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Gr 5 lesson 1 visual art

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  • 1. Lesson Title: Write and Create a Storyboard to Illustrate Your Own Tall Tale: “Let’s All Tell a Tall Tale”5th Grade ELA: Theme 1, VAPA Visual Art, Assessment 1Essential Question: Who invented the Tall Tale and how does a writer organize a story into sequential or chronological order to write a Tall Tale? Using contour line drawings, how does an Illustrator or Graphic Artist use the Principle of Art, Unity and Harmony when composing a Storyboard in sequential or chronological order? Integrated Learning Objective:By the end of this lesson students will be able to write their own original tall tale and create a storyboard using contour line drawing and perspective to demonstrate sequential or chronological order and the art principle of “unity and harmony.” Reading/Language Arts Visual ArtStandard(s)Reading Comprehension 2.0Theme 1 Nature’s Fury, Focus on Tall TalesReading Comprehension2.2 Analyze text that is organized insequential or chronological order.2.3 Discern main ideas and concepts in text, identifying and assessing evidence that supports those ideas.Writing Strategies 1.01.6 Edit and revise manuscripts to improve the meaning and focus of writing by adding, deleting, consolidating, clarifying and rearranging words and sentences.Written & Oral Language Conventions1.4 Use correct capitalization.Artistic PerceptionIdentify and describe the principles of design in visual compositions, emphasizing unity and harmony.Creative Expression2.2 Create gesture and contour observational drawings.2.6 Use perspective in an original work of art to create a real or imaginary scene.(Extension) Connections, Relationships, ApplicationsResearch and report on what various types of artist (e.g. architects, designers, graphic artists, animators) produce and how their works play a role in our everyday environment.Resources5th Grade Theme 1, Focus on Tall TalesHoughton Mifflin, Reading, CA pgs. F108-F129“Paul Bunyon, the Mightiest Logger of them All”“John Henry Races the Steam Drill”“Sally Ann Thunder Ann Whirlwind”“February”Genre Lesson: Elements of Tall Tales (F111)Writing Lesson: Tall TalesPage 128 ReaderStoryboardWebsites that provide examples of storyboards:What is a Storyboard and how is it used?Mini Lesson: Art careers as an Illustrator, Graphic Artist, Designer, Animator and Architect.Mini Lesson: Contour Line Drawing Mini Lesson: Drawing Using One Point and Aerial Perspective Student Performance and ArtworkHow will students demonstrate their new knowledge and skill?Students will divide into small groups and read or tell their Tall Tale to the group as a storyteller would do this- dramatically and with humor. As they read they will point to the sequence of events on the Storyboard they designed to illustrate their own tale. They will act in the role of an Illustrator or Graphic Artist who has completed these drawings to demonstrate the 5 most important visual scenes that will be needed in order to produce a movie of their own Tall Tale. After they have told their tale they will use the Language of Art to explain how they used the Design Principle: Unity to produce harmonious contour drawings demonstrating their understanding of linear and/or aerial perspective. AssessmentHow will teachers and students know that they have met the full rigor of the standard?I will know that the students have met the objectives when they have been able to successfully write using sequential and chronological order and correct capitalization, and read their own original Tall Tale presenting it dramatically and with humor to a small group of students.I will know that the students have met the objectives when they have been able to create a Storyboard with 5 separate drawings that illustrate their own original Tall Tale in sequential and chronological order using contour line drawings and correct use of linear and/or aerial perspective. They will then be able to explain the use of the Principle of Design, “Unity” using the language of art (the Elements of Art).MaterialsHoughton Mifflin 5th Grade ReaderPaper, pencilsDrawing paper, pencils, colored pencils, scissors, glue stick, black construction paperHandout of the Elements of Art and the Principles of DesignUnity Poster “Crystal Publications” Physical Space Requirements andGrouping(s)As determined by teacherPresentations can be in small groups. Teacher may decide to use a larger space such as the library media center to enable groups to be far enough away from one another as to not be a distraction to one another. If time allows the presentations could be made to the entire class or could be shared, one on one, with a lower grade student.<br />What is a Storyboard and why are they created by professional Illustrators, Graphic Artists and Designers?<br /> Storyboards are graphic organizers made up of a series of illustrations or images displayed in sequence and chronological order for the purpose of planning and visualizing a live action or animated motion picture, commercial or other visual media. Storyboards can be used in theater to help playwrights and directors understand the layout of a scene. Storyboards are used to show where the camera angle is in the scene; for example close-up, far away or from a low point, looking up at the scene. Writers may use a storyboard to plot the story in a sequence of events and arrange the scenes accordingly.<br />Drawing to record information<br /> Drawing is a quick, flexible and direct method for putting together information. They may show us how to put things together (instructions). <br /> Drawing skills support career paths throughout the world of business and media. Product designers use the sketching process to visualize ideas and concepts for new products. Fashion designers use drawing to develop and communicate ideas for clothing and accessories. Graphic designers create illustrations and advertisements for business clients. Illustrators, architects, and cartoonists all use drawing as a vehicle for visual and creative thinking and to communicate ideas.<br />“Discovering Drawing”, Rose, Mahan-Cox, 2007 Davis Publications, Inc. pg. 5<br />Perspective<br /> The Element of Art- Space <br /> Space in a drawing refers to the work’s two-dimensional surface area or picture plane. Because the picture plane is two dimensional, perspective systems allow artists to mimic ways in which we see. Perspective allows for an understanding of special relationships. Artists, architects, and illustrators manipulate space to create the illusion of three dimensions by using, size, overlapping, and high or low placement. <br /> Another way to create an illusion of space is linear perspective. One point Perspective is used when parallel lines recede toward a common vanishing point on the horizonline (eyelevel). <br />Use One Point Perspective<br /> I find that it works best if you demonstrate this at the front of the class using the same size sheet of paper as the students are using. On a sheet of unlined paper ask the students to use their ruler to measure half way down the paper, horizontally. Label this the horizonline. Measure the middle of the line and make a dot. This is the vanishing point. Ask students to draw a box below the horizon line. Connect all of the corners to the vanishing point using light lines. These are called receding lines. To define the top and sides of the box draw lines that are parallel to the original box. Try this again above the horizon line and then on the horizon line. When the box is on the horizon line, it is at eye level. <br />Handout provided.<br />Contour line drawing<br /> Contour is sometimes defined as drawing a line where two planes meet. There are few true lines in figures. The edges where values meet or planes meet can be drawn as lines.<br />Mini Lesson<br />Work with a partner, and take turns being the artist and the model. Try several poses that can be held comfortably for a long period until you find one that works well. Remember the rule about models; the artist should be 3 to 5 times the height of the model away. Use a light pencil to put in a few placing marks to use as guides. Do not draw the figure; just indicate important markers such as top of the head, waist knees and bottom on feet. Use a felt tip marker to draw the contours of the figure. Focus on the entire figure and do not stop at points where there are many details to draw such as the face. Take no more than 10 minutes for this drawing. Then trade places with the model. Do this several times on the same piece of paper. Note: students should not worry about getting it exactly right the first time. I have students use the markers so that they will not be so concerned with erasing over and over to get it just right. If students are really concentrating they will be using the non-verbal side of the brain so they will not be talking. I always remind my students that you cannot talk and draw at the same time.<br />The Storyboard Project<br /> After they have written their own Tall Tale they will divide it into 5 major scenes- small drawings that will illustrate what is happening in the story at that time. They will want to write a sentence that will tell what is happening at this time in the story, keeping in mind that they are giving instructions to a camera crew as to:<br />What characters are in the frame, and how are they moving?<br />What are the characters saying to each other, if anything?<br />How much time has passed between the last frame of the storyboard and the current one?<br />Setting. Where are the characters located (indoors or outdoors)?<br />Where is the camera. (high, low, close-up or far away)?<br />Give each student a sheet of newsprint to create thumbnail sketches (small drawings about 11/2” x 3”) so they can brainstorm ideas and work out their ideas on sketch paper before going to the final storyboard paper. After they have worked out their 5 main scenes in sequence and chronological order they are ready to draw the final storyboard of their own Tall Tale. <br />Each student will be given 2 sheets of drawing paper (9”x12”). Measure the papers in half both ways (hamburger and hot-dog) using a ruler and light pencil lines. Cut the paper on the lines using scissors. Students will use 6 of the quarter sheets on their storyboard. (They will have 2 extras in case of errors) one will be used to create the title and author- The title they have chosen for their Tall Tale and their own name as the author.<br />Students make sketch lightly with pencil their contour line drawings of the main characters, keeping in mind the use of perspective. The small papers will be in a horizontal format- like a movie or T.V. screen.<br />After they have drawn the 5 scenes lightly in pencil they will use color. Remind the students that warm colors (red, orange and yellow) make things stand out and come forward in a work of art while cool colors (blue, green and violet) make things recede or go back in a work of art. <br />Colored pencils or fine tipped markers can be used.<br />When all drawings are completed the students will take the six small sheets and space them evenly on a sheet of black construction paper (12”x18”) 3 in the top row and 3 underneath. Use the glue stick to glue them down. Remember to have the title and their name as the first scene.<br />They are now ready for their presentation.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br />Reading/Language ArtsTheatre Arts or Visual ArtsDay OneINTRODUCEDescription of Practice (ELA)Description of Practice (VAPA)Create Context Teach the meaning of the objectivePrior Knowledge VocabularyCFU<br />TEACHTeacher Modeling Engage StudentsWarm ups that connect prior knowledge and skills and front load new knowledge and skills.CFU<br />PRACTICEGuided PracticeAesthetic exploration of new arts skills and knowledge with ELA skills and knowledge.CFUIndependent PracticeCreate artwork or performance that demonstrates understanding of ELA and Theatre or Visual Art knowledge and skills.<br />APPLYAssess Student PerformanceDid students meet their integrated performance objective?How do the teacher and students know?Close Restate objectives. Make connections. Student ReflectionHOMEWORKIndependentPractice<br />Reading/Language ArtsTheatre Arts or Visual ArtsDay TwoINTRODUCEDescription of Practice (ELA)Description of Practice (VAPA)Create Context Teach the meaning of the objectivePrior Knowledge VocabularyCFU<br />TEACHTeacher Modeling Engage StudentsWarm ups that connect prior knowledge and skills and front load new knowledge and skills.CFU<br />PRACTICEGuided PracticeAesthetic exploration of new arts skills and knowledge with ELA skills and knowledge.CFUIndependent PracticeCreate artwork or performance that demonstrates understanding of ELA and Theatre or Visual Art knowledge and skills.<br />APPLYAssess Student PerformanceDid students meet their integrated performance objective?How do the teacher and students know?Close Restate objectives. Make connections. Student ReflectionHOMEWORKIndependentPractice<br />Reading/Language ArtsTheatre Arts or Visual ArtsDay ThreeINTRODUCEDescription of Practice (ELA)Description of Practice (VAPA)Create Context Teach the meaning of the objectivePrior Knowledge VocabularyCFU<br />TEACHTeacher Modeling Engage StudentsWarm ups that connect prior knowledge and skills and front load new knowledge and skills.CFU<br />PRACTICEGuided PracticeAesthetic exploration of new arts skills and knowledge with ELA skills and knowledge.CFUIndependent PracticeCreate artwork or performance that demonstrates understanding of ELA and Theatre or Visual Art knowledge and skills.<br />APPLYAssess Student PerformanceDid students meet their integrated performance objective?How do the teacher and students know?Close Restate objectives. Make connections. Student ReflectionHOMEWORKIndependentPractice<br />Reading/Language ArtsTheatre Arts or Visual ArtsDay FourINTRODUCEDescription of Practice (ELA)Description of Practice (VAPA)Create Context Teach the meaning of the objectivePrior Knowledge VocabularyCFU<br />TEACHTeacher Modeling Engage StudentsWarm ups that connect prior knowledge and skills and front load new knowledge and skills.CFU<br />PRACTICEGuided PracticeAesthetic exploration of new arts skills and knowledge with ELA skills and knowledge.CFUIndependent PracticeCreate artwork or performance that demonstrates understanding of ELA and Theatre or Visual Art knowledge and skills.<br />APPLYAssess Student PerformanceDid students meet their integrated performance objective?How do the teacher and students know?Close Restate objectives. Make connections. Student ReflectionHOMEWORKIndependentPractice<br />DIFFERENTIATING INSTRUCTIONESL LDGATE Connections to other subjects <br />