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Corporate Presentation, For Management Or Hr Dir

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A preview introduction to the Corporate Creating Wellness Program.

A preview introduction to the Corporate Creating Wellness Program.


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  • 1. Creating Wellness In The Workplace Presented by Debra Cassera
  • 2. 2004 -- US spending on healthcare
    • United States spent $1.9 trillion on health care, comprising 16% of its Gross Domestic Product, an average of $6,280 per person
    • (Source:Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Office of Actuary,
    • National Statistics Group, National Health accounts)
  • 3. Chronic diseases, particularly heart disease and cancer, are the leading causes of death in the United States – But what is the cause…
  • 4. Chronic Diseases
    • These diseases account for seven of every ten deaths and affect the quality of life of 125 million Americans.
    • Although chronic diseases are among the most common and costly health problems, they are also among the most preventable.
  • 5. The cover of "The Economist", Dec. 2003. Over 5 Million Years A Few Decades
  • 6. The direct medical costs for diseases related to obesity are approximately
    • $98 billion per year for Type 2 diabetes
    • $8.8 billion per year for hearth disease
    • $5.3 billion per year for osteoarthritis
    • $3.2 billion pre year for gallbladder disease
    • $1.3 billion for colon cancer
    • $1.1 billion for breast cancer
    • $310 million for endometrial cancer
    • (Source:The US Center for Disease Control)
  • 7. BMI Categories Body Mass Index
    • Underweight -- < 18.5
    • Normal weight – 18.5-24.9
    • Overweight – BMI > 25
    • Pre-obese – BMI> 25 – 29.9
    • Obesity – BMI > 30
  • 8. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1985 No Data <10% 10%–14%
  • 9. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1986 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%
  • 10. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1987 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%
  • 11. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1988 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%
  • 12. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1989 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%
  • 13. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1990 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%
  • 14. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1991 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%
  • 15. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1992 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%
  • 16. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1993 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%
  • 17. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1994 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%
  • 18. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1995 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%
  • 19. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1996 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%
  • 20. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1997 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20
  • 21. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1998 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20
  • 22. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1999 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20
  • 23. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2000 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20
  • 24. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2001 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25% (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)
  • 25. (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person) Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2002 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%
  • 26. Obesity* Trends Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2003 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%
  • 27. Obesity* Trends Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2004 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25% (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)
  • 28.  
  • 29. Adopting A Healthy Lifestyle
    • Eating nutritious foods
    • Being physically active
    • Thinking Well
    • Avoiding tobacco use
    These changes can prevent or control many of the devastating effects of these diseases. Adopting a healthier lifestyle is critical to improving the health of Virginians
  • 30. Could it be so simple?
  • 31. So the question is -- What is truly effective to help your employees and their families improve their lifestyle choices?
  • 32. Wellness Program Best Practice
  • 33. Let’s Drill Down
    • Number of employees
    • Number of employees who you think
      • will join the program
      • will successfully complete once enrolled
      • would benefit from a Wellness Program
  • 34. How To Begin
    • Gather Key Data
      • What does the business need out of their wellness program efforts?
      • What do the employees want?
  • 35. Successful Data Collection and Analysis
    • Apply honesty in analyzing your data
    • Respect that this is sensitive information
    • Garbage in, garbage out.
    • Protect individual’s privacy.
    • Beware of data overload
    • Data collection is not health/wellness promotion
    • Take a new perspective at your company
    • Be creative
  • 36. Obtaining Senior Level Support
    • Foundation for Success:
      • Financial Resources
      • Access to all Employees
      • Really Important Business
    • Demonstrate Value:
      • Meeting Objectives
      • Competitive Advantage
      • Measurable Results
    • Communicate your Message
  • 37. The Wellness Team/Committee
    • Forming the Team
      • Who
      • How
      • When
    • Function of the Team
      • Establish a Vision – Current Wellness Status
      • Decide on Goals – Small Steps with a Timeline.
  • 38. KEEPING YOUR WELLNESS PROGRAM ON TRACK
    • Effective Wellness Team:
      • Communicate
      • Get a Fast Start
      • Widen the Circle
      • Roles and Responsibilities Should be Clear
      • Remember That the Business of Business is Business.
  • 39. Your Wellness Operating Plan
    • Do I Really Need a Written Plan?
      • A plan forces you to consider your company’s needs, and strategic priorities
      • A plan legitimizes and communicates your program to senior managers.
      • A plan provides for program continuity through personnel changes.
      • A plan gives the energy to get things moving
    • Seven Elements of a Plan:
      • 1. Vision Statement
      • 2. Goals
      • 3. Objectives
      • 4. Implementation and Timeline
      • 5. Marketing and Communications Mix
      • 6. Itemized Budget
      • 7. Evaluation Plan
  • 40. Seven Elements of a Plan 1. Vision Statement
    • A time yet unrealized
    • - Dreams
    • - Hopes
    • - Aspirations
    This will engage the reader to consider “what’s possible”.
  • 41. Seven Elements of a Plan 2. Goals
    • Determines when you have reached Success
  • 42. Seven Elements of a Plan 3. Objectives
    • Specific
    • Measurable
    • Achievable
    • Realistic
    • Time Specific
  • 43. Seven Elements of a Plan 4. Implementation and Timeline
    • Program Offered
    • Schedule
    • Responsibilities
    • Method of Accountability
  • 44. Seven Elements of a Plan 5. Marketing
    • Getting the message out
      • Website
      • E-mail
      • Newsletters
      • Audio & Video
      • Brochures
  • 45. Seven Elements of a Plan 6. Itemized Budget
    • Accurate & Detailed
    • Realistic to achieve your desired outcome
    • Periodic Reporting on Progress
  • 46. Seven Elements of a Plan 7. Evaluation Plan
    • A Method to Report on the Success of the Program
  • 47. Choosing A Wellness Program
    • What risk factors are a key concern in your Company?
    • What have you determined that your Senior Management wants to achieve?
    • What have you determined your Employees want?
    • What are the financial and human resources available?
    • What do you want from a Wellness Program?
  • 48. Employee Accountability
    • Insurance and Health Care Cost have been increasing for years
    • Change in strategy is to partner with your employees by providing incentives to live a healthier lifestyle.
    • Employee buy-in is key in keeping down costs.
  • 49. Change in Public Sentiment
    • A Harris Interactive online survey of 2,323 U.S. adults, conducted between July 11-13, 2006 for the Wall Street Journal Online’s Health Industry Edition, showed that 53% of the adults say it is fair for people with unhealthy lifestyles to pay higher premiums, compared to 37% in 2003.
  • 50. The Common Key Risk Factors
    • Stress
    • Overweight/Obesity
    • Limited to No Physical Activity
    • Smoking
    • Job Related Injuries
  • 51. Virginia Health Risk Factors as reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    • 58% of all Virginians are overweight or obese.
    • 23% do not exercise on a regular basis
    • Est. 25% smoke or use other tobacco products
    • Between 1993 and 2003, according to a federal study, Virginians got fatter faster than any other state, as the number of obese residents rose 10%
  • 52. Risk factors for heart disease and stroke – Virginia
    • 24.3% had high blood pressure
    • 32.6% of those screened reported having high blood cholesterol
    • 7.2% had diabetes
    • 22% were current smokers
    • 57.7% were overweight or obese (Body Mass Index greater than or equal to 25.0)
    • 22.1% reported no exercise in the prior 30 days
    • Approximately 79% had one or more of these six risk factors
  • 53. STRESS
    • Workplace stress costs the nation more than $300 billion each year in health care, missed work and stress reduction efforts.
    • Stress is responsible for 19% of employee absenteeism and 40% of employee turnover.
    • Stress is responsible for creating 60% of the cost of workplace accidents.
    • Research shows that 60% to 90% of doctor visits are stress-related.
    (Source:American Institute of Stress and Chrysalis Performance Strategies.)
  • 54. The Age of Multi-Tasking
    • Today, we are juggling more, and more, and more ….. than ever before.
  • 55. Fast paced, 24/7 Communication
    • Email
    • Voice Mail
    • Text Message
    • Internet
    • Blackberry
    • Beepers
  • 56. Our Changing Environment
  • 57. A 3-Dimensional Approach
    • Physical (Be Fit): How you use your body.
    • Bio-Chemical (Eat Right): What you put into your body
    • Psychological (Think Well): The mind-body connection.
    In order to move toward total wellness, all 3 dimensions must be addressed at the same time.
  • 58. Designing Your Program
    • Flexible
    • Scalable
    • Customized Options
    • Technology Driven
    • Personal Touches
    • Coaching Options & Support Groups
    • Outstanding Reporting & Recognition for Success
    • Incentives
    • Competition
    • Valuable for All Employees
    • Partnership – With Same Goals
  • 59. Incentives to get the Results you Want
    • Financial Incentives
    • Non-Financial Incentives
  • 60. Employee Wellness Culture
    • Creating the Environment that supports a wellness lifestyle.
      • Physical Look
      • Actual Smells
      • Sounds you Hear
      • Safety Measures
      • Food Options
      • Supportive and Open
      • Recognition and Rewards
      • Proactive policies
  • 61. Evaluating Results Requires
    • Determine key numbers or facts that can be used to measure the success of achieving your goals and objectives.
    • Comparison to your baseline data
    • Consistent method of tracking and reporting
    • Fair and consistent tracking and rewarding of Incentives offered.
    • Frequency of reporting
    • Budget review – allocation to actual cost
    • Determine report distribution
    Creating Wellness Corporate Programs are customized to the unique needs of each of your company's and its employees.
  • 62. A HEALTHIER YOU!
    • Education, Knowledge and Implementation
    • Reduced Risk Factors
    • Participants Satisfaction
    • Participants Involvement and Commitment
    • Containment or reduce cost
    • Improved trends in Health care claims
    • Reduction of lost work days/Workers compensation claims
    • Improved Absenteeism Rates
    • Presenteeism – Improved Production
    • Improved turnover and ability to attract new employees
    • Employee Wellness Cultural Improvements
    • Policy changes
    • Improved perception of health/wellness promotion program
  • 63. The Winning Edge of a Corporate Wellness Program
    • Cost savings for the company -- $$$
      • Insurance Cost
      • Absenteeism
      • And more immediate results from reduced injuries.
    • Cost saving for the employee -- $$$
    • Improved health for the employee and their family – PRICELESS