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The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?
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The Great Divide: The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other?

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Deciphering the differences between traditional universities and for-profits..what they can learn from each other..Please see page 62!

Deciphering the differences between traditional universities and for-profits..what they can learn from each other..Please see page 62!

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  • 1. Career College Central PoliticsMARCH 2013 Students 15500 W. 113th St., Suite 200 • Lenexa, KS 66219 FIRST Semantics at the heart of latest attack on for-profits Inflated Cash or Dreams? Class? Are the aspirations of today’s Fueling the entrepreneurial students reachable through spirit in today’s college education? students The Definitive Voice of the Career College Sector of Higher Education www.CareerCollegeCentral.com
  • 2. We have you covered. We’ve been doing “organic” since last century HigH-converting student leads come naturally when you have a partner that cares—with the experience to get results. We’re experts at: • Search—organic & strategic paid • Fresh, real-time lead delivery • Exclusivity—we’ll never re-sell your leads + We own, operate and maintain every web site we use, so you’ll always know where your leads are coming fromYour Partner in Education SolutionsExperience how Ambassador can develop the perfect course materials management solution for your school. Leverage ourleading-edge technologies and customized integrations to fulfill academic and financial goals, enhance student satisfactionand increase efficiencies. We have complete solutions for textbooks, eTextbooks, scrubs, kits, supplies and logo apparel, andyou will receive unparalleled service 100% of the time. When it comes to course materials management, we have you covered. Learn how Ambassador’s education solutions can work for you. Go to www.ambassadorbookstores.comCOLLEGE BOOKSTORES email info@ambassadorbookstores.com or call (800) 431-8913 search marketing specialists 1.866.766.2589 info@beelineweb.com
  • 3. Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 1
  • 4. Contents News Career College Central 26 Paying Dues By Jenni Valentino The ever-increasing student loan debt in America continues Politics to take a backseat to current events and economic debates like the fiscal cliff. However, with the start of President Barack Obama’s second term, changes to regulate and simplify costs MARCH 2013 and financial aid for higher education may be looming in the Students near future. FIRST 66 ATA College By Jane Mahoney In order to combat low retention rates and encourage student success, ATA College has created a successful mentorship Semantics at the heart of latest attack on for-profits program and an administrative retention specialist position to 15500 W. 113th St., Suite 200 • Lenexa, KS 66219 keep at-risk students engaged and on the path to graduation. INFLATED CASH OR DREAMS? CLASS? ARE THE ASPIRATIONS OF TODAY’S FUELING THE ENTREPRENEURIAL STUDENTS REACHABLE THROUGH SPIRIT IN TODAY’S COLLEGE Contributed Articles EDUCATION? STUDENTS The Definitive Voice of the Career College Sector of Higher Education www.CareerCollegeCentral.com 20 I nflated Dreams? On the Cover 10 By Brjden Crewe With the famed successes of multibillionaire college dropouts Politics First like Mark Zuckerberg, young people are growing up with an By Kevin Kuzma increasingly unrealistic American dream. Contributing writer In his last term before retirement, Senator Tom Harkin, Brjden Crewe defends the importance of a higher education as D-Iowa, has launched another damaging attack on the a means to achieving one’s ballpark dreams. career college sector – the most threatening offensive since the Department of Education’s gainful employment rule. Editor Kevin Kuzma explains why his legislation to 24 C ash or Class? By Dr. Pietro (Pete) Savo crack down on bad actors” throughout all of education The Thiel Foundation is giving $100K to students willing to forgo is not about students at all, but rather about the aims of a college education and become entrepreneurs before higher legislators. education impedes their creative ideas. Dr. Pietro (Pete) Savo, Chief Financial Officer of a Service Disabled Veteran Owned Small Business, discusses the legitimacy of this idea and ways to combat such notions in the classroom. 60 he Great Divide T By Robyn Shulman, M.Ed. It isn’t difficult to see the drastic differences between a career college and a traditional university, and chances are that everyone prefers one over the other. Robyn Shulman,Subscribe! Managing Editor of ED News Daily, explores what makes these higher ed institutions different and the room for improvementCareer College Central grants you access to: this could mean for both.• Insightful operations tactics from sector experts• Student stories 6 W hos Representing Your Best Interests?• Sector research and analysis By John AssuntoOnly $59 for an annual subscription Having trouble finding a quality search firm? John Assunto,and $39 for additional subscriptions. President and CEO of the Hudson Group, has some advice onContact Us Today! Call 913.254.6016 how to find the firm that puts your interests ahead of its own.or email bridgetd@careercollegecentral.comMARCH 2013 | 2
  • 5. 38 A Model for Success www.CareerCollegeCentral.com By Erik Slagle The Queens campus of Lincoln Technical Institute has teamed up with the Greater New York Auto Dealers Publisher/Editor Association, placing students and potential employers in the Kevin Kuzma same building. Erik Slagle of Lincoln Education Services kevink@careercollegecentral.com discusses the model for success such a match has created. Graphic Designer16 B uilding a Better Externship Rick Kitchell By Dr. Susan F. Schulz Externships open career opportunities for students and solidify career school relationships with local businesses Columnists and employers. They also benefit enrollment and retention Amir Moghadam rates. Dr. Susan F. Schulz of Susan F. Schulz Associates Vincent Scaramuzzo Inc. outlines successful externship strategies utilized by several career institutions. Staff Writers Tahsa Cerny54 H istory ... On Repeat Jane Mahoney By John Lee Jenni Valentino Despite a changing education sector, for-profit colleges have been facing the same criticisms challenges for more Copy Editors Erin Cockman than 100 years. John Lee, Founder and President of JBL Piper Hale Associates Inc., discusses the reasons for these challenges Nate McGinnis and ways to change this repetitive history. Megan Schulte Subscriptions Manager In Every Issue/Columns Advertising Sales Bridget Duffy Hays bridgetd@careercollegecentral.com5 Letter from the editor 913.254.601630 IMAGINE AMERICA FOUNDATION Career College Central, March/April 201343 the link Application to mail at periodicals postage rates is pending at Olathe, Kan. Career College Central is published50 Book Review bimonthly, six times a year, in January, March, May, July, September and November. Annual subscription fee is $59. Office of known publication: PlattForm Advertising, 1550064 LINK UP ON LINKEDIN W. 113th Street, Suite 200, Lenexa, KS 66219. Periodicals Postage Paid at Olathe, Kan., and at additional mailing52 SCARAMUZZO offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to PlattForm Advertising, 15500 W. 113th Street, Suite 200, Lenexa, KS 6621970 MOGHADAM For more information about subscriptions or advertising72 MAKING HEADLINES (website and/or magazine), please contact: Bridget Duffy Hays, Director of New Business Development76 Why I chose 15500 W. 113th Street, Suite 200, Lenexa, KS 66219 TEL: 913.254.6016 FAX: 913.764.4043 www.CareerCollegeCentral.com Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 3
  • 6. MARCH 2013 | 4
  • 7. LETTER from theDear readers, editor Legislators should not judge the paths these students choose or paintBefore I can commence with writing my letter this month, I first haveto give praise to our printer who was gracious enough to stop the the colleges they attend as bad actors if the legislators don’t agreepresses on this edition of the magazine though we were deep into the with or understand the students’ choices. The path should not be asfinal stages of publication. Our original cover story for March was important as the outcome.much different than what you see here, but that was before our sectoronce again became the focus of potentially unfair and overbearing Career colleges help students land jobs and take that important firstlegislation in Washington. step toward a brighter future. Those of us who care to set foot inside these schools know this. Our legislators do not. I would like to askThis month, Senator Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, launched a new front in them to leave education to those who know and care something abouthis battle against career education. In the guise of legislation that it. We’ve been putting students first for decades. There is a differenceprotects students from preying colleges, Harkin is seeking to provide between a cleverly titled act … and a mantra.the Department of Education more power to take measures againstthe “bad actors.” Our new cover story takes an insightful look at theact and explains why this latest effort could be more damaging to thesector than the original gainful employment rule.Our elected officials in the Senate are running with an idea that issound in principle and have positioned it as a positive for all of highereducation. And yet, the Students First Act is really about puttingundue pressure on all career colleges. Our sector has its naysayers inWashington, but we all know that entities that operate on a for-profitbasis have negative stigmas attached to them. That makes them allsomewhat suspicious to many in government.Harkin’s act makes it clear: The day career colleges are finallyappreciated by the masses and lauded by the general public and evenby career politicians for the value they bring in delivering skilled laborto the U.S. workforce – the flexibility they offer older adults withoutthe time or money for traditional education – is not likely to comein 2013. That day won’t arrive until we all agree that what shouldmatter more than the profit status of an institution is whether or notthat school leads students to a path to achieve their dreams.Everyone has a different dream and a different idea of how to getthere, as writers Breden Crewe and Dr. Pete Savo explore in this issue.Their articles shine a light on student aspirations. Are today’s students’hopes inflated? Is a college education a requirement for achievingtheir dreams? These are relevant questions that help us come to abetter understanding of the role education should or should not play inthe lives of our next generation of Americans. Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 5
  • 8. john assuntoWhosREPRESENTINGYOUR BEST Quality search firms represent yourINTERESTS? interests, not theirs By John Assunto, Hudson Group“I can get you an interview … ”It always amazes me when either my staff or I speakto executives in our industry and they inform usthat they received an email from a recruiter statingthat their client wants to set up an interview withthem – even though the executives never spokewith that recruiter or gave them their resumes. Thelevel of misrepresentation from those situationspuzzles me every time I hear it. Yes, we recognizethe industry has had some corrections, and we’veseen the activity increase in our offices. But, at theend of the day, if it sounds too good to be true, itprobably is.MARCH 2013 | 6
  • 9. Now more than ever, if you find yourself exploring Take the time to ask those important questionsopportunities in the education space, you should and ask what the follow-up procedure would betake the time to administer your own litmus test. after your resume has been submitted. Ask theAsk questions to ensure that you are dealing with search consultant for any assistance they may bea quality search firm that has your best interests at able to provide to best prepare you for a potentialheart. Here are some simple questions you can pose interview. Also, ask the search consultant if theyto test credibility. are open to informing you of other positions in the industry that they are aware of that fit your • efore I forward my resume, do I have your B background. commitment that you will not submit it to anyone unless I have the opportunity to learn Now more than ever, if you find about the position/company? yourself exploring opportunities • ill my resume be forwarded to HR/internal W in the education space, recruiting, or will it be submitted to a hiring you should take the time to manager? administer your own litmus test. • oes your client have a defined interview D A quality firm with a high level of integrity often process? has strong long-term professional relationships with executives and will assist you in your search, • Will I be contacted directly by your client? even if the firm might not immediately obtain a fee. A good firm will recognize that helping • hat is your background in education outside of W an executive in the present is an opportunity to recruiting? Is your firm managed by executives build a trusting relationship into the future. Don’t who are experienced in both executive search underestimate the value of a partnership between and education? you and a search consultant who is willing to look out for your interests – when others are only looking out for their own bottom lines. There are firms that will be willing to help. Ask the right questions, and you’ll find the recruiters who will go above and beyond; hold onto your relationships with firms like this. Those firms will go the extra mile when you need to hire. John Assunto is the President and CEO of the Hudson Group. He started the education division at the firm and has provided consulting to the top executives in proprietary education. He has been ranked in the top 1 percent of all recruiters worldwide by Management Recruiters International. His career includes work with both international schools and domestic colleges, universities, career schools and education service corporations. He can be contacted at 860.652.8660, ext. 103, or johna@hudsongrp.com. Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 7
  • 10. Greetings from Hollywood Beach! 10th Annual Best Practices and Great Ideas Conference 2013 April 17-18, 2013 Marriott Hollywood Beach 2501 N. Ocean Drive Hollywood, FL 33019 Register now TpiBestPractices.com Questions? Email Donna Varela dvarela@citycollege.edu Make a Hotel Reservation Follow Us Hosted by: Stay at the Marriott Hollywood Beach twitter.com/tpiConference hotel and get a special discount. Go to facebook.com/tpiConference TpiBestPractices.com for details.MARCH 2013 | 8
  • 11. The New CampusVue Portal. CampusVue® Ecosystem CampusVue® Student CampusVue® Portal CampusVue® Forms Builder Talisma® CRM Talisma® Fundraising CampusVue® Finance CampusVue® HR Payroll CampusVue® Performance AnalyticsMore flexible, more brandable, more collaborative.Discover how you can transform your institution’s Website into a true Web collaboration platform. With the new CampusVue® Portal,students, faculty, and staff connect to your institution on the fly, publish and share documents, and easily customize their onlineexperience. What’s more, you can tailor online student applications to their programs and interests with drag-and-drop ease. See thenew CampusVue Portal in action.Visit the CampusVue Demo Center at www.campusmanagement.com/democenter or call 1.866.397.2537.© 2012 Campus Management Corp. All rights reserved. Campus Management Corp, CampusVue and Talisma are registered trademarks ofCampus Management. These marks may be registered in the U.S. and other countries. All other trademarks and registered trademarks arethe properties of their respective owners. Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 9
  • 12. kevin kuzma Politics Students FIRST Semantics at the heart of latest attack on for-profits By Kevin Kuzma, EditorMARCH 2013 | 10
  • 13. The title sounds noble: the no meaningful education, misusing taxpayer dollars, and Students First Act. sticking students with the bill.” The paragraph concludes with this statement: “A rising number of students at these In those four words, you institutions are being forced to drop out and default on theirwill find something you can stand behind – a cause we federal student loans.”can all champion: protecting students from colleges anduniversities preying on the unsuspecting through flashy The bad actors label is cause for concern for all careermarketing pieces and aggressive phone calling. (Actually, colleges. And the last statement referring to “thesemake it two things we can stand behind: protecting institutions” perhaps should cause even greater anxiety.students … and our dislike of intrusive marketers.) Why? Because Senator Harkin considers all for-profit schools bad actors. By his vague definition, all careerLast week, U.S. Senators Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, colleges are overly aggressive in their marketing efforts,Chairman of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and are not graduating students at high enough rates and arePensions (HELP) Committee, and Frank R. Lautenberg, essentially flawed institutions because of what he sees asD-N.J., introduced the Students First Act to remedy the their motives.Department of Education’s oversight of higher educationinstitutions that are taking advantage of students and The Students First Act is nothing more than Senator Harkintaxpayers. upping the ante against for-profit colleges by granting the Department of Education an expansion of power.But pay no mind to the language they are using, specificallythe broad claim that the act targets institutions of higher While we all agree students should come first – no mattereducation. Harkin, in his final term before retirement, what sector of higher education we might work in – weis dedicating a large portion of his time to for-profit need to fight against this act. We need to take action beforebashing. The Students First Act is easily the biggest threat the Department of Education uses its power to unfairlyto all career schools since the advent of the Department of target career colleges – career colleges where studentsEducation’s gainful employment rule in 2010. are getting a quality education, a reality that occurs at the overwhelming majority of for-profit schools.The bill enhances the program review process, creatingtriggers that require the Department of Education to Something else we can all agree on: Lawmakers and theirconduct program reviews of institutions most at risk of proposed solutions are not the answer for the betterment ofviolating federal law. It also strengthens existing sanctions higher education. Their threats create dissension, put theagainst colleges that knowingly and willfully violate various sectors of higher education at odds and carelesslyrequirements of federal student aid programs and holds cause trouble for institutions that have done nothing wrong.executives of those institutions personally accountable. Students should definitely come first, but with thisFollow along with me, if you will, and read between the legislation, politics do.lines of the language used in the HELP Committee’s pressrelease announcing the proposed legislation.The language claims the act will help the Department ofEducation act against schools taking advantage of low- Kevin Kuzma is Editor of Career College Central.and middle-income students who rely upon federal student His feature writing, essays and short stories haveaid to help make college affordable. “Bad actors” are appeared in The Kansas City Star, Urban Times, Review, Ink Magazine and Present Magazine. He canspecifically made targets and are defined as institutions be contacted at kevink@careercollegecentral.com.that “are aggressively marketing to vulnerable studentsin potentially illegal ways while often providing little or Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 11
  • 14. tasha cerny Senator Tom Harkin, D-Iowa www.harkin.senate.gov Behind the Students FIRST ACT Everything you need to know about the legislation proposed by Senators Harkin and Lautenberg By Tasha Cerny, Staff WriterMARCH 2013 | 12
  • 15. U.S. Senators Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, Chairman of the Senator Frank R. Lautenberg, D-N.J. Senate Health, Education, www.lautenberg.senate.gov Labor and Pensions (HELP)Committee, and Frank R. Lautenberg, D-N.J., introduceda new piece of legislation on March 1, titled the StudentsFirst Act, a proposal designed to reinforce and strengthenthe Department of Education’s supervision of institutionsof higher education and better hold accountable thoseinstitutions profiting illegally from students and taxpayers.Along with Senator Harkin and Senator Lautenberg, SenatorsRichard Durbin, D-Ill., and John D. Rockefeller IV, D-W.V.,are supporting the bill as co-sponsors.The bill was proposed as a way to target and prevent theactions of colleges and universities that take advantage ofstudents who receive federal student aid in order to reducetheir own costs and receive a higher profit. Senator Harkinand Senator Lautenberg were noted in a letter sent toEducation Secretary Arne Duncan in December as havingput a large emphasis of this fraud on manipulation of studentloan default rates: “The for-profit sector consistently has thehighest default rates among colleges and universities … For-profit colleges enroll only 13 percent of students, yet accountfor almost half (47 percent) of all defaulted borrowers.”*In a quote published in a Senate newsroom press release,Senator Harkin said, “Plain and simple, students and taxpayersexpect federal dollars to be spent at colleges and universitiesthat provide a quality education. Unfortunately, there aretoo many institutions that put other priorities over students’academic success. This important legislation will help focusthe Department of Education’s efforts to effectively detectand stop the patterns of waste, fraud and abuse that leavestudents with mountains of debt and without degrees.”The Students First Act adds to the program review process,making investigations into fraudulent cases more thoroughand increasing the encompassing criteria that would requirethe Department of Education to conduct program reviews.The legislation also increases the current sanctions in placefor those institutions in violation, or at risk of violation, ofthe requirements for federal student aid programs and holdsexecutives of these institutions personally accountable.The legislation seems to focus specifically on the for-profit sector of higher education, though the bill is wordedto encompass all higher education institutions. In theletter from Senator Lautenberg and Senator Harkin sent toSecretary Duncan, Senator Lautenberg states that, “For-profitschools should not be able to use administrative smoke andmirrors to circumvent regulations that protect students andtaxpayers, and the Department should take action to preventthese tactics.”* Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 13
  • 16. Specifically, the Students First Act: Senator Tom Harkin, D-Iowa • einforces overview of violating institutions by R www.harkin.senate.gov requiring department reviews of institution programs engaged in risky behavior, such as serial forbearance, default rate manipulation, exceeding the 20 percent revenue spending limit on recruitment marketing, and receiving more than 85 percent of revenue from federal student aid sources • ncourages the Department of Education to include E proactive program reviews for institutions according to criteria related to default rate, total federal student aid revenue, spikes in enrollment, complaints, suspicious graduation rates, financial health and/or profit margins • equires institutions found in violation of these R stipulations to notify prospective students when and why the institution is under review • urther develops existing procedures by requiring F that all reviews assess abuse of the aforementioned violations, as well as assess the institution’s financial and administrative capabilities and program integrity • pecifies that all program review personnel be S appropriately trained and that violating institutions share program review results with federal and state entities, including accrediting agencies and associations • ncreases the mandatory penalties for violating I institutions by revoking eligibility for federal student aid and requires that the Department of Education specify mandated sanctions for other violations • nforces financial penalties for colleges and E universities that lose their eligibility and raises the fines for breaching Title IV regulations • ses funds from these penalties to provide financial U * he letter to Secretary of Education Arne Duncan can T relief to students in attendance at violator schools be found here: http://www.lautenberg.senate.gov/assets/ default-manipulation.pdf • ncreases recordkeeping for data collection and I complaint tracking and improves the current central Sources: database on institutional accreditation, eligibility and http://www.help.senate.gov/newsroom/press/ certification release/?id=0cc7ef6b-40ce-49d8-b9be- 35b12b2fdb46groups=Chair http://www.lautenberg.senate.gov/assets/StudentFirst.pdf http://lautenberg.senate.gov/newsroom/record. cfm?id=338110MARCH 2013 | 14
  • 17. Pearson. We’re on a mission – Yours. From pre-enrollment to placement, and everything in between, Pearson is proud to work with private sector and career colleges PEARSON APSCU’S to provide services, solutions, and strategies to THE LINK meet the unqiue goals of your institution. We are proud to sponsor APSCU’s THE LINK, a publication dedicated Partner with Pearson to maximize today’s to support your mission to improve opportunties for growth and innovation: • Business services to improve your lives and advance careers through institution’s effectiveness education. • Strategies tailored to meet your growth goals • Customized solutions for improved results and outcomes.Learn more about how Pearson can help you create solutions specific to the needs of your institution students. Visit us at www.pearsonlearningsolutions.com/private-sector/. Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 15
  • 18. dr. susan schulzBuildinga BetterExternship How great externships can result in 100 percent placement rates By Dr. Susan F. Schulz, Susan F. Schulz Associates Inc.
  • 19. E xternships provide many benefits to career there. If not, there are many companies and community schools, students, employers and the resources to locate potential externship hosts. These include community. When structured effectively, chambers of commerce and professional organizations students have the opportunity to gain related to your training, associations, unions and tradevaluable experience to add to their resumes, and publications.employers can benefit from an extended interviewwith a potential new hire. Externships can be crafted A benefit of reaching out to the community is the increasedfor just about any program – even those with no contact with decision-makers. They can learn the benefitsclinical or internship/externship requirements. Planned of your institution as a source for training and staffing. Ineffectively, externships can help career schools achieve addition, as you meet contacts in your community, youhigh placement rates and enhance brand and image. learn about new jobs and meet people who can tell you about these openings plus any new training needs.Externships are great tools to address gainfulemployment and other regulatory issues. One of the A current trend is to offer externship opportunities for allbest ways to counter bad press and accusations is with training programs, whether externships are required or not.facts. Successful externships can result in high job Since career colleges typically serve individuals with littlestatistics, enhanced relationships with and testimonies or no relevant work experience, this means it is a challengefrom employers, and a greater understanding by for them to develop effective resumes. When externshipsthe community of the value of the for-profit sector. are properly structured and required for all training,Externships can impact all areas of the career school graduates gain work skills. In addition, they learn businessand result in increased enrollment, retention, placement and work ethics as well as soft skills, such as criticaland public relations opportunities. thinking, communications and teamwork, which rarely get taught in class. They have an increased opportunity to landThe following provides an outline of successful a great first job and jump-start job retention and promotion.externship strategies employed at several career schools This helps you to meet your placement commitment as aand colleges. career training provider. In addition, you have an increased ability to stay in touch with your graduates when you have to report placement success and possibly salary. InStart the process addition, when prospective students consider whether to enroll in your school or a competitor’s, the school with theTo be successful, new initiatives often start with externships might win out!an advisory board, either formal or informal.Stakeholders discuss parameters such as budget,staff, where externships are to be held and for Formalize the externship programwhich programs, and how to craft an externshipunique to their institution. Additionally, regulatory Externships must be run in a highly organized way torequirements also need to be considered at this time. achieve results. If you are starting out, this is the opportunityDepending on your programs, externship experiences to set them up right. If you already offer externships, this ismay have regulatory guidelines dictating required the time to formalize them. First, determine if the trainingclock hours, skills and learning objectives. you offer requires externships specified by your regulatory agencies. If yes, what are the specifics in terms of clockInitial steps include identifying current and prospective hours, skills requirements, evaluation and time frames?externship sites. You may already have relationships These requirements will become the underpinnings ofwith companies that allow your students to extern your externship program. Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 17
  • 20. Successful externships canresult in high job statistics,enhanced relationshipswith and testimonies fromemployers, and a greaterunderstanding by thecommunity of the value ofthe for-profit sector.MARCH 2013 | 18
  • 21. Evaluation for results and benefitsWhen you begin the process, reach out to your Routine check-in strategies must be built into anycommunity to locate externship sites. Once you have initiative. Surveys, questionnaires and other forms offound some matches, the next step is to formalize feedback yield valuable information from studentsthese relationships. This requires signed agreements. and externship supervisors. You need data to measureTypically, externship sites have their own agreements success and determine what changes are required. Mostprepared by their legal departments showing liability, important, you have another way to stay connected toresponsibilities and more. Your institution’s externship the community and workplace decision-makers. Youagreement will outline what you expect: the number of have tools to continue to reach out to individuals andhours your students will be at the site, the role of the companies that can benefit from your institution as aon-site supervisor, the specific work to be performed, source for training and employees.how often the student will get feedback and formalevaluations, and more. Great externship programs can result in 100 percent placement, plus many more benefits. Your placementFor your students to be successful and ultimately offered department may have a lot less work because of the work-full-time positions, they must be prepared. Preparation ready training your graduates receive. Many careersincludes keeping the students focus on placement require skills not always offered in the classroom, suchand helping them to act as if they were taking part in as the use of new equipment or procedures, especiallyan extended job interview. It means training them to in middle- and high-skills jobs. This means thatbelieve they have the skills to successfully complete companies may have to spend weeks training new hiresthe externship. Most important, they need the mindset to meet their specific way of doing business. Much theto assert themselves as valuable players so they can way apprenticeships used to, externships can head offpossibly be offered salaried positions! that problem and afford you the added benefit of being able to promote your graduates as being trained to meetYour externship advisory board can help determine how employers’ specific needs.to train students to be successful externs. Requirementsto consider include: completion of specific courses and Schools with outstanding externship programs attractrequired grades, demonstration of skills, employment an increased number of qualified enrollments. Therereadiness, self-confidence, ability to work with others, are more referral students from happy graduates asand more. Students typically benefit from having an well as an increased number of community contacts.externship mentor as their go-to person for immediate Retention increases because students are motivatedanswers to questions and dilemmas. to get to the externship stage of their training. You have the opportunity to reach out to the communityWhen formalizing your externship program, to build job listings as well as additional externshipdocuments outlining regulatory agency requirements, sites. Most important, you enhance the image ofskills requirements, institution on-site and workplace the for-profit sector and reach out to an increasedcoordinator responsibilities, and methods for tracking number of individuals whose lives you can helpresults can be helpful in making sure your externship change with training.program stays on track. Dr. Susan F. Schulz has been working in the adult education and career school sector for nearly 20 years. She is President of Susan F. Schulz Associates Inc. and owner of Schools for Sale International Inc. She can be contacted at susan@susanfschulz.com or 561.483.9554. Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 19
  • 22. brdjen creweInflatedDreams?Bypassing education for bigger dreamsis quickly becoming one version of theAmerican dream By Brjden Crewe, Contributing WriterIt’s simple math, really. A theorem, if you will. them to somehow morph into the billionaire superstars that they The more education you receive, the more look up to on television. And no matter how rare or isolated the you increase your chances of becoming success stories of their role models seem to be, these students neveranything you want professionally, thus controlling your seriously take into account the probabilities of failure. Every one offinancial future. OK, so it’s not exactly the most technical of them believes they are one in a million.mathematical equations, but it’s true. One of my professors once told me that “dreams are only for theToday, we witness the rise of businesspeople who have dropped unconscious.” He reminded me of this statement later when Iout of school and wear Levi’s jeans to multimillion-dollar board told him that I would be volunteering as a mentor/tutor for at-riskmeetings, a trend that lends the illusion of accessibility to our children in the public school system four years after I first took hisown dreams of success; success suddenly seems attainable and class. Because he wouldn’t expound on what exactly he meant byattractive without the necessity of a college degree. But no matter that statement as it pertained to my new venture, I was left to makehow many Mark Zuckerbergs or Jay-Zs defy conventional logic my own assumptions. Though he commended me on my efforts,as seemingly overnight millionaire entrepreneurs, the path I believe he was trying to tell me that I was dreaming if I thoughtto professional success has been and always will be through that I could change the world by going down this path, and I shouldeducation. wake up and do something more financially fulfilling and useful. I took those thoughts with me throughout my time volunteering, butA firsthand look at being blind something about what he was saying still felt weird.As a tutor and junior high mentor for the Las Vegas Clark Countyschool district, I’ve encountered the naivety of unfocused and As I performed my duties, the more students I listened to and gaveunprepared optimism that comes with the dreams of assorted advice to, the more I learned that their hopes and dreams weresuccess sans education and planning. Many of the middle school enormous, but their thirst for education didn’t match their ambition.students I interact with believe that a willingness to achieve their Every child wants to be a famous professional and/or make lots ofdreams is enough to influence the forces of destiny, allowing money doing something that they believe they were born to do. InMARCH 2013 | 20
  • 23. all the years I’ve been tutoring, I’ve never heard one teenager say process of making a dream a reality. And once you’re awake,that he or she would like to grow up and be a middle manager or it’s your goals that make your dreams come to life. I later texteda day laborer. Their professional ambitions are always of great my professor what I believed he was saying. He simply textedimportance and stature. Even to this day, on many occasions, me back:I try to help them realize the importance of school and thebenefits it will have on whatever they’d like to accomplish Work ethic + education =professionally, but only a few take in what I’m saying. financial independence I was told that millionaires are made during a recession.After a while, I began working with children from all Savvy, intelligent and motivated businesspeople driven enoughenvironments – not just at-risk children in public schools. to provide an in-demand product or service could make heavyWorking with independent charity organizations, I’ve been able waves in their bank accounts during the economic climate today.to meet and listen to children of all ethnicities and backgrounds, But even though the Internet, television and the invention of theand I’ve discovered that blindly ambitious optimism is consistent Snuggie feed the perception that young businesspeople can easilyamong children of vastly different economic and educational make millions of dollars, the path to riches isnt as quick as it maybackgrounds. They all believe they are going to be who they seem. Todays entrepreneurs want it fast, want it now and, in mostwant to be because of sheer independent will, and because life instances, want the success without expending the effort needed toowes them a fulfillment of their date with destiny. And the more be a successful businessperson in the long run.I experienced it among the children I was meeting, the more Ibegan to understand what my professor was saying. For every Mark Zuckerberg,No one should ever take away a child’s dream (or an adult’s for there are millions of otherthat matter). Dreams give us a reason to live and provide us withthe hope that one day life will finally reward and high school and collegerepay us for all of the torturous time we’ve dropouts who tried tospent fruitlessly longing for the fulfillmentof our aspirations. Dreams matter. But create their ownwhat I now understand about my megacorporationsprofessor’s comment is that wakingup is an essential part of the but failed and were left without a college degree to fall back on. Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 21
  • 24. Once upon a time, the American dream was to be able to provide 1 ark Zuckerberg was intelligent and educated enough to Ma better life for your family. Education for your children, a actually get into Harvardhome of your own and three meals a day all came courtesy ofa simple, financially stable job that dad (or mom) was proud 2 or every Mark Zuckerberg, there are millions of other high Fto perform five or six days a week, eight to 12 hours a day. school and college dropouts who tried to create their ownSure, many people had the Ralph Kramden get-rich-quick megacorporations but failed and were left without a collegedreams of financial independence, but keeping your day job and degree to fall back on. Many of the trials and difficulties thatmaking sure that your initial dream stayed in focus was first and characterize the path of a Mark Zuckerberg at times go unseenforemost. Today, thanks to the high-speed and lavish lifestyle and unnoticed, but his success at such a young age coupledimages of the stockbrokers in the 1980s and 1990s, hip-hop with his lack of a college degree inspires the kind of dreamand music moguls, and the T-shirt-wearing millionaire Internet that many promising (and oftentimes lazy) entrepreneurs hopeentrepreneurs of the past 10 years, the glamorized accessibility to replicate with their own businesses and creations. They areof how we define and view what we can achieve has shifted. pursuing the new American dream“Why can’t I be the next Sean Parker? I wear T-shirts, too!” What dreams may becomeThe new American dream is to own your own company and On the eve of whats sure to be marked as the 12-year anniversaryprovide others with jobs – a luxury once afforded only to those of our war efforts in the Middle East, were faced with aeducated and privileged enough to have such a company handed struggling economy, diminished middle class and one of theto them. We no longer aspire to simply get by financially or worst unemployment rates in 80 years. We have seen countriesto support our families while we spend two-thirds of our days such as India, Japan and Finland continue their strides towardworking for a company that doesn’t appreciate us. Todays implementing innovative learning programs and placing a highinstant entrepreneur thinks big and dreams even bigger. But priority on education while the United States continues to see itsdoes this ambition have a foundation of strong educational roots international rankings sink lower each year while it places higherand solid experience, or has the success of new, more relatable priorities on voting issues and government spending. As we searchmillionaire businesspeople today made it look a little too easy? for the answer to how we can climb out of an economic cesspool, the answer to bringing back the integrity of America as a superpowerI often hear many young entrepreneurs note that Mark known throughout the world may be right under our illiterate noses:Zuckerberg, Co-Founder and CEO/President of Facebook, E-D-U-C-A-T-I-O-N. And guess what. I wrote that without the aiddropped out of Harvard and successfully created a multibillion of spell-checker because of my own.dollar corporation when they speak in defense of the superfluityof a college degree in order to succeed in business today. Here The moral of the story is that todays instant entrepreneurs needare two things worth noting: not give up on their dreams or chase those dreams without a plan. Education, stability and patience are essential in gaining financial success in your professional life. You may not be the next Diddy or Myspace founder, but whos to say that you wont be even bigger? The only sure way to ensure a bright future for yourself is to pursue higher education no matter what your journey. Following a dream can mean a number of things, but expecting success without the aid of education may be enough to wake you up to the cold, hard reality of what it truly means to survive without education. Brjden Crewe has been in radio for more than eight years and is a writer for a number of well-respected publications nationwide, including MTV.com, BET. com, SonicMusicMonkey.com and a number of local publications. He currently writes for Las Vegas Sun, Review-Journal, Las Vegas Weekly, The Daily Scene, VegasDeluxe.com, Las Vegas Magazine, Vegas Magazine, and Vegas Rated Seven Magazine.MARCH 2013 | 22
  • 25. It was a search that an swered a question t hat inspired an inquiry tha t launched a future Step UpPlattForm partners with educational institutionsto deliver data-driven strategies that increaseenrollments. If you’re ready to work with amarketing partner that’s passionate abouteducation, step up to PlattForm. 913.254.6000 PlattFormAd.com Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 23
  • 26. dr. pete savoCash orClass?Rekindle theentrepreneurialspirit within theyoung at heartBy Dr. Pietro (Pete) Savo The entrepreneurial gene goes dormant or is lost forever becauseService Disabled Veteran Owned open creative minds are soon focused on grades and earning anSmall Business education. The priority of entrepreneurial creativity is lost, too. This is particularly troubling because humanity has risen to the top ofP the food chain thanks to the risk that comes from creative thinking. eter Thiel from the Thiel Foundation recently gave a This writer feels it was creative thought and the entrepreneurial new class of students $100,000 to forgo college. His spirit that drove us out of caves to cross large landmasses to monetary prizes were to encourage students to drop create a better life. It is no different from developing successful out of college and become entrepreneurs on their own, businesses today. The spirit to take flight, take risk and accomplishbefore college ruined their entrepreneurial spirit. Thiel holds the finishes second to caution and the fear of failure. What’s lost isperception that higher education impedes, rather than enhances, the the understanding that inventiveness and creativity are importantdevelopment of creative ideas. Does this statement have merit? To stimulators for ensuring the learning process.find the answer, we first need to understand the issue. Entrepreneurship is a natural ability. We all have theOnce young minds get to college at the undergraduate level, entrepreneurship gene, although some people exercise it andthese students become trained to follow a standard principle of some dont. Imagine if an even greater percentage of peoplebook learning. The lecture hall echoes rhetoric being force-fed found a way to thrive using entrepreneurial thinking? There areto students by professors who oftentimes have been in academia some very successful technology entrepreneurs, for example Billall their careers and not directly contributing to developing Gates, Michael Dell and Mark Zuckerberg, who never graduatedsuccessful practices in business. Many college and university from college. J.R. Simplot, who died at the age of 99 with a netstudents are refined out of being imaginative. Simply stated, worth of $3.6 billion, created one of the largest privately heldstudents forget what it is like to encourage their imagination to food and agribusiness companies in the nation – all without evervoyage beyond book learning. attending college.MARCH 2013 | 24
  • 27. Carl J. Schramm, a professor at Syracuse University and co-author • ith a young fearless mind, everything is possible; an experienced Wof Better Capitalism, indicates that the rate of starting new firms entrepreneurial mentor is perhaps what you needhas fallen off. Beginning in 2009, the average annual number ofentrepreneurial-driven new start-up businesses has fallen from • on’t wait for college. Imagine if we could incorporate an Da steady state of roughly 700,000 to 500,000. This research also innovative attitude into a middle school or high school settingclaims that the decline eliminated the growth potential for 200,000to 1,000,000 new jobs that simply were not created. Perhaps the perception that higher education impedes rather than enhances the development of creative ideas is not entirely true.Our nation’s defenders of job growth are the entrepreneurs building Obstructions of entrepreneurial ideas are more a result of not beingsmall businesses. According to the Census Bureau, in 2009 alone prepared for the demands of every changing evolutionary obstaclemore than 552,000 companies with at least one employee were that humanity must endure.launched. Small firms accounted for 65 percent of the 15 million netnew jobs created between 1993 and 2009, which equals a substantial9.8 million positions (Ramachandran, 2012). Our goal must be toThe results of the past are impressive, but we may have to reinventthe wheel a few times to find the secret for the future. Todays world bring back generationsis far different from yesterdays world, and the new traditional of creativeness as aeducation is a different beast born out of necessity. In October2011, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that 68.3 percent proactive approach toof 2011 high school graduates were currently enrolled in colleges entrepreneurial thinking.or universities.The effort is made to differentiate between education based on Entrepreneurship is born out of need, as much as creativity is a naturalassumption, consumption of knowledge, and social experiences byproduct of being at the top of the food chain. As the planet becomesexisting between educators and students. Our goal must be to more crowded, entrepreneurship becomes more critical to humanity’sbring back generations of creativeness as a proactive approach survivability. Survivability resulting in prosperity will becometo entrepreneurial thinking. Entrepreneurial thinking becomes dependent not so much on obtaining a college or university degree,a consequence of shared learning between educator and student but more on inspiring as many serial entrepreneurs as possible. Make(Ageyev, 2012). It is safe to say the solutions for empowering Bill Gates, Michael Dell, Mark Zuckerberg and J.R. Simplot the norm,entrepreneurial thinking rest in higher education. Since problems not the exception to the rule.become less of a problem by collaborative, common-sensesolutions, here are some academic solutions to bring about Sources: Ageyev, V. (2012). Psychological foundations of creative education. Creativeentrepreneurial thinking for those who did not win the Thiel Education, 3(1), 1+Foundation $100,000 prizes. Ramachandran, D. (2012). The Government Doesn’t Create Jobs: Entrepreneurs Do. Secret Entourage, 2 • Recruit entrepreneurs to develop and create a class around their own successful entrepreneurial experiences. Then offer courses Schramm, C., Litan, R., (2012). Better Capitalism, Yale University Press and experiences to prepare interested students to be successful entrepreneurs. In this way, a student will be better equipped Shane, S., (2010). The College Dropout Turned Billionaire Entrepreneur, Bloomberg BusinessWeek to engage in taking the risk and experiencing the real world, including its challenges and disappointments Dr. Pete Savo is the Chief Financial Officer of a Service • Find out what motivates the individual, because one size does not Disabled Veteran Owned Small Business (SDVOSB), a fit all. Motivation becomes the central emotional drive that has higher education service business that provides qualified student candidates to military-friendly colleges and the power to advance people. Such activities are fun, motivating universities nationwide. Savo, a respected lecturer and and thought-provoking to take part in, and they encourage the published author, was employed 18 years with Sikorsky students natural crazy gene to float to the surface Aircraft and six years as a direct business operations and lean manufacturing consultant for the U.S. Air Force Small Business Manufacturing Technical Assistance Production Program • Incorporate a variety of innovative entrepreneurial strategies (MTAPP), Air Force Outreach Program Office and the Department of Defense (DOD) supply chain missions. He can be reached at psavo@education- to prepare students to be successful in whichever career they resource-information.org or 603.321.6224. choose Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 25
  • 28. jenni valentino Paying Dues Obama, Congress attempt to get ahead of the nation’s struggles with financial aid By Jenni Valentino, Staff WriterT hough the time between President Barack have combined to form the perfect storm of student loan debt. Even Obama’s re-election and second-term those who did everything “right” – attended public universities, inauguration was dominated by raucous debate graduated in four years and leaned on their solid support systems over gun control and panic over the fiscal cliff, – are struggling with debt loads that outweigh their incomes.millions of students around the country still wait to hearwhat will come of their quieter, looming struggle with Beth D. graduated from the University of Maine in 2010 withstudent loans. a B.A. in History. She owes $110,000 in student loans and is currently working retail part time after being laid off from herSkyrocketing tuition costs, a confusing and disjointed full-time job.financial aid system, and a slow-going economic recoveryMARCH 2013 | 26
  • 29. A survey led by Wonderlic of Imagine America Foundation scholarship and award applicants in 2012, found that 82 percent of respondents had to take out student loans for school. The alarming news, 55 percent of those students“A big part of my negative experience and tremendous sense did not understand all aspects of the student loan process.of guilt is that my parents said theyd handle everything. I wasbrought up to never talk about money, so I stuck my head in What specifically did students notthe sand,” she said. “I was also taught it didnt matter what understand?you studied in college. I thought that as long as I got a degree, • 9 percent did not understand the difference between 6I’d be able to get a job that paid well enough to cover my federal loans and private loansloans. When I graduated right in the middle of the recession, • 5 percent did not understand the repayment options 4I was able to find a job, but it wasnt enough for me to live on • 9 percent did not understand the interest accrued on 3my own, let alone pay my loans off by myself. My parents loansare left helping me pay them off at the expense of their own • 4 percent did not understand their monthly payment 1retirement. amount“While no one could have seen the economy being this bad One approach to solving this financial illiteracy problem,in 2005 when I was picking a college, I take responsibility that shows promise, is a short online resource developedfor the fact that I should have made more of an effort to and provided by the Imagine America Foundation calledbe informed about what I was signing and what it meant,” Financial Planning Made Simple (FPMS). After watchingshe said. “But how do you make a 17-year-old see beyond an 18-minute video on the basics of budgeting, borrowingthe dreams colleges are selling to the possibility of a future and the repayment process, 49 percent of respondents saideconomic collapse?” they decided to borrow less money for school.The student loan problem is important – even defining – to How much less?individual students, of course. But according to some policy • 37 percent borrowed $2,500 or lessanalysts, it is also an area in which Obama and the 112th • 33 percent borrowed $2,501 to $5,000 lessCongress can make great strides toward overall economic • 10 percent borrowed $5,001 to $7,500 lessimprovement. • 6 percent borrowed $7,501 to $10,000 less • 14 percent borrowed more than $10,000 lessThroughout his tenure, Obama has been a proponent ofhigher education accessibility and affordability. He supportsPell Grants, direct student loans, transparency and efforts The results suggest the magnitude of the potentialto launch the United States back to the upper echelon of savings based on just one year of borrowing. Reducingcollege-educated citizenries. He put American colleges and student debt by using the effective training and planninguniversities “on notice” in his State of the Union address in tools such as the one provided by the Imagine America2012. However, throughout his first term, this support seemed Foundation could result in major savings to students andto be relegated to ideas and dreams. What American students the federal government. According to an analysis done byneed now from the President and his Congress is actionable JBL Associates, if half of the 10.4 million Stafford Loanstrategy. borrowers reduced the amount borrowed by a third, as was estimated in this study, students would borrow $27.8 billion less in Stafford Loans annually. It is reasonable to assume that the smaller loan amounts would translate into lower default rates in the future. Having more borrowers use the Financial Planning Made Simple tool could reduce dependence on loans by helping students be realistic about their immediate financial needs and anticipate the long-term repayment burden. Having each new borrower spend 20 minutes learning about student loans and developing a personal budget before taking out a loan could help eliminate unnecessary debt and reduce the longer-term risk of defaults. Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 27
  • 30. Payment “We’re at the early stages of a transformation – 10 years from now, higher education won’t look the same,” said RichardPlans Vedder, an Ohio University economics professor who directs the Center for College Affordability and Productivity, in a December 2012 Businessweek article. “There are millions of people feeling the pain of student debt. When that number gets big enough, it starts to permeate the public consciousness.” In 2012, American student loan debt passed $1 trillion, raising theMore students’ struggles question: Why is that number not big enough already? The answer likely lies in the power of the university. For decades, the $500with student debt billion-a-year higher education industry has been permitted to increase tuition prices at rates far outpacing inflation and averageRenata S., a 2010 graduate of Rutgers University, still owes income levels. Through its $100 million-a-year lobbying efforts,$15,000 for her B.A. in Biology. Her position in regulatory it has been able to rail against a decade’s worth of cost-controlaffairs at a large biopharmaceutical company does not pay measures enacted by the Bush and Obama administrations. Andenough to cover her loans. “Paying off my student loans it has consistently confused students with the complexity of thewould be impossible without my parents,” she said. “My student loan process.husband and I don’t currently bring in enough to pay forour household bills and to also pay down the student loans. “Too often, students receive financial aid award letters that areFortunately, my parents have graciously offered to pay my laden with jargon, use inconsistent terms and calculations, andmonthly student loan payment until they are retired, which make it unnecessarily difficult to compare different financialis about five years away. At that point, I’ll have to take aid awards side by side,” said Richard Cordray, Director of thethem over. I hope our finances will be in order by then.” Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.Lauren P. graduated with a Master’s degree andcoursework for her Ph.D. from Tyler School of Art atTemple University. She is currently an adjunct art historyinstructor at a four-year university and a communitycollege. She owes $86,000 in government loans and “ ut how do you make a B$10,000 in GATE loans. “I do not make anywhere nearenough money to make the traditional payment on my 17-year-old see beyondgovernment loan, but at least they are working with me the dreams colleges arebased on my income. My private loans do not work withme at all. The interest rate is alarming. I cannot defer selling to the possibilitynor can I arrange smaller payments or a longer payment of a future economicschedule. I wish my parents would have explained it to mebetter, or I wish the student loan company would have laid collapse?”out the terms more clearly. The payments are crippling, – Beth D.especially in the summer when I work less.” University of Maine graduateMARCH 2013 | 28
  • 31. Sarah Q., a technical services chemist, graduated with a B.S. in college selection by highlighting key information, including theChemistry and a B.A. in English from Case Western Reserve cost of attendance, financial aid options and graduation rates.University in 2007. “I graduated with somewhere around $70Kin student loans,” she said. “My universitys financial aid office It will take time to climb out of the hole dug by $1 trillion inwas terribly confusing. I was told to just sign on the dotted student loan debt. But the agony of the system is finally beginningline, not to think about it. I literally had no concept of how to permeate the public consciousness, as Vedder predicted.my loans worked, how I would be repaying them, nothing. Through a unified effort between both political parties, privateAsking questions to understand was actively discouraged. One financial aid providers, and a unified network of public andfinancial aid representative actually made me cry while she was private colleges and universities, students will continue to viewmocking my family not being able to help me.” higher education as a path to their dreams, not to their doom.Recent bipartisan efforts have been focused on transparencyin borrowing. Republicans and Democrats alike have joinedtogether to encourage higher education institutions to use astandardized form that will explain to students how much theirdegree will cost, how much they will owe, and how much theycan reasonably be expected to earn. Jenni Valentino is a freelance writer and editor withMore than 500 colleges and universities have already adopted years of involvement and experience in the career college sector. She can be reached atthe Financial Aid Shopping Sheet, a form backed by the jzvalentino@gmail.com.Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. The Shopping Sheetprovides students with a standardized financial aid award letterthat makes it easier to compare their options and make their Pr Ad De Fir Pu Se Sp    Ini Move Over Textbooks. Classroom Technology Has Taken Over. Since 1892, Brown Mackie College has believed education should evolve to meet the needs of students and employers. Back then, that meant delivering a quality, career-focused education via pencils and paper. Today, it means we’re embracing tablet technology in our classrooms and beyond. BrownMackie.edu Brown Mackie College is a system of over 25 schools located throughout North America. Programs, credential levels, technology, and scheduling options vary by school and are subject to change. See BMCprograms.info for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other important info. Apple, the Apple logo and iPad are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 29
  • 32. Career Colleges Necessary to MeetAmerica’s Skilled Worker GapEmployment is shifting away from goods-producing to service- How are career colleges meeting this need?producing industries, which are anticipated to create nearly 18million new jobs. Jobs requiring an Associate degree or vocational • areer colleges helped to populate and equip the workforce by Caward are projected to increase by 35% from 2010 to 2020. awarding 49 percent of health degrees and certificates in 2010-11Currently, career colleges serve more than 3.9 million students:many who are considered non-traditional students. For the United • n the six fastest-growing occupations requiring an Associate degree, IStates to remain competitive in the global economy, career colleges career colleges conferred:are a much needed part of higher education. o 71 percent of all cardiovascular technologist awards o 54 percent of all diagnostic medical sonographer awardsThe Imagine America Foundation is pleased to announce the release o 53 percent of all veterinary technology awardsof its Fact Book 2013: A Profile of Career Colleges and Universities.Prepared by leading industry analysts, the Fact Book contains • n the six fastest-growing occupations requiring a certificate degree, Iresearch and analysis of important trends in the career college sector career colleges conferred:of higher education. The Fact Book presents a comprehensive look o 6 percent of all hairdressers, hairstylists, and cosmetologist 8at the for-profit and career college sector of higher education, as well awardsas a comparison of public and private two- and four-year institutions. o 7 percent of all heating, air conditioning mechanics 7 awardsThe 2013 edition presents an abundance of important facts about o 73 percent of all dental assistants awardscareer colleges. For example, our research shows that career collegesare necessary to help meet America’s skilled working gap. Growth Throughout the Fact Book, you’ll find even more achievements thatin the health services and business support fields will generate are quite different from what you may have heard or read about thisan increasing number of new jobs, most of which will require sector of higher education. These facts, in our opinion, both justify andpostsecondary training or an Associate degree. More than 5.7 million solidify the existence of these schools. This information is importantjobs, an increase of 33 percent between 2010 and 2020, are projected to the future of this nation, and we are honored to present it to you.to emerge in the healthcare and social assistance fields alone. For more information about the Fact Book 2013 or Imagine America Foundation award programs, contact Robert L. Martin, President and CEO of the Imagine America Foundation, at 571.267.3012 or bobm@ imagine-america.org.
  • 33. Imagine America Foundation’sInstitutional Annual Report tothe CommunityIn recent years, the value of private career-specific educationproviders has been called into question. These schools havecome under fire in the media and on Capitol Hill. However,those who have attended career schools and work inside ofthem know a far different, more positive story – one that needsto be showcased!Changing the public’s opinion of the sector and its more than3.9 million students needs to start at the local level. To do this,the Imagine America Foundation is developing an InstitutionalAnnual Report to the Community. Through data from ournew IAF Civic Engagement Survey and the Fact Book 2013:A Profile of Career Colleges and Universities, IAF hopes tocreate an effective community outreach plan for career schools.This initiative will be piloted at three career schools to researchhow career colleges can best utilize the Annual Report. Digitaltemplates will include national trends and data showcasingcareer colleges. Through this template, institutions can theninput their institutional data and success stories, among otherinformation. Additionally, a utilization plan will be available toguide career education institutions with community outreach.For more information, contact Robert L. Martin, President andCEO of the Imagine America Foundation, at 571.267.3012 orbobm@imagine-america.org.
  • 34. Imagine America Events at the 2013APSCU Convention and ExpositionGiven the critical new challenges facing the career college sector,the Imagine America Foundation’s (IAF) mission is more importantnow than it has ever been. Serving career college students is who weare and what we do, but there is more we can do – with your help. Find out what bandBy sponsoring an IAF event at the 2013 APSCU Convention inOrlando, you will be helping career college students accomplishtheir dreams while simultaneously increasing your company’s will be playing at thevisibility to the sector. IAF is a 501(c)(3) organization; as such, yourcontributions are tax deductible to the fullest extent of the law. convention by going toIt’s not too late to become an IAF sponsor! Sponsorship opportunitiesare as follows. imagine-america.org/Concert sponsorship opportunities: specialevents.• Event Sponsorship – sold out (Champion College Services Inc.)• Entertainment Sponsor for the 2013 Concert o Platinum Level – 2 available o Gold Level – 2 availableAdditional 2013 convention sponsorship Sponsoring sector research remains an integral component of IAF’sopportunities: mission, including the upcoming 2013 Fact Book. The 2013 Fact Book contains research and analysis of important trends in the career college• Lifetime Achievement Award Video/Presentation – 1 available sector, and data from the Fact Book is often used within the sector• Event Sponsorship – IAF Golf Tournament – sold out (Gragg when representatives visit Congress or speak with the media. Advertising Inc.)• LDRSHIP Award Video/Presentation – sold out (Ambassador These are some of the exciting things IAF is able to do with the support College Bookstores) of scores of career college executives and organizations. Take a look and consider joining us.Every year, IAF grants more than 20,000 scholarships and awards tocareer college students. Our new Financial Planning Made Simple Additional benefits of sponsoring an IAF event can be found at(FPMS) tool helps students make better financial aid decisions and imagine-america.org/specialevents. For sponsorship opportunities orborrow less. additional information, contact Robert L. Martin, President and CEO of the Imagine America Foundation, at 571.267.3012 or bobm@ imagine-america.org.
  • 35. Imagine America Foundation Ambassador College BookstoresAnnounces Champion College Contributes to the ImagineServices Inc. as Event Sponsor America LDRSHIP Award Programof 2013 IAF Concert at the The Imagine AmericaAPSCU Convention Expo Foundation is pleased to announce thatThe Imagine America Ambassador College COLLEGE BOOKSTORESFoundation is pleased to Bookstores has contributed $25,000 to the Imagine Americaannounce that Champion LDRSHIP Award for the fourth consecutive year. Support of theCollege Services Inc. will LDRSHIP Award helps IAF continue its tradition of honoringbe the event sponsor at U.S. military students attending career colleges.the Premier SponsorshipLevel for the 2013 IAF IAF would like to thank Steven M. Blicht, Co-Founder and Chiefconcert at the APSCU Convention Expo. IAF would like to Operating Officer at Ambassador College Bookstores, for theirthank Mary Lyn Hammer, President and CEO of Champion support of the IAF. A special video presentation focused on theCollege Services Inc., for their support of IAF. 2013 LDRSHIP Award recipients will take place at the APSCU Convention and Expo.Imagine America Foundation Since 2004, IAF has annually honored military personnelAnnounces Gragg Advertising as with LDRSHIP Awards. Nearly $400,000 has been awardedEvent Sponsor of 2013 IAF Golf to exceptional military students attending career colleges nationwide. In that time, the awards have provided financialTournament assistance to young men and women returning from militaryThe Imagine America Foundation service in Iraq and Afghanistan as well as reservists, honorablyis pleased to announce that Gragg discharged, retired and active-duty military personnel.Advertising will be the event sponsorfor the Annual IAF Golf Tournament for ED MAP Pledges to Imaginethe second consecutive year. IAF wouldlike to thank Darryl Mattox, President of America Foundations 21st CenturyGragg Advertising, for their support of Workforce FundIAF. The Imagine America Foundation is pleasedSupport from these events helps IAF underwrite scholarships to announce ED MAP’s new Gold Leveland awards to students attending career colleges nationwide. pledge to the 21st Century Workforce Fund. This contribution will be used to support the, Fact Book 2013: A Profile of Career Colleges and Universities. Support of the Fact Book helps the Foundation continue its tradition of providing research to the career college sector! IAF would like to thank Kerry S. Pigman, President and COO of ED MAP, for their support. Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 33
  • 36. Imagine America Foundation’sRole in Filling the Skills GapEncouraging student financial success whiletraining for the future schools to fend for themselves and rely heavily on student tuition to keep functioning. With tuition costs growing at a rate faster than inflation, it isn’t difficult to see why our country is struggling economically. Imagine America Foundation is working toward changing this. We work with career colleges and students alike to provide financial opportunity and resources that not only prepare students to enter the workforce with as little debt as possible, but also encourage students to seek out training for those occupations most in need of workers. The Foundation works with colleges to provide scholarships and grants for students of all backgrounds seekingSince its beginnings more than 150 years ago, the career higher learning. Along with this, Imagine America also offerseducation sector has focused its attention on fulfilling the a user-friendly financial training program – Financial Planningneeds of employers of the day. As you might imagine, those Made Simple – to assist students in budgeting and preparing forneeds have changed dramatically over time – from teaching their future.type-writing and horse-shoeing skills to the knowledge tooperate and maintain the cutting-edge technology of the day. With transforming economic needs, Imagine America Foundation is working toward a better future, helping students achieve theirAs our nation evolves and modernizes, the demands of our academic goals and promoting career-based educations that willemployers and what we teach in our classrooms advances, too. prepare students to finally fill the ever-widening skills gap.According to the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Our mission – inherently – is to help the schools that provideStatistics, in the last decade, 12 of the fastest-growing jobs skilled labor to the workforce. Our nation’s employers are well-in America have been technology and/or healthcare industry served by our colleges that provide pathways for graduates intobased, such as computer software engineers/support specialists the fastest-growing careers of the future. And we are honored toand home health aides. With this, the number of jobs requiring provide support to the schools that fulfill such a vital role for ourunskilled workers has steadily decreased. In today’s economy, nation and its economy.semi-skilled jobs are in demand, and it is predicted that withinanother decade, skilled jobs will be on the rise. This means the Robert L. Martinimportance of having a college education is ever-increasing. President, Imagine America Foundation 571.267.3012While the skills gap broadens, the amount of student loan debt bobm@imagine-america.orgcontinues to increase at exponential rates. State and federalgovernments are cutting back on funding for education, leavingMARCH 2013 | 34
  • 37. Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 35
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  • 39. ADVERTISEWITH US!Be a part of thedefinitive voiceof the careercollege sectorand advertise yourbusiness inCareerCollegeCentralor onCareerCollegeCentral.com.Call Bridget Duffy Haysat 913.254.6016
  • 40. A Model erik slaglefor Success professional association can work together not only to best serve futureLincoln Technical Institute’s technicians, not only further the success of the business partners, but to do both these things in tandem. This is how we can continue aidingcorporate partnerships the economic and jobs recovery in this country in the coming years.”create prime opportunities for The unique success in the collaboration between the school and the association has turned the LTI – Queens campus into the standard-students and graduates bearer for how this kind of partnership can not only function but also flourish. McAlmont describes it as a model that should be replicatedBy Erik Slagle, Lincoln Educational Services throughout the Lincoln network as well as around the country.If you had to design the ideal campus for a career training institution, you’d want to start with a faculty and leadership team that’s committed to the academicexcellence of your students and the career success of yourgraduates. You’d want a student body held to a higher standard ofachievement. You’d want the facilities to be state-of-the-art withthe latest industry-specific equipment and technology. And, you’dwant more than 600 potential employers in need of your graduates The Queens campus of Lincoln Technical Institute and GNYADA’sjust down the hall to complete the picture. Center For Automotive Education and Training offer students career training and job opportunities in one state-of-the-art facility.If that all sounds too good to be true, then you haven’t been tothe Queens, N.Y., campus of Lincoln Technical Institute (LTI). The proximity of the campus to GNYADA isn’t accidental. When theThe campus resides in a building owned and cohabited by the association was looking to partner with a training institution for a newGreater New York Auto Dealers Association (GNYADA), and facility in 2006, they chose LTI over many other local and nationalthe partnership between Lincoln and GNYADA has dramatically schools. GNYADA operates its own training center in the building, andchanged the way New York area auto dealers find and hire the relationship has produced great results for the dealers that worktechnicians to fill their open positions. It has changed the career with LTI, according to GYNADA CEO Mark Schienberg.search landscape for LTI students as well. “When we built the Center for Automotive Education and Training“Lincoln’s Queens campus has become a model institution six years ago, our goal was to provide our area’s dealers with theon many levels,” said Shaun McAlmont, Lincoln Educational most highly skilled technicians,” Schienberg said. “Thanks to ourServices President and CEO. “It’s a model for outstanding student relationship with Lincoln, I’m proud to say that this goal has beenservice and regularly has among the highest graduation and achieved. The students who come through Lincoln Technical Instituteplacement rates of all of our schools. It’s a model for how we can are a new generation that has embraced the changes taking place inwork with the government and educate them about what we do the industry. With the skills provided by Lincoln Tech, they can lookand why career training is such a vital piece of higher education forward to successful careers in the retail automotive industry in thein America. And it’s a model for how a training provider and a years ahead.”MARCH 2013 | 38
  • 41. Success starts in the classroom“Your profession just started. It’s day one. Welcome.” LTI students train to not only perfect their technical skills, but to develop their personal brand and stand out in the job market. As LTI’sAt LTI – Queens, nearly every incoming class of auto technicians Executive Director James Morrissey explains, a Lincoln programhears that at their orientation. The word choice is intentional. opens doors to new opportunities – but each student has to walkIt’s not “your education” or “your training” that just started – it’s through on their own.“your profession.” It’s a way of addressing students that reinforcesemployment as the ultimate goal of their enrollment, and it sets the “Dealers know the caliber of Lincoln students is a given,” Morrisseytone for a journey that will see them transformed from students who said. “The Lincoln name can get a student an interview, but thenlove cars to trained, skilled technicians with a professional mindset. they’ve got to nail it. The students are their own product. We helpBecause close to 90 percent of Lincoln graduates are employed in the them discover what they can do to differentiate themselves as jobautomotive industry after graduation, instilling the professional ethic candidates. Having GNYADA here is a daily reminder that there areearly on is critical. And with access to more than 600 auto dealers great careers in their futures – if they are ready to market themselvesjust a short walk down the corridor, LTI has uniquely positioned its as the best candidate. Their successful job outcomes are what drive thestudents for success. success of Lincoln as a whole.”“It’s a built-in motivator for The partnership between Lincoln and the Greaterour students, having that dealerpresence right next door,” New York Auto Dealers Association has dramaticallyMcAlmont said. “Knowing that changed the way New York area auto dealers find andtheir future employer could bewalking through the doors at hire technicians to fill their open positions.any time inspires our students toexcel, and that partnership element helps students get jobs.” Student successes such as 2012 graduate Shawn Mustapha are an example. Mustapha, who started his LTI training with a love for carsStudents are finding those jobs with leading brands such as Honda, but no previous exposure to automotive technology, completed hisToyota and Volkswagen and at elite dealerships such as BMW and program last year and almost immediately began his new career withMercedes-Benz of Manhattan. It’s a multidimensional partnership Manhattan Motorcars. He now enjoys a career maintaining high-endbenefiting GNYADA, LTI and their students, and everyone has a European brands like Bentley and Rolls-Royce.part to play. Dealer representatives can reach out to the campus’career services team to find candidates to fit their open roles, and the “I loved having hands-on training from my instructor, a master certifiedteam also has regular contact with the GNYADA jobs bank manager technician,” Mustapha said. “I started with no prior knowledge ofto complete tasks including posting resumes in the bimonthly auto technology. Now, I’m an automotive technician trainee workingnewsletter distributed to approximately 650 area dealerships. toward my own master certification.” James Morrissey, Executive Director of the Queens Lincoln Tech campus (suit, right of center) introduces New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (center) to a class of Automotive Technology trainees. Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 39
  • 42. Lincoln actively supports GNYADA’s annual New York International Auto Show.LTI’s Career Services Director Kate Clymer referred Mustapha for At the crux of these joint activities, however, are the Lincoln studentsthe job, and at his formal interview with Manhattan Motorcars, he training to become highly skilled automotive technicians and thewas offered a position on the spot. dealerships that hire them. The selection process for acceptance to the Queens campus of LTI is rigorous and ensures only the most committedA working relationship that really works and dedicated students are admitted. Applicants must have a highThe GNYADA presence has boosted LTI in broader ways, too. school diploma or be near graduation to be considered. For studentsThe association’s political involvements bring a regular flow of who are finishing or just out of high school, parents are required to beguests through the facility – often government officials at both the an active part of the application process by visiting the campus andlocal and national level. attending orientation so they can better understand the value of the investment they are making.“Mark Schienberg is very gracious,” Morrissey said. “WheneverGNYADA hosts a political figure – governors, mayors,councilmen – he makes sure the Lincoln relationship is not onlyincluded, but highlighted.”For example, this past summer, Rep. Joseph Crowley, D-N.Y.,visited with Jay Williams, Executive Director of AutomotiveRecovery for the Obama administration. Better known inWashington, D.C., as the “Car Czar,” Williams remarked that theLincoln campus was one of the most sophisticated training centersof its type that he had seen in his travels around the country.Building on the relationship with GNYADA, Lincoln invitespoliticians to graduation ceremonies and campus events.Lincoln also supports GNYADA’s efforts through involvementin activities such as the annual New York International AutoShow, where the school hosts the event banquet and high schoolscholarship competition. Lincoln is a sponsor of the annual Lincoln President and CEO Shaun McAlmont (right) listens asGNYADA golf outing, the Manufacturers Challenge Cup, which Washington ‘Car Czar’ Jay Williams (center) talks career trainingraises money for scholarships to support students looking ahead with a Lincoln Tech student on campus. New York Congressmanto automotive careers. Joseph Crowley looks on.MARCH 2013 | 40
  • 43. Once admitted, students train with a faculty of instructors who areall master certified technicians. This selective admissions process,combined with an elite staff of instructors and proximity to one ofthe largest hiring bodies in the New York area auto industry, hasmade the Queens campus a model for how a postsecondary traininginstitute like Lincoln can distinguish itself and drive remarkablestudent outcomes.Training technicians, developingprofessionalsAs McAlmont puts it, “Better students, a better faculty, and betterinstructor-student ratios lead to better jobs. We aren’t just trainingour students to fix cars. We’re developing them into professionalauto technicians right from day one.”A key component of this development is the inclusion of soft skillsin the LTI curriculum. Director of Education Herman Dawkins, whoonce hired Lincoln graduates in his management role at an autosupply chain, recognized an opportunity in those graduates to morefully develop critical-thinking, time management, communicationand leadership skills.“It’s a gradual transformation to turn students into professionals, andit can be a bit of a transition for them.” Dawkins said. “Gradually astudent will start to see the value of what he or she can achieve whenthey start to change their behaviors. It’s about learning responsibilityand focus.”Dawkins and Morrissey were instrumental in creating andimplementing a series of student contact points designed to ensureevery student was receiving the individual attention and personalguidance they needed. These contact points formed a supportsystem recognizing each student as an individual with their own setof strengths, challenges, life struggles and aspirations. By requiringthat students keep regular check-ins with academic advisors, thecareer services team and campus executives, the LTI – Queensstaff were shaping a philosophy that would soon be adopted by thelarger Lincoln Educational Services corporation – a philosophy nowknown as The Lincoln Edge, which sets LES apart from other careertraining institutions around the country.“Our end goal is to help our students get jobs, and these initiativesaddress that,” Morrissey said. “It’s bigger than just academics. Astudent isn’t admitted unless we’re confident that student is goingto succeed, and then we make sure we support that student in everyway possible. We make our student body an integral part of thecampus fabric, right down to things like taking them on staff walk- New York Congressman Joseph Crowley addresses students andthroughs of the facility to give us a student’s perspective. It leads to the media in the auto bays of Lincoln’s Queens, NY campus.a greater sense of pride in being a Lincoln student.”Lincoln students take that pride with them when they go out into theworking world as automotive technicians, in many cases into the auto Erik Slagle is a Copywriter/Content Developer atbays of the very dealerships that make up GNYADA. As New York Lincoln Educational Services Corporation, a leadingarea auto dealers experience the quality, skills and professionalism national provider of career training and education. Heof Lincoln graduates firsthand, they’re increasingly making LTI their has spent more than 15 years in the postsecondarygo-to source for new technicians. It’s a partnership that can only education industry working with campuses to strengthen their messaging internally and externally.succeed when Lincoln graduates succeed, and the pieces are firmly He can be reached at eslagle@lincolnedu.com orin place to ensure that success in the years ahead. 973.736.9340. Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 41
  • 44. “PEARSON RXPRECEPTOR COME TOGETHER TO ENHANCE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND INCREASE INSTITUTIONAL SUCCESS. ” Improve communication, organization and accountability within your externship program with RXpreceptor, Experiential Learning Management System (ELMS) for career education. n Scheduling with Lottery / Match n Site Visit Tracker n Evaluation and Survey Management and Reporting n Site and Job Development Tools n Student Competency Management n Institutionally Managed Job Board n Student and Site Requirements Management n Placement Tracker n Student Hours Tracking and LDA Reporting n Institutional and Accrediting Body Customized Reports n Clinical Site Incident Report Visit us at the ABHES National Conference Booth #9 RXinsider - Higher Education Group 800.972.2083 EducationSupport@RXinsider.com RXpreceptor.com 1300 Division Road, West Warwick, RI 02893MARCH 2013 | 42
  • 45. P O W E R E D B Y p r o u d s p o n s o rAt a time when college costs and student debt are rising, the issue of return on investment becomes a big one for individual students, their families andeven the government. Our sector has seen the realityof this challenge when simply looking at enrollmentnumbers. At the beginning of the recession, we witnesseddouble-digit enrollment increases as students recognizeda need to increase their skills in order to pursue new jobopportunities. With the lack of a jobs recovery, studentshave increasingly decided to delay any investment ineducation until they are more confident of a new job at theend of their studies.Purdue University’s new President (and Indiana’s formerGovernor) Mitch Daniels, R, received national attentionwith his inaugural letter to the “People of Purdue” whenhe wrote, “College costs too much and delivers too little.Students are leaving, when they graduate at all, with loadsof debt but without evidence that they grew much in eitherknowledge or critical thinking.”Return onInvestmentBy Steve Gunderson, President and CEO, APSCU P O W E R E D B Y Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 43
  • 46. Return on InvestmentWe, as a sector, have always prided ourselves on a mission We can immediately calculate the benefits of this newthat invests private sector dollars to educate America’s professional to America’s competitive place in a globalstudents – especially those with multiple barriers to college economy. We can immediately recognize the benefit of thissuccess. In the midst of the debate over gainful employment family’s increased earnings in their community and in thein September 2010, Charles Rivers Associates produced a education of their children. The multiplier impact of thisstudy showing that our schools produce graduates in our increased education and income are all positive!two-year programs that cost the taxpayers $25,000 lessthan at our colleague institutions. But in today’s era of limited public sector resources, there is an increasingly important return on investment toI don’t know if such numbers are accurate or useful. My government. As part of the work in my book The New Middlefocus has been, and will continue to be, on the emerging Class: Creating Wages, Wealth, and Opportunity in the 21stskills gap in America, the capacity gap and the resulting Century, I did some quick math. According to the census dataopportunity gap. We know that America will likely need for 2011, a total of 20.6 million Americans hold an Associate55 million new workers by 2020 – 23 million in new degree – approximately 9 million occupational degrees andjobs and 32 million in replacement jobs for retirees. We 11 million academic degrees. If you multiply the additionalalso know that 65 percent of all jobs and 85 percent of lifetime earnings of $63,000 by 20.6 million (at a 15 percentnew jobs will require postsecondary education and skills. tax rate), the additional federal tax revenues equal $1.3Furthermore, public funding, especially at the state level, trillion. And this doesn’t count state, local and other taxes.remains significantly below the levels of five years ago, Nor does it count society’s benefits from having successfulresulting in limitations on access to needed courses, skills professional families living their definition of the Americanand certificates/licensures that enable students to pursue dream.these new job opportunities. So the skills gap and thecapacity gap are real, and we don’t need to spend much Late last fall, I had the honor of giving the keynote addresstime debating who among the different sectors of higher at the Maryland Association of Private Colleges and Careereducation is better or worse. Schools annual meeting. Ed Gillespie, the association’s current president, gave his report during that same luncheon.But, if we are serious about putting students first, we do He summed up their work with the philosophy he follows atneed to focus on the opportunity gap. And it is here – with his schools when he said, “In the end, we change lives.”a focus on the students – that our return on investmentis most compelling. Georgetown University’s Center That is the greatest return on investment of all! And that ison Education and the Workforce’s report The College why each of us is so committed to this important work, evenPayoff shows that lifetime earnings for a worker with in difficult economic and/or regulatory environments. Thanksan Associate degree average $1,727,000, compared to the to you for who you are and all that you do in changing thelifetime earnings of a high school graduate at $1,304,000. lives of those we serve – our students.This represents a monetary return on investment for thestudent of $423,000!MARCH 2013 | 44
  • 47. Career CollegeWorked for Me By Scott Fairfield My starting salary was better than the starting salary of any of my Graduate of All-State Career School college friends. In fact, some of them are still unemployed while I’m working 13 hours a day, sometimes seven days a week.If it wasn’t for All-State Career School, I wouldn’t Being able to make this kind of income is important to me since have found my way in life. I’d surely be struggling I’m responsible for supporting my family. My wife and I see to find work and feed my family. others struggling to pay their bills, and we’re thankful that my job lets us take care of our kids and contribute to society. I’m aMy decision to attend All-State was the best one I ever made, and consumer now, and the money I spend on my family is helpingthe education I received has turned me into someone who can the local economy in Philadelphia.support my family, contribute to the local economy and give backto my community. Schools like All-State and other career colleges are a way out of this tough situation. They are able to give you an education thatMost of the kids I grew up with knew they wanted to go to works on your terms. With classes at night or online, you can docollege. Not me. I didn’t see higher education as an option for the work on your schedule. They offer you training and educationme. In fact, like many kids, I didn’t really value education and got in subjects that will make you attractive to local employers. Theyinto my fair share of trouble as a youth. don’t waste your time or money giving you instruction that you don’t need. They have a career focus that makes sense to peopleA few years ago, I had a choice: I could continue on the destructive in my situation.path I was on, or I could try to make something of myself. I chosean education over a dead-end job or simply drifting through I worked hard to take full advantage of the opportunity that All-life. I know a lot of people my age are struggling, especially in State gave me. That’s why I’ve stayed in touch with the school andcities like Philadelphia where I live. The unemployment rate is participated in its apprenticeship program. I’m helping to traintoo high, and a large number of young men are in situations that other All-State students so they can have the same opportunitiesmake it hard for them to ever get a good job. that I did. I never thought I’d see the day when I’d be a teacher, but All-State has even offered to hire me as an instructor. All-For most traditional colleges, my background would have meant State gave me a great education and believed in me enough tomy admissions application would have gone straight in the trash. ensure I’m successful in life.But All-State is different. It doesn’t care about what you did in thepast – it cares about what you want to do in the future. This school I’m enthusiastic about my job and enthusiastic about careertook a chance on me and gave me the opportunity to succeed. colleges. It’s important that these schools are given the chance toThey motivated me to stick with it when I was discouraged and reach people like me, people who just wouldn’t fit in at traditionalmade sure that I had the support I needed to graduate and get a colleges. We deserve an education, too. We deserve the chance tojob. And I’ve made the most of this opportunity. improve our skills and get better jobs.After receiving my education at All-State, Centerline These career schools offer a way to help those in PhiladelphiaCommunications hired me as an HVAC technician. I service and around the nation who are trapped in poverty and who don’theating and air conditioning for cell tower site control rooms have the skills to contribute to our economy. I was once one ofacross Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware and even into West those people, but now I’m a hard-working taxpayer who can takeVirginia. care of his family. P O W E R E D B Y
  • 48. Private SectorCollegesBenefit ourCommunities By Thomas Kosel, Director of Government Relations for Globe UniversityA well-educated workforce is good for our By providing an education that is focused on specific technical skills communities and our local businesses. That’s and delivered through non-traditional means, these schools can reach something everybody agrees on. That’s why a far greater number of people than can be reached by other institutions it’s so important to recognize the work being of higher education. Private sector schools can educate people whodone by private sector colleges and universities in supplying an work full-time jobs, single parents, veterans and others who wouldeducated workforce. These schools are an important component otherwise be unable to get the education that today’s jobs require.in economies across the country, and they are poised to contribute Hence, there is a double value on the investment by allowing peopleeven more to our communities – so long as policymakers let them. to continue being productive while contributing to the economy just as they are acquiring new skills.Today’s jobs aren’t like the jobs our parents and grandparents had.In the 1950s through the 1980s, many people could make a good Providing an education to these individuals certainly benefits them.living with just a high school diploma. That just isn’t true any They see higher earnings and better job prospects.longer. In today’s economy, if you want to succeed, you need ahigher education. But what’s not talked about is that it benefits local businesses, as well. Many companies are desperately looking for workers who haveMany people get this education in public universities and colleges certain skills. Too often, many job seekers just don’t have those skills.or private nonprofit colleges. That is a great way to get aneducation if you have the time and money for it. Many people, That’s where private sector colleges and universities thrive. Theyhowever, aren’t traditional college students. For whatever reason, a work with local businesses to create classes and degree programs thattraditional college doesn’t work for them. meet the local demand for workers. By focusing on what jobs are needed in an area, these schools are building pools of talent that localThis is where the private sector colleges and universities come in. businesses can rely on.MARCH 2013 | 46
  • 49. In today’s rapidly changing world, there’s an even greater needfor schools to innovate the way they deliver an education. Whilepublic universities and nonprofit colleges have often laggedbehind when it comes to innovation, this is the only way thatprivate sector schools can keep their doors open. They must beresponsive to their customers, and that’s something that makesthem work hard to satisfy both their students and local businesses.Under this system, more than just the workers and businessowners benefit. A prime factor in attracting or retaining a businessis how well an area’s workforce is educated. More businessesin a location mean more economic growth, something that haspositive spillover effects for an entire community.We see many businesses located around public universities andcolleges taking advantage of the graduates they produce. Yet,every town can’t have a big university or college. There aremany areas that don’t even have a community college that canhelp grow an educated workforce. But with the proliferation ofcareer colleges in higher education, businesses that would haveotherwise struggled to produce workers for jobs requiring ahigher education can find the employees they need.With millions of private sector college graduates working acrossthe nation in engineering, law enforcement, healthcare, cooking,art design and many other professions, the benefits of thiseducation should be obvious. Unfortunately, some still fail to seeit. That’s why we have to be vocal and very clear on what theseschools do and why they are necessary.If we don’t, we risk erecting barriers for students who want toattend private sector colleges and universities. Not only will thishurt the students, it will also hurt our businesses, communitiesand economy.Without private sector colleges and universities, highereducation would effectively be off-limits to a wide swath ofpeople. Depriving non-traditional students of the means to betterthemselves will have a negative impact on our businesses and inour communities. We all benefit from the education provided byprivate sector schools, and that’s why it’s important that all of ussupport them. P O W E R E D B Y Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 47
  • 50. A Fresh NewWebsite for APSCUBy APSCU StaffIn January 2013, the Association of Private Sector Colleges and Universities (APSCU) launched its new website. The new site is not only a fresh digital reset for the organization, it is also partof an ambitious effort to create a central information hub for ourmember schools and other individuals wanting to learn more aboutthe sector’s activities.APSCU is no stranger to educating the broader public about thebenefits of career colleges in the 21st century. As our schoolsaggressively reshape the higher education landscape, it will beeven more critical to create a central space where visitors can findessential information about the sector’s direction – and what it’sdoing to brighten the futures of millions of Americans.The new space, a dramatic and refreshing shift from the formersite, does this and more. We listened to you, our members andcolleagues in the sector, and created a simpler user interface thatmakes the site much more navigable. That way, information is We’re especially excited about the Knowledge Center. A keynow easier to find on the APSCU site, making it readily available challenge for APSCU over the years has been our ability toto our members, our millions of students and the general public. seamlessly share crucial data on our sector’s progress and its impact on higher education. Before, that information appearedIt is now an all-in-one, user-friendly digital experience that provides scattered and inaccessible. We’ve resolved this issue by creatingeasily accessible content on the sector. Information is now sharply the Knowledge Center, a complete data warehouse containing vitalorganized into five key areas: facts organized by state. In addition, we’ve also created a “School Finder,” a quick navigation search tool that can find specific • embership – Information about joining APSCU, as well as M schools according to their location or their industry of expertise. a list of our members Also included is an archive of publications we contribute to and publish in (“Publications”), with the center complemented by our • olicy and Issues – The latest in federal and state legislative P very own “Compliance Corner” offering the latest information on issues, as well as regulatory information. This also includes a regulatory issues we need to know. link to our grassroots site Our goal was to improve the availability and overall quality of the • ews and Media – The place to find APSCU’s latest press N information we were providing to our members. Yet, we also saw releases this new digital launch as an opportunity to increase awareness about our mission, our goals and our tireless efforts in higher • vents – Information about upcoming APSCU-sponsored E education. Too often, our sector is the target of misinformation, events, including Hill Day and the convention mischaracterizations and misconceptions. A cleaner, more organized and nimble source of detailed content and data provides • nowledge Center – The one-stop shop for facts and K our sector with a greater capacity and opportunity to cut through information on the sector the noise.MARCH 2013 | 48
  • 51. APSCU Introduces New“Knowledge Center”By APSCU StaffIt is important that our members have the best information about our sector. From knowing more about our students and the benefits of a private sector college education to setting the record straight onhow much APSCU institutions contribute to the larger economy,the need for facts on career colleges is essential.That’s why we’ve taken the extra step of creating an all new“Knowledge Center” on our recently launched website to helpyou spread the truth about our sector. We have already populatedthe center with fresh, new fact sheets and sector backgrounddocuments at http://www.career.org/knowledge-center/facts/sector/ for your convenience and review. No longer will you haveto scrounge about on the web in search of crucial facts and datapoints on private sector colleges. The purpose of the KnowledgeCenter is to provide you with an easy, one-stop-shop of criticalmaterial that you can easily access at any time.Among the documents available in the Knowledge Center:• Leave Behind Document on Private Sector Colleges A • he Elevator Speech: When someone asks you, “what is private T Universities: This three page document is designed to give all sector education,” and you only have a few short moments to interested parties comprehensive background consisting of the explain, these are your go-to talking points. For your convenience, “who, what, where and why” of the sector. More importantly, we have developed both short and long form versions for quick it outlines our sector’s contributions to higher education, job and easy access. growth and a recovering economy. It’s a user-friendly and easy- to-print document that can be left with elected officials after an Providing correct and accurate information to the public is office visit, with newspaper staff after an editorial board meeting, absolutely essential to what we do as representatives of the private or used as a quick reference piece whereby whole sections can be sector college sector. Our greatest challenge is fending off the copied and pasted according to your needs. misperceptions and misunderstandings about the fantastic work we do. What better way to succeed in our mission to raise awareness• act Sheet: This two page document offers an overview of F than by simply building an online space that gives you the ability to important private sector college and university facts. It can serve access needed information at your fingertips. as a refresher for you or your spokespeople before meeting with a reporter, or it can be used as a reference guide when creating We will be updating this section frequently over the coming weeks, additional promotional materials. so please check back regularly for new information! P O W E R E D B Y Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 49
  • 52. book reviewTies to TattoosTurning Generational Differences into a Competitive AdvantageB usinesses today are facing a first: a unique workforce spanning four distinct generations, all with widely varying ideas about work ethic, commitment, values and personal priorities. Sherri Elliott-Yeary,President and Owner of Optimance Workforce Strategies, LLC,discusses strategies for reaching across these generations in herbook Ties to Tattoos: Turning Generational Differences intoa Competitive Advantage. The book serves as a manual forrecognizing generational differences, assessing and serving agenerationally diverse workforce, and increasing harmony andproductivity between employees’ various generational values.With the more experienced traditionalists and baby boomers, andthe tech-savvy Generation Xers and millennials, today’s workforcehas never been more diverse. In her book, Elliott-Yeary points outthe unique characteristics of each generation. She suggests thetraditionalists believe in good work ethic and money management,the baby boomers are creative idealists, the Generation Xers areambitious and entrepreneurial, and the millennials are confidentand eager to learn. However, this diversity also brings its ownchallenges; along with a looming labor shortage and a decrease inemployee productivity, the generational gap between employeesbrings problems of the language barrier, stereotyping and atransfer of knowledge from long-time employees to new hires.Ties to Tattoos gives insight into these generational differences,giving employers the knowledge and advice to resolve problemsin the workforce and boost employee productivity. Along with In an ever-changing job market, today’s complex workforce servesaddressing conflict built on generational variances, Ties to as the key to creating and preparing a successful business for theTattoos provides strategies for recruiting, training, managing and future. Through Elliott-Yeary’s insights, Ties to Tattoos provides themonitoring a multigenerational workforce, as well as motivating knowledge and strategies employers need in order to harness thisyounger generations and looking past outside appearances in complex and generationally diverse workforce and create productive,order to reward what Elliott-Yeary says “really matters.” long-term employees. By Tasha Cerny, Staff WriterMARCH 2013 | 50
  • 53. WE KNOW GREAT LEARNING MODELS   LEAD TO GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT. How do you make content accessible to multiple learning styles and levels? What standards or national accreditation guidelines are you to consider?Are the relevant course concepts addressed and up-to-date? Is there a place for technology? If so, how will it be integrated? Adopting the right curriculum model is the backbone of any learning environment. McGraw‐Hill Learning   Solutions collaborates with you and your team to arrive at the best curriculum solution for your needs.     Our on‐staff instructional designers and product managers have real‐world experience and advanced degrees in:   → Educational/Organizational Leadership  → Adult and Secondary Education  → Educational Technology  → Organizational Management     We can help you refine a program you already have in place, or help you design   and implement an entirely new program. From program outcomes and   competencies through individual course descriptions and objectives, to syllabi   and lesson plans, we offer customized products and services for every need.    We can also work with you to help develop course and faculty guides for online,   blended, or traditional learning environments. This can be a great way to  ensure   key objectives are being taught consistently across campuses, or it might improve  the student experience in the first course.    McGraw‐Hill Learning Solutions collaborates with you to design curriculum that engages students, aligns to   rigorous accrediting guidelines, and improves student achievement on the path to Gainful Employment.   For more information on McGraw‐Hill Curriculum Services, please contact your McGraw‐Hill Sales Representative or   Learning Solutions Consultant at Learning_Solutions@mcgraw‐hill.com. Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 51
  • 54. vincent scaramuzzoTo Thankor ThankNot?By Vincent ScaramuzzoThe thought defies everything we have been I am not sure there is an absolute right or wrong way to approach thank- told since first meeting with a career you notes, but I firmly believe email is now the accepted standard. I counselor in high school or college. don’t think you can lose a job because your thank-you note wasn’tTraditionally, you were probably taught to send a written thank- handwritten unless your audience is very old-fashioned.you note to a hiring manager after completing an interview, butin today’s high-tech society, can this actually hurt your chances of Here is why:getting the job? • ost hiring processes now move too fast for a handwritten thank- MSometimes, yes – it can. It is really important to know your you note. By the time you write it, mail it and the hiring manageraudience. Does the position you are interviewing for require actually opens it, the decision most likely has already been madea tech-savvy candidate? Does the company rely on the latest regarding which candidates will move forward. I recommendtechnology to drive their business, or does it conduct business at emailing your thank-you note shortly after the interview – but nota more old-fashioned pace using written records, invoices, etc.? too quickly. If your interview is in the morning, I would adviseAccurately profiling your prospective employer in this way can sending it at the end of the business day. If your interview is inmake the difference between you landing the job or not. the afternoon, I suggest sending it first thing the next morning. This shows the hiring authority that you have taken some timeDuring one interview I was present for, I saw a candidate and to reflect on the interview and the opportunity. A thank-you emailhiring manager get into some small talk about an old candy bar that arrives too quickly can be perceived as canned or pre-writtenbrand they both really enjoyed but found hard to come by. After and lacking sinceritythe interview, the candidate purchased one of these candy barsand sent it with a handwritten thank-you note. The thought was • rganizations are either very tech-savvy or on their way out. It is Osincere, and the gesture was pretty original, but though the hiring almost impossible for companies to successfully do business todaymanager felt the same, the overall feeling was a bit creepy. The if they are not embracing technology. I believe sending anythinghiring manager wasn’t going to eat a candy bar sent by someone other than an email could lead the employer to perceive you aswho was practically a stranger, so what seemed like a really being behind the timescreative approach unfortunately backfired.MARCH 2013 | 52
  • 55. Technology is a Tool Global knows the limits of technology and how to get the most out of it. Global’s people, process and technology approach to servicing has kept Colleges in front of regulatory changes and delivered fast, accurateA well-timed thank-you email can really make a big difference. and compliant services forIf a hiring manager was feeling good about your interview, thatemail can cement positive thoughts on your candidacy and over 5 million student packages.raise his or her enthusiasm about you when reviewing yourqualifications with colleagues. On the other hand, if you didjust OK during the interview, a well-timed thank-you emailcan cause a hiring manager to re-evaluate your interview andconclude that your initial interview performance may be worthbringing you back for additional interviews.The technology and mode of delivery have changed when itcomes to thank-you notes, but timing, sincerity, professionalism Financial Aid Administrative Services | Strategic Consultingand effectiveness have not. Writing a great thank-you email Hosted Financial Aid Softwarecould ultimately help you land your next great position. Phone: 228.523.1797 – E-Mail: solutions@globalfas.com 10467 Corporate Drive – Gulfport, MS 39503 www.globalfas.com/ccc Vincent Scaramuzzo is the President of Ed-Exec Inc., one of the leading executive search firms in education. He has consistently been ranked in the top 2 percent of all recruiters worldwide by Management Recruiters International, the world’s largest executive search firm. As a specialist in the education field, Scaramuzzo works nationally with universities, colleges, online institutionsand career schools. He can be contacted at vincent@ed-exec.com or © 2012 Global Financial Aid Services, Inc.860.781.7641. Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 53
  • 56. john leeHistory …On RepeatHistory of for-profit school regulationBy John Lee, JBL Associates Inc.If history repeats If you are on the front lines of the regulatory battles, it may help to know that this is not the first time these hostilities have taken place. Indeed, skirmishes between itself, and the for-profit education providers and the larger education policy community have been a recurring event for the last 100 years. unexpected always Early history happens, how Proprietary education first appeared in the 1600s at about the same time institutions like Harvard were being created. The differences that distinguish for-profit education from traditional colleges and incapable must universities were present at inception. These early proprietary schools provided practical education to many students in contrast Man be of learning to traditional colleges that provided a liberal arts education to the elites. Another distinction that continues to this day is the fact from experience? that for-profit schools welcomed minorities and women at a time when only Caucasian men typically went to college. – George Bernard Shaw The time following the Civil War was a period of growth for proprietary schools as they trained workers for a growing industrial sector. The first conflict between for-profit education and the larger education community came as public education developed the comprehensive public high school we know today and traditional colleges and universities began offering business and vocational curricula. By 1910, proprietary education was perceived as a competitor instead of an alternative to liberal arts education. The charges of misleading unsophisticated students to register and providing an inferior education that did not prepare graduates for jobs first appeared in the press of this time, mirroring the charges made today.MARCH 2013 | 54
  • 57. The response to these criticisms was to initiate an accreditationprocess for proprietary schools. The Accrediting Council forIndependent Colleges and Schools was chartered in 1912 in aneffort to affirm the quality of education provided by accredited Today, even with allschools. This was the first step in responding to public criticismof the sector. of the changes madeFirst federal effortsThe next round of criticism came after World War II when to assure compliancethe GI Bill provided millions of veterans with the funds topursue postsecondary education. Just three years later, in1948, veterans accounted for 49 percent of college admissions. and quality education,Veterans also used the GI Bill to enroll in proprietary schools inrecord numbers. Due to this, the for-profit sector was accusedof using aggressive advertising and making educational goals the same criticismssubordinate to making a profit, and scandals surroundingfraudulent accounting practices with regard to student aidtarnished the reputation of the for-profit sector. This added that were made 100the charge of misusing federal funds to the list of suspicionsheld by traditional educators. The result was a requirement that years ago are stillproprietary schools had to be accredited and licensed by a stateagency for vocational education – rules which still exist today.This was the second step in assuring quality and compliance of being made aboutfor-profit schools.Title IV and the Department of for-profit education.EducationThe introduction of federal student aid set the table for the third That leads one toconflict between traditional education and proprietary schools.The introduction of the Pell Grant in 1972 and the growth of thestudent loan program that took place over the 1970s and 1980s wonder why all ofbrought to light the issue of student loan defaults. With the firstcalculation of cohort default rates in 1987, proprietary schoolsdominated the list of schools with the highest default rates. these improvementsAt the same time, it became known that proprietary schoolsreceived 30 percent of the Pell Grants awarded in the previous to quality in for-profityear. The perfect trifecta was realized as Dr. William Bennett,the Secretary of Education under Ronald Reagan, had beencritical of the student aid programs. This put the traditional education have noteducation lobby on high alert as they saw what they thought wasan illegitimate claimant take too much of the federal student aidpie and graduate students with high default rates. resulted in a greaterThe high default rates of proprietary schools were the perfecthammer to attack the for-profit sector. Defaults were claimed acceptance ofas evidence of inadequate education, poor job placement andputting profitability ahead of education. The events culminated the sector.in the 1992 amendments to the Higher Education Act of 1965that imposed a series of limitations on the for-profit sector,such as expulsion from Title IV programs due to high defaultrates and limits on the percent of income coming from federalstudent aid, as well as other financial and operational standards.This was the third step-up in quality assurance for schools inthe sector. Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 55
  • 58. The same issues continue todayToday, even with all of the changes made to assure compliance High graduation rates of high-risk students in for-profit schoolsand quality education, the same criticisms that were made 100 are ignored, as are low graduation rates of the same type ofyears ago are still being made about for-profit education. That students in many community colleges.leads one to wonder why all of these improvements to qualityin for-profit education have not resulted in a greater acceptance This history and analysis leads to the gloomy conclusion that,of the sector. in the competition for dollars and students, traditional educators will always be willing to cast the for-profit sector as the outsiderThe best way to think about the continuation of the criticism is and judge them by the worst examples in the sector.as an expression of prejudice. As Gordon Allport wrote in TheNature of Prejudice, Prejudice is an antipathy based on faultyand inflexible generalization. These stereotypes simplify things What can be done? The answer is tried and true: Bring educators from other sectorsby allowing us to infer that an individual has the characteristics to see what is being done on the campus and share best practicesthat we assume are common to all members of that group. with those other educators. It is hard to hold a stereotypical prejudice about the sector in the face of students having a positiveStereotypes lead to social categorization, which is one of the educational experience. The more nuanced and detailed thereasons for the prejudiced attitudes that result in out-groups and observation, the more difficult it will be for critics to hold simplein-groups. Oftentimes, the result is acceptance of observations beliefs. This will not solve all the problems, but it may allowthat support the prejudicial view and rejection of information debates among competing education sectors to take place withthat is counter to the prejudice. The logic of prejudice also more balance and consideration for what is best for students.means that those in your own group are not judged by the samestandards as those outside your group.Reports of high default rates among proprietary schools support John Lee is Founder and President of JBLthe stereotype, but reports of high defaults in other public and Associates Inc., a national consulting firmnot-for-profit colleges are not criticized with the same vigor. specializing in postsecondary education policy research. His areas of expertise include designing programs to help college students succeed, faculty working conditions, higher education finance and for-profit education. He earned a B.A. and M.A. in Psychology from California State University at Sacramento and received an Ed.D. in Postsecondary Education from the University of California, Berkeley. He can be contacted at jbl@ jblassoc.com.MARCH 2013 | 56
  • 59. Advance Your Career With a Master’s Degree in Education Focusing on Career College Administration 100% Online 3 A focused degree designed for the career college professional 3 Complete your master’s degree in as few as 12 months 3 Courses include: Enrollment Management Theory Practice Student Retention Management Managing Campus Operations 3 Continue your education for a PhD in Educational Leadership Call toll free to speak with an Admissions Counselor 1.877.827.7654 Admissions Hours: Mon - Thurs 8am - 10pm, Fri 8am - 8pm, Sat - Sun 9am - 10pm KeiserUniversity.edu/GraduateSchool You Can Be... Placement erifiers Placement erifiers TM678.310.3251 www.placementverifiers.com Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 57
  • 60. MARCH 2013 | 58
  • 61. The right message in the right medium at the right time. The right partner - PlattForm. Step UpThe education seeker’s path to enrollment has changed. To be effective intoday’s multichannel world, you need a full-service marketing partner thatunderstands the when’s, where’s, and why’s of student behavior. If you’reready to take a more precise approach to marketing and reach studentswhere and when they’re looking for you, step up to PlattForm. Contact us to get your complimentary copy of our 913.254.6000 PlattFormAd.com latest whitepaper on consumer behavior trends. Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 59
  • 62. robyn shulman The differences are great, but can traditional universities and for-profit colleges learn from each other? By Robyn Shulman, M.Ed.MARCH 2013 | 60
  • 63. T here are significant differences between for- What are the benefits of and key differences between career profit career colleges and traditional universities. colleges and traditional universities? However, as higher education changes rapidly from day to day, it is safe to assume both types Career colleges are run on a business model. According to thisof institutions are driving into uncharted territory without a model, education is a business, and students are paying customers.roadmap. Therefore, data, assessment and analytics are a very important piece in deciphering the needs of the students. Decisions andThe rise of massive open online courses (MOOCs), demand changes are made quickly based on assessments and measurablefor online courses and financial expectations from students outcomes to assure the education being delivered matches thehave caused quite a buzz over the past few years. The changes market in demand and meets the needs of employers.in higher education do not appear to be slowing down any timesoon. Therefore, as society moves along with these changes, Career colleges tend to focus on specific vocational programs,it is important to pause and take a look at how career colleges such as nursing, information technology and/or education. Theand traditional universities differ and, if possible, how they programs are designed with a specific curriculum in mind, withcan learn from each other. Whether one believes one form of little room for free academic holistic teaching. Career colleges alsoeducation is better than the other, the outcome should be the place a great emphasis on specific skills and embrace technologysame: providing students with the highest level of knowledge, and change. In fact, they evolve in sync with industries, keepingskills and opportunities for employment while stimulating up with the fast pace of changing practices while bringing in thegrowth, expanding knowledge, and creating a stable and most modern and technological advances in higher education.strong economy. Education is truly going global, and in orderfor the United States to stay on the playing field, collaborationmay be the next logical step.
  • 64. Schedules for students are flexible and are designed to meet the demands of the non-traditional student. Most programs are offered online, which provides great convenience to many students. Career colleges also tend to offer various distance learning programs and certificates. Students can work at any time of the day or night from almost anywhere. Although these modern conveniences are generally positive and beneficial to students, they may also create some feelings of disconnect. Since many career colleges offer online programs, students may feel a lack of community and miss out on social events; live interaction among peers, students and teachers can also suffer as a result. According to Frank B. McCluskey in an article appearing on E-mentor, the faculty of a career college typically consists of many adjunct professors who are specialists in their fields or skill areas, leaving only a handful of full-time professors. Most professors are adjuncts and work contract-to-contract without the possibility of tenure. Large decisions are made by administration, rather than with fully shared governance that involves faculty. As a result, McCluskey states, the state of academia may suffer. Curriculum is typically prepared by professors in a short time, and tends to change as needed. The process to change and develop a course is usually a quick and easy one. Traditional colleges are run differently than career colleges in a number of ways, both through historical traditions and varying deliverables. Traditional institutions are mostly nonprofit and do not run on a corporate business model. Students may be viewed simply as students rather than as paying customers. The emphasis on and importance of data, numbers and assessment tend to be less rooted in the dynamics of enrollment, motivation, pace and change. Change tends to come a bit more slowly to the traditional university due to the layering structure of shared governance. Curricula and program offerings vary; while some may be defined, most are holistic in nature at the beginning. Professors typically develop the curriculum, and there is room for flexibility, interpretation and change. Getting a new course approved quickly is rare in a traditional university. There is a protocol to follow, and it can take some time to get a new course approved via committees, meetings and rungs of approval. Governance is shared among faculty and administration. Therefore, when change is quickly moving outside the bubble of academia, change may occur slowly at a traditional university. One example of a slower change would be the use of technology. Traditional universities offer a mix of brick and mortar, hybrid, and online offerings. Most universities are now catching up with the new advances in technology; however these technological changes happen at a much slower pace than at career colleges.MARCH 2013 | 62
  • 65. Traditional institutions offer tenure. Tenured professors are the • an treat college students as both students and customers. Cbones of the university. Professors who have tenure have more They need to be assured they are getting what they pay foracademic freedom to develop curriculum and teach without while garnering the respect afforded to students in highersevere restrictions, and typically they have greater job security education(although this is not always the case). Traditional colleges:A traditional university also has a history and a culture rooted • eed to understand that a student (especially a non-traditional Nin beliefs, reason and research. These universities tend to student) is both a paying customer and a student. Thesehave a greater degree of community activity, more person-to- students deserve great service: phone calls returned, cleanperson interaction and more social events than career colleges. campuses, accurate information and modern resourcesTraditional universities can provide an undergraduate studentwith experiences for growing into adulthood, dealing with • eed to provide flexible schedules for the non-traditional Nreal-life circumstances, facing new situations and taking on student. Courses should be offered online, on weekends andresponsibility. These opportunities are due to the nature of the at nighttypical brick and mortar campus and, more specifically, areoften most accessible to those who live on campus during their • an offer more programs that are geared toward specific Cundergraduate years. vocations and skills Whether one believes one form of education is better than the other, the outcome should be the same: providing students with the highest level of knowledge, skills and opportunities for employment while stimulating growth, expanding knowledge, and creating a stable and strong economy.Traditional universities are also the leaders in research, • hould use data and analytics to observe and keep track of Sknowledge and new developments. Research is highly valued what is working and what is not working. If data are trackedand well regarded among the faculty; writing and publishing and analyzed, the school may not be forced into closingare greatly encouraged or required; and debate, discussions and classes and programs so abruptly. Using this informationhigh-level thinking are staples of a traditional university. will also provide the faculty with the ability to move around (if possible) and change courses as needed; it may also resultWith all of these differences, can career colleges and traditional in fewer layoffsuniversities learn something of value from each other? Afteryears of academic advising and seeing and hearing the needs • hould not be afraid of technology. Technology is here Sof non-traditional students at a nonprofit institution, I believe to stay, and there is simply no way around it. Traditionalthere are a few things of great value that each kind of institution colleges should also train the faculty to be prepared for thesecan learn from the other as sources for improvement. rapid changes, thereby increasing chances of survivalCareer colleges: As I’ve always said, there is no university without students, and • an provide more opportunities for the faculty to have a C students must always be put first. Universities should strive to significant influence on the curriculum. Since many of the treat them with the respect they deserve as students, customers professors tend to work in the areas they teach, they have and human beings. the life skills and experience to teach their students outside of the written curriculum. There is opportunity here to expand academic growth Robyn Schulman is a certified teacher in Illinois who has taught 4th – 6th grade and ESL to both children • an provide more opportunities in regard to community, C and adults. She specializes in writing, academic/career advising and higher education. Robyn is a professional sports, social events, etc., giving the traditional college adviser for the state of Illinois, the Managing Editor of ED News Daily and a blogger for Chicago Now. She can be feeling that many crave (Grand Canyon University is a reached at robyn.shulman@ednewsdaily.com. prime example of this effect) Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 63
  • 66. The Career College Central LinkedIn group is a forum full of invoking questions, thoughtful responses and animated discussion. If you haven’t joined our LinkedIn page yet, then you’re missing out. Come join us and make your voice heard!Michael Platt: Students shocked by schools abrupt Don Arnoldy: ACI had eight campuses; Sawyer had five.closing” (from WWLP.com): Two closed in 30 days. While Thats hundreds of employees, thousands of students and millionsother schools rise up to clean up these messes, I am just of dollars of tuition invested in incomplete educations. As Martinthankful that operators like this are GONE!!!! says, These are the bad apples that are dragging down the publics perception of the industry.Don Arnoldy: This is not good! With the downturn inenrollment, I think were going to see more of these. I also Michael says, the collective we only exists conceptually. Thisexpect that the other schools in their respective regions already may be true, but there are some tangible expressions of that concepthave a good idea who they will be. of we-ness: APSCU, ACICS, ACCSC, CAPPS, NWCCF and others. How many millions of dollars more will “we” spend tryingThis kind of closing is a disaster for the students. (It’s not that to overcome the damage these schools have done to our collectivegreat for the employees either.) reputation?Cant we, collectively, come up with a plan to identify these One idea that occurred to me is for regional associations to workschools and take action before everybody shows up to find a with accrediting bodies and government regulators to create softlocked door? fall management teams that could step in, pick up the pieces from the failed operators, and keep the campuses running long enoughMichael Platt: No. These are private businesses and the for an orderly teach-out. I dont think they would have to be largecollective “we” only exists conceptually. The owner of this teams, but they would need to be experienced and prepared.school, Sawyer, would have likely been considered part ofthe “we” a couple of weeks ago. The best any school can do When individual schools go in and recruit the displaced studentsis to pursue teach-out relationships. The problem is that low- (as well-meaning as I know that it is), it can appear vulture-like. Itintegrity operators like this simply close the school without would be much better to keep the learning community together. Wetrying to figure out a path forward for the students. Schools can have to find a way to make it right – as Mike Holmes (somebodystill contact the state to offer teach-outs, but the damage to the else who works in an industry that has public perception issues)sector is done. would say.Shame. I know that I dont have all the answers – maybe not even any of them – but if we (however conceptual that may be) are not seenJohn Assunto: Living in New England, I had a great to be actively looking for them, then government agencies will dodeal of opportunity to see this coming – and not just since the looking. We may not like the answers they find.the regulatory environment has changed. Our firm has beenreceiving a plethora of calls from staff for the past few years Valerie Kindall: How do you manage enrollments withoutregarding simple challenges that were not being met. Its asking for numbers? Ideas? Best practices?disappointing that steps were not taken to address issues a longtime ago. This should be a viable operation. I am not in admissions but am just curious: how on earth can you manage people without clearly defined goals/metrics/Martin Lind: The good news is that the accreditation agency ANYTHING? I have heard of managing the behaviorswill now prevent the owners (and their relatives, I think) from that lead to enrollments among a few other things. What hasEVER opening a school again. These are the bad apples that worked for you? Any DOAs out there blowing it out of theare dragging down the publics perception of the industry. water right now? Whats your secret?MARCH 2013 | 64
  • 67. Michael Platt: You dont. Numbers are one way to measure the numbers. If they are good, they will take the informationthe efficacy of your admissions reps. I think the best measure is and make things happen. Feedback is critical.comparing them to one another and historical data. Believe me,a rep who pushes too hard will be revealed in the numbers, like I also agree with Mr. Platt. I rank my team from top to bottom inthe percentage who show for their FA appointment and even activity and results daily. I also suggest what we as a team canorientation. be doing to correct the numbers.Our sector must stop apologizing for the great work we do. Anthony Martin: I agree with all the comments above.Better performing reps change more lives and help more people. Personally, I believe it all starts with inspiring and motivatingPeriod. Over the years, I have heard so many grads say things your employees through articulating your mission in a waylike, “I am so appreciative Greg pushed me. I needed it.” that connects with them intrinsically. We do this by working one-on-one with each of our employees to understand whatJim Tussing: Valerie, I appreciate you referring to motivates them (extrinsic/intrinsic) and partner with ourmanaging enrollments, not the reps. I am a big believer that we employees to accomplish their goals and align them to ourmanage things and coach people. One thing I have learned over organizational goals. I believe once you understand the goalsthe years is that good representatives are not good accountants of each employee and how they align with your goals, you startnormally. Dazzle them with too many numbers and you lose to use data, empower them to make decisions, give targets andthem. Instead, give them the information about what can change reward positive momentum. Join the Conversation Discussions Promotions Jobs Search More... Join the definitive voice of the career college sector of higher education. Become a part of the Career College Central group on LinkedIn and join the conversation. Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 65
  • 68. ATA jane mahoney College Taking new steps toward student success By Jane Mahoney, Staff WriterMARCH 2013 | 66
  • 69. L ike many other career colleges, ATA College of Louisville, Ky., offers plenty of services to their students. They offer career services to those who have completed their certificate programs, along withacademic tutoring for those currently enrolled in courses.Community service projects such as blood drives and healthfairs provide an opportunity for students to engage with theirsurrounding community, while honing in on lessons learned inthe classroom.Along with these benefits, ATA College is offering two newservices that go above and beyond their call to keep studentsengaged. First, the college has created a program called theSuccess Coach Program designed to pair each new student withtheir own personal mentor. ATA College administrative staffcreated this service in spring 2012 after taking the time to look attheir retention numbers. The second strategy ATA College implemented to combat student withdrawal rates was to create the administrative position of retention specialist, a position that works solely with individuals at risk of withdrawing. The retention specialist position works full time to make students’ transitions back into a school environment more comfortable and aids current students with personal life issues or distractions.“We found that students who were dropping for one or more “A mentor is like asemesters had lower success rates,” said Brett Weber, Chief cheerleader for theirOperations Officer at ATA College. “Many of these studentsdropped for personal life reasons.” success. I don’t try to answer every question. IThe Success Coach Program was created to keep retention rates allow them to ask questions,up. Statistics showed that a majority of the withdrawals ATA sawwere during a student’s first semester. Now, all new students are and I correspond andassigned a full-time staff member as their personal success coach. connect with them on aThese mentors are generally a person involved in administration, personal level.”rather than an instructor. Because instructors are able to interactwith students in the classroom, ATA College felt that another – Brett Weber, Chief Operations Officer at ATA Collegeconnection at school could be helpful.Throughout a student’s first semester, they meet with their successcoach to talk to them about any issue in their lives. Lauren Breslin, ATA College Retention Specialist, works to make sure students have what they need with the help of a community“A mentor is like a cheerleader for their success. I don’t try to resource binder she has created that has information for communityanswer every question. I allow them to ask questions, and I groups students may need to utilize. Breslin has created relationshipscorrespond and connect with them on a personal level,” Weber with these groups and acts as a liaison for students if they are insaid. “It is entirely for motivational purposes.” need of contacting a community resource. Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 67
  • 70. As retention specialist, Breslin also tracks attendance of allstudents at ATA College. When she finds that a student did notmake it to class on a given day, she will reach out to them to findout what caused them to miss class. For example, if a studentwas unable to make it to class due to car issues, Breslin willprovide them with contacts that may be able to help them fixthe problem. She will also pass on assignments from a student’steacher to help them stay on track, regardless of absence. Herrole in tracking students’ absences is not disciplinary.“If absences happen frequently, I will meet with the student one-on-one to find out what is going on,” Breslin said.In these meetings, Breslin and ATA attendees figure out what isnecessary for success.Students who re-enroll in classes at ATA College after taking aquarter or more off from classes are required to attend a successseminar. This seminar is like a new student orientation, designedto help students to get reacquainted with the college.MARCH 2013 | 68
  • 71. “We found that only 20 percent of students that have awithdraw action actually graduate,” Weber said. “We spenda lot of money and time on them to help them, but they oftendo not graduate.” ExpertiseWeber said the success seminar is a motivational event. “Weremind students of their goals, and they sign a goal agreement for the Digital Worldwith us.”These programs have created a sense of companionship at EmailATA College, which has already seen benefits from these Mobile Marketingefforts.“We went from seeing about a 70 percent retention rate ofstudents in their first semester, to around 90 percent,” Webersaid. Web Online Affiliate Site Marketing Marketing Jane Mahoney is a recent graduate of the University of Kansas with a degree in Strategic Communication from the William Allen White School of Journalism. She can be reached at janemahoney@ku.edu. SEO SEM The key to marketing success is a powerful Internet presence created by steadfast online campaigns. MDT offers a full suite of Internet marketing services, including: Search Engine Optimization (SEO) Search Engine Marketing (SEM) Website Design and Analysis Mobile Campaign Development Cross Media Campaign Solutions User Experience and Analytics Reporting Call MDT today to generate a more effective program and better results. 1.866.371.5332 www.MDTDirect.com Advertising that Stands Out Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 69
  • 72. amir moghadamThe Evolutionof ROIThe benefits of linking employee development andstudent retentionBy Amir MoghadamFounder and CEO, MaxKnowledgeA cademic leaders in the career college sector realize between employer and employees is the key to success. The that their student retention initiatives must improve presentation took an analytical approach to identifying the impact student outcomes and gainful employment, while also of best practices in human resources on operational excellence producing a positive return on investment (ROI) for and how employee satisfaction drives outstanding performance.the institution. The benefits of any sustainable student retention Gilbert examined the critical aspects of the HR process, includinginitiative must outweigh its development and implementation the importance of effective employee training and development.costs. Gilbert’s research-based presentation clearly indicated the positive effect of employee performance and satisfaction on student retentionAt MaxKnowledge, we have the pleasure of collaborating with and outcomes.the chief academic officers from some of the leading institutionsin the career college sector. We are clearly seeing that student Gilbert’s research at Vista College further supports the results ofretention initiatives have increased in our sector in response to a doctoral study conducted by Dr. Michale McComis, ACCSCthe decrease in new student enrollments. However, institutional Executive Director, who examined the relationship betweenleaders are challenged to allocate additional resources to improve leadership characteristics and student achievement in career colleges.academic quality and student performance at a time when McComis found that strong leadership has a significant impact onorganizational budgets are significantly reduced. Academic student success and concluded that leadership development shouldleaders have a heightened awareness that they must carefully be recognized as a requisite part of institutional development andspend investment dollars on initiatives with proven ROI potential operations.to ensure the continued success of the institution from both theacademic and operational perspectives. Another study that supports Gilbert’s findings is a research report by the ROI Institute® that shows the positive impact of effectiveAt the recent Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and faculty development on student retention. Commissioned by theSchools (ACICS) Centennial Conference, Jim Tolbert, CEO of Imagine America Foundation, this independent case study measuredEducation Futures Group (Vista College) and past Chairman of and documented the ROI of the Center for Excellence in Educationthe Association of Private Sector Colleges and Universities, gave a (CEE) Faculty Development Program at Universal Technicaldynamic presentation on “The Evolving Science of Management: Institute (UTI).Human Resources in the 21st Century.” The session focused onthe evolution of management and how a collaborative relationshipMARCH 2013 | 70
  • 73. IMPROVE EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE ENHANCE INSTITUTIONAL EFFECTIVENESS REAL TRAINING - REAL RESULTS • Create a Compliant Culture • Address Employee Skills Gaps These studies indicate a fundamental precept: Employee development is a key component of student retention initiatives. • Improve Operational Efficiency Furthermore, institutions must clearly link employee learning to performance goals to achieve a positive ROI from their • Enhance Student Success training programs. As career educators, we identify and work toward student learning outcomes that lead to increased student performance. We must use the same learning theories and AVAILABLE 24/7 APSCU MEMBER DISCOUNTS AVAILABLE principles to create a comprehensive training and support system for our employees. With the increased focus on ROI in today’s CEUS AWARDED educational landscape, employee training programs must be competency-based and lead to measurable performance results. Over 100 Courses in 10 Categories Over 50 Expert Training Facilitators Dr. Amir Moghadam is the Founder and CEO of APSCU ONLINE TRAINING CENTER MaxKnowledge, the leading employee training company for the career college sector of higher WWW.APSCUTRAINING.ORG education. He has more than 25 years of experience in career education, serving in many capacities, including Professor, Director of Education, Academic Dean, Director of Student Affairs, Campus Director, andCollege President and Owner. Moghadam earned his Ph.D. in Engineeringfrom the University of Cambridge at the age of 22. He is a recognized leaderin career education and has been selected as a Top Innovator by CareerCollege Central. Moghadam can be reached at amirm@maxknowledge.com. Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 71
  • 74. making headlinesPlattForm Advertising sells to private Online learning continues to expandequity firm Despite massive open online courses, or MOOCs, taking the spotlight,PlattForm Advertising has been sold to private equity firm Sterling credit-based online courses are continuing to see success in higherPartners. Lenexa, Kan.-based PlattForm is an industry leader in learning institutions, as shown by the 2012 iteration of the Babsonhigher education marketing, particularly in the for-profit college Survey Research Group’s annual Survey of Online Learning.sector. The company ranks No. 1 on the Kansas City BusinessJournal listing of Top Area Advertising Agencies, based on net While 2011 saw a decline in enrollment for American colleges andincome of $133.7 million generated locally in 2011. universities, the number of postsecondary students enrolled in online courses continues to grow, though enrollment is at its lowest growthFinancial terms of the deal were not disclosed. rate in the last decade. More than 70 percent of public and for-profit colleges currently provide complete academic programs online, andSterling is buying out PlattForm’s previous main investor, Maryland- the number of private nonprofit colleges doing so has doubled sincebased Arlington Capital Partners. 2002.Synopsis of: “PlattForm Advertising Sells To Private Equity Firm” MOOCs are also experiencing increasing popularity; 2.6 percent ofSource: CareerCollegeCentral.com about 2,500 colleges surveyed offer such courses, with another 9.4Date: Jan. 10, 2013 percent reporting that MOOCs are in the near future. However, concern with the sustainability of MOOCs is still widely split.Industry leader’s decline marks turnin for-profit college sector Other insights from the Babson Survey show that online learning is becoming increasingly incorporated into many academic institutionsFor-profit education investors continue to respond negatively as and gaining positive repute with chief academic officers, though theindustry leader Apollo Group Inc. sees new problems arise in light number of faculty members who agree has decreased since 2004.of the imminent turnabout in the fading sector. Synopsis of: “Growth for Online Learning”The University of Phoenix chain of for-profit colleges, owned by Source: Inside Higher EdApollo, may face a withdrawal of its accreditation endorsement if Date: Jan. 8, 2013it does not solve certain issues. Without its accreditation, Universityof Phoenix essentially will lose its revenue stream, and students College degree increasingly vital toneeding Title IV loans through the Department of Education will not millennial generationbe able to receive them. Due to an increasing emphasis on higher education in the professionalMost analysts believe that Apollo’s University of Phoenix ultimately sphere, the millennial generation – individuals aged 18 to 34 – facewill not lose its accreditation. However, the prospect only adds to the a scarce job market without a college degree. According to thedarkening atmosphere faced by the for-profit sector. Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, in 2007, nearly 60 percent of American jobs listed some form of collegeWith federal funding being potentially withdrawn and enrollment experience as a requirement for job-seeking candidates. Analystsnumbers down, the for-profit education industry is facing an upset. project that by 2018 the number of jobs requiring this of their employeesInstead of retreating to previous norms, companies in the for-profit will rise to 62 percent.education sector must look toward adapting to the new settlingenvironment. Apollo looks to adapt by reaching into global markets In a tough job market, lower wages and unemployment are morewhere the for-profit education industry is milder. likely for those without some form of college education. In 2011, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that the average income forSynopsis of: “Apollo’s Slide Heralds the For-Profit College Industry someone with a Bachelor’s degree was $1,053 per week. Those withShakeout” an Associate degree earned roughly $768 per week, and those withoutSource: The Wall Street Journal a college degree made an average of only $638 per week.Date: Jan. 9, 2013MARCH 2013 | 72
  • 75. Compiled by Tasha Cerny, Staff Writer Senator Harkin of Iowa to RetireWith scarcer job prospects and a significantly smaller salary, high Democratic U.S. senator Tom Harkin, from Iowa, announced onschool graduates tend to struggle with the circular socioeconomic January 26 that he won’t be seeking re-election in 2014.problem of finding a job with a salary that can support their families,leaving their children to struggle in the same way later. The news comes as a surprise to many Democrats, who were under the impression that Senator Harkin would run for another term.Synopsis of: “Millennials Face Bleak Future Without College Harkin’s retirement opens up a competitive seat for both DemocratsDegree” and Republicans seeking to regain majority in the senate.Source: U.S. News World ReportDate: Jan. 9, 2013 Harkin is known for being vocal on social issues and having large influence on party leader decisions. He is chairman of the Health,Controversy with Iowa university Education, Labor and Pensions committee, and is best known forinstitute honoring senator his work on equality rights for persons with disabilities and his supportive influence over the Affordable Care Act. Harkin also servesRuth Harkin, an Iowa Board of Regents member, pressed for on committees for agriculture, appropriations and small business.the approval of a university institute named after her husband,Democratic Senator Tom Harkin, prior to the leave of two fellow Currently, 20 Democratic seats and 14 Republican seats will needBoard of Regent members. to be defended in the 2014 election. Harkin has said the time was right for his leaving, and will allow other Democratic congressmenThe plans for the Harkin Institute of Public Policy were kept quiet advancement in their careers.until brought before the board, where the approval passed on a voteof 6-2 just days before Michael Gartner’s and Bonnie Campbell’s Synopsis of: “Iowa Sen. Harkin will Not Seek Re-election”terms on the board ended. Gartner assisted in the fundraising for the Source: USA Todayinstitute, and Campbell was backed by Senator Harkin for a position Date: Jan. 26, 2013as a federal appeals court judge. Both were replaced by RepublicanGovernor Terry Branstad’s appointees.The controversial institute has been proposed as a place for scholarsto research issues on agriculture, education and other interests ofHarkin’s, as well as study papers written during Harkins 40 yearsin Congress. The institute’s plan to research agriculture is currentlyunder dispute with university leaders who wish to prevent duplicationand give the university’s esteemed Center for Agricultural and RuralDevelopment complete control over the study.Along with these disputes, questions have arisen regarding thesources of the funds raised for the institution, despite stated attemptsby Harkin to remain clear about funding sources, after a scandal witha similar institute named after Charlie Rangel caused concern.Synopsis of: “Harkins wife pressed Iowa university for institutehonoring senator”Source: Washington GuardianDate: Jan. 5, 2013 Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com | 73
  • 76. ADVERTISERSAmbassador College Bookstores IFC LEADS 360 35AMT 36 MaxKnowledge 71BEcker media 58 MCGRAW hill 51BeeLine IBC NCCT BCBrown mackie college 29 MDT 69CAMPUS management 9 Neutron Interactive 1Champion College services 74 Pearson 15Collegiate Housing Services 58 placement verifiers 57DJA and associates 75 Plattform advertising 23, 59ed exec 36 RX INSIDER 42global financial services 53 Susan Schulz associates 75IMAGINE AMERICA FOUNDATION 30 TFC 75infocision 37 Underground Elephant 4Keiser University 57MARCH 2013 | 74
  • 77. SCHOOLS FOR SALE I N T E R N AT I O N A L , I N C . Specializing in the Purchase and Sale of Career Schools and Colleges Dr. Barry Berkowitz (561) 483-9554 Certified Business Intermediary (IBBA) Licensed Real Estate Broker www.sfsintl.com Don’t turn prospective Career Schools and Colleges students away because are our Only Business! they don’t have financing We can help! Susan F. Schulz Associates, Inc. Call us today for more info! Consultants to the Career School New York California and College Sector 800-832-2733 800-832-5626 Dr. Susan F. Schulz (561) 483-9554 TFCtuition.com susan@susanfschulz.com www.susanfschulz.com pERsoNAlIzED sERvICE, PROFESSIONAL RESULTS DJA is a national leader in financial aid services and Offering support features like free monthly webinars, consulting. Clients trust DJA with everything from custom training seminars, assigned account support, Direct Loans, Pell Grants and the Campus-Based electronic processing and direct personal interaction, programs, to recordkeeping, audits, electronic data DJA enjoys long, satisfied client relationships. storage and seamless technology integration. Let us help you, so you can better help them. ACCREDITED IN PEACE OF MIND 800.242.0977 | gotodja.comDJA0012 HalfPageAd.indd 1 Subscribe at www.CareerCollegeCentral.com 4/10/12 | 1:28 PM 75
  • 78. why i chose Amanda Howell Vires National CollegeA manda Howell Vires has a job that she loves, working as a staffing consultant for Manpower employment agency, but she knew that she wouldn’t be able to move up in the company without a degree. Sheenrolled in the Business Administration – Management program atNational Colleges Lexington campus at the advice of her mother,Cheryl Howell, a National College graduate who currently worksas the campus’ career center director. Amanda was inspired byher mother’s success at National College, and she continues to beinspired by the great success that other National graduates achieveevery day, as her mother assists them in finding the job of theirdreams.Before coming to National, Amanda attended a large universityfor four years, but she wasn’t able to complete her program. “Lifehappened – I had to work,” recalled Amanda, who found that theuniversity’s class schedule wouldn’t sync with her work schedule.National’s night classes and convenient location made it possiblefor her to work full time while going to school. She was able totransfer many of her credits from the university to National, whichhelped her complete her program as quickly as possible.Once she began attending classes, Amanda found instructors atNational who shared examples of real-life situations from theirown business experience in class. “I would highly recommendNational,” she said. “The teachers there are either currentlyworking in the field or (they are) very recently from those fields.They’re extremely knowledgeable,” she said.Amanda uses the knowledge from classes such as human “I hope to stay right here and hopefully progress within the company,”resources, management, marketing and accounting in her work shared Amanda, who aspires to move up into an account managementevery day as she interviews candidates, places them in jobs, assists position at Manpower. She will complete her Associate degree inwith payroll and builds relationships with clients. February and plans to return to National soon thereafter to earn her Bachelor’s degree. Republished with the permission of National College. student stories To nominate a student for Why I Chose, contact news@careercollegecentral.com.MARCH 2013 | 76
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  • 80. Career College Central PoliticsMARCH 2013 Students 15500 W. 113th St., Suite 200 • Lenexa, KS 66219 FIRST Semantics at the heart of latest attack on for-profits Inflated Cash or Dreams? Class? Are the aspirations of today’s Fueling the entrepreneurial students reachable through spirit in today’s college education? students The Definitive Voice of the Career College Sector of Higher Education www.CareerCollegeCentral.com

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