Rob livingstone - Australian Payroll Association's Annual Conference May 2011

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Rob Livingstone - Australian Payroll Association's Annual Conference - Is global warming likely to shrink the (skills) iceberg on which you have based your career?

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Rob livingstone - Australian Payroll Association's Annual Conference May 2011

  1. 1. Is global warming likely to shrink the (skills) iceberg on which you have<br />based your career?<br />Rob Livingstone<br />Principal<br />Payroll News Conference <br />27th May 2011, Melbourne, Australia<br />Copyright Rob Livingstone Advisory Pty Ltd. All rights reserved. <br />
  2. 2. Agenda<br />Discuss some similarities between payroll and IT <br />Recognising change in the business environment, before it impacts your career<br />Generating influence<br />Transactional skills vs. Transformational skills: What’s your mix?<br />What’s got you this far may not work for you in the future.<br />Seek objective, trusted opinions to help steer you towards an outcome that YOU want..<br />Who is responsible for your career? <br />Can mentoring drive sustainable transformational change?<br />The multiplier effect of effective mentoring: Change one, benefit many<br />Wrap-up and Q&A<br />
  3. 3. 1. Some similarities between Payroll / HR and IT <br />
  4. 4. 2. Recognising changes in the business environment, before it impacts your career<br /><ul><li>Gain knowledge outside of your core area of expertise
  5. 5. Read widely in your industry, watch for technology and business trends
  6. 6. Sort the dross from respected sources for opinions, thoughts
  7. 7. Subscribe to relevant eNewsletters, feeds
  8. 8. Become informed about world events, read trusted business commentaries
  9. 9. Develop a strong peer network OUTSIDE of your employer, or current network
  10. 10. Self confidence and personal resilience will grow with knowledge, exposure ,etc
  11. 11. Get out of your foxhole, to use the military analogy</li></li></ul><li>3. Generating influence: Can you promote an idea to non HR/Payroll stakeholders?<br />ie: How can you influence others in your business where you do not have authority?<br /><ul><li>Influence is key to being able to deliver positive change in your organisation, and in doing so, build your career as well
  12. 12. Promote ideas, concepts and desired outcomes without compromising your own integrity.
  13. 13. Focus on the contribution to the overall organisation
  14. 14. Do not waste emotional or intellectual energy on trivial points.
  15. 15. Don’t push the idea too hard.
  16. 16. Present a realistic cost / benefit for all ideas, or the costs will be presented to you.
  17. 17. Objection handling and managing implied criticism: Never speak or send emails when angry or out of control!
  18. 18. Display self confidence. Practice public speaking …</li></li></ul><li>4. Can you differentiate Transactional skills vs. Transformational skills: What’s your mix?<br /><ul><li>If you do your job really well at the transactional level, it may one day just be outsourced to the lowest cost provider, as you’re not ‘adding a lot of value’.
  19. 19. Efficiency = lowest cost , or highest output for lowest input is where you don’t want to be (for too long).
  20. 20. Each career professional should be continually re-investing in their supplemental skills, but NOT just reinforcing skills in their area of specialty.
  21. 21. Exceptions to this may be a fire-fighter, medical specialist or airline pilot where continual ‘deep-dive’ skill refresh on a regular basis is critical.
  22. 22. Successful outcomes often depend more on relationships between people than pure process or technology.</li></li></ul><li>5. What’s got you this far may not work for you in the future.<br /><ul><li>Repeated past behaviours that have historically worked, are often the reason you are where you are.
  23. 23. Just repeating these behaviours are no guarantee of future success
  24. 24. Working hard and achieving results will (or should) automatically result in recognition. Myth??
  25. 25. Achieve visibility - Be responsible for your own marketing? Some career professionals are uncomfortable about displaying their own strengths in a positive way. Not innate to some individuals
  26. 26. Adaptability and ‘having valued and well considered options’ are crucial to your continued success in your career of your choice, not someone else’s</li></li></ul><li>6. Seek objective, trusted opinions to help steer you towards an outcome that YOU want.<br /><ul><li>At some key points in your career, seek out a truly independent person who has preceded you in your chosen or targeted area of expertise, or at least have a solid understanding of your skills in the context of organisations.
  27. 27. If they don’t, then it’s all theory – just like someone sitting in the lodge describing how you can climb the mountain having never done it themselves.
  28. 28. Follow the experienced mountaineer as you climb the mountain, is what I’m trying to say. </li></li></ul><li>7. Who is responsible for your career?<br />The good news is you are!<br /><ul><li>Lifetime employment is a thing of the past
  29. 29. Your life and career is more important that that of the organisation
  30. 30. Consciously take some time to actively set your own goals, then
  31. 31. put some time and effort into managing your career.
  32. 32. Realise the power of ‘personal branding’ – after all you ‘run your own business’, that is …..</li></ul>‘your business is deciding who you wish to work for!’<br />
  33. 33. 8. Can mentoring drive sustainable transformational change?<br />Modern thriving and vibrant organisations require confident, competent, high performing career professionals and managers in their core service support functions……<br />Imagine for a moment your working environment where people still ‘did their job’, however also demonstrated effective skills in areas such as:<br /><ul><li>being able to see both their jobs and their own contribution from other’s perspectives;
  34. 34. more able to professionally handle objections from non Payroll/HR stakeholders
  35. 35. confidence and capacity to thrive in stressful situations;
  36. 36. improved ability to cope in ambiguous or uncertain environments;
  37. 37. being able to work more collaboratively with stakeholders outside their own area of expertise ;
  38. 38. being able to communicate more effectively in a range of unfamiliar situations; as well as
  39. 39. Being able to communicate complexity effectively, to non-Payroll/HR stakeholders</li></li></ul><li>9. The multiplier effect of effective mentoring: Change one, benefit many<br />Focussed and effective mentoring of important staff and managers that sit at the intersections of different teams, departments and functions can have a positive multiplier effect through the organisation.<br />Each time such people interact with others across the organisation (including customers and external stakeholders); there is the potential to either have a positive or negative impact.<br />Successful, thriving organisations have an abundance of effective interpersonal skills in key people <br />Where these professionals lack specific supplemental soft-skills, effective and appropriate mentoring, coaching and training can have a very positive impact.<br />
  40. 40. 10. Wrap-up, Q&A<br />
  41. 41. Thankyou<br />Contact: Rob Livingstone, Principal<br />Phone: +61 2 8005 1972 <br />Mobile: +61 419 632 673 <br />Fax: +61 2 9879 5004 <br />Email:rob@rob-livingstone.com<br />Website:www.rob-livingstone.com<br />Address: PO Box 842, Gladesville, NSW 1675<br />Twitter:rladvisory<br />Skype:rladvisory<br />

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