Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Earth science day one
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Earth science day one

143

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
143
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Lab one • Part 1-the scientific method • Part 2-based on Hardness • (excell file)(Moh’s Scale • Part 3-based on cleavage • GOOD NEWS( most of the lab is done for You!! • Again-this is very boring but the exciting part is the concept of learning to classify items!!!
  • 2. Do not focus on the mineral itself • Focus on the method
  • 3. The whole lab • Part 1-the scientific method • #1 on p.2 • #2 on p. 4-what is the difference between a rock and a mineral • #4 on p. 8 –excell sheet • #5 p. 12 • #6 –extra credit
  • 4. Also . . • Due sept. 16th –all properties will be used to identify rocks • “how minerals effect every day life” • You must bring me the prelab assignment on page 20-21 (INSULIN CRYSTAL GROWTH)
  • 5. Lets start with p.2 • Part 1-the scientific method • “how did early geologists classify Earth minerals?” • To simplify –in groups of 3-4-use one box • I will assign 6 geological samples to you • Please make a flow chart based on “what stood out for you?”
  • 6. Your group must pick one property , then . . another property and so forth!
  • 7. The groups-please choose a name( • Eratosthenes • James Hutton • Mary Anning • Friedrich Mohs • Alfred Wegener • Inge Lehmann • http://coolsciencelab.com/geologists.htm
  • 8. Worksheet on page 2 Group Defining critieria for each group Specimens in Group EEratosthene s Jonath an, Trevis, Ana 5,10,4,10,9,3 . .
  • 9. Eratosthenes-grade A+ • Jonathan, • Trevis,Ana • 5,10,4,10,9 and 3 • Color=how many are brown? • 5 is brown, 4 is black, 10 is burgundy, 10a clear, 9 white, 3 is black
  • 10. Eratosthenes-high proficient talk- ready to press forward A+ work • Texture • 5. softer than a glass , harder than a penny pumice rock • 10. harder than glass and penny scoria rock • 4. harder than glass and penny obsideant rock • 10. softer than glass and penny • 9. softer than glass and penny and fingernail • 3. softer than glass and penny
  • 11. Eratosthenes • Went on to identify minerals to expert level of performance. Nice work “Eratosthenes”
  • 12. James Hutton-did not present • Stephanie • Amandy • Angie • Rocks: 8,13,20,28,11 and 33 • Color: 8 is grey, 13 is grey=20 is blk, 28 is grey • 11 is grey and blk, 33 is brown
  • 13. Mary Anning-did not present fossils • Renee’,Mario, Arturo • 16,23,9,28,32,and 8 • Color: • 16 is brown, 23 is beige, 9 is blk and white, 28 is green, 32 glass blk, and 8 is brownish grey • Texture:
  • 14. James Hutton • 3 grey minerals=luster
  • 15. Friedrich Mohs-no comments- A+ • Marcy, Catherine, Chante’ • 2, 15, 21, 5 and 20, 17 • Color : 2 is cloudy clear, 15 is clear, 21 is platinum, 5 is light grey with pink, 20 is transparent blue green, 17 is shimerry yellow gold • Size: 2 large and heavy, 5 large nd heavy, 21 small, 17 large and light weight, 20 medium size, 15 large • Hardeness: 2 hard as glass, 5 rough, 21 smooth as a penny, 15 hard as glass, 17 hard and rough, 20 harder than a penny softer than glass
  • 16. Friedrich Mohs • Next is shape: • This group had excellent presentation skills. • Demonstrated use of the scientific method. • All participants contributed, and no one was isolated or unenvolved. Exceptional presentation guys.
  • 17. Doppler Group-A+work • Andrew, Danny • 1, 6, 9, 16, 18, 20 • Color: 1 is peach, 6 is black, 9 is white, 16 is clear, 18 is black, 20 is green • Texture-will finish this
  • 18. Doppler Group-A+work • This group went ahead to indentify hardness. They class would say they had sufficient knowledge of the scientific method which was the desired goal.
  • 19. Alfred Wegener-did not present • Andrea, Jermaine, Eunice, Troy • 12, 20 , aa, ab, ac, ad • Color: 12 is black, 20 is black-all minerals • Shape: 12 and 20 rectangular(rhonbodal) • Aa and ab flat and rectangular • Ac and ad-chopped and screwed
  • 20. Inge Lehmann-inner core-did not present • Priscilla, Diane, Mary • 21, 20, 18 ,10 , 24 and 1 • Tetuxe: 21 is soft, 20 is rough, 18 is rough, 10 is really soft, 24 is not so rough, 1 is smooth
  • 21. What is a justifiable property? • Size • Shape • “is the rock clear, transparent, very dark?” • Texture-”feel smooth” • Etc.-this is calite • A rhombohedral • (60 degrees and • 120 degree angles)
  • 22. Ladies( Like for diamonds
  • 23. A sample flow chart
  • 24. For the credit for Part 1 • One person will have to present the flow chart to the class?
  • 25. Part 2-based on Hardness • What is hardness? Tourmaline • hardness : 7.0 - 7.5
  • 26. http://academic.brooklyn.cuny.edu/geology/leveson/core/linksa/hardness_def.html • "Hardness is a measure of how difficult or easy it is for a substance to be penetrated or scratched! For example, steel (like a steel nail) can scratch your fingernail, so steel is harder than fingernail!!"
  • 27. Sample scale • Finger nail • Penny • Glass • First relative scale
  • 28. Use the terminal in front of you . . • http://library.thinkquest.org/J002289/mohs.ht ml
  • 29. Moh's Scale measures • The Moh's Scale measures the relative hardness of various substances. It uses ten reference minerals. The hardness of a substance is determined by scratching it against a reference mineral. If it scratches that mineral, then it is of equal hardness or harder than that mineral, otherwise it is softer then that mineral. The picture below shows the minerals that are used on the Moh's Scale.
  • 30. Quartz can scratch gypsum.
  • 31. Can use this one as a comparison Moh's Hardness Scale Hardness Mineral Description 1 Talc Fingernail scratches it easily. 2 Gypsum Fingernail scratches it. 3 Calcite Copper penny scratches it. 4 Fluorite Steel knife scratches it easily. 5 Apatite Steel knife scratches it. 6 Feldspar Steel knife does not scratch it easily, but scratches glass. 7 Quartz Hardest common mineral. It scratches steel and glass easily. 8 Topaz Harder than any common mineral. 9 Corundum It scratches Topaz. 10 Diamond It is the hardest of all minerals. Back Next
  • 32. Second scale • Which rock scratches the surface of which rock? • Feldspar will scratch Gypsum
  • 33. Nice web site • http://itc.gsw.edu/faculty/tweiland/sedrx2.ht m
  • 34. Dr Skaggs suggest’s . . . 13 softer than 21 based on 21 scratches 13 13 does not scratches 21 finger nail at Calcite
  • 35. Use this principle any thing I can scrathe wih my finger nail 3 below fingernail so now build up to finger nail any thing I can scrathe wih my penny 3 below Penny (copper) so now build up to copper any thing I can scrathe wih my glass 3 below glass so now build up to glass
  • 36. • Do you know the difference between a rock and a mineral? Minerals are the building blocks of rocks. Here are some of the basic characteristics of minerals to help you understand what they are:
  • 37. They are . . . • Naturally occurring • Homogeneous • Inorganic • Solid • Ordered internal arrangemnt of atoms • (crystals or glasses) • Distinctive chemical composition
  • 38. caesium chloride unit cell this structure is more likely to be formed from two elements whose ions are of roughly the same size (for example, ionic radius of Cs+ = 167 pm, and Cl− = 181 pm).
  • 39. . • Minerals are inorganic; they are not alive and they are not plants or animals. An example of a rock that is not a mineral is coal. Coal is a substance formed from decayed plants and animals. Therefore, coal is not considered a mineral.
  • 40. • Minerals are found in the earth or are naturally occurring substances. They are found in dirt, rocks, and water. They are not made by man • A zincblende unit cell
  • 41. • Minerals are chemical substances. Some minerals like gold or silver are made of only one element. Other minerals, like quartz and calcite, are combinations of two or more elements.
  • 42. • Minerals always have the same chemical makeup. For example, quartz will always consist of one part silicon (an element) two parts oxygen (another element).
  • 43. • Minerals always have the same chemical makeup. For example, quartz will always consist of one part silicon (an element) two parts oxygen (another element).
  • 44. • About 2,000 minerals have been found. Oxygen is part of many minerals. Minerals containing oxygen make up almost half of the earth's crust. Quartz is a common mineral. Other common minerals are feldspar, mica, and horneblend. Many rocks are made of these common minerals
  • 45. • Some minerals are rare and expensive. They are called gems . Diamonds, rubies, and emeralds are good examples of such minerals. Gold and silver are also minerals. Together, these natural substances are used to make beautiful jewelry
  • 46. A rock • Is a naturally occurring, inorganic solid consisting of an aggregate of mineral grains , pieces of older rocks, or a mass of natural glass
  • 47. Please complete page 8 Minerals Rocks Other . .
  • 48. Lastly page 12-exercise 5 • Please identify all 24 sample according to cleavage
  • 49. Click here to go back to the main page Cleavage is the tendency of a mineral to break along smooth planes parallel to zones of weak bonding.
  • 50. • Fracture is the tendency of a mineral to break along curved surfaces without a definite shape. These minerals do not have planes of weakness and break irregularly. See the picture below:
  • 51. “without a definite shape”
  • 52. Mineral Type of Breakage Halite CLEAVAGE Cleavage in three directions at right angles (90o). Cubic cleavage.
  • 53. Calcite CLEAVAGE Cleavage in three directions not at right angles (120o and 60o). Rhombohedral cleavage.
  • 54. Calcite = CaCO3 • Rhombic or elongated crystals • Reacts with HCl- • Specific gravity = 2.71 • Cleavage=3 directions not at 90o
  • 55. Gypsum gypsum CLEAVAGE Cleavage in one direction.
  • 56. Calcium sulfate-dihydrate • Gypsum=CaSO4.2H20 • Occurs in crystals or gray or white, earthly masses –alabaster Colorles, white and gray • Hardness = 2 • Perfect cleavage in one direction-may show two other directions not at 90 degrees
  • 57. Muscovite CLEAVAGE Cleavage in one direction.
  • 58. KAl2 (AlS3010) • Can be pealed into transparent, elastic sheets • Specific gravity = 2.66 • Streak = yellow • Perfect cleavage in one direction • Hardness= 2-2.55
  • 59. Feldspar CLEAVAGE Cleavage in two directions at right angles.
  • 60. Quartz FRACTURE Mineral does not exhibit cleavage, it breaks or fracture in an irregular manner.
  • 61. quartz • Conchoidal fracture • Hardness = 7 • Elongated six sided crystals • Specific gravity = 2.65

×