Developing a Rubric  for Assessment
What is a rubric? <ul><li>A scoring tool that lays out  specific expectations  for an assignment. </li></ul><ul><li>Divide...
Do you need a rubric? <ul><li>YES - a rubric is a  flexible tool  that can be used to measure student learning related spe...
What are the Parts of a Good Rubric? <ul><li>Good rubrics tend to have four basic parts: </li></ul><ul><li>The assignment ...
Step 1:  Clearly define the assignment <ul><li>Consider the  topic , the  process  that the students will work through + t...
Step 2:  Consider what learning outcomes (criteria) will be assessed <ul><ul><li>Often with a project, students are expect...
Step 3:  Establish clear + detailed descriptions for each performance level for each criteria <ul><ul><li>Determine what t...
Step 4:  Test drive your new rubric <ul><li>Sample a few examples of student work from previous semesters to see if the ru...
How do rubrics  enhance  student learning?  <ul><li>When students are made aware of the rubrics prior to instruction + ass...
Using rubrics for assessment <ul><li>Share your rubric with students  before  they complete an assignment. This will help ...
Scales  vs. Rubrics Below Expectation Meets Expectation Exceeds Expectation Citations X
Scales vs.  Rubrics Below Expectation Meets Expectation Exceeds Expectation Citations The paper fails to cite sources usin...
Assessment  Scale
Assessment   Rubric
S tudent  L earning  O utcomes +  Rubrics-   Course Descriptions CE 2411 Web I Explore the creative possibilities for inte...
S tudent  L earning  O utcomes +  Rubrics-  Student Learning Outcomes <ul><li>At the conclusion of this course, students w...
S tudent  L earning  O utcomes +  Rubrics - Student Learning Outcomes  2 <ul><li>At the conclusion of this course, student...
Student Learning Outcomes  +  Rubrics-  Web I Assessment Rubric
Using  Rubrics <ul><li>All  assignments should be scored using the rubric. </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss  scores with students...
Practice <ul><li>‘ Select’ a rubric that is currently being used: </li></ul><ul><li>Is it a rubric or a scale? </li></ul><...
Where to start <ul><li>Get ideas by looking at what others have done. </li></ul><ul><li>Lots of sample rubrics for many di...
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Effective Implementation of Rubrics in CE classes

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Effective Implementation of Rubrics in CE classes

  1. 1. Developing a Rubric for Assessment
  2. 2. What is a rubric? <ul><li>A scoring tool that lays out specific expectations for an assignment. </li></ul><ul><li>Divides assignments into component parts . </li></ul><ul><li>Provides a detailed description of what constitutes acceptable levels of performance for each part. </li></ul><ul><li>Can be used for grading variety of assignments. </li></ul><ul><li>Used to get consistent scores across all students. </li></ul><ul><li>Allows students to be more aware of the expectations for performance and consequently improve their performance. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Do you need a rubric? <ul><li>YES - a rubric is a flexible tool that can be used to measure student learning related specifically to course objectives. </li></ul><ul><li>YES - rubrics provide descriptions of each score level, it is easier to use a rubric to grade consistently across students . </li></ul><ul><li>YES - students are aware of expectations before they start an assignment. </li></ul><ul><li>YES - eliminates the need to occupy an entire class session with a discussion of assignment requirements. </li></ul>
  4. 4. What are the Parts of a Good Rubric? <ul><li>Good rubrics tend to have four basic parts: </li></ul><ul><li>The assignment or task description </li></ul><ul><li>A scale or levels of achievement and/or points </li></ul><ul><li>The dimensions of the assignment- skills involved </li></ul><ul><li>Descriptions of what constitutes each level of performance </li></ul>
  5. 5. Step 1: Clearly define the assignment <ul><li>Consider the topic , the process that the students will work through + the product they are expected to produce. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Step 2: Consider what learning outcomes (criteria) will be assessed <ul><ul><li>Often with a project, students are expected to demonstrate several course outcomes. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>For example, outcomes related to writing + critical thinking may be assessed, as well as more discipline-specific outcomes. </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Step 3: Establish clear + detailed descriptions for each performance level for each criteria <ul><ul><li>Determine what the different levels of performance look like within each criteria </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Give examples of high, mid and low performers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Begin by describing the highest level of performance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use specific language for performance level descriptors </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Step 4: Test drive your new rubric <ul><li>Sample a few examples of student work from previous semesters to see if the rubric yields a consistent score. </li></ul>
  9. 9. How do rubrics enhance student learning? <ul><li>When students are made aware of the rubrics prior to instruction + assessment, they know the level of performance expected and they are more motivated to reach those standards . </li></ul>
  10. 10. Using rubrics for assessment <ul><li>Share your rubric with students before they complete an assignment. This will help them understand the performance standards. </li></ul><ul><li>Rubrics provide both a grade (summative) + detailed feedback to improve future performance (formative). </li></ul><ul><li>Rubrics promote student self-assessment- making them more responsible for their learning + performance. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Scales vs. Rubrics Below Expectation Meets Expectation Exceeds Expectation Citations X
  12. 12. Scales vs. Rubrics Below Expectation Meets Expectation Exceeds Expectation Citations The paper fails to cite sources using a consistent, formal, citation style. Most follow a consistent style, although some contain minor errors or incomplete information. All citations are complete, accurate, and consistently conform to a formal style.
  13. 13. Assessment Scale
  14. 14. Assessment Rubric
  15. 15. S tudent L earning O utcomes + Rubrics- Course Descriptions CE 2411 Web I Explore the creative possibilities for interactive design and art making that the web opens up with an introduction to XHTML , the basic framework of web design and Cascading Style Sheets ( CSS ) – the key to page layout and formatting – essential for the control and design of a quality website. Using these building blocks, create a basic, multi-page website, and address information architecture, file compression, importing | exporting, linking and more.
  16. 16. S tudent L earning O utcomes + Rubrics- Student Learning Outcomes <ul><li>At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to: </li></ul><ul><li>Create well-organized, styled + standards-compliant web sites. </li></ul><ul><li>Understand basic XHTML/CSS code + effectively utilize this code. </li></ul><ul><li>Design optimized graphics for the web. </li></ul><ul><li>Understand browser compatibility + contemporary web trends. </li></ul><ul><li>Gain a critical understanding of the process of developing resources for the web. </li></ul><ul><li>Develop skills in project planning, information architecture, teamwork + oral presentation. </li></ul><ul><li>Explore new approaches to web design; develop critical thinking, writing + research skills. </li></ul><ul><li>Develop professional portfolios. </li></ul>
  17. 17. S tudent L earning O utcomes + Rubrics - Student Learning Outcomes 2 <ul><li>At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to: </li></ul><ul><li>Create well-organized, styled + standards-compliant web sites. DESIGN AESTHICS </li></ul><ul><li>Understand browser compatibility + contemporary web trends. INFORMATION DESIGN </li></ul><ul><li>Explore new approaches to web design; develop critical thinking, writing + research skills. INFORMATION DESIGN </li></ul><ul><li>Develop skills in project planning, information architecture, teamwork + oral presentation. PRESENTATION </li></ul><ul><li>Develop professional portfolios. PRESENTATION </li></ul><ul><li>Understand basic XHTML/CSS code + effectively utilize this code. TECHNICAL </li></ul><ul><li>Design optimized graphics for the web. TECHNICAL </li></ul><ul><li>Gain a critical understanding of the process of developing resources for the web. TECHNICAL </li></ul>
  18. 18. Student Learning Outcomes + Rubrics- Web I Assessment Rubric
  19. 19. Using Rubrics <ul><li>All assignments should be scored using the rubric. </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss scores with students after initial assignment- demonstrate how rubric was used + the correlation between their final score + the rubric criteria . </li></ul>
  20. 20. Practice <ul><li>‘ Select’ a rubric that is currently being used: </li></ul><ul><li>Is it a rubric or a scale? </li></ul><ul><li>Are there multiple descriptions of the criteria (at least 3)? </li></ul><ul><li>Are the descriptions clear and easy to use? </li></ul><ul><li>Would other faculty agree on the descriptors? </li></ul>
  21. 21. Where to start <ul><li>Get ideas by looking at what others have done. </li></ul><ul><li>Lots of sample rubrics for many disciplines at: http://www.winona.edu/air/rubrics.htm </li></ul><ul><li>Online tool for developing rubric (with more samples): </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rubistar for Teachers: http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Online module for using the Rubistar at: http://www.vcu.edu/cte/resources/videos/Rubistar_tutorial/index.html </li></ul></ul>
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