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Elements of phillipine poetry
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Elements of phillipine poetry

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  • 1. - Deals with emotions asthey are aroused by somescene, experience,attachment; often rich insentiment and passion;imaginative.
  • 2. - The language oftheimagination, almostentirely figurative, andalso a musical literarylanguage.
  • 3. Forms:Couplet- Two lines of versewith similar end-rhymes.
  • 4. - A two-line stanza with bothgrammatical structure andidea complete within itself.Sample: More relative than this. The play’s the thingWherein I’ll catch the conscience of the King.
  • 5. Tercet- A triplet in whicheach line ends withthe same rhyme.
  • 6. Sample:When as in silks my Julia goes, Then, then, methinks, how sweetly flowsThe liquefaction of her clothes.
  • 7. Quatrain- A stanza of fourlines.
  • 8. - A complete poemconsisting of fourlines only: any oneof many four-linestanza forms.
  • 9. - The possible rhymeschemes vary from anunrhymed quatrain toalmost any arrangementof one-rhyme, two-rhyme,or three-rhyme lines(abab, aabb,abba, aaba,
  • 10. Diction- Choice of words is ofgreat importance inpoetry.
  • 11. - Words orcombinations of wordsare painstakinglychosen by the poet fortheir exactness as wellas suggestiveness.
  • 12. - The connotativevalue of a word isparticularlyimportant to thepoet.
  • 13. Tone- The attitude of thepoet or the persona orthe speaker in thepoem.
  • 14. - The tone ofvoice variesaccording to theemotional stateof the speaker.
  • 15. - In order to identifytone in poetry, oneshould be sensitiveto the inner state ofthe speaker.
  • 16. The usual themes inpoetry arelove, death, brotherhood, inhumanity, loneliness, and joy.
  • 17. Poetry can do the following:
  • 18. 1. Move an individual to tears or laughter.2. Stir the insights of the readers.3. Stimulate the imagination of the reader.
  • 19. 4.Lift the burden ofa heavy heart.5.Ease and relaxtension in atroubled world.
  • 20. - A nondramatic poem thattells a story or presents anarrative, whether simpleor complex, long or short.Epics, ballads, Metricalromances are among themany kinds of narrativepoems.
  • 21. a. Metrical Tale:- A series of events or facts told or presented based on the metric system as a standard of measurement.- Tendencies of romanticism in itsfreedom of technique and itspreference for remote settings aswell as its essential qualities.
  • 22. EDMUND AND HELENCOME, SIT THEE BY ME, LOVE, AND THOU SHALT HEAR A TALE MAY WIN A SMILE AND CLAIM A TEAR- A PLAN AND SIMPLE STORY, TOLD IN RHYME, AS SANG THE MINSTRELS OF THE OLDEN TIME. NO IDLE MUSE ILL NEEDLESSLY INVOKE- NO PATRONS AID TO STEER ME FROM THE ROCK OF COLD NEGLECT ROUND WHICH OBLIVION LIES; BUT LOVED ONE, I WILL LOOK INTO THINE EYES,FROM WHICH YOUNG POESY FIRST TOUCHED MY SOUL,
  • 23. AND BADE THE BURNING WORDS IN NUMBERS ROLL;-- THEY WERE THE LIGHT IN WHICH I LEARNED TO SING;AND STILL TO THEE WILL KINDLING FANCY CLING- GLOW AT THY SMILE, AS WHEN, IN YOUNGER YEARS, IVE SEEN THEE SMILING THROUGH THY MAIDEN TEARS,LIKE A FAIR FLOWERET BENT WITH MORNING DEW; WHILE SUNBEAMS KISSED ITS LEAVES OF LOVELIEST HUE.
  • 24. b. Epic:- A story about heroic deeds of an individual written in verse.- - Epics without certain authorship are called Folk Epics.
  • 25. Characteristics of an Epic
  • 26. • HERO - a figure of imposing stature, of national or international importance, and of great history or legendary significance.• SETTING - vast, covering great nations, the world, or the universe.
  • 27. • SUPERNATURAL FORCES – gods, angels, and demons – interest themselves in the action and intervene from time to time.• STYLE – sustained elevation and grand simplicity is used.• ACTION – consists of deeds of great valor or requiring superhuman courage
  • 28. Sample Text: The Epic of Labaw Donggon
  • 29. 1 The Birth Odoyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy Let us narrate with care Take note much in detailAll about Labaw DonggonWho was born in the womb Of Anggoy Alunsina.
  • 30. BuyungLabawDonggon Not long after he was delivered,Hardly noticed by anyoneBecame a mature person, A sturdy young man.
  • 31. 2 Wooing of AbyangGinbitinanOdoyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy LabawDongon said To his respected parents AbyangAlunsina.
  • 32. “Open, please openThe great wooden chest Whose heavy cover Is elaborately carved.
  • 33. Then select from there Very carefullyMy treasured possessions and My fine clothes.”
  • 34. - One of the earliest forms ofliterature.- The narration of a story in poetry form.- Form of verse to be sung or recited and characterized by its presentation of a dramatic or exciting episode in simple narrative form.
  • 35. - Essentially a narrativepoem originally intended tobe sung.- The traditional balladconsists of four lines with anabcb rhyme scheme andmay employ a refrain.
  • 36. Characteristics of Ballad:• The supernatural is likely to play an important part in events.• Physical courage and love are frequent themes.• Slight attention is paid to characterization/description.
  • 37. • Transitions are abrupt.• Action is largely developed through dialogue.• Tragic situations are presented with the utmost simplicity.
  • 38. The Mermaid by Author Unknown Twas Friday morn when we set sail,And we had not got far from land, When the Captain, he spied a lovely mermaid, With a comb and a glass in her hand.
  • 39. Chorus Oh the ocean waves may roll,And the stormy winds may blow,While we poor sailors go skipping aloft And the land lubbers lay down below, below, below And the land lubbers lay down below.
  • 40. Then up spoke the Captain of our gallant ship,And a jolly old Captain was he; "I have a wife in Salem town,But tonight a widow she will be."
  • 41. - A brief subjective poemstrongly marked byimagination, melody, andemotion, and creating asingle, unified impression.- (GREEK) Expression ofthe emotion of a singlesinger accompanied by alyre.
  • 42. - “Choric” – verses that werethe expression of a group andwere sung by a chorus.- Individual and personalemotion of the poet still holds.- Most broadly inclusive of allthe various types of verse.
  • 43. a. Ode:- A single, unified strain ofexalted lyrical verse, directedto a single purpose, anddealing with one theme.- Connotes certain qualitiesof both manner and form.
  • 44. - An elaboratelyric, expressed in languagedignified, sincere, andimaginative and intellectual intone.- No definite pattern.- Each is distinguished by itssubject matter.
  • 45. - The elegy dwells on deathand the sorrow that comeswith the contemplation of loss.- Addresses an object in loftyterms.- More complicated thanmost of the lyric types.
  • 46. Sample Text: Ode to My Angel Michael Flores Fly me to your heavenly garden of peace With your pure and perfect pallid wings Carry me to my fairest hopes and dreamsAnd put my feet up on your red rose’s bed.
  • 47. Bless my mornings with your comforting touch And feed me with your sweetest smilesI’ll drink your tears to heal my painsAnd live with you forevermore.
  • 48. Guide me to my future successesWith your eyes so angelic and divine Sing your most romantic melodies Erase my worries and perplexities.
  • 49. O my dearly beloved angel of heavens Your smell I breathe awakens me Embrace me with your warmest armsForever I will live with thee.
  • 50. Song:- A lyric poem adapted tomusical expression.- Usually short, simple,sensuous, emotional – themost spontaneous lyricform.
  • 51. Sample Text: I HAVE BECOME LIGHTER I have become lighter than a basketof beaten cotton in the presence of so many relatives all heavily adornedwith double necklaces of gold and precious beads;
  • 52. heavy earrings of gold hunglike leaves upon their ears;but I sit in their midst with a necklace of lasa seeds interspersed with thehumble seed of the tugitugi
  • 53. and cheap green beads of glass, adorned with a crossmade of squash shell because I know not how to tie properly a string around my neck, which is the proper and decorous thing for a young woman
  • 54. Sources:Holman, Hugh, et al.:A Handbook toLiterature.C.Macmillan PublishingCompany.1986Tomeldan, Yolanda V., Prism: AnIntroduction to Literature. NationalBookstore.1986Senatin, Ruby B.,Centenera, FeG.:Introduction to Literature English 104(Textbook-Workbook).NationalBookstore.2003
  • 55. Prepared by:Robert Ryan L. IliganIII-BSELa Salle College Antipolo