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Presentation2

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  • 1. live a self-determined life imbued with the rich, humanistic vision and spiritual ideas of Judaism. After Warsaw and Auschwitz, this determination and definition shows that hope itself still lives.
  • 2. they
  • 3. England, that Jews had kidnapped a Christian child, tied him to a cross, stabbed his head to simulate Jesus' crown of thorns, killed him, drained his body completely of blood, and mixed the blood into matzos (unleavened bread) at time of Passover."
  • 4. struggle. It is precisely because Jews knew that they could not militarily defeat the Germans, that this event must be understood as brought about not by desperation but by a decision for self- definition, autonomy, and for Jewish political selfhood.
  • 5. Poland for years to come ノ Should be read not only by specialists in early-modern religious history, but by anyone interested in the history of antisemitism, Jewish- Catholic relations, or Polish history more generally.'
  • 6. no direct tie to the neopagan Nazi racism that reached fulfillment in the Shoah. But he adds his verdict that it acted as a tragic precursor, a conditio sine qua non.
  • 7. redemption." Echoes of the traditional view, according to which Jewish suffering is punishment for their rejection of Jesus' appearance as savior, can be heard clearly in this statement.
  • 8. and of the Polish nation, and the help provided by the Catholic clergy to the Jews duringtheperiodofGermanoccu pation. Thesebecamecentralmotifsinth eeducationprovidedby the Bishops to their congregations, and they had great historical importance in terms of the next gen-
  • 9. surelyforsooktheextremepositi onstheyhadheldpriortothewar. Buttheanti-Jewishviewsofthe Polish Catholic clergy proved to be deep-rooted and vigorous, and they found renewed sustenance in the new political reality of the late 1940s.
  • 10. while maintaining their moral integrity. Today, Jewish survival is a supreme moral act of political self- definition. Jews refuse to define them selves as victims, but rather as Jews who wish to live a self-determined life imbued with the rich, humanistic vision and spiritual ideas of Judaism. After Warsaw and Auschwitz,
  • 11. defense in the ghetto will have been a reality. Jewish armed resistance and revenge are facts. I have been a witness to the magnificent, heroic fighting of Jewish men in battle.”

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