Georgia Family Statistics:Context for FACS Program Development           Robert B. Nielsen     Department of Housing & Con...
Outline1. Families’ current social and economic context     a.k.a. Death by 1,000 Slides2. A quick demographic snapshot o...
Death by 1,000 slides1. FAMILIES’ CURRENT SOCIAL ANDECONOMIC CONTEXT                                                      ...
My perspective…Influential factors for families this century: Macro and microeconomic challenges   – A two-recession deca...
My perspective II… Like most here, I view consumers and families  from an ecological perspective. Individual consumers a...
$45,973        GATitle              6
Income this Century          Median Household Income 2000 to 2011: U.S. and Georgia$60,000            $54,841             ...
8
9
By Your Own Bootstraps: 2010 The percentage of working-age adults who live  in poverty was the highest its been since 196...
GA18.4% 11
Bishaw, A. (2011). Poverty 2009and 2010. ACS Brief ACSBR/10-01. Available athttp://www.census.gov/prod/2      12011pubs/ac...
7 Lowest and Highest Poverty Rates: 2010                                     Poverty Rate              Median Household In...
14
15
16
How Bad Is It for Families with Kids?                                                    17             Prepared by Robert...
Family Budget SharesSource: USDA Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, http://www.cnpp.usda.gov/Publications/CRC/crc2...
Food Insecurity                                                                                                           ...
59.6% GA53.2% GA31.8% GA19.2% GA           20
Nevada                                                          Arizona, Florida                                          ...
22
Just when you thought things were OKLet’s say the median wealth family has avoided poverty, avoided two-adult simultaneo...
24
Absence of hardship doesn’t equal wellness A few estimates from the Federal Reserve’s  most recent Survey of Consumer Fin...
Absence of hardship doesn’t equal wellnessSource: Federal Reserve 2010 SCF Chartbook, http://www.federalreserve.gov/econre...
Absence of hardship doesn’t equal wellnessSource: Federal Reserve 2010 SCF Chartbook, http://www.federalreserve.gov/econre...
28Source: Federal Reserve 2012 SCF Bulletin, http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/bulletin/2012/pdf/scf12.pdf
Absence of hardship doesn’t equal wellness The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau  (our newest regulatory agency) is fo...
DelinquinciesSource: New York Office of the Federal Reserve http://www.newyorkfed.org/householdcredit/                    ...
31Source: Federal Reserve 2012 SCF Bulletin, http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/bulletin/2012/pdf/scf12.pdf
h                                                                    h                                                    ...
“Who is to blame?”    Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
So I find myself asking…   When can weshift from SURVIVE    to THRIVE?!                                                 34...
My tentative answer… When we stop pining  for how how thingswere and start workingtoward what could be.                   ...
2. A DEMOGRAPHIC SNAPSHOT OFGEORGIA THIS CENTURY                                                 36          Prepared by R...
Georgia Population Georgia is a populous and growing state Population estimates  – 2000         8.1 million         10th...
Increasingly Diverse Nation                                                                                               ...
Increasingly Diverse Society Increasingly diverse society  – Mapping two decades of change (Wash Post)  – 2010 Decennial ...
Increasingly Diverse State                                                                                                ...
41Available at http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br-04.pdf
From Center for American Progress                     (Yes, they lean left)      Top 10 things to know about Georgia’s dem...
From Center for American Progress                     (Yes, they lean left)      Top 10 things to know about Georgia’s dem...
65.1  %5.3% 67.5%   32.5%  2.71   2.51         44
Changing Household Structure                                                   2000                                  2010 ...
Changing Household StructureAvailable athttp://www.census.gov/prod/cen201                                                 ...
Largely as reported in Specialists’ Logic Models and Trend Statements3. OPPORTUNITIES ANDCHALLENGES AHEAD                 ...
I can’t do each area justice and I’m not sure I should try at all…theexperts are in the room…still, it was part of my char...
FACS Base Programs3.1.1. ECONOMIC WELL-BEING FORINDIVIDUAL FAMILIES                                                       ...
Georgians Will Manage Credit & DebtSpecialist: Michael Rupured People with higher credit scores are offered  more favorab...
Risk Management and InsuranceSpecialist: Joan Koonce Deciding what kind and how much insurance an  individual or family n...
FACS Base Programs3.1.2. POSITIVE DEVELOPMENT FORINDIVIDUALS, FAMILIES, ANDCOMMUNITIES                                    ...
In 2010                                                                Women were 46.7% of the US labor                  ...
Quality Caregiving for Children & YouthSpecialist: Diane Bales Child care has an enormous economic impact on Georgia.   –...
Intimate Partner RelationshipsSpecialist: Ted Futris In Georgia:   – Marriage rate continues to decline (10.3 per 1000 to...
Specialist: Don Bower Said he’ll be covering his                                                         56              ...
Specialist: Sharon Gibson Is part of the panel Still, my take…preparing youth to envision what  could be if we embrace t...
FACS Base Programs3.1.3. FOOD SAFETY                                                            58                     Pre...
Safety of Locally Grown ProduceSpecialist: Judy Harrison Georgia ranks 9th in the number of cases of  foodborne disease i...
Preserve and Store Foods SafetySpecialists: Elizabeth Andress & Judy Harrison 2010 Pew Charitable Trust estimates that a ...
Commercial Food SafetySpecialists: Elizabeth Andress & Judy Harrison ServSafe since 1995! Georgia has   – over 16,000 in...
FACS Base Programs3.1.4. FOOD NUTRITION AND HEALTH                                                            62          ...
Decreased MorbiditySpecialist: Connie Crawley 2011 Georgia adults:  – 28% obese; 62.7% overweight or obese; 24th in US 2...
FACS Base Programs3.1.5. HEALTHY, SAFE, AFFORDABLEHOUSING ENVIRONMENTS                                                    ...
Safe and Affordable HousingSpecialist: Pamela Turner GA housing market is showing signs of recovery;  however, the demand...
Housing and Demographic Research Center (Dr. Tinsley)3.1.5. GICH: COMMUNITY HOUSINGINITIATIVE                             ...
Local Housing AssistanceKaren Tinsley Georgia Initiative for Community Housing (GICH)  provides support and technical ass...
If none, I have a slide graveyard we can walk through4. CONVERSATION LEADING INTOTHE PANEL DISCUSSION.                    ...
The micro- and macro- environment                                                       Natural/Structured                ...
Slides not used for the presentation but that might be useful for thepanel question session afterwardGRAVEYARD            ...
Long-Term UnemploymentSource: Department of Labor via Wall Street Journal,http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000142405270230...
72
Weekly Food ExpendituresSource: USDA Economic Research Service, http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/err-economic-research...
Current P60 Report                                           74    Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
On technology…“Technology changes society by changing ourenvironment to which we, in turn, adapt. Thischange is usually in...
76Source: Federal Reserve 2012 SCF Bulletin, http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/bulletin/2012/pdf/scf12.pdf
77Source: Federal Reserve 2012 SCF Bulletin, http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/bulletin/2012/pdf/scf12.pdf
78Source: Federal Reserve 2012 SCF Bulletin, http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/bulletin/2012/pdf/scf12.pdf
79Source: Federal Reserve 2012 SCF Bulletin, http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/bulletin/2012/pdf/scf12.pdf
80Source: Federal Reserve 2012 SCF Bulletin, http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/bulletin/2012/pdf/scf12.pdf
81Source: Federal Reserve 2012 SCF Bulletin, http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/bulletin/2012/pdf/scf12.pdf
82Source: Federal Reserve 2012 SCF Bulletin, http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/bulletin/2012/pdf/scf12.pdf
83Source: Federal Reserve 2012 SCF Bulletin, http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/bulletin/2012/pdf/scf12.pdf
84Source: Federal Reserve 2012 SCF Bulletin, http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/bulletin/2012/pdf/scf12.pdf
85Source: Federal Reserve 2012 SCF Bulletin, http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/bulletin/2012/pdf/scf12.pdf
86Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
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  • http://www.stonybrook.edu/workingclass/publications/Casualty%20study%20main%20report%20Oct%202011.pdf http://www.prb.org/pdf11/reports-on-america-2010-census.pdf
  • Also see Dan Weinberg’s Income Inequality Report using ACShttp://www.census.gov/prod/2011pubs/acs-16.pdf (which notes Athens-Clark as a top-five inequality location)http://www.census.gov/prod/2012pubs/acsbr10-18.pdf
  • America's economic history is rife with tales of individuals who overcame incredible obstacles to achieve economic success. However, the past decade has proven to be one of the most economically challenging on record. (CLICK for bullet 1) The most recent government estimates indicate that the percentage of working-age adults who live in poverty is the highest its been since 1966 (13.7%) and the percentage of people who live in the suburbs who are poor is at the highest (CLICK for bullet 2) level since 1967 (11.8%). (CLICK for bullet 3) If anyone can be expected to pull themselves up by their own bootstraps, it's these Americans. Yet, they're falling behind. This class explores the causes and consequences of the current economic hardships that have caused what has been dubbed "The Lost Decade."
  • In 2011, the official poverty rate was 15.0 percent. There were 46.2 million people in poverty.After 3 consecutive years of increases, neither the official poverty rate nor the number of people in poverty were statistically different from the 2010 estimates.The 2011 poverty rates for most demographic groups examined were not statistically different from their 2010 rates. Poverty rates were lower in 2011 than in 2010 for six groups: Hispanics, males, the foreign-born, nonciti¬zens, people living in the South, and people living inside metropol¬itan statistical areas but outside principal cities. Poverty rates went up between 2010 and 2011 for naturalized citizens.For most groups, the number of people in poverty either decreased or did not show a statistically significant change. The number of people in poverty decreased for noncitizens, people living in the South, and people living inside metropolitan statistical areas but outside principal cities between 2010 and 2011. The number of naturalized citizens in poverty increased.The poverty rate in 2011 for children under age 18 was 21.9 per-cent. The poverty rate for people aged 18 to 64 was 13.7 percent, while the rate for people aged 65 and older was 8.7 percent. None of the rates for these age groups were statistically different from their 2010 estimates. (the above text verbatim from http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/poverty/data/incpovhlth/2011/highlights.html)
  • ACSBR/10-01 at http://www.census.gov/prod/2011pubs/acsbr10-01.pdf
  • U.S. was 14.7% food insecure and 5.6% very low food security
  • Atlanta Homeowner Vacancy Rate 3.0; Rental Vacancy Rate 13.8
  • “These young adults who lived with their parents had an official poverty rate of only 8.4 percent, since the income of their entire family is compared with the poverty threshold. If their poverty status were determined by their own income, 45.3 percent would have had income falling below the poverty threshold for a single person under age 65.” http://blogs.census.gov/2011/09/13/households-doubling-up/
  • Federal Reserve 2010 SCF and http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/12/business/economy/family-net-worth-drops-to-level-of-early-90s-fed-says.html?_r=0
  • Federal Reserve 2010 SCF and http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/12/business/economy/family-net-worth-drops-to-level-of-early-90s-fed-says.html?_r=0
  • http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/12/business/economy/family-net-worth-drops-to-level-of-early-90s-fed-says.html?_r=0
  • http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/12/business/economy/family-net-worth-drops-to-level-of-early-90s-fed-says.html?_r=0
  • http://www.newyorkfed.org/householdcredit/
  • Loan types. In our analysis we distinguish between the following types of accounts: mortgage accounts, home equity revolving accounts, auto loans, bank card accounts, student loans and other loan accounts. Mortgage accounts include all mortgage installment loans, including first mortgages and home equity installment loans (HEL), both of which are closed-end loans. Home Equity Revolving accounts (aka Home Equity Line of Credit or HELOC), unlike home equity installment loans, are home equity loans with a revolving line of credit where the borrower can choose when and how often to borrow up to an updated credit limit. Auto Loans are loans taken out to purchase a car, including Auto Bank loans provided by banking institutions (banks, credit unions, savings and loan associations), and Auto Finance loans, provided by automobile dealers and automobile financing companies. Bankcard accounts (or credit card accounts) are revolving accounts for banks, bankcard companies, national credit card companies, credit unions and savings & loan associations. Student Loans include loans to finance educational expenses provided by banks, credit unions and other financial institutions as well as federal and state governments. The Other category includes Consumer Finance (sales financing, personal loans) and Retail (clothing, grocery, department stores, home furnishings, gas etc) loans.
  • http://2010.census.gov/2010census/data/
  • http://www.11alive.com/news/article/183232/165/Census-Hispanic-population-explosion-in-Georgia-especially-in-Gwinnett-County
  • http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br-04.pdf
  • http://www.census.gov/prod/2012pubs/p60-243.pdf
  • http://www.stonybrook.edu/workingclass/publications/Casualty%20study%20main%20report%20Oct%202011.pdf http://www.prb.org/pdf11/reports-on-america-2010-census.pdf
  • Nielsen 2012 extension_prog_dev

    1. 1. Georgia Family Statistics:Context for FACS Program Development Robert B. Nielsen Department of Housing & Consumer Economics Housing and Demographic Research Center Extension FACS Program Development Conference Athens, GA October 2, 2012
    2. 2. Outline1. Families’ current social and economic context  a.k.a. Death by 1,000 Slides2. A quick demographic snapshot of Georgia  Including selected statistics on each issue area3. Challenges and opportunities ahead  As reported in situation statements, logic models, or trend statements4. Conversation leading into the panel session 2 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    3. 3. Death by 1,000 slides1. FAMILIES’ CURRENT SOCIAL ANDECONOMIC CONTEXT 3 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    4. 4. My perspective…Influential factors for families this century: Macro and microeconomic challenges – A two-recession decade included the Great Recession; an unprecedented housing crisis; poverty rates not seen since 1960s Increasing diversity – Increasingly multicultural society; “minority” births now majority Terrorism, wars, and conflict – From 9/11 to the longest war in U.S. history to cultural conflicts Rapid technological changes – Influences how consumers and families communicate, work, learn, recreate, and consume (perhaps a panel conversation) Political changes – Distrust of large institutions; cycles of optimism and pessimism; varying levels of excitement about new voters 4 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    5. 5. My perspective II… Like most here, I view consumers and families from an ecological perspective. Individual consumers and families are influenced by—but also influence—the persons, processes, contexts, and time in which they interact in their social, political, economic, and physical environments. Still, where else would a family economist start but with income? 5 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    6. 6. $45,973 GATitle 6
    7. 7. Income this Century Median Household Income 2000 to 2011: U.S. and Georgia$60,000 $54,841 $50,054$50,000 $45,973$40,000 $41,901$30,000$20,000$10,000 $0 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 Source: Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States (P60-243); All values expressed in 2011 dollars 7 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    8. 8. 8
    9. 9. 9
    10. 10. By Your Own Bootstraps: 2010 The percentage of working-age adults who live in poverty was the highest its been since 1966 (13.7%) The percentage of people who live in the suburbs who are poor was at the highest level since 1967 (11.8%) If anyone can be expected to “pull themselves up by their own bootstraps” its these groups of Americans. Yet, they’re falling behind. 10 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    11. 11. GA18.4% 11
    12. 12. Bishaw, A. (2011). Poverty 2009and 2010. ACS Brief ACSBR/10-01. Available athttp://www.census.gov/prod/2 12011pubs/acsbr10-01.pdf
    13. 13. 7 Lowest and Highest Poverty Rates: 2010 Poverty Rate Median Household Income Fayette 6.7% $79,276 Forsyth (FACS) 7.2% $81,629 Oconee (FACS) 8.2% $76,298 Cherokee 8.6% $63,520 Columbia 8.8% $64,435 Paulding 8.8% $61,496 Harris 9.4% $62,264 Clarke (FACS) 33.3% $34,000 Bulloch 34.3% $31,943 Dougherty (FACS) 35.1% $31,200 Clay 35.7% $27,080 Atkinson 36.3% $28,579 Calhoun 36.8% $28,618 Stewart (FACS) 38.1% $26,659 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Small Area Estimates Branch Release date: 11.2011 13 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    14. 14. 14
    15. 15. 15
    16. 16. 16
    17. 17. How Bad Is It for Families with Kids? 17 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    18. 18. Family Budget SharesSource: USDA Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, http://www.cnpp.usda.gov/Publications/CRC/crc2011.pdf 18 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    19. 19. Food Insecurity GA 17.4% GA 6.4%Source: USDA Economic Research Service, http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/err-economic-research-report/err141.aspx 19 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    20. 20. 59.6% GA53.2% GA31.8% GA19.2% GA 20
    21. 21. Nevada Arizona, Florida Georgia: 12.3, 3.4 NC MI, AL S. CarolinaUS 2.6 US 10.2 21 Retrieved from http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br-07.pdf
    22. 22. 22
    23. 23. Just when you thought things were OKLet’s say the median wealth family has avoided poverty, avoided two-adult simultaneous unemployment, survived a recession (or two), enough (safe) food to eat, retained medical care access, not become unwilling landlords, not had to double-up, and managed not to hit one another while arguing.It’s all good, right? 23 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    24. 24. 24
    25. 25. Absence of hardship doesn’t equal wellness A few estimates from the Federal Reserve’s most recent Survey of Consumer Finances: 25 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    26. 26. Absence of hardship doesn’t equal wellnessSource: Federal Reserve 2010 SCF Chartbook, http://www.federalreserve.gov/econresdata/scf/files/2010_SCF_Chartbook.pdf 26 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    27. 27. Absence of hardship doesn’t equal wellnessSource: Federal Reserve 2010 SCF Chartbook, http://www.federalreserve.gov/econresdata/scf/files/2010_SCF_Chartbook.pdf 27 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    28. 28. 28Source: Federal Reserve 2012 SCF Bulletin, http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/bulletin/2012/pdf/scf12.pdf
    29. 29. Absence of hardship doesn’t equal wellness The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (our newest regulatory agency) is focusing its educational efforts on – mortgages, – credit cards, and – student loans. First a look…then the question, “Why?” 29 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    30. 30. DelinquinciesSource: New York Office of the Federal Reserve http://www.newyorkfed.org/householdcredit/ 30 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    31. 31. 31Source: Federal Reserve 2012 SCF Bulletin, http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/bulletin/2012/pdf/scf12.pdf
    32. 32. h h hSource: Federal Reserve 2012 SCF Bulletin, http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/bulletin/2012/pdf/scf12.pdf 32 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    33. 33. “Who is to blame?” Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    34. 34. So I find myself asking… When can weshift from SURVIVE to THRIVE?! 34 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    35. 35. My tentative answer… When we stop pining for how how thingswere and start workingtoward what could be. 35 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    36. 36. 2. A DEMOGRAPHIC SNAPSHOT OFGEORGIA THIS CENTURY 36 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    37. 37. Georgia Population Georgia is a populous and growing state Population estimates – 2000 8.1 million 10th in the U.S. – 2005 9.0 million 9th in the U.S. – 2010 9.5 million 9th in the U.S. – 2020 10.8 million (est.) How about your county? – This tool offers a population change snapshot. 37 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    38. 38. Increasingly Diverse Nation Number 2000 2010 Change Number Percent Number Percent Percent Total 281,422 100.0 308,746 100.0 9.7 Non-Hispanic White 194,553 69.1 196,818 63.7 1.2 Black 33,948 12.1 37,686 12.2 11.0 Asian 10,123 3.6 14,465 4.7 42.9 Islander 354 0.1 482 0.2 36.2 Am. Indian 2,069 0.7 2,247 0.7 8.6 Other 468 0.2 604 0.2 29.1 Two or more 4,602 1.6 5,966 1.9 29.6 Hispanic 35,306 12.5 50,478 16.3 43.0Source: U.S. Census Bureau (2000 and 2010 decennial censuses); expect slight variations due to rounding 38 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    39. 39. Increasingly Diverse Society Increasingly diverse society – Mapping two decades of change (Wash Post) – 2010 Decennial Census (Census Bureau) 39 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    40. 40. Increasingly Diverse State Number 2000 2010 Change (in thousands) Number Percent Number Percent Percent Total 8,072 100.0 9,480 100.0 17.4 Non-Hispanic White 5,328 65.1 8,787 59.7 8.6 Black 2,350 28.7 2,950 30.5 25.6 Asian 173 2.1 315 3.2 81.6 Islander 4 0.1 7 0.1 60.1 Am. Indian 22 0.3 32 0.3 47.9 Other 196 2.4 389 4.0 98.1 Two or more 114 1.4 208 2.1 81.7 Hispanic 435 5.3 854 8.8 96.1Source: U.S. Census Bureau (2000 and 2010 decennial censuses); expect slight variations due to rounding 40 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    41. 41. 41Available at http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br-04.pdf
    42. 42. From Center for American Progress (Yes, they lean left) Top 10 things to know about Georgia’s demographics and immigration politics (I share a few) 1. Georgia is at a demographic tipping point – 1 of 13 states where people of color make up more than 40% of population. 2. People of color make up a substantial portion of Georgia’s population – African Americans make up 31.5% of population – Hispanics or Latinos 8.8% 3. Georgia has a large racial generation gap – 73.2% age 60+ are non-Hispanic white – 46.9% of children are non-Hispanic white 4. Demographic change is reshaping the electorate – Number of eligible Hispanic voters increased 181%--and they’re young relative to whitesAvailable at: http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/race/news/2012/03/02/11191/the-top-10-things-you-should-know-about-georgias-demographic-changes-and-immigration-politics/ 42 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    43. 43. From Center for American Progress (Yes, they lean left) Top 10 things to know about Georgia’s demographics and immigration politics (I share a few) 5. The state is feeling the effects of H.B. 87, the “papers please” law. – Economic losses not yet determined, but estimates upward of $1B in 2011 growing season 6. Communities of color contribute to the state’s economy – Unauthorized immigrants paid $456.3 million in state and local taxes in 2010 – Purchasing power of Georgia’s Latinos estimated $17 billion – 32,500 Latino-owned business account for $6B revenue, employ approximately 36,000 – Asian American-owned businesses increased 72% 2002-2007; GA second-fastest growing state for Asian American-owned businessesAvailable at: http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/race/news/2012/03/02/11191/the-top-10-things-you-should-know-about-georgias-demographic-changes-and-immigration-politics/ 43 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    44. 44. 65.1 %5.3% 67.5% 32.5% 2.71 2.51 44
    45. 45. Changing Household Structure 2000 2010 Change (in thousands) Number Percent Number Percent Percent Total household 3,006 100.0 3,586 100.0 19.3 Families 2,112 70.2 2,458 68.5 16.4 With own child <18 1,051 35.0 1,258 32.3 10.1 Married couple 1,549 51.5 1,715 47.8 10.7 With own child <18 733 24.4 757 21.1 3.2 Female head (no 435 14.5 568 15.8 30.5 Husb) With own child <18 258 8.6 320 8.9 24.2 Average size 3.14 -- 3.17 -- 1.0 Nonfamily households 895 29.8 1,128 31.5 26.0 Living alone 711 23.6 909 25.4 28.0 65 or older 210 7.0 268 7.5 27.5 Average size 2.65 -- 2.63Source: U.S. Census Bureau (2000 and 2010 decennial censuses); expect slight variations due to rounding -- -0.8 45 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    46. 46. Changing Household StructureAvailable athttp://www.census.gov/prod/cen201 460/briefs/c2010br-04.pdf Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    47. 47. Largely as reported in Specialists’ Logic Models and Trend Statements3. OPPORTUNITIES ANDCHALLENGES AHEAD 47 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    48. 48. I can’t do each area justice and I’m not sure I should try at all…theexperts are in the room…still, it was part of my charge so here are a fewhighlights as I see them (and on occasion I’m cross-eyed).3.1 SELECTED STATISTICS ON EACHISSUE AREA 48 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    49. 49. FACS Base Programs3.1.1. ECONOMIC WELL-BEING FORINDIVIDUAL FAMILIES 49 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    50. 50. Georgians Will Manage Credit & DebtSpecialist: Michael Rupured People with higher credit scores are offered more favorable loan rates; this saves money that can be put to other uses. Georgia ranks 46th among the states for credit scores. – Augusta (710) and Savannah (713) have the distinction of being in the list of cities with the top ten worst Vantage scores 50 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    51. 51. Risk Management and InsuranceSpecialist: Joan Koonce Deciding what kind and how much insurance an individual or family needs can be a daunting task. With the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, the health insurance marketplace is undergoing dramatic changes; all must soon participate in this complex and expensive marketplace. – www.healthcare.gov offers educational insights to consumers, including timeline of the rollout of new health insurance provisions 51 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    52. 52. FACS Base Programs3.1.2. POSITIVE DEVELOPMENT FORINDIVIDUALS, FAMILIES, ANDCOMMUNITIES 52 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    53. 53. In 2010  Women were 46.7% of the US labor force, a slightly larger share than at the start of the recession.  58.6% of women age 16+ were employed or looking for work.  Women were nearly twice as likely as men to work part time.  Women were nearly 50% more likely to work in the public sector than men; 18.2% of employed women worked in public sector jobs.Source: Department of Labor (2011). Women’s Employment During the Recovery. Available at http://www.dol.gov/_sec/media/reports/FemaleLaborForce/FemaleLaborForce.pdf 53 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    54. 54. Quality Caregiving for Children & YouthSpecialist: Diane Bales Child care has an enormous economic impact on Georgia. – The child care industry generates about $2.4 billion in gross receipts each year – employs more than 61,000 people directly – Parents with young children earn between $13.6 billion and $32.7 billion each year because child care is available Child care in Georgia offers long-term benefits by – helping children develop knowledge and skills that will enable them to be ready for school, be better students, more likely to complete high school, less likely to be in costly special education programs, less likely to commit crimes, and more likely to be productive members of our future workforce. 54 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    55. 55. Intimate Partner RelationshipsSpecialist: Ted Futris In Georgia: – Marriage rate continues to decline (10.3 per 1000 total population in 1990 vs. 6.6 in 2009) – Nearly half of all marriages in a year are remarriages. – In 2009, 32% of high school students were in a physical fight one or more times during the past 12 months; 16% were hit, slapped, or physically hurt on purpose by their boyfriend or girlfriend. – The 2010 teen birth rate was 41.2 per 1,000 15-19 year old adolescent girls (13th highest). 55 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    56. 56. Specialist: Don Bower Said he’ll be covering his 56 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    57. 57. Specialist: Sharon Gibson Is part of the panel Still, my take…preparing youth to envision what could be if we embrace the future rather than pine for the past. Teens as planners! 57 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    58. 58. FACS Base Programs3.1.3. FOOD SAFETY 58 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    59. 59. Safety of Locally Grown ProduceSpecialist: Judy Harrison Georgia ranks 9th in the number of cases of foodborne disease illnesses – An estimated $1.2 billion cost in GA Local food producers report poor adherence to hygiene protocols, and 90% of consumers don’t ask about growing/production practices Readings Judy’s statement scared me!  By the way, my kids love all that is BAC! 59 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    60. 60. Preserve and Store Foods SafetySpecialists: Elizabeth Andress & Judy Harrison 2010 Pew Charitable Trust estimates that a single case of botulism costs $726K in related medical services, deaths, lost work, disability. The majority of botulism cases in the U.S. are from home production 1/3 of home canners ‘adapt and improvise’ in ways that may be dangerous 60 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    61. 61. Commercial Food SafetySpecialists: Elizabeth Andress & Judy Harrison ServSafe since 1995! Georgia has – over 16,000 inspected foodservice establishments – an industry that employs over 374,000 people (10% of the employment in Georgia), generating $15.2 billion in sales (National Restaurant Assn. projections for 2012) The benefit? Beyond physical wellness… – Vibrio vulnificus $3,045,726 – Botulism $726,362 – E. coli O157:H7 $14,838 – Salmonella $9,146 – Campylobacter $8,901 – Listeriosis $1,695,143 61 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    62. 62. FACS Base Programs3.1.4. FOOD NUTRITION AND HEALTH 62 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    63. 63. Decreased MorbiditySpecialist: Connie Crawley 2011 Georgia adults: – 28% obese; 62.7% overweight or obese; 24th in US 2011 Georgia children: – 38% of high schoolers obese or overweight If average BMI reduced by just 5% by 2030 – 7.7% savings in health care cost savings 63 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    64. 64. FACS Base Programs3.1.5. HEALTHY, SAFE, AFFORDABLEHOUSING ENVIRONMENTS 64 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    65. 65. Safe and Affordable HousingSpecialist: Pamela Turner GA housing market is showing signs of recovery; however, the demand for housing is not yet strong enough to consume the existing inventory. In the current market, individuals and families are faced with rising costs for electricity, water, gasoline, food and other necessities while income has remained stagnant or decreased. Tighter mortgage lending and weak consumer confidence has kept potential home buyers from taking advantage of historically low interest rates. 65 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    66. 66. Housing and Demographic Research Center (Dr. Tinsley)3.1.5. GICH: COMMUNITY HOUSINGINITIATIVE 66 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    67. 67. Local Housing AssistanceKaren Tinsley Georgia Initiative for Community Housing (GICH) provides support and technical assistance to local housing efforts – Improve neighborhoods; revitalize community Partnership among HDRC, OVPPSO, Georgia Dept. of Community Affairs, and the Georgia Municipal Association. Also, Georgia EMC, Carl Vinson Institute, and Archway are implementation partners. – http://www.fcs.uga.edu/hace/hdrc/docs/GICHannRepor t2012lowRes%20for%20web.pdf 67 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    68. 68. If none, I have a slide graveyard we can walk through4. CONVERSATION LEADING INTOTHE PANEL DISCUSSION. 68 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    69. 69. The micro- and macro- environment Natural/Structured MACROENVIRONMENT Societal Systems MACROENVIRONMENT MICROENVIRONMENT Physical Economic Family Political Human System made Physical Social Sociocultural Technological BiologicalDeacon & Firebaugh (1988).Family Resource Management: Principles and Applications. Prepared by Sharon Y. Nickols, Ph.D.
    70. 70. Slides not used for the presentation but that might be useful for thepanel question session afterwardGRAVEYARD 70 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    71. 71. Long-Term UnemploymentSource: Department of Labor via Wall Street Journal,http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702303812904577299982932070176.html 71 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    72. 72. 72
    73. 73. Weekly Food ExpendituresSource: USDA Economic Research Service, http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/err-economic-research-report/err141.aspx 73 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    74. 74. Current P60 Report 74 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    75. 75. On technology…“Technology changes society by changing ourenvironment to which we, in turn, adapt. Thischange is usually in the material environment, andthe adjustment we make to the changes oftenmodifies customs and social institutions.Everywhere there is evidence of the stimulus ofwar in developing an unprecedented number ofinventions which are being added to and changingour material environment. We shall be interestedin seeing how these wartime developments inapplied science will change society in peacetime.”Ogburn, William F. (1947). How technology changes society. Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 249, 81-88. 75 Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
    76. 76. 76Source: Federal Reserve 2012 SCF Bulletin, http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/bulletin/2012/pdf/scf12.pdf
    77. 77. 77Source: Federal Reserve 2012 SCF Bulletin, http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/bulletin/2012/pdf/scf12.pdf
    78. 78. 78Source: Federal Reserve 2012 SCF Bulletin, http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/bulletin/2012/pdf/scf12.pdf
    79. 79. 79Source: Federal Reserve 2012 SCF Bulletin, http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/bulletin/2012/pdf/scf12.pdf
    80. 80. 80Source: Federal Reserve 2012 SCF Bulletin, http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/bulletin/2012/pdf/scf12.pdf
    81. 81. 81Source: Federal Reserve 2012 SCF Bulletin, http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/bulletin/2012/pdf/scf12.pdf
    82. 82. 82Source: Federal Reserve 2012 SCF Bulletin, http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/bulletin/2012/pdf/scf12.pdf
    83. 83. 83Source: Federal Reserve 2012 SCF Bulletin, http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/bulletin/2012/pdf/scf12.pdf
    84. 84. 84Source: Federal Reserve 2012 SCF Bulletin, http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/bulletin/2012/pdf/scf12.pdf
    85. 85. 85Source: Federal Reserve 2012 SCF Bulletin, http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/bulletin/2012/pdf/scf12.pdf
    86. 86. 86Prepared by Robert B. Nielsen, Ph.D.
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