Can we go beyond timber and manage for
both timber and non-timber forest products?
Case of rattans near Kisangani (D. R. C...
Problematic
 Principal concern of forestry for

decades:
 sustained production of timber
products.

Logging for timber

...
Multiple forest use
In recent decades, research
and NGO attention has
focused on the potential for
Non Timber Forest Produ...
Importance of the NTFP sector
in DR Congo

NTFP sector especially
developed in rural areas
NTFPs largely used
 Subsistenc...
Importance of the Rattan sector
in DR Congo (1/2)
 Rattan diversity:
11 over 22 african species

 Rattan resource = One...
Importance of the Rattan sector
in DR Congo (2/2)
 Rattan exploitation =
economic potential and
alternative option for wo...
Rattan in and around Kisangani
(1/2)

 Source of additional income in rural areas:
 E. haullevilleana commercialisation:...
Rattan in and around Kisangani
(2/2)

 Sustainable harvest of Rattan = Alternative or
complement to timber exploitation
...
Studied species (1/2)
1- L. secundiflorum

Split canes:
 Basket & Hat’s frames

A robust species of rattan:
• Wide leafle...
Studied species (2/2)
2- E. haullevilleana

 A slender to moderate
rattan

 Source of cordage and weaving
material in ru...
Research site
 Location:
• Yoko
Forest
Reserve:
evergreen tropical rain forest;
• South of Kisangani city: left
bank of t...
Data collection
 Monitoring for demography
of 267 clumps :
 159 L. secundiflorum
 108 E. haulllevilleana

 With differ...
Global results

Combined effects
TxL

(Extracted from Kahindo’s Thesis)

Species

Laccosperma
secundiflorum
Eremospatha
ha...
Treat./Light Effects on Recruitment
1- L. secundiflorum

 Under full light:
Max recruitment with total
harvest

 Under p...
Treat./Light Effects on Recruitment
2- E. haullevilleana

Harvest

 Max recruitment with partial
harvest

 Max recruitme...
Conclusions
&
Suggestions
Conclusions
2 main conclusions:
1- Full light conditions favour the recruitment and
growth initiation of E. haullevilleana...
Suggestions
1- Rattan harvesting could be a complementary activity
to logging for timber
2- Apply silvicultural treatments...
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Can we go beyond timber and manage for both timber and non-timber forest products? Case of rattans near Kisangani (RD Congo)

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Can we go beyond timber and manage for both timber and non-timber forest products? Case of rattans near Kisangani (RD Congo)

  1. 1. Can we go beyond timber and manage for both timber and non-timber forest products? Case of rattans near Kisangani (D. R. Congo) Kahindo J-M. (PhD, UNIKIS) Mate J-P. (PhD, UNIKIS) Nasi R. (PhD, CIFOR) International Meeting ATBC and SCB, 12 – 16 June 2011, Arusha
  2. 2. Problematic  Principal concern of forestry for decades:  sustained production of timber products. Logging for timber  Many, if not most, national forest development plans and valuation studies have therefore neglected to incorporate NTFPs into management strategies
  3. 3. Multiple forest use In recent decades, research and NGO attention has focused on the potential for Non Timber Forest Products (NTFPs) to play an important complementary role to timber and agriculture in rural livelihoods.
  4. 4. Importance of the NTFP sector in DR Congo NTFP sector especially developed in rural areas NTFPs largely used  Subsistence purpose;  Commercialization Not enough is known:  only scarce data on Congolese NTFPs and rattans is available
  5. 5. Importance of the Rattan sector in DR Congo (1/2)  Rattan diversity: 11 over 22 african species  Rattan resource = One of the most important NTFPs largely used in D. R. Congo
  6. 6. Importance of the Rattan sector in DR Congo (2/2)  Rattan exploitation = economic potential and alternative option for wood consumption (furniture)
  7. 7. Rattan in and around Kisangani (1/2)  Source of additional income in rural areas:  E. haullevilleana commercialisation:  monthly 25 – 50 $ / household  provide income to solve Food complement Health fees Other needs (school, equipment) Rate (%) 37 17 33
  8. 8. Rattan in and around Kisangani (2/2)  Sustainable harvest of Rattan = Alternative or complement to timber exploitation  L. secundiflorum’s forest potential:  700 linear meters of cane/ha (not exploited);  Good regeneration (1 bud/clump/month)  E. haullevilleana commercialization:  81 591 meters sold monthly (in urban markets)  Rattan consumption:  Rattan furnitures present in 98% urban households
  9. 9. Studied species (1/2) 1- L. secundiflorum Split canes:  Basket & Hat’s frames A robust species of rattan: • Wide leaflets • Acanthophylls up to 4 cm long
  10. 10. Studied species (2/2) 2- E. haullevilleana  A slender to moderate rattan  Source of cordage and weaving material in rural and urban areas  Provides raws and items for local and national trade in D. R. Congo • Leave bifid (younger stages) • Slender acanthophylls, up to 3.5 cm long
  11. 11. Research site  Location: • Yoko Forest Reserve: evergreen tropical rain forest; • South of Kisangani city: left bank of the Congo river (Km 21 - 38)  Area: 6975 ha;  Climate: Af Koppën type, refering to Kisangani: 1800 mm per year; 28 C
  12. 12. Data collection  Monitoring for demography of 267 clumps :  159 L. secundiflorum  108 E. haulllevilleana  With different harvest treatment (0; 3/4; 4/4)  From different light regimes (closed canopy; partial; total)
  13. 13. Global results Combined effects TxL (Extracted from Kahindo’s Thesis) Species Laccosperma secundiflorum Eremospatha haullevilleana Separate effects T L Recruit. Init. Mort. T 0.075 0.211 0.198 TxL 0.018* 0.159 0.375 T 0.031* 0.008 * 0.067 L < 0.001** 0.052 0.173 Kahindo (2011)  (*) Significant effect at the 0.05 level
  14. 14. Treat./Light Effects on Recruitment 1- L. secundiflorum  Under full light: Max recruitment with total harvest  Under partial light: Max recruitment with partial harvest Interaction Treatment x Light  Under full light: Harvest all adult canes  Under partial light: Favour partial harvest of adult canes
  15. 15. Treat./Light Effects on Recruitment 2- E. haullevilleana Harvest  Max recruitment with partial harvest  Max recruitment under full Light availability light  Apply partial harvest on clumps &  Favour full light conditions Separated effects
  16. 16. Conclusions & Suggestions
  17. 17. Conclusions 2 main conclusions: 1- Full light conditions favour the recruitment and growth initiation of E. haullevilleana ; this parameter also affects the recruitment of L. secundiflorum, but through an interaction with harvest treatment; 2- Neither light availability nor harvest treatment has a significant effect on stem’s mortality within the clump of studied rattan species;
  18. 18. Suggestions 1- Rattan harvesting could be a complementary activity to logging for timber 2- Apply silvicultural treatments susceptible to provide better light conditions and so favour regeneration within the rattan clumps; 3- Practice sustainable harvest by applying appropriate cutting techniques according to the rattan species and light conditions; 4- Promote rattan enrichment planting in disturbed areas in order to increase stock and provide addditional incomes in forest areas around Kisangani and in D. R. Congo.
  19. 19. EU UNIKIS
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