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Fundamentals of EtherNet/IP, RSTechED 2012 Session NIS06
 

Fundamentals of EtherNet/IP, RSTechED 2012 Session NIS06

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Learn the fundamentals, capabilities and features of EtherNet/IP. This session will break down the networking lingo and acronyms. Learn how the Common Industrial Protocol (CIP) fully utilizes the OSI ...

Learn the fundamentals, capabilities and features of EtherNet/IP. This session will break down the networking lingo and acronyms. Learn how the Common Industrial Protocol (CIP) fully utilizes the OSI reference model and the value of supporting standard Ethernet and IP network technology.

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  • There’s been a lot of evolution in this application space. The first applications for industrial Ethernet had to do with things like being able to program and troubleshoot industrial automation and control system controllers over the industrial Ethernet. Examples would be things like operator interface, data acquisition, as well as supervisory control and data acquisition - SCADA. Since the original start of industrial Ethernet applications, there has been an exponential enhancement to standard Ethernet itself, specifically the reduction in network latency and jitter. The term latency is the delay when one device transmits and another device receives on the network. Jitter is the variance in that delay. I/O Control itself requires low latency and jitter which standard Ethernet provides. We see the evolution from information only to I/O control over industrial Ethernet. Again, there has been a continued evolution of industrial application. The I/O Control has led to the capability of safety control. Now, we are seeing safety applications like machine safety, utilizing things like safety control, safety I/O, as well as drive systems, all on the common network infrastructure: automation, standard I/O control, and safety applications. In applying other industry standards like the IEEE 1588 precision time protocol for time synchronization, now we are seeing the deployment of motion control on standard Ethernet for applications such as packaging and converting.The overall trend here is to have a multidiscipline control and information platform which is enabling an industrial network convergence: information, I/O control, safety application, time synchronization as well as motion control.
  • Developing a robust and secure network infrastructure requires protecting the integrity, availability and confidentiality of control and information data. Users should address the following when developing a network: Is the network infrastructure resilient enough to ensure data availability? How consistent is the data? Is it reliable? How is data used? Is it secure from manipulation?
  • Strategy: Make the call on best media for each level of your network
  • Cable TypeCableApplicationConductorPBRiserStandard8 (4 pair)TBRoboticFlex4 (2 pair) or 8 (4 pair)MBPlenumUse in air ducts8 (4 pair)M12 Connectivity: 1585D-M4TBJM-*, IP67 Applications. Only 2 pair cable option available.RJ45 Connectivity: 1585J-M4TBJM-*, In-Cabinet - IP20 ApplicationsCable Spools: 1585C-C4TB-S*, Custom Applications. Rockwell provides various cable options with various Field Attachable optionsDrilling down into connectivity aspects that can withstand the MICE environmental risks requires solutions that address not only sealed connectors but media that can withstand high stress and flex as well as higher voltage environments.Slide shows complete solutions from RA for copper connectivity
  • Often described as the “silent performance killer”.Auto-negotiation allows devices to select the most optimal way to communicate without the user having to configure the devices.In order to auto-negotiate both sides must be in the auto-negotiation mode …. manually configured port do not support the auto-negotiation protocol.While all 100 Mbps devices are required to support auto-negotiation, most legacy 10 Mbps devices do not. Auto-negotiation is not supported by fiber links.Best practice:Be consistent, do not mix auto-negotiate with fixed settings Verify the settingsDuplex mismatch will slow communicationsMDIX feature detects and corrects for cross-over/straight thru cables
  • Inexpensive physical layer devices should NOT be used on an industrial EtherNet/IP systemLayer 2/Layer 3 switch approach is recommended for this issue for several reasons:Physical layer devices offer no buffering or advanced diagnostic featuresPhysical layer devices like these are easily overrun by an EtherNet/IP system (and no buffering = lost data)Layer 2 devices have buffering, QoS, and other management features Even unmanaged switches have buffering and offer some protection against lost control data
  • Static vs. Dynamic network addressing – Will the ip address be the same each time this device joins the network or assigned one from a pool of available addresses?DHCP vs. Bootp – (Dynamic host configuration protocol) (bootstrap protocol) Most DHCP servers will support both (including the RSLinx utility) DHCP enhancements include: more configuration parameter options, rebinding/renewing of configuration with the server (lease period)A node’s unique Network identity consists of 3 parts (IP address, subnet mask, and network gateway)An IP address is a 32 bit identification of a node on the network. It is usually displayed in the easily read decimal form (4 octets separated by a “.”) It has 2 parts: network ID and the node #, the network ID will always be first and the unique node identification secondSubnet or Network Mask – is what is used to determine which (of the 32 bits in the IP address) are part of the network ID and which are part of the unique node Identification. This is also used to determine the size of your network or subnetwork. (In the example above all 16 bits in the first 2 octets are part of the network ID and the last 16 bits or last 2 octets are the unique node identification)Gateway Address: This is how we would route packets from the local subnet, there would be one gateway for the subnet and anything that needs to leave the local subnet would be sent to that location.Domain Name: Label given to a logical grouping of nodes on a network (usually contains multiple parts separated by dots, the most specific part first down to most general part ie. BuildingID.Country.Company or google.comHostname: is a label given to a specific node. The hostname and domain name make up the nodes “fully qualified identity”The Name servers will translate hostnames into network addresses for the transport.
  • Multiple CIP connections can be supported by 1 TCP connections:A Logix controller has 5 I/O connections to modules in a remote chassis, and all of these connections originate with a local 1756-EN2T and connect using the same remote chassis, with the same 1756-EN2T. This would example would use: 1 TCP connection and 5 CIP connections.CIP connection Types: rack-optimized vs. direct: data from selected I/O modules is collected and produced on one connection instead of separate direct connections for each module

Fundamentals of EtherNet/IP, RSTechED 2012 Session NIS06 Fundamentals of EtherNet/IP, RSTechED 2012 Session NIS06 Presentation Transcript

  • NIS06 – Fundamentals of EtherNet/IPBob Amich, Rockwell AutomationJosh Matson, Rockwell Automation Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Agenda Industrial Network Trends OSI Reference Model Layers 1 - 7 Plantwide Network Architectures EtherNet/IP Advantage Summary Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • What you will learn Trends in Industrial Network Convergence  Technology enablers and business drivers Fundamentals of EtherNet/IP  What it is, capabilities and features  Networking basics  breaking down the lingo and acronyms  models and standards  Multidiscipline control and information applications  Representative plantwide network architectures  EtherNet/IP advantages which enables and drives convergence of control and information Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Industrial Network ConvergenceContinuing TrendEvolution of industrial Ethernet applications Information I/O Control Safety Motion High Applications Control Availability Industrial Network Convergence EtherNet/IP – Enabling & Driving Convergence of Industrial Control and Information with IT Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Industrial Network ConvergenceContinuing Trend EtherNet/IP – Enabling & Driving Convergence of Industrial Control and Information with IT Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Industrial Network Design Methodology Understand application and functional requirements  Devices to be connected – industrial and non-industrial  Data requirements for availability, integrity and confidentiality  Communication patterns, topology and resiliency requirements  Types of traffic – information, control, safety, time synchronization, motion control, voice, video Develop a logical framework (roadmap)  Define zones and segmentation  Place applications and devices in the logical framework based on requirements Develop a physical framework to align with and support the logical framework Determine security requirements  Take into consideration IT requirements ASSESS  Establish early dialogue with IT for MANAGE / MONITOR plantwide applications Use technology & industry standards, reference models and reference architectures DESIGN/PLAN AUDIT IMPLEMENT Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • OSI Reference ModelOpen Systems Interconnection What makes EtherNet/IP Layer Name Layer No. Function industrial? Examples Application Layer 7 Network Services to User App CIP Presentation Layer 6 Encryption/Other processing Session Layer 5 Manage Multiple Applications Transport Layer 4 Reliable delivery/Error correction TCP - UDP Routers Network Layer 3 Logical addressing - Routing IP Switches Data Link Layer 2 Media Access Control IEEE 802.3 Physical Cabling Layer 1 Specifies voltage, pin-outs, cable TIA - 1005Physical Layer Infrastructure Device Common Application Hardening Hardening Layer Protocol 5-Layer TCP/IP Model Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • OSI Reference ModelProtocol Stack Layer Name Layer No. Function Application Layer 7 CIP Modbus TCP Presentation Layer 6 PCCC/CSP HTTP Coexistence VoIP Session Layer 5 Transport Layer 4 TCP - UDP Network Layer 3 IP Data Link Layer 2 IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer 1 TIA - 1005 Coexistence Interoperability Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • OSI Reference ModelProtocol Stack Sender Receiver Application - CIP Layer 7 Application - CIP Presentation - Null Layer 6 Presentation - Null Session – Null Layer 5 Session - Null Transport – TCP/UDP Layer 4 Transport – TCP/UDP Network – IP Layer 3 Network - IP Data Link - Ethernet Layer 2 Data Link - Ethernet Physical - Ethernet Layer 1 Physical - Ethernet Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • OSI Reference ModelProtocol Stack Layer Name Layer No. Function ControlLogix® RSLogix™ 5000 RSLinx® Classic Application Layer 7 CIP Presentation Layer 6 Session Layer 5 Transport Layer 4 TCP - UDP Network Layer 3 IP Data Link Layer 2 IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer 1 TIA - 1005 Encapsulation Decapsulation Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • OSI Reference ModelProtocol Stack Example - Encapsulation RSLogix 5000, via RSLinx Classic, uses CIP to create a message to read information from a Logix Controller CIP Payload RSLinx Classic passes the message on to the TCP program which adds on pieces to Segment guarantee the integrity of the message TCP CIP TCP program passes the new message to the IP program which adds information to get the message routed IP TCP CIP Packet IP program passes the new message to Ethernet program which adds on the Ethernet part needed to Enet IP TCP CIP Frame send it over the network Ethernet Frame is sent out the PHY Physical Layer Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • OSI Reference ModelPhysical Layer Independent Layer Name Layer No. Function Application Layer 7 CIP Presentation Layer 6 Session Layer 5 Transport Layer 4 TCP - UDP Network Layer 3 IP Data Link Layer 2 IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer 1 Copper Physical Layer Independent Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • OSI Reference ModelPhysical Layer Independent Layer Name Layer No. Function Application Layer 7 CIP Presentation Layer 6 Session Layer 5 Transport Layer 4 TCP - UDP Network Layer 3 IP Data Link Layer 2 IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer 1 Fiber Physical Layer Independent Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • OSI Reference ModelData Link Layer Independent Layer Name Layer No. Function Application Layer 7 CIP Presentation Layer 6 Session Layer 5 Transport Layer 4 TCP - UDP Network Layer 3 IP Data Link Layer 2 IEEE 802.11 IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer 1 Wi-Fi Fiber Physical Layer Independent Standard IP provides Portability and seamless Routing Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • OSI Reference ModelOpen Systems Interconnection Layer Name Layer No. Function Application Layer 7 IE Protocol Presentation Layer 6 Session Layer 5 Transport Layer 4 Vendor Specific Network Layer 3 Vendor Specific Data Link Layer 2 IEEE 802.3 Physical Layer 1 TIA - 1005 Limits Portability and Routability, may require additional assets to forward information throughout the plantwide architecture Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • OSI Reference ModelOpen Systems Interconnection Layer Name Layer No. Function Application Layer 7 IE Protocol Presentation Layer 6 Session Layer 5 Transport Layer 4 Vendor Specific Network Layer 3 Vendor Specific Data Link Layer 2 Vendor Specific Physical Layer 1 TIA - 1005 Non standard Ethernet, will require additional assets to connect into the plantwide architecture Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • OSI Reference ModelNetwork Independent Layer No. Layer 7 Layer 4 Layer 3 Network Layer 2 Independent Layer 1 Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • OSI Reference ModelOpen System Interconnection Layer Name Layer No. Function Examples Application Layer 7 Network Services to User App CIP Presentation Layer 6 Encryption/Other processing Session Layer 5 Manage Multiple Applications Transport Layer 4 Reliable delivery/Error correction TCP - UDP Routers Network Layer 3 Logical addressing - Routers IP Switches Data Link Layer 2 Media Access Control IEEE 802.3 Physical Cabling Layer 1 Specifies voltage, pin-outs, cable TIA - 1005 Similar sounding network devices, services and terms exist at Layer 2 (L2) and Layer 3 (L3) – e.g. QoS, Resiliency, Security, Connections Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 1 – Physical Layer• Design and implement a Cable Selection ENET-WP007 robust physical layer• Environment Classification - MICE• More than cable – Connectors – Patch panels LAN Troubleshooting Guide – Cable management – Grounding, Bonding and Shielding (noise mitigation)• Standard Physical Media Industrial Ethernet Physical – Wired vs. Wireless Infrastructure Reference – Copper vs. Fiber Architecture Design Guide – UTP vs. STP – Singlemode vs. Multimode – SFP – LC vs. SC• Standard Topology Choices ODVA Guide – Switch-Level & Device-Level Fiber Guide ENET-TD003 Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 1 – Physical Layer• It provides the hardware means of sending and receiving data on a carrier, including defining cables, cards and physical aspects.• LAN or WAN – Voltage levels, physical data rates, maximum transmission distances, physical connectors• Ethernet examples: – 10Base-2, 10Base-5, 10Base-T, 100Base-TX 100Base-SX• Responsible for converting a frame, Layer 2 output, into electrical signals to be transmitted over the physical network.• Other PHY examples: – RS-232 – T1, E1 – ISDN – 802.11 Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 1 – Physical LayerAuto-Negotiation vs. Fixed Settings Pulses detect Negotiate Link speed and Negotiate optional integrity Full/Half features (like Duplex (10/100/1000) MDIX) Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 1 – Physical LayerEN2TR Example RSLinx Classic Module Configuration EN2TR Webpage Network Settings RSLogix 5000 EN2TR Properties Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 1 – Physical LayerInfrastructure – Active Devices A repeater recreates the incoming signal and re-transmits it without noise or distortion that may have effected the signal as it was transmitted down the cable. Repeaters were available on legacy Ethernet to increase the overall length of the network and allow additional nodes to be added. Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 1 – Physical LayerInfrastructure – Active Devices - Media Converters Small Form-Factor Pluggable (SFP) Fiber link Fiber link Use Caution! Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 1 – Physical LayerTopology - Linear Layer 2 Access Switch Layer 2 Access Link Stratix 8000 Layer 2 Interswitch Link/802.1Q Trunk Layer 2 Bridge Layer 3 Link Multi-Layer Switch Layer 2 and Layer 3 Stratix 8300 Layer 3 Router Linear Linear Device-Level Switch-Level Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 1 – Physical LayerTopology – Star and Redundant Star Star Redundant Star Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 1 – Physical LayerTopology - Ring Ring Device-Level Ring Switch-Level Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 2 – Data Link802.3 – Ethernet – Local Area Network (LAN) Pre SFD DA SA Type/Len Data (Payload) FCS  The Data Link layer is divided into two sub layers: 802.3 Frame  The Media Access Control (MAC) sub-layer and the Logical Link Control (LLC) sub-layer.  MAC (802.3) lower sub-layer controls how a device on the network gains access to the data and permission to transmit it.  Ethernet Media Access: CSMA/CD  LLC (802.2) upper sub-layer controls frame synchronization, flow control, and acts as an interface between the MAC sub-layer and the network layer.  Layer 2 LAN and WAN Examples:  802.3, 802.5, Frame Relay, ATM, ISDN, MPLS (service providers)  Layer 2 Protocol Examples:  ARP – Address Resolution Protocol  Layer 2 Services Examples  QoS – Quality of Service, VLAN – Virtual Local Area Network , Resiliency and Security Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 2 – Data LinkHardware Addressing  All devices on Ethernet communicate using the Ethernet address for the device. This address is sometimes referred to as the “hardware”, “burned-in” or “MAC address” (MAC stands for Media Access Controller).  The hardware address is a unique (in the world) 6-byte address that is embedded in the circuitry of every device that sits on an Ethernet network. First 3-bytes identify a specific vendor.  Every vendor of Ethernet products obtains their own unique address range  Allen-Bradley’s is 00:00:BC:XX:XX:XX and 00:1D:9C:XX:XX:XX  Example - 00:00:BC:03:52:A9 Note that each digit of the MAC address is a hex number (range 0-F) http://www.techzoom.net/tools/check-mac.en MAC Decoder Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 2 – Data LinkLAN Transmission Methods Unicast  A method by which a frame is sent to a single destination. Multicast  A technique that allows copies of a single frame to be passed to a selected subset of possible destinations.  Example: 01-00-0C-CC-CC-CC (Cisco Discovery Protocol – CDP) Broadcast  A frame delivery system that delivers a given frame to all hosts on the LAN.  FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 2 - Data LinkBridging  A bridge is a device that isolates traffic between segments by selectively forwarding frames to their proper destination. It is transparent to the network and protocol independent.  Similar to the repeater, the bridge isn’t used much any more, but more advanced devices which perform the bridging function are commonly used. Bridge Ethernet Ethernet Layer 2 Ethernet Bridge Token Ring EtherNet/IP Bridge DeviceNet Layer 3 Layer 7 Access Work Group Point Bridge Ethernet Ethernet Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 2 - Data LinkSwitching  Multi-port Bridge  Examples - Stratix 8000 and 6000  All ports are in the same broadcast domain LAN  Forwards frames based on the MAC address and a forwarding 8 6 table 1  CAM Table – content addressable memory  Learns a station’s location by examining source address  Sends out all ports when destination address is broadcast, multicast, or unknown address  Forwards when destination is located on different interface  Managed switches provide Layer 2 features, such as segmentation (VLAN tag), security, QoS, resiliency, etc. Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 2 – Data LinkSwitching Options • Industrial versus COTS - Panel & DIN Rail Mounting vs. Table & Rack (e.g. 1RU) • Managed versus Unmanaged Advantages Disadvantages • Loop prevention • Security services • Diagnostic information Managed • Segmentation services (VLANs) • More expensive • Requires some level of support and Switches • Prioritization services (QoS) configuration to start up • Network resiliency • Multicast management services • No loop prevention • No security services • Inexpensive Unmanaged • Simple to set up • No diagnostic information • No segmentation or prioritization services Switches • Difficult to troubleshoot • No network resiliency support Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 2 – Data LinkEN2TR Example EN2TR Webpage MAC Address RSLinx Classic EN2TR Webpage EN2TR Diagnostics Ethernet Statistics Ethernet Statistics Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 2 – Data LinkEtherNet/IP is Standard Pre SFD DA SA Type/Len Data (Payload) FCS 802.3 Frame  Standard MAC - 00:00:BC:XX:XX:XX & 00:1D:9C:XX:XX:XX  Transmission types: unicast, multicast and broadcast  EtherType  Common – e.g. IPv4, ARP  ODVA Embedded Switch Beacon - EtherType - 0x08E1  Layer 2 service example  QoS – CoS Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 3 – NetworkInternet Protocol (IP) Packet Version ToS Len ID Offset TTL Proto HCS IP SA IP DA Data /Len Byte IPv4 Packet  This layer provides switching and routing technologies, creating logical paths, known as virtual circuits, for transmitting data from node to node.  Routing and forwarding are functions of this Layer, as well as addressing, and internetworking.  IP Address, Subnet Mask, Default Gateway  Layer 3 Protocol Examples:  ICMP – Internet Control Message Protocol  IPsec – Internet Protocol Security  IGMP – Internet Group Management Protocol  Routed protocol vs. Routing Protocol vs. Router Redundancy  Layer 3 Services Examples  QoS – Quality of Service, Resiliency, Security Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 3 – NetworkLAN Transmission Methods Unicast  A method by which a packet is sent to a single destination. Multicast  A technique that allows copies of a single packet to be passed to a selected subset of possible destinations  224.0.0.0 - 239.255.255.255  EtherNet/IP IP Multicast Address Range:  239.192.0.0 - 239.195.255.255 Broadcast  A packet delivery system that delivers a given packet to all hosts on the LAN.  255.255.255.255 Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 3 – NetworkInternet Protocol Address Fixed or assigned from a pool? What type of server? If assigning from a pool Unique Network Identity Resolves Hostnames to IP addresses on the network “User-Friendly” Name to identify a node on the network Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 3 – NetworkIP Addressing Schema Option Description Advantages Disadvantages In large environments, can be burdensome Static Devices hard coded with an Simple to commission and to maintain Hardware IP Address replace Limited ranged of IP addresses and subnet Not all devices support Requires technician to configure IP Static via BOOTP Server assigns devices IP address/MAC address when a device is addresses Supported by every device Configuration replaced Precursor to DHCP Adds complexity and point of failure Server assigns IP addresses Efficient use of IP address More complex to implement and adds a point from a pool (NOT range of failure DHCP RECOMMENDED for Can reduce administration Devices get different IP addresses when they industrial devices) work load reboot Efficient use of IP Address Server assigns consistent IP More complex to implement and adds a point range DHCP Option 82 addresses from a pool (NOT Can reduce administration of failure RECOMMENDED) Mixed environments may not work work load Efficient use of IP Address Automatically assign IP range DHCP port- Requires some maintenance and upkeep, on address per physical switch Eases commissioning and based allocation a per switch basis port maintenance in large environments Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 3 – NetworkIP – Default Gateway Routing Table Gateways and Routers use the network portion of IP addresses to Network Port identify where networks are. 10.17.10.0 1 Switch/route packets by IP Address. 10.10.10.0 2 Stratix 8300 – Layer 2 and Layer 3 switching. A table is kept that tells the device which port a message should be transmitted out in order to get the message to the proper network. Default Gateway 10.10.10.1 If the particular network is not directly attached to that device, it will 10.17.10.1 simply forward the message to the next gateway or router in the path for further routing. Time-to-live (TTL) 10.17.10.56  RA EtherNet/IP implementation for multicast – TTL=1 10.10.10.56  RA EtherNet/IP implementation for VLAN 17 VLAN 10 Subnet 10.17.10.0/24 Subnet 10.10.10.0/24 unicast – TTL=64 Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 3 - NetworkRouting Switch/route packets by IP Address. WAN Extend network distance  LAN, MAN, WAN Default Gateway 10.10.10.1 10.17.10.1 Connect different LANs  Broadcast control  Multicast control, EtherNet/IP multicast not routable - TTL=1 Layer 3 features such as security, 10.17.10.56 QoS, resiliency, etc. 10.10.10.56 Make sure IT understands required protocols VLAN 17 VLAN 10 Subnet 10.17.10.0/24 Subnet 10.10.10.0/24  Is there a need to route to other subnets?  Multicast traffic?  Security or segmentation? Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 3 – NetworkRouter and Routing Routed protocols  Examples:  Internet Protocol (IP)  Novel Netware Internetwork Packet Exchange (IPX) Routing Protocols  Routers talking to routers  Maintaining optimal network topology/path to subnets, and forwarding packets along those paths – static and dynamic routes  Examples:  OSPF – Open Shortest Path First, IETF Standard (Link-State Routing)  EIGRP – Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol, Cisco innovation (Distance Vector Routing) Router Redundancy Protocols  Fault tolerance for default gateways  Examples:  VRRP – Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol, IETF Standards  HSRP – Hot Standby Router Protocol , Cisco innovation  GLBP – Gateway Load Balancing Protocol , Cisco innovation Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 3 – NetworkEN2TR Example EN2TR Webpage ARP TableRSLogix 5000EN2TR PropertiesPort Diagnostics EN2TR Webpage IP Statistics Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 3 – NetworkEtherNet/IP is Standard Version ToS Len ID Offset TTL Proto HCS IP SA IP DA Data /Len Byte IPv4 Packet  Standard IPv4  Transmission types: unicast, multicast and “ip directed-broadcast”  TTL  Unicast - 64  Multicast - 1  Multicast addresses - 239.192.0.0/14 range 239.192.0.0 - 239.195.255.255  Layer 3 service example  QoS – ToS - DSCP Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 4 – TransportSegment  This layer provides transparent transfer of data between end systems, or devices, and is responsible for end- to-end error recovery and flow control. It ensures complete data transfer.  User Datagram Protocol - UDP  Connectionless/best effort  Does not use acknowledgements  IP - Unicast and Multicast UDP Header  CIP – used for Class 1 (Implicit) I/O and P/C connections – port 2222  Transmission Control Protocol - TCP  Connection-oriented, end-to-end reliable transmission  Utilizes acknowledgements (ACK) to ensure reliable delivery  IP - Unicast  CIP – used for Class 3 (Explicit) messaging such as Operator Interface – port 44818 TCP Header Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 4 – TransportPorts and Sockets KnowledgeBase Answer# 29402 Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 4 – TransportControlLogix Module connection support (partial list) Communications TCP connections CIP Connections Module 1756-ENBT 64 128 1756-EN2T 128 256 1756-EN2TR 128 256 1756-EN3TR 128 256 1756-EN2F 128 256 ENET-UM001G-EN-P EtherNet/IP Modules in Logix5000 Control Systems …. provides connection and packet rate specs for modules Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 4 – TransportEN2TR Example EN2TR Webpage UDP Statistics EN2TR Webpage Diagnostic Overview EN2TR Webpage TCP Connection Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 4 – TransportEtherNet/IP is Standard UDP Header TCP Header Standard TCP & UDP Standard TCP & UDP Port Usage Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 7 – ApplicationCommon Industrial Protocol Guten tag? Hello. How are you? Bonjour? Hi. I’m great. PLANT MACHINE An open, common, standard, and proven language is everything!! Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 7 – ApplicationCommon Industrial Protocol • Standard set of servicesLayer No. for accessing data and controlling industrial device operation • Standard to integrate Layer 7 I/O control, device configuration and data collection in industrial automation and control Layer 4 systems Layer 3 Layer 2 Layer 1 odva.org Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 7 – ApplicationCommon Industrial Protocol• CIP uses object modeling to describe devices• Device Profiles define the communication view of a device• Electronic Data Sheets (EDS) Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 7 – ApplicationCIP – Object Modeling - Example Object Class: Human Object Object Instance: Instance: Peter Sam Attributes Weight: 82 kg Weight: 75 kg Height: 1.8 m Height: 1.7 m Age: 28 years Age: 29 years Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 7 – ApplicationCIP Objects Connection Objects model the communication characteristics of a particular application to application(s) relationship  In EtherNet/IP these are actually several objects Connection Sensor Actuator Controller Application “Connection “Connection Application Object Objects” Objects” Object Device #1 Device #2 Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • CIP Safety Layer 7 - Application• CIP Extension• High-integrity Safety Services and Messages for CIP – Data redundancy - data sent twice (actual & inverted) – Safety CRC redundancy – actual & inverted – End-to-end Safety CRCs - individual CRCs for data (actual & inverted) and overall message – Every packet is time stamped• IEC 61508 – SIL3 and EN 954-1 - Cat 4• Two behaviors must be implemented: – Real-time transfer of safety data • Safety Validator Object – Client (Device producing safety data) – Server (Device consuming safety data) • Safety Messages – Configuration of safety devices • Safety Supervisor Object – Originator (Device originating connection) – Target (Target of connection origination) • SafetyOpen, SafetyOpen Response Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • CIP SafetyLayer 7 - Application Catalyst 2960Catalyst 3750 FactoryTalk StackWise ServerSafety I/O Safety Controller Camera Safety I/O Safety I/O HMISafety I/O VFD I/O Controller Safety Controller I/O Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • CIP SyncLayer 7 - Application CIP Extension Defines time synchronization services and object for CIP Networks• Allows distributed control components to share a common notion of time Implements IEEE-1588 precision clock synchronization protocol  Referred to as precision time protocol (PTP) Synchronized  Provides +/- 100 ns synchronization (hardware-assisted clock) Clock Value  Provides +/- 100 µs synchronization (software clock) Layers 5-7 FTP HTTP OPC CIP SNMP 1588 Time Synchronized Applications such as: TCP UDP  Input time stamping Layer 4 Optional  Alarms and Events OSPF ICMP IGMP Hardware  Sequence of Events (SOE) Assist  First fault detection ARP IP RARP Layer 3  Time scheduled outputs IEEE 802.3 Ethernet  Coordinated Motion Layer 1-2 Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • CIP MotionLayer 7 - Application  Traditional approach to motion control - Network Scheduling (time-slot)  CIP Motion approach - Pre-determined Execution Plan for position path, based on a common understanding of time between the motion controller and drives …… where to be and at what time Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • CIP MotionLayer 7 - Application• CIP Extension• Controller and Drive Profiles• Motion Axis Object Safety I/O Safety Controller Camera Safety I/O Controller HMI VFD I/O I/O Controller Servo Drive Servo Drive Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Layer 7 – ApplicationEN2TR Example EN2TR Webpage Diagnostic Overview RSLinx Classic - EDS RSLinx Classic EN2TR Diagnostics Connection Manager EN2TR Webpage Diagnostic Overview Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Plantwide Network Architectures I/O Isolated Network with Single Controller Star (ODVA) VFD HMI Drive Examples  Machine Builder Solution (Machine or section of machine) I/O Controller Servo Drive Linear I/O I/O I/O Ring HMI HMI VFD Drive Controller Servo Drive VFD Drive Controller I/O Servo Drive Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Plantwide Network Architectures I/O Isolated Network with Multiple Controllers (ODVA) Star VFD Examples HMI Drive  Integrated Machine Builder Solutions  Single Cell/Area Zone, Multiple Machines or Lines I/O Controller Servo Stratix Drive Linear 8300 I/O I/O I/O Ring VFD Drive Controller Servo Drive HMI HMI VFD Drive Controller I/O Servo Drive Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Plantwide Network Architectures Connected and Integrated Control System (ODVA) Examples  Integrated Machine Builder Solutions or End User Plant Network  Single Cell/Area Zone, Multiple Lines, Multiple Machines Industrial Zone Level 3 Cell/Area Zones Levels 0–2Production - VLANs VLAN 43 HMI CameraIP Camera - VLAN Stratix 8000/8300 VLAN 43 Camera REPConvergence-Ready Class 1 & 3 Safety Controller I/O HMI Controller I/O VFD VFD Drive Controller Drive Controller I/O VLAN 17 Subnet 10.17.10.0/24 VLAN 16 Subnet 10.16.10.0/24 Safety I/O I/O I/O VLAN 10 Servo Subnet 10.10.10.0/24 Drive HMI Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • EtherNet/IP Advantage Summary Single Network Technology for:  Discrete Control, Process Control, Batch Control, Configuration, Information/Diagnostics, Safety Control, Time Synchronization, Motion Control and Energy Management Established – 300+ Vendors, over 4,500,000 nodes  ODVA: Cisco Systems and Rockwell Automation are principal members  Supported – All EtherNet/IP products require conformance testing Standard - Ethernet and TCP/IP Protocol Suite  IT friendly  Future-ready – Sustainable; Industry Standards such as IEEE and IETF Topology & Media Independent – flexibility and choice Portability and Routability  Physical layer and data link layer independence; seamless data forwarding Common industrial application layer protocol  DeviceNet, ControlNet and EtherNet/IP  Seamless bridging throughout CIP networks Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Additional MaterialRockwell Automation Networks Website: http://www.ab.com/networks/ EtherNet/IP Website: http://www.ab.com/networks/ethernet/ Media Website: http://www.ab.com/networks/media/ethernet/ Embedded Switch Technology Website: http://www.ab.com/networks/switches/embedded.html Publications:  ENET-AP005-EN-P Embedded Switch Technology Manual  ENET-UM001G-EN-P EtherNet/IP Modules in Logix5000 Control Systems …. provides connection and packet rate specs for modules  1783-UM003 Stratix 8000 and Stratix 8300 Ethernet Managed Switches User Manual  ENET-WP0022 Top 10 Recommendations for Plantwide EtherNet/IP Deployments  ENET-RM002A-EN-P Ethernet Design Considerations Reference Manual Network and Security Services Website:  http://www.rockwellautomation.com/services/networks/ Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Additional MaterialODVA Website:  http://www.odva.org/ Media Planning and Installation Manual  http://www.odva.org/Portals/0/Library/Publications_Numbered/PUB00148R0_EtherNetIP_Media_Plan ning_and_Installation_Manual.pdf Network Infrastructure for EtherNet/IP: Introduction and Considerations  http://www.odva.org/Portals/0/Library/Publications_Numbered/PUB00035R0_Infrastructure_Guide.pdf Device Level Ring  http://www.odva.org/Portals/0/Library/CIPConf_AGM2009/2009_CIP_Networks_Conference_Technica l_Track_Intro_to_DLR_PPT.pdf The CIP Advantage  http://www.odva.org/default.aspx?tabid=54 Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Additional MaterialCisco and Rockwell Automation Alliance  Websites  http://www.ab.com/networks/architectures.html  Design Guides  Converged Plantwide Ethernet (CPwE)  Application Guides  Fiber Optic Infrastructure Application Guide  Education Series  Whitepapers  Top 10 Recommendations for Plantwide EtherNet/IP Deployments  Securing Manufacturing Computer and Controller Assets  Production Software within Manufacturing Reference Architectures  Achieving Secure Remote Access to Plant Floor Applications and Data Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Additional MaterialCisco and Rockwell Automation Alliance Education Series Webcasts  The Trend - Network Technology and Cultural Convergence  What every IT professional should know about Plant Floor Networking  What every Plant Floor Controls Engineer should know about working with IT  Industrial Ethernet: Introduction to Resiliency  Fundamentals of Secure Remote Access for Plant Floor Applications and Data  Securing Architectures and Applications for Network Convergence  Convergence-Ready EtherNet/IP Solutions  Available Online  http://www.ab.com/networks/architectures.html Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Additional MaterialPanduit, Cisco, Rockwell Automation Collaboration  Plantwide EtherNet/IP Ecosystem Partners Website  Fiber Optic Infrastructure Application Guide ENET-TD003 Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Additional MaterialNetwork Sessions Automation Fair 2012 November 7th – 8th , 2012 Philadelphia  W5: Robust, Secure Plantwide EtherNet/IP Infrastructure  RA, Cisco, Panduit & Fluke Networks  W6: Achieve Secure Remote Access to Plantwide Applications  RA & Cisco  T8: Networks: Fiber Optic Application Best Practices for EtherNet/IP  Panduit, RA & Fluke Networks  T43: Wireless: Applying Plantwide Industrial Wireless Communications for Cost Savings  RA & Cisco  Lab 16: Applying EtherNet/IP in Real-Time Applications Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Thank you for participating! Please remember to tidy up your work area for the next session. We want your feedback! Please complete the session survey!Follow ROKAutomation on Facebook & Twitter.Connect with us on LinkedIn.www.rockwellautomation.com 110 Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Questions? Copyright © 2012 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.