Social Media 202, goals, structure, state government

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Robin J Phillips prepared this presentation for the Arizona Game & Fish Department on Social Media for State Government.

This is the third of four social media sessions. This one focuses on setting goals, tracking progress, a case study about social media use during the Wallow Fire in eastern Arizona, and balancing your personal and professional selves online.

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  • azgfSocialMedia  -  http://azgfsocialmedia.blogspot.com/
  • http://www.facebook.com/insights/
  • Twittercounter.com
  • Track twitter followers, webinars, tools
  • Social Mention - to track who’s talkinghttp://socialmention.com/search?t=all&q=Reynolds+Center&btnG=Search
  • http://www.lunametrics.com/blog/2010/02/12/bitly-education-advanced/
  • Now Twitter 4,820 / Facebook 8,054
  • Once your goals are set… follow people, find out what they are saying. Search.
  • Once your goals are set… follow people, find out what they are saying. Search.
  • Once your goals are set… follow people, find out what they are saying. Search.
  • http://developers.facebook.com/docs/plugins/
  • http://www.diaryofareluctantblogger.com/2009/07/personal-vs-professional-social-media.html
  • http://www.slideshare.net/kivilm/personal-professional-mix-in-social-media-for-nonprofits?from=ss_embed
  • Social Media 202, goals, structure, state government

    1. 1. + Arizona Game & Fish Department Social Media for State Government Social Media – 202, Goals, Structure By Robin J Phillips, Managing Editor, The Reynolds Center for Business Journalism Twitter: @RobinJP | phillipsrobinj@gmail.com
    2. 2. + Robin J Phillips | About Me  25 years in the news game  Experience in print, magazines, wire services, online  Deputy business editor, Newsday, The Arizona Republic  Community news manager, azcentral.com  Small Business Editor, BusinessWeek Online  Business Editor, The Record of Hackensack (N.J.)  Co-founder, #wjchat, weekly online web journalism discussion  Co-founder of Perfect Moment Project  Web Managing Editor, The Reynolds Center for Business Journalism
    3. 3. + BusinessJournalism.org Free training, news, community for journalists who cover business issues
    4. 4. + What you will learn today  using the tools for work  setting goals and tracking progress  researching within social media tools  ways to find out what people are talking about during certain times, in certain places  how to engage in conversations - beyond promoting your work, how to encourage conversations, take part in them  the difference between personal and professional use of social media tools  ethical concerns - what to tweet, what not to tweet, how to correct something
    5. 5. + Quick recap  Social Media matters  Great bio statements  Tie together Facebook, Twitter, Youtube  Find people to follow: WeFollow  Be as personal, human as possible  Try to avoid automated social media tools  Social media is just a tool – relationships are key
    6. 6. + Resource website for you AZGFsocialmedia.blogspot.com
    7. 7. + Set your social media goals  Traffic - visits to your website  Reach - increase fans, follows, friends, likes  Buzz – more mentions means more awareness of you  Ultimately - new people finding you and your services
    8. 8. + Traffic: Send people to website Google analytics
    9. 9. + Reach: Increase followers, fans Facebook insights
    10. 10. + Reach: Increase followers, fans Twitter Counter
    11. 11. + Reach: Increase followers, fans Hubspot
    12. 12. + Buzz: Tracking ‘engagement’
    13. 13. + Buzz: More ‘engagement’
    14. 14. + Tracking engagement, sharing  Number of times your shortened URL was clicked on  Number of times other Bit.ly shortened versions of the same page were clicked on  Watch in (near) real time as people click on your Bit.ly link  Referring sites/applications from which your shortened URL was clicked  Location (country) of the person clicking on your shortened URL  Conversations – the tweets that include your Bit.ly link Bit.ly
    15. 15. + bit.ly link traffic
    16. 16. + So what are your goals?  Traffic to website – how much? What works? What doesn’t?  Reach – increase fans, followers. Set a number. 1,000 on Twitter in a year? 2,000? Follow back and engage.  Buzz – get people to talk about you. Customer photos, contests, Facebook questions, prizes.  New people finding you – Expand networks, share general info, encourage family fun.
    17. 17. + In short: Create community
    18. 18. + Searching, listening Search : Right now, right here. Search.Twitter.com
    19. 19. + Keyword, location Search.Twitter.com/advanced
    20. 20. + ‘Wallow Fire’
    21. 21. + Anger, fear, info
    22. 22. + #wallow #azfires #wildfires
    23. 23. + Sharing information
    24. 24. + Photos
    25. 25. + Missed opportunities
    26. 26. + Create community before you need it
    27. 27. + Engage beyond specific promos
    28. 28. + More promo ideas
    29. 29. + Ask a question Hot on Facebook Link from …  Newsletter  Twitter  Website
    30. 30. + Make it easy for people to share
    31. 31. + Make sure they can’t miss you Make sure you link to…  Blogs  Twitter  Related FB pages  Email  Any website pages you want to highlight
    32. 32. + Coordinating Personal/ Professional
    33. 33. + Conversations visible forever eye2eye
    34. 34. + What’s the problem?  Organization fears someone will say something inappropriate.  Individuals worry about censorship, responsibility of always being “on.”
    35. 35. + Everyone is a spokesperson  Awesome! … if you can trust people to know and say the right things.  Frightening! … if you’re not sure or think people don’t know how to present themselves on your behalf.
    36. 36. + What’s the right social media mix? 5 common approaches
    37. 37. + Two separate profiles  Personal and professional social media accounts. Don’t mix them. Ever.  Even if this sounds like a good solution, it’s really unrealistic.  Very difficult to maintain.  People really are multidimensional.  And followers get confused.
    38. 38. + Personal profile with some work  It’s yours personally and you mention work sometimes, unofficially.  Everyone agrees and is happy.  Site is yours to keep if you move jobs.  Never ever ever slam your job.
    39. 39. + Personal profile, mostly work  Mostly about work, but you mention personal too.  Site would disappear or require a username change if you left the job.  May or may not be thought of as ‘official.’  Use is a little arbitrary, undefined, unclear.  Does give personality to work content.
    40. 40. + Official profile  Site exclusively shares updates about the organization.  Users usually don’t know the people behind the account.  Personality can come through but nothing personal.
    41. 41. + Multiple sites under one umbrella  Hub of this network is the official work, organization site.  Separate department, region sites.  Staff have personal sites.  Staff encouraged to include work information on personal sites.  Bio statements on all sites make affiliation to work clear.
    42. 42. + Coordinate, coach each other Young journalist gets it wrong
    43. 43. + Ethical issues  BASICS:  Fine line of spamming. Promote with value.  Feuds with others. Help, don’t put down.  Lying. Be honest, transparent, if you make a mistake, fix it.  Misrepresentation. Don’t hire interns to leave positive comments.  Countless other examples come up. If in doubt, talk with each other. Put together your own standards, guidelines.
    44. 44. + Issues to keep in mind  General ETHICS:  To quote or not to quote. Read all links before sharing.  When to take conversation off line.  Need for speed. Mistakes happen.  Deceptive intimacy. Careful what you share, Congressman.  Mingling with non-professionals. Not everyone knows your business.
    45. 45. +Tweet that went very wrong Original Tweet
    46. 46. + Just because we can…
    47. 47. + Bad news travels fast
    48. 48. + Not too quick response
    49. 49. + Lessons to learn  Acknowledge the issue  Find out what went wrong, ask questions  Be factual rather than emotional, in other words, don’t get defensive  Correct any misinformation  Offer a solution or explain how you’re going resolve the issue  Respond publicly whenever possible  Say thank you – a complaint is a gift and an opportunity to make things right  Think about setting up a dedicated page on the company site where your community can go to get all the updates in one place. Be sure to include links to all your social media outposts as well. - Thanks to Trish Forant, Radian6 Here are a few things any brand can do right away when dealing with a crisis via social media:
    50. 50. + Takeaways  Setting goals, tracking progress.  Right now: People talking about breaking news.  Ideas for engaging as an organization.  Work-life, personal-professional balance.  Be a good social media citizen.  Work together to find your own organizational style.
    51. 51. + THANK YOU!

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