Future Trends in Industrial Networking
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Future Trends in Industrial Networking

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Learn how industrial networking advances can help achieve greater plant performance.

Learn how industrial networking advances can help achieve greater plant performance.

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  • This is about what is happening now – when you want to know where you are going, it helps to know where you have come from
  • While the numbers behind EtherNet/IP are variable, all major research bodies find that EtherNet/IP is #1 with >30% market share
  • I recently asked a group of end users how hard it was to convince their machine builders to use EtherNet/IP; they said ‘not at all’. This is a technology that delivers benefits to both machine builder and manufacturers alike
  • Manufacturing lags enterprise, and enterprise lags consumer, but we are only talking about time – are we ready for proliferation of mobile devices, exponential growth in data volumes and dramatic shifts in the kind of data flowing through our networks. Maintenance manuals on Youtube? You bet!
  • Best in class manufacturers are standardizing on Ethernet and using it to provide real time visibility throughout the enterprise.
  • The biggest change happening today is the penetration of Ethernet into Process Control
  • This is a slide I showed 4 years ago here in Chicago in the same presentation when I addressed Process Control. Things have changed in the last 4 years.
  • E+H and other process device manufacturers are implementing EIP because customers want to buy it!
  • Reducing network count, maintenance training, toolsets
  • RA’s chances of winning in Process applications come when EtherNet/IP is being used. If you are an end user, that is when we deliver our greatest benefits. If you are an OEM or SI, that is when you deliver the greatest benefits
  • 1 network may be lower cost, but it must be well designedIn the old days, control systems would have 1,000s of network connected nodes; about half of them spread across maybe 100 DeviceNets, maybe 40 ControlNet and maybe 4 isolated EthernetsOne network is great, but 6,000 devices on a single network is unmanageable – we need to put tools in place to make it manageable
  • Comms between segment is only possible for solutions that use IP as part of std unmodified Ethernet. Addition of Unicast in V19 makes this easy and efficient to take advantage of
  • Network Address Translation provides the most elegant integration mechanism for a machine to be installed into a line or plant
  • These are some of the problems we need to address next
  • Talk about difference between NAT and Layer 3 from the users perspective, quoting Daimler in a german magazine
  • OEMs and End User’s free choice will not match – the plusses in design and install (where an OEM spends money) drive them to NAT while the plusses in the operate and maintain cycle drive the End User to a layer 3 solutionWe all need to work together to a solution that meets the needs of both
  • IP addresses go against best practice in the commercial and industrial worlds. Logix 5000 already supports address by host name as well as IP address
  • Small section – there is a separate wireless tech session
  • Convergence and central management are just as important in a wireless environment as a wired one
  • Testing proves the technology for control applications. >5k pps > good for any app solved with an ENBT. Latency of <4ms good for any app with default RPIs of 20ms
  • Not a priority! You don’t need to be afraid of IPv6

Future Trends in Industrial Networking Future Trends in Industrial Networking Presentation Transcript

  • Future Trends in Industrial Networking Paul Brooks Business Development Manager, Networks PortfolioCopyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Agenda 1. Industry Trends 2. EtherNet/IP in Process 3. Network Architecture Direction 4. Wireless Networking 5. IPv6 Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved. 2
  • INDUSTRY TRENDS Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved. 3
  • 2011 - Leading Industrial Protocols4 Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Who says EtherNet/IP is Globally #1? If you don’t believe me, believe the competition. Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved. 5
  • Packaging Machinery Manufacturers Institute (PMMI) View 51% of Packaging OEMs and Machine builder survey respondents say their current and emerging preference for industrial protocol is EtherNet/IP. "PMMI is a trade association with more than 500 member companies that manufacture packaging and packaging-related machinery.”6 Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Changing Dynamics in a Connected World “The inbox culture is dead. To solve problems and make decisions effectively, we mustoften come together in real time, rather than wait for the e-mail” Evan Rosen – Culture of Collaboration Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Convergence is Happening 54% 44% Best-in-Class Respondents Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Convergence Guy • Do I spend my day worrying about actionable information or production reliability? • Is real-time information updated every 10 seconds or every 10 milliseconds? • Do I worry about networks or fieldbuses? • Do I need to deliver web based dash-boards or on- machine operator panels? • Do I use CiscoWorks or RSLogix™ 5000 software? • Do I manage deployment of telephones or I/O? • Which of these is important to my employer? • Am I IT or Automation? Not all manufacturers want to employ Convergence Guy…… the ones who do generally don’t care if he works for IT or production. Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved. 9
  • Industry TrendsETHERNET/IP FOR PROCESSCONTROL Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved. 10
  • The View 4 Years Ago…• EtherNet/IP isn‟t ready for Process I/O Control: – No redundant controller – No redundant network – No redundant I/O• Trigger point: – Instruments Integrated as tightly as Drives Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved. 11
  • Recent and Upcoming Instrument Integration Product Launches Reduced network count, common integration profiles, harmonized user experience. Scalable offering for Skid Builder and Plant Manager.12 Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • PlantPAx System Release 2.0 Replicated Operator• End-to-end high Workstations availability• Scalable to match Redundant Servers needs with economics Redundant Networks Redundant Controllers Meeting the needs of Redundant I/O Modules demanding critical process control and Redundant Field Devices 24x7 applications Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved. 13
  • Process Instrumentation on EtherNet/IP - Customer Benefits• Simplified integration – Minimal programming required – Operator faceplates• Simpler, easier to manage architectures – Same network for controllers, I/O, drives, computers and now instruments – Instrument is a network node. Information is available to any controller or computer in the network without application code• Reduced hardware costs – No need for additional interfaces – Single instrument can provide real-time data for multiple variables Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved. 14
  • Mass Flowmeters in a Converged Network ArchitectureSame experience, Real-time display of all look & feel as process variables RockwellAutomation devices (i.e. PowerFlex® Plant Network drive) Operator faceplates identical to HART RSLogix 5000 profile Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved. 15
  • The 4th Process Network… Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved. 16
  • NETWORK ARCHITECTUREDIRECTION (SHORT TERM) Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved. 17
  • Converged Plantwide Ethernet Architectures• Manufacturing framework• Effective management of ERP, Email, Wide Area Network Enterprise Zone network and switches (WAN) Levels 4 and 5 Patch Management Demilitarized Zone (DMZ)• Hierarchical segmentation Terminal Services Application Mirror AV Server Gbps Link for – Traffic management Failover Detection Firewall (Standby) – Policy enforcement Firewall Cisco ASA 5500 Demilitarized Zone (DMZ)• Real-time performance (Active) FactoryTalk Application Servers Manufacturing Zone •View Site Manufacturing – Virtual LANs • Historian Cisco Catalyst 6500/4500 Operations and Control • AssetCentre Level 3 • Transaction Manager – Quality of Service (QoS) FactoryTalk Services Cisco Catalyst Switch Platform • Directory Network Services – Multicast management • Security Catalyst 3750 Data Servers StackWise •DNS, DHCP, syslog server Switch Stack • Network and security management• Security policies Levels 0–2 Cell/Area Zones HMI Controller Rockwell Automation Stratix 8000 Drive Layer 2 Access Switch HMI Controller DIO Drive Drive HMI DIO DIO DIO Cell/Area #1 Controller Cell/Area #2 Cell/Area #3 (Redundant Star Topology) (Ring Topology) (Bus/Star Topology) http://www.ab.com/networks/architectures.html Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved. 18
  • Network SegmentationEach machine - each machine builder - with their own subnet Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved. 19
  • Segmentation by Function, not by Location Clear division of responsibilities Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved. 20
  • Control Between Subnets• Enables a Logix controller to communicate to other EtherNet/IP devices via unicast • Applies to standard I/O* and standard produced/consumed tags • Unicast support for safety produced/consumed tags and safety I/O will be added at a later release• Unicast also allows EtherNet/IP produced/consumed tag communications in Logix to span multiple subnets • Example application includes interlocking of remote controllers over the plant infrastructure• Helps streamline traffic on the network by allowing one-to-one transmission of EtherNet/IP I/O data which greatly eliminates unwanted multicast traffic * Hardware support may vary Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved. 21
  • Network Address Translation Animated Slide Between Machine and Enterprise Line NAT 53.14.y .z: 10.104.y.z 10.104.100.23 Machine 1 NAT Machine 2 NAT 10.104.101.x : 10.104.102.x : 192.168.1.x 192.168.1.x53.14.101.17 10.104.102.17 192.168.1.104 192.168.1.104 Within a Machine Between Machine and Line Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • NETWORK ARCHITECTUREDIRECTION (LONG TERM) Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved. 23
  • Network Address Translation (NAT) orFlat Networks? NAT can result in many IP Layer 3 switching can result in addresses for a single device – different application files for when do you use which? identical machines Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved. 24
  • Strengths and Weaknesses NAT vs Layer 3Criterion NAT router Enterprise-wide routingFor pre-commissioning at easily possible (+) Equipment manufacturerequipment manufacturer requires a planned address Design and list (-) InstallDuplication of equipment easily possible (+) impossible (-)Avoid address collision with easily possible (+) Centralized management ofother users of private the entire address spaceaddresses OEM Preference needed (-)Additional maintenance effort required (-) not required (+)for the required 1:1 NAT Operate andaddress mappings (private Maintain↔ public)Failure probability NAT router is a "single point Low because of redundant of failure" (-) router/layer 3 switch (+)Availabilty of network difficult (-) easily possible (+)services DHCP and DNS End User Preference You need a solution that gets a lot more +s on the chart. Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved. 25
  • Where Does the IP Address Go From Here?• IPv6 is important: – China will run out of IPv4 Addresses by end 2011 – Mobile devices drive proliferation – Smart Grid drives proliferation – Mitigated by company use of private addresses • IPv4 is manageable inside a single enterprise• Are you a PLC-5® or SLC™ 500 controller user? – Does N12:5/3 mean anything to you?• Are you a ControlLogix® controller user? – Line2.Machine5.Running make sense?• Does your PC have an IP address? What is it?• When did you last use IP address 74.125.79.105? We all need to investigate host names and URLs. Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved. 26
  • ? Migration to Host Names? Animated Slide Between Machine and Enterprise Line VLAN/DNS MyPAC.Line Machine 1 Machine 2 VLAN/DNS VLAN/DNS MyPAC.Machine2MyPAC.Machine1.Line4 PowerFlex-301 PowerFlex-301 Within a Machine Between Machine and Line Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • WIRELESS NETWORKING Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved. 28
  • Strategy Built Around IEEE 802.11N Packet Backward MIMO Compatibility Aggregation Operate reliably Many wired Integrate Human without line of devices with 1 & Machine sight wireless link mobility IEEE 802.11N ratified September 11, 2011. Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved. 29
  • Controller-based WLAN • Centralizes Management – Eases deployment – Increases security – Improves scalability, resiliency – Adds services Expected converged factory floor architecture. Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved. 30
  • Enhanced Testing – Point to Multi-Point Load Generation LatencyCLX Using I/O w/PIO Measurement CLX Pair CLX Consumer CLX Switch Producer CLX AP RPI QTY ms WGB WGB WGB 20ms 7 Min Latency 0.921 Switch PIO1 PIO6 PIO7 Ave Latency First and Last non-zero values From Controller (us) (all) (in band) 1.075 Notes 1756-ENBT Total (index) (value) Average: 1075 1075 Independent pulse generator Test Configuration RPI (ms): 25 Firmware: 4.700 Counts 100000 First: Last: 0 30Max. Latency 0 30 Minimum: Maximum: 921 3797 921 3797 3.797 80000 70000 60000 50000 40000 Load QTY ID 30000 20000 5.67k pps 3 2ms 1-3 10000 0 4 3ms 4-7 0 10 2 20 4 30 6 Time (ms) 40 8 50 10 60 12 Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved. 31
  • IPv6 Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved. 32
  • The Sky Has Fallen In• IPv4 Address Pool Depleted – IANA issued last 5 blocks to the 5 RIRs on 3 February 2011 – RIRs expect to allocate these by mid 2012• US Government Mandates IPv6 2 – USGv6-1.0 IPv6 Profiles – No EtherNet/IP Device is “USGv6-1.0-Capable” Sounds Like Y2k? Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Extending the Life of IPv4• PUBLIC IPv4 Addresses depleted – Enterprise uses private IP addresses• Network Address Translation – 192.168.1.x<>10.10.y.y<>Internet – IPv6 Internet available to IPv4 Clients• IPv4 & IPv6 Internet Coexistence• IPv4 & IPv6 Intranet Coexistence IPv6 Migration will be slow and smooth Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Drivers for IPv6 AdoptionExternal Application• Customer concern IPv4 • Remote Telemetry depletion – IPv6 needed for remote• Government Policy communications – Hybrid IPv4/v6 at Outstation costly – China Growth – US Government drive Industry • Device Level Ring behaviour – IPv6 information clients on a ring – New application space • Dual Stack Devices • SmartGrid – IPv6 „up‟, IPv4‟down‟ – New Devices • 4G Mobile Telephony We cannot ignore the architectural implications Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • IPv6 Opportunity for EtherNet/IP• Simplified Device Commissioning – Auto-configuration and Neighbor Discovery are a platform for Zero Touch device commissioning and replacement – Competitive advantage as EtherNet/IP goes lower• Security – Standardised authentication and encryption – Competitive advantage as we respond to Stuxnet• New customer benefits – Take advantage of IPv6 architectures – Competitive advantage vs IPv4 laggards Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • A future-proof and scalable network architecture meeting the needs of machine builders and manufacturers across all industries.Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.