Strategic Communication: A Business Perspective

722 views

Published on

Presentation by Robert Hastings at 2013 National Summitt on Strategic Communications, Washington, DC.

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
722
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
36
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • The practice of strategic communication is not limited to the world of government and military public affairs. Today businesses large and small are discovering the power of synchronizing their images, actions and words to be more effective in the marketplace and win. Success or failure in strategic business communications can grow a business or ruin it; create jobs or lose them; build capital or wipe it out; or as we’ve seen in recent years, shape the future of entire industries. What I hope to share with you today is my perspective on strategic communications, gained as a military public affairs officer,former Pentagon public affairs chief, accredited public relations professional, and a business executive.
  • It’s no surprise to those of us in this room that the way the world develops, manages and consumes information is changing faster today than at any time in our history, and along with it so is the way we practice communications. With this speed of change, the need for effective strategic communication is more important than ever. When I walked into the pentagon a few years ago – this was the world of strategic communications. These are the images that many of you in this room would select to represent what you do every day. This world has been the focus of the strategic communications dialogue. This world has been at the core of most of the presentations you’ve heard over the past few days. Today’s dynamic communications environment requires a new brand of leader who is more than just the architect of a company’s words. Communication leaders must be more than counselors for what an organization says; they must be architects, advocates and watchdogs for its actions as well. They must have not only a seat at the table, but a voice as well; one grounded in credibility as a member of the C-suite leadership. Communication leaders must be business leaders who understand their environment well enough to participate in the decision-making process and exercise influence at the front end, not just develop the talking points, after decisions have been made.
  • This is the view of strategic communications out in the business world. Today’s dynamic communications environment requires a new brand of leader who is more than just the architect of a company’s words. Communication leaders must be more than counselors for what an organization says; they must be architects, advocates and watchdogs for its actions as well. You - strategic communicator - must have not only a seat at the table, but a voice as well; one grounded in credibility as a member of the C-suite leadership. Communication leaders must be business leaders who understand their environment well enough to participate in the decision-making process and exercise influence at the front end, not just develop the talking points, after decisions have been made.
  • Everyone here knows this – the environment that we do our jobs in has changed – and continues to do so at a rapid pace.
  • Modern technology equalizes the battlefield of communication, giving small voices equal and sometimes even more powerful voices. The war of ideas can be between east and west, between capitalism and communism, or it can between corporations and individuals.
  • Strategic Communication: A Business Perspective

    1. 1. STRATEGIC COMMUNICATION A Business Perspective Robert T. Hastings Senior Vice President Communications & Gov’t Affairs Chief of Staff Bell Helicopter Assistant Secretary of Defense for Public Affairs (acting) 2008-2009
    2. 2. The Birth of Human Communication 4000 BC The Evolution of the Strategic Communicator
    3. 3. The Golden Age of Advertising 1930’s – 1970’s The Evolution of the Strategic Communicator
    4. 4. The Age of Public Relations 1990’s-2000’s The Evolution of the Strategic Communicator
    5. 5. The Dawn of Information Operations 2001+ The Evolution of the Strategic Communicator
    6. 6. The Evolution of the Strategic Communicator Today - The Age of Strategic Communications
    7. 7. Strategic Communication The Information Environment is Changing…… Every Day • News has become hyper-competitive • Perceptions drive customer behavior • Everyone is trying to influence everyone • All information reporting is biased • There is a journalist on every corner and a camera in every pocket • Consumers choice their source and give it credibility • Institutional trust is down – whistleblower trust is up • There is no longer a news cycle – speed is paramount • Tactical actions can have immediate strategic consequences • “Reporting” is faster than operational reporting • We are competing with many voices • Technology equalizes big and small voices
    8. 8. Strategic Communication “Strategic Communication is the synchronization of actions, images, and words to achieve a desired effect.”
    9. 9. The strategic communication process is designed to synchronize - and thus maximize the impact of - efforts to achieve one or more of the following: • Improve U.S. credibility and legitimacy; • Weaken an adversary's credibility and legitimacy; • Convince selected audiences to take specific actions that support U.S. or international objectives; • Cause a competitor or adversary to take (or refrain from taking) specific actions. Strategic Communication Joint Integrating Concept; 2009 Strategic Communication
    10. 10. Gentle/Indirect Forceful/Direct Inform Educate Influence/Advocate Induce/Coerce PSYOPS The Information Operations Spectrum MIL DEC Info Operations PSYOPS Public Diplomacy Public Diplomacy Public Affairs Public Affairs Strategic Communication
    11. 11. Effective strategic communications are…… • Leadership driven: leadership provides clear intent, direction, and engagement. • Business focused: derived from the business’ goals and objectives and short and long-range strategic plans. • Strategic: focused on understanding and shaping the environment through sound research, analysis, planning and assessment. • Credible: honest, timely, and as transparent as possible. Hastings Principles of Strategic Communication
    12. 12. Effective strategic communications are…… • Thoughtful: engaging the right audience with the right message at the right time. • Results oriented: undertaken to achieve specific outcomes. • Dynamic: persistent, continuous, adaptable and agile • Employee centric: well informed and engaged employees are a competitive advantage. • Coordinated: synchronized and coordinated across the business, horizontally and vertically. Hastings Principles of Strategic Communication
    13. 13. Lessons Learned……… • Strategic Communication is a leadership function • It must be embedded in business strategy • Influence is name of the game • Think bigger than media, but don’t forget about it • Use every tool, every channel, every opportunity • Listen, understand, know audiences • Act first and communicate first - Imagery and speed win • Credibility and legitimacy are paramount • Research, assess and measure • Be prepared for “casualties” Strategic Communication
    14. 14. Robert T. Hastings robert.t.hastings@gmail.com 817-528-2790

    ×