnosticscan bedisplayed onone HMI.BenefitsInformationenabled.Fewercomponents.Less training.Streamlinedmaintenance.Optimalconnectivitywith multiplenetworks.Kinetix6000DeviceNetSafety relays& contactorsmay not berequired.
  • 21. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.Communication &Coordination LogicStandardControllerMotionControllerSafetyControllerSoftwareLogicIntegratedSafetyControllerControlCompetitive solutions typically require 2 or 3 different softwarepackages and 20-30% more engineering and design time than theequivalent safety system from Rockwell Automation!Competitive vs. Rockwell SolutionsSoftwareLogic
  • 22. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.AgendaTypes of Safety Logic SystemsSafety Logic System Functionality and PurposeIntroductionMarket SegmentsDifferences in Safety Logic SystemsDetermining the Best Safety System for YouHow Rockwell Automation can Help
  • 23. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 23How do I determine the best safetysystem for me?
  • 24. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.Follow the SafetyLife Cycle!5. Operate, Maintain and Improve 1. Assessment4. Installation and Validation 2. Functional SafetySystem Requirements3. Design and VerificationIdentifies Task &Hazards PairsCircuit & Component SelectionSafety System DesignDesign VerificationGuarding designOutlines functionalrequirements of the safetysystemFinal site assemblyCommissioningValidationFinal Assessment ValidationDetailed operational specificationRequired maintenance schedulePreventive maintenance scheduleThe Safety Life-cycle helps you determinesystem requirements & needs!Steps 1 & 2 help to define system requirements priorto the selection & design process!
  • 25. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.Step 1: Do a Risk Assessment! ISO-13849-1 identifies a risk assessment as the means of determiningrisk levels, associated risk reduction methodologies, and the type ofsafety system performance that needs to be implemented. Risk assessments also help identify each hazard that needs to besafeguarded.S1S2F2F1abbP1P2ecddP1P2P1P2P1P2F2F1bbcdd
  • 26. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.Step 2: Develop a Functional Specification! A Functional Safety Specification helps determine the proper safetyfunction needed to protect people from each hazard on themachine/system. Functional specifications determine the following: Safety system needs for each mode of operation. Safety function(s) needed to mitigate each hazard/risk. Safety system structure & technologies (Zones/Safe Speed/SafeDirection).
  • 27. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.My assessment &requirements specsure made this easy!Step 3: Design & selectionconsiderations!Design considerations: What mitigation technique should I use? What circuit structure should I use? What safety products should I use? What type of control system should I use?(Relays/Controllers/PLC’s) What type of special operations do I need?(Zone control/Safe-speed/etc.) Where are all of my safety devices? What kind of interactions are needed forauxiliary machines? What kind of diagnostics do I need? Should I use hardwiring or networkedsystems?
  • 28. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.Additional Factors in Determination of Design Category, PL, or SIL level requirement Functional requirements Compatible interfaces to sensors and actuators System size / footprint System complexity – Logic Requirements Process complexity Zoning requirements Safety Monitoring / Diagnostics / Information Documentation, Validation, Reporting Cost
  • 29. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.Cultural Factors that Drive Relayand Controller Selection!1. Customer does not use automationproducts2. Customer’s Maintenance staff does notuse PCs and is not software literate3. Customer not clear on how safetysystems will impact his business, plant,machinery, or processes4. Customer very happy with SLCs,Micrologix or similar low end PLCsolutions1. Customer is a sophisticated user ofautomation2. Customer Uses Integrated Architecture /Logix3. Customer has challenging applications andcan deal with overhead to “get started”4. Customer has numerous potentialapplications and wants to maximizeproductivityRelay Solutions Controller & PLC Solutions
  • 30. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.Safety Control System Options (ControlDevices)SafetyControllerSafety PLCs - Functionality Certified up to SIL 3 / Cat 4 IEC 61311 Programming Safety Specific Instructions Standard Networking Options Local or Distributed Safety I/O Safety Networking Options Discrete, Analog & High SpeedCounter I/OConfigurableRelay SystemDedicatedRelaysIntegratedSafety PLCSafety Relays - Functionality Certified to Cat 4 Electromechanical or Electronic Dedicated or Expandable Application Specific Units - Mats, LightCurtains Standard Networking Options - DiagnosticsIntegratedSafety PLCStandards allow usage of programmable electronic safety controls.
  • 31. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.Safety Relay/Safety Controller/SafetyPLC Selection MatrixSafety Relays 1 Zone Local/Hardwired I/O Simple Safety Logic 1 to 2 dual channel Inputs 2 to 3 outputsSafety Controllers & ExpandableRelays 1 to 3 Zones Local & Distributed I/O Simple & Semi-complexSafety Logic 1 to 10 dual channel Inputs 1 to 10 outputs Basic Diagnostics thru PLCSafety PLCs More Than 3 Zones Distributed I/O Simple & Complex Safety &Standard Logic 1 to 200 dual channel Inputs 1 to 200 outputs Advanced HMI Diagnostics
  • 32. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.AgendaTypes of Safety Logic SystemsSafety Logic System Functionality and PurposeIntroductionMarket SegmentsDifferences in Safety Logic SystemsDetermining the Best Safety System for YouHow Rockwell Automation can Help
  • 33. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.Rockwell Automation the global leader insafety (Services/Products/Solutions)!Rockwell Automation is the worlds lead in safetyautomation solutions and can help in any phase ofyour project from assessment to mitigation to start-upand validation!30 + RA SafetyProfessionals3 RA Safety Partners– 20 Resources4 SafetyProfessionals20+ RA SafetyProfessionals12 RA Safety Partners –24+ Resources20+ SafetyProfessionals6 SafetyProfessionals5 SafetyProfessionals5 SafetyProfessionals
  • 34. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.Rev 5058-CO900DQuestions?
  • 35. Copyright © 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved.Rev 5058-CO900DThank you for participating!