Applying Best Practices to Achieve Superior Results with the PlantPAx System
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Applying Best Practices to Achieve Superior Results with the PlantPAx System

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This session will discuss the application rules you need to follow to ensure optimal performance of your PlantPAx system. Leverage the knowledge of system experts as we review the PlantPAx Reference ...

This session will discuss the application rules you need to follow to ensure optimal performance of your PlantPAx system. Leverage the knowledge of system experts as we review the PlantPAx Reference Manual. This is great for beginners or used as a refresher course for anyone who regularly implements PlantPAx systems.

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Applying Best Practices to Achieve Superior Results with the PlantPAx System Applying Best Practices to Achieve Superior Results with the PlantPAx System Presentation Transcript

  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. PUBLIC INFORMATION Applying Best Practices to Achieve Superior Results with the PlantPAx® System Sizing, Selection and Best Practices
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 2 Agenda Seven Most Common Mistakes in PlantPAx System Sizing Best Practices When Designing PlantPAx System System Architecture and Elements PlantPAx – Process Automation System
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. PlantPAx Process Automation System 3 PlantPAx is a Modern DCS Integrates with your Enterprise IT systems enabling the Connected Enterprise Provides Faster Time to Market and Lower Total Cost Of Ownership Enables improved Asset Utilization and Enterprise Risk Management. Uses open communications standards and leverages Ethernet/IP as its backbone to make real-time information available based on throughout the organization for better business decisions PlantPAx Combines the plant-wide control technologies and unmatched scalability of Integrated Architecture with all the core capabilities expected in a world-class distributed control system (DCS) and more…
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Plant-wide control technologies • Standards-based architecture using Integrated ArchitectureTM components enables multi-disciplined control • Scalable high availability throughout the architecture • Extends EtherNet/IP as control backbone Optimized for performance in process • Characterized for performance • Documented architectures, defined system elements, detailed sizing rules and application guidelines Extended with tools and utilities • System definition and sizing tools • Standard application components • Deployment and configuration tools • System health and diagnostic tools PlantPAx is our Rockwell Automation Process Automation System: Plant-wide control technologies in a DCS Platform PlantPAx Process Automation System
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Where to Get More Information? PlantPAx Technical Documentation Selection Guide: ” “How do I define a system?” http://literature.rockwellautomation.com Keyword PROCES-SG001 Reference Manual: “How do I build a system?” http://literature.rockwellautomation.com Keyword PROCES-RM001 PlantPAx TOC on the Rockwell Automation KB: 62366
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 6 Agenda Seven Most Common Mistakes in PlantPAx System Sizing Best Practices When Designing PlantPAx System System Architecture and Elements PlantPAx – Process Automation System
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. PlantPAx Architecture Classes and System Elements 7 System Element Description Station Distributed – Single Server Distributed - Multiple Server Process automation system server (PASS) Required system element that may host displays, alarms, and data connections to controllers Single computer serves as PASS, EWS, and OWS One PASS required and includes: • FTD Server • HMI Server • Data Server • A&E Server One PASS required and includes: • FTD Server • HMI Server • Data Server • A&E Server Addl. PASS as needed (up to 10) Operator workstation (OWS) Provides an interactive graphical interface to monitor and control process 10 OWS 10 OWS per PASS; up to 50 per system Engineering workstation (EWS) Central location for configuring the system and maintaining operations 1 EWS required (can have as many as 5) 1 EWS required (can have as many as 5) Process Controller Logix Based Controller 1...5 Logix controllers 1...8 Logix controllers 1...8 Logix controllers per PASS Application Servers Information management, Asset management, Batch Application Servers as needed Application Servers as needed Domain Controller N/A Optional Required if there more than 10 PC
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 8 Agenda Seven Most Common Mistakes in PlantPAx System Sizing Best Practices When Designing PlantPAx System System Architecture and Elements PlantPAx – Process Automation System
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Design Recommendations for Performance 9 Asked Global Process Technical Consultants (GPTC), what are the most common design mistakes that lead to performance problems? Didn’t size system properly Controller tasks not configured correctly Controller tags not structured optimally Exceeded system / performance limits System infrastructure not built according to specifications System performance is not monitored
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. App Process Control EtherNet/IP Asset Management Operator Workstations Engineering Workstations Process Automation System Server and Application Servers – HMI Batch Management Info Management Process Controllers Variable Speed Drives Local, Distributed, and Intelligent I/O Valves and Instrumentation Integrated Process Skids • # of Tags on Scan • # of OWS • # of Alarms • CPU % • Memory % • # of Tags on Scan • I/O • Control Strategies • Controller types • # of OWS Keys to System Performance 1. Size System Properly
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Keys to System Performance 1. Size System Properly 11 PlantPAx Selection Guide (PROCES-SG001) provides high level guidelines to properly size system
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Keys to System Performance 2. Configure Controller Tasks Properly Do not use continuous task Organize your periodic tasks so fastest tasks has highest priority and avoid multiple tasks with the same priority Do not use task as an organization method. Task is an execution marker. Allow for time for CPU Communications Includes; alarms, display tags, faceplate tags, DL tags and Historian tags and MSG(s) Continuous Communication task slice selection does not apply when using periodic tasks
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Keys to System Performance 2. Configure Controller Tasks Properly Do not use continuous task Reduces task switching improving application and system performance Continuous task not good for time-based operations like PID Improves predictability and ability to monitor the controller free-time available for communication Configure faster tasks with higher priority (lower number) 1756-RM094, Logix5000 Controllers Design Considerations
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Keys to System Performance 2. Configure Controller Tasks Properly Minimize number of periodic tasks 150 PID Loops @ .1 sec L7, 1 task: 70% CPU L7, 20 tasks: 90% CPU Best practice, use few tasks, organized by speed fast/slow Inhibit/Delete unused tasks Example: Fast Loops: 100ms, Priority 6 Flows, Valves, Motors Typical Loops: 500ms, Priority 8 Temperatures, levels, etc.
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Keys to System Performance 3. Optimize Your Controller Tags 15 The organization of data in the controller can impact performance: Tag Types (e.g. DINT vs INT) Affects efficiency of CPU by reducing type casting Affects efficiency of memory utilization Tag structures and arrays Improves efficiency of memory utilization Can help improve HMI performance Organization of tag structures also important to performance
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Keys to System Performance 3. Optimize Your Controller Tags 16 Use DINT and REAL data types whenever possible A Logix5000 controller typically compares or manipulates values as 32-bit values (DINTs or REALs). The controller typically converts a SINT or INT value to a DINT or REAL value before it uses the value. If the destination is a SINT or INT tag, the controller typically converts the value back to a SINT or INT value. The conversion to or from SINTs or INTs occurs automatically with no extra programming. But it takes extra execution time and memory.
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Keys to System Performance 3. Optimize Your Controller Tags 17 Define tags in arrays and a UDT whenever possible The minimum memory allocation for a tag is four bytes. When you create a tag that stores data that requires less than four bytes, the controller allocates four bytes, but the data only fills the part it needs. Arrays act as single tags and utilizes memory more efficiently Use of tag structures, such as UDT’s, AOI’s can also help efficient memory utilization Better memory utilization helps HMI and controller redundancy performance Single atomic tag has a the same security and service overhead as Array or UDT type tags
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Keys to System Performance 3. Optimize Your Controller Tags 18 When creating User-Defined or Add-On-Defined data types, group BOOL tags together whenever possible: uses less memory and communication bandwidth. BOOL tags must align on 8-bit boundaries. But, if they are placed adjacent to each other they can share the same byte
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Keys to System Performance 4. Understand System Limits 19 Understand Product Limits, System Limits, and your Performance Limits Product Limits are what products have been qualified to do What is possible with the products? Discovered in product documentation System Limits are what the system have been proven to do Proven limits based on system characterization Discovered in PlantPAx Reference Manual Your Performance Limits is what your system should be expected to do based on your application # of I/O, tags, OWS, controller types, server layout Guidance in PlantPAx Reference Manual Enabled by Sizing Tools
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Keys to System Performance 5. Follow Infrastructure Guidelines 20 Optimize your operating system settings Turn off automatic updates (follow Rockwell patch recommendations: KB Aid 35530) Disable Windows Error Reporting Disable operating systems themes On virtualized systems, use the PlantPAx Virtual Image Templates
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Keys to System Performance 5. Follow Infrastructure Guidelines 21 Use a domain One place to manage users, groups, and security settings Required for systems with more than 10 computers All workstation and server system elements in a single PlantPAx system must be members of same domain Use DNS and Time Synchronization
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Keys to System Performance 5. Follow Infrastructure Guidelines 22 Use managed switches Use static IP addresses on your workstations, servers, and controllers Disable power saving on the Network Interface Card (NIC) that connects the servers and workstations to other devices on the network Logically segregate your networks I/O Control System Enterprise For more recommendations, see the PlantPAx Reference Manual PROCES-RM001
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Key to System Performance 6. Monitor System Utilization When defining the application code, make sure the CPU utilization of the process controller can accommodate these values: In the development environment, CPU utilization should be less than 50% to allow for the additional CPU load that will be experienced in the production environment During the operation of the system, the CPU utilization should be monitored and should never exceed 75% during normal operations
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. PlantPAx Library of Logix Diagnostic Objects L_CPU: Controller Usage Monitor
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. What Logix Diagnostic Objects are Available? A summary of the Logix Diagnostic Objects available in each PlantPAx Library revision is shown in the table below: Logix Diagnostic Object Description 1.0 1.5 2.0 L_CPU Controller Usage Monitor Y Y Y L_TaskMonitor Controller Task Monitor Y Y Y L_Redun Redundant Controller Monitor N N Y L_ChangeDet Controller Change Detector N N Y
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Key to System Performance 6. Monitor System Utilization 26 Task Monitor Tool Upgrade V20 Version 3.0 merges Logix5000™ Task Monitor Tool and Logix Diagnostics Tool and adds additional functionality Better GUI representation Better analysis of tasks and communication bandwidth
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Key to System Performance 6. Monitor System Utilization 27 Make sure that Server and Controller CPU utilization and controller memory utilization is within our recommended limits Verify there are no errors when calling the display by reviewing IIS and FactoryTalk® Diagnostics logs
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 28 Agenda Seven Most Common Mistakes in PlantPAx System Sizing Best Practices When Designing PlantPAx System System Architecture and Elements PlantPAx – Process Automation System
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Seven Most Common Mistakes in PlantPAx System Sizing 29 System sizing was not performed Memory usage was underestimated Application requirements were overestimated (more or faster than needed) Not accounting for all I/O delivered through data and process networks Not accounting for communication with legacy networks Not accounting for all data Did not spend (any) time learning the tools
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 1. System Sizing Was Not Performed (the Most Common Issue) 30 “I have 30 years of experience, I know…” Every application is unique, based on scope of supply, distribution of responsibilities, expected longevity, local requirements, etc. Between two regions, number of I/O for the same application (oil rig, compressor station, remote pump station) could be very different (30-50%) By splitting application between 2 suppliers, communication requirements could increased dramatically “I did this application 5 years ago. I still remember…” Number of variables expected to be displayed on OWS and/or historized almost doubled in last 5 years. Number of “requested” alarms almost doubled after several recent accidents End Users try to take advantage of extra asset diagnostic data available on control level
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 1. System Sizing Was Not Performed (the Most Common Issue) 31 “Loop is a loop, is a loop… It is the same for Food Industry as for Oil and Gas” Average number of tags (control, visualization and historization) per I/O point for Heavy industries in 2-4 times higher than for CPG and Pharma System was built out of sub-systems provided by multiple suppliers. There was no “system responsibility” This is the most difficult case. Sub-system and OEM skid suppliers almost never aware of complete system architecture. EU or EU engineering company should hire RA or SI to perform system sizing (Cont.)
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 2. Memory Usage Was Underestimated 32 “I estimated system with a simplex (controller or server) and it does not work with redundant (controller or/and server)…” Redundant Logix requires almost 2x of application memory in controller (see 1756-UM523E…) Secondary Data server, once connected, requires the same amount of memory in controller as the Primary server “I did not use arrays, UDT and AOI types, but a lot of individual tags instead and I am out of memory…” Every tag (atomic or complex type) has the same overhead (about 100 bytes). Estimate in PSE assumes memory usage by PlantPAx process library (primarily AOI and UDT type tags)
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 2. Memory Usage Was Underestimated 33 “Before I start using PlantPAx Process Objects my Controller memory utilization was lower ” PlantPAx Library built for a typical “process” use when all object operation configurations and parameters , interlocks, permissives, etc. could be done from an Operator Workstation (OWS). This functionality requires high quantity of tags. (Cont.) Operator Alarm AlarmConfig Maintenance Engineering P_AIn 70 37 21 25 14 35 202 P_AInAdv 92 60 35 37 18 45 287 P_AInDual 111 58 33 28 16 45 291 P_AInMulti 136 51 29 43 37 36 332 P_AOut 38 16 9 31 14 23 131 P_Din 21 4 6 12 8 13 64 P_DOut 58 30 17 28 17 16 166 P_DoseFM 69 30 17 18 22 34 190 P_DoseWS 65 30 17 16 24 33 185 P_VSD 81 38 21 30 59 23 252 P_Motor 47 31 17 24 14 35 168 Faceplate GraphicObject Total Tags per Process Object
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. PlantPAx System Tools and Utilities 34 When you think that IAB recommended “way too many servers or controllers”, please check your rate of execution and system limits 34 System and location preferences allows you to customize the tool to your requirements. 3. Application Requirements Were Overestimated (More or Faster Than Needed)
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 4. Not Accounting for All I/O Data Delivered Through Networks 35 Selected configuration of smart field device can very significantly change number of tags. This data will be processed or/and displayed and, therefore, should be considered in estimation Examples of DeviceNet parameter groups for E3 Overload Relay E+H Promag on EtherNet/IP & Logix tags
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 5. Not Accounting for Communication Through Legacy Networks 36 Communications between Logix® Controllers and legacy Analog I/O on legacy networks (RIO) or legacy Controllers on legacy networks (DH+) implemented through Logix® MSG instruction. If configuration has 30 1771 analog I/O modules that should be scanned every 100ms then: 30* 10 msg/sec = 300 msg/sec 300 msg/sec ~ 35% of CPU utilization for L7x Additional Controller communication capacity is required when RIO I/O connected to PlantPAx
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 6. Not Accounting for All Data You thought your system was… 37 System was sized and verified with IAB PSE, but there was a disconnect between EU and SI
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 6. Not Accounting for All Data But your system really was… 38 Existing Controllers Existing and new corporate software 3d party DCS All sub-systems that could be connected should be accounted for and estimated New Skids
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. PlantPAx System Tools and Utilities 39 7. Did Not Spend Time Learning the Tools Project Preferences allow changing the System calculation defaults 39 Preferences allows you to customize tool to your requirements. Use it wisely!
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. PUBLIC INFORMATION Questions?
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. We care what you think! On the mobile app: 1. Locate session using Schedule or Agenda Builder 2. Click on the thumbs up icon on the lower right corner of the session detail 3. Complete survey 4. Click the Submit Form button 41 Please take a couple minutes to complete a quick session survey to tell us how we’re doing. 2 3 4 1 Thank you!!
  • Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. PUBLIC INFORMATION Thank you for participating! Please remember to tidy up your work area for the next session. We want your feedback! Please complete the session survey!