CITRUS COLLEGE BASEBALL
Blue Book
by
Skip Claprood
Introduction
Keys To Success.
Team And Lineup
Selection
And
Evaluation
BASEBALL IS A SIMPLE GAME
Factors That Improve the Chance of Winning
The most important facet of the game of baseball is R...
The neutralization of quality right-hand pitching can be accomplished with left-hand hitting.
Since a championship offense...
KEYS TO A WINNING TEAM AND INDIVIDUAL SUCCESS
KEYS TO PITCHING
Leadoff man retired 67% Strike one
First pitch strike 65% H...
QUALITIES NEEDED BY POSITION TO BUILD A DEFENSE
There are three phases of the game; pitching, defence and offense. In any ...
SECOND BASE
1. Defense
a. Fielding needs soft hands and the ability to move efficiently in space
b. Double Play
c. Arm, st...
SIX TYPES OF LINEUPS
1. Speed Used in large ballparks or to counteract a lack of power can
exploit a questionable defense....
BATTING ORDER
1. LEAD OFF
1. On base percentage
2. Speed (60 yd - 7.0 sec. and lower)
3. Threat to steal a base
4. Good Ba...
9. NINE HITTER
1. Second best lead off hitter
2. Good base runner (this hitter becomes extremely important as the batting
...
WHINE CONNOISSEURWHINE CONNOISSEURWHINE CONNOISSEURWHINE CONNOISSEURWHINE CONNOISSEUR
This individual cries and complains ...
ALIBI IKEALIBI IKEALIBI IKEALIBI IKEALIBI IKE
This guy has never yet made a mistake. “Yeah but,” is his mantra. Excuses ar...
STARTING LINEUP OPPONENT__________________
1.___________________ _______ PITCHING CHART_____________________
2.___________...
BASEBALL PLAYER ANALYSIS SHEET
NAME ____________ 2003 POSITION _________________
HEIGHT ___________ 2004 POSITION ________...
TEAMMATE EVALUATION
NAME Attitude Work
Ethic
Commitment
to Improve
Commitment
to Team
Quality
Individual
Lawyer Teammate S...
Mental
Preparation
ORDER “““““AAAAA SIXSIXSIXSIXSIX PACKPACKPACKPACKPACK OFOFOFOFOF PsPsPsPsPs””””” FOR SUCCESS
PASSIONPASSIONPASSIONPASSIONP...
PRESEVERANCEPRESEVERANCEPRESEVERANCEPRESEVERANCEPRESEVERANCE
1. The road to success is uphill for the total journey.
2. To...
DIFFERENCE BETWEEN DESTRUCTIVE SELF-CRITICISMDIFFERENCE BETWEEN DESTRUCTIVE SELF-CRITICISMDIFFERENCE BETWEEN DESTRUCTIVE S...
1. All your actions, feelings, behavior and most important, your abilities are consistent with this self
image. In short, ...
ORGANIZATION:ORGANIZATION:ORGANIZATION:ORGANIZATION:ORGANIZATION:
Controls must be placed on young men. Perhaps a better w...
CONCENTRATIONCONCENTRATIONCONCENTRATIONCONCENTRATIONCONCENTRATION
DEFINITION:DEFINITION:DEFINITION:DEFINITION:DEFINITION:
...
Important areas of feel:
a. Hitters - Hitter must know where the ball is and where the barrel of the bat is at all times. ...
GOAL SETTINGGOAL SETTINGGOAL SETTINGGOAL SETTINGGOAL SETTING
Most people set many goals in their lives without realizing t...
5. Set short, medium and long range goals.
a. Pitch, hitter or at bat, inning, game.
b. Daily, series of at bats or games,...
job better than you could do it by conscious effort or will power. A good example of this is if you begin
"thinking" while...
SAMPLE THOUGHTS THAT PRODUCE PRESSURESAMPLE THOUGHTS THAT PRODUCE PRESSURESAMPLE THOUGHTS THAT PRODUCE PRESSURESAMPLE THOU...
SELF-CONTROL AND CONTROL SPEEDSELF-CONTROL AND CONTROL SPEEDSELF-CONTROL AND CONTROL SPEEDSELF-CONTROL AND CONTROL SPEEDSE...
HURRY SITUATIONS IN HITTINGHURRY SITUATIONS IN HITTINGHURRY SITUATIONS IN HITTINGHURRY SITUATIONS IN HITTINGHURRY SITUATIO...
HURRY SITUATIONS IN PITCHINGHURRY SITUATIONS IN PITCHINGHURRY SITUATIONS IN PITCHINGHURRY SITUATIONS IN PITCHINGHURRY SITU...
Emotional high, physical explosion, loud and verbal
this will be only a momentary high, a deep emotion
valley will follow....
THE REALITIES OF BASEBALL THAT ARE EASY TO FORGET
1. YOU PLAY THE GAME BECAUSE YOU LOVE THE GAME, NOT
BECAUSE YOU MUST BE ...
BEWARE OF THE PROZAC PHRASES
The current athlete has developed a very bothersome and unproductive behavior that is now
app...
VISION: GET MEANING FROM WHAT YOU SEEVISION: GET MEANING FROM WHAT YOU SEEVISION: GET MEANING FROM WHAT YOU SEEVISION: GET...
2.2.2.2.2. PLAY LIKE YOU DON'T CARE.PLAY LIKE YOU DON'T CARE.PLAY LIKE YOU DON'T CARE.PLAY LIKE YOU DON'T CARE.PLAY LIKE Y...
Failure
F – Frustration
Not succeeding as fast as we want. Remember the Scientist who said, “ At the best
research is abou...
PROCESSPROCESSPROCESSPROCESSPROCESS
WINNING AND WINNERSWINNING AND WINNERSWINNING AND WINNERSWINNING AND WINNERSWINNING AN...
PROCESSPROCESSPROCESSPROCESSPROCESS
We must enjoy the process of striving toward our goal. That goal could be the purchase...
SKILLS THAT ASSIST ADJUSTMENTSSKILLS THAT ASSIST ADJUSTMENTSSKILLS THAT ASSIST ADJUSTMENTSSKILLS THAT ASSIST ADJUSTMENTSSK...
RECOGNITIONRECOGNITIONRECOGNITIONRECOGNITIONRECOGNITION
Display, Removal,
Netutralize
of Emotion
STERNUM UPSTERNUM UPSTERN...
OFFENSE
HITTING PARAMETERS
1. Timing is being in the right place at the right time. Good hitters are on
line and on time.
2. The b...
MENTAL PREPARATION FOR HITTINGMENTAL PREPARATION FOR HITTINGMENTAL PREPARATION FOR HITTINGMENTAL PREPARATION FOR HITTINGME...
E. IN THE HOLE
1. Performance E.
Bat selection & preparation
Stretching - get body loose
Put on batting glove-ultimate hit...
I. STEPPING INTO THE BOX
1. Performance I
Centering self in the box-balance point
Quickly scan and relax body
Warm up swin...
M. STEP OUT OF THE BOX
1. Performance M.
Step out of the box and reload
Trace your centering point
Take breath-clearing te...
OWL SWING GLOSSARYOWL SWING GLOSSARYOWL SWING GLOSSARYOWL SWING GLOSSARYOWL SWING GLOSSARY
AccelerationAccelerationAcceler...
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excellent book by Skip Claprood. Originally for Citrus College Baseball

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Bluebookonline coaching

  1. 1. CITRUS COLLEGE BASEBALL Blue Book by Skip Claprood
  2. 2. Introduction Keys To Success. Team And Lineup Selection And Evaluation
  3. 3. BASEBALL IS A SIMPLE GAME Factors That Improve the Chance of Winning The most important facet of the game of baseball is Runs. A fact that needs to be remembered by all baseball coaches is that the prevention of runs from scoring is just as important as the ability to score runs. There is no difference in value between the creation and the prevention of runs, the game is always determined by the team that has produced the most runs. John Scolinos, the former Hall of Fame coach at Cal Poly Pomona, believes that the game is divided into three primary areas; Pitching, Offense and Defense. If during a game any two of the three primary areas are present the chance of winning is at 67%. Offense and Pitching are the most difficult areas to maintain on a game to game basis. Injuries, fatigue, poor match ups, skill level, loss of rhythm and umpires strike zones all play a significant role in determining pitching success. An offense could hit 27 rockets at defenders and still have a no-hitter or shutout thrown against them. A pitcher on his game easily can neutralize the most potent offense. Coach Scolinos feels that a coach has only control of one area on a game to game basis and that is the Defense. Defense can be mastered through drills, repetition and an understanding of the percentages of the game. If a team has developed a consistent sound Defense then all that is needed each game is either Pitching or Offense to have a 67% chance of winning. Former Cerritos College legend Wally Kincaid always felt that baseball was an easy game if you followed three simple rules: 1. Put the Ball in Play Cut down the number of strikeouts and force the opposition to make the plays. The more pressure that can be put on the defense the greater the chance of winning. 2. Force the Opposition to Put the Ball in Play The best way to prevent runs from scoring is to reduce the numbers of base runners. The easiest and most controllable method of reducing base runners is to limit the number of base on balls issued. This forces the opposition to have multiple hit innings in order to score. 3. Play Catch A sound defense helps reduce base runners and forces an offense to trade outs for the advancement of bases. Make the percentage play and always keep the double play in order. The Citrus College program has been successful for the past three decades by following the philosophy that championships are won at all levels with solid left-hand hitting and quality left-hand pitching. Hard throwing, high velocity right-hand pitchers are in great abundance. It is this group of pitchers that must be neutralized in order to have an opportunity of winning a championship.
  4. 4. The neutralization of quality right-hand pitching can be accomplished with left-hand hitting. Since a championship offense is loaded with left-hand hitters, the only way to curtail that offensive production is with quality left-hand pitching. The difficult part of this philosophy is in the securing and development of left-hand hitters and pitchers. A coach should always give the left-hand individuals a greater opportunity to demonstrate their abilities to play the game. The Keys to Success, listed on the following page, are very similar to the Management by Objectives philosophy used in the business world. Over a 30 year period at Citrus College all championship and playoff team statistics and charts were compiled, evaluated and the percentages for the Keys to Success were developed. As the percentages began to materialize, it became apparent that the figures could be reached and a team did not need to have the best talent in order to be successful. The Keys to Success gave the program a controllable roadmap to success. It forced the coaching staff to reevaluate practice procedures and determined what was important and what was of less importance in attempting to reach our goals. If we needed to reach a specific level of performance in a given area, then thorough instruction needed to be applied to that area. It enabled the coaching staff to concentrate only in the specific areas of importance. An example of this approach would be that a 78% offensive execution is required then moving base runners with the bat must be practiced and the corresponding base running reactions must also be practiced. The ability to drag bunt, hit and run, hit to the right side and score the runner from third with a ground ball or fly ball needs to be mastered, as well as, the appropriate base running reaction for each situation. In order to master the offensive skills, balance plays an important role and must also be taught. If you take this thought process and apply it to each of the areas in the Keys to Success, it assists in creating a constructive and efficient approach to instruction.
  5. 5. KEYS TO A WINNING TEAM AND INDIVIDUAL SUCCESS KEYS TO PITCHING Leadoff man retired 67% Strike one First pitch strike 65% Here and Now Two of first three pitches strikes 75% Assertiveness, which pitch is under command. Hits per inning 1.0 Or less than 3 base on balls Base on balls per nine innings 3.0 Or more than 9 strikeouts per 9 inn. Ball/Strike ratio 62% ERA 4.10 Can be higher only if the offense averages 7.0 Pitches per inning 15.0 Mechanically sound, pitch to count, never experiment. KEYS TO DEFENSE Team errors per game 1.5 Stay under control, set feet and align on throws. Unearned runs per game 1.0 Make the percentage play. Fielding percentage . 962 Never make a throw without proper alignment. Double plays per game 1.0 Always keep the DP in line. KEYS TO OFFENSE Execution percentage 78% Be able to hit the other way. Percentage scoring run from third 70% Balance and bat control. Runs per game 6.0 Use outs wisely, never at the plate less than 2 out. Batting average . 300 Only important to you and your parents. On base percentage 41% Able to hit deep in the count, unselfish at bats. Score ability 15.0 The fewer the better Contact percentage 90% Discipline and two strike hitting, be on plane, on line, on time. Stolen base percentage 75% At this number or it is not worth the risk. Stolen base per game 2.0 Good reads rather than great speed. Double plays per game 1.0 Hit behind runners, keep the inning alive.
  6. 6. QUALITIES NEEDED BY POSITION TO BUILD A DEFENSE There are three phases of the game; pitching, defence and offense. In any one game if there are two of the three phases working well there is a 67% chance of victory. Pitching and offense are the most difficult variables to determine on a game-by-game basis. But, the defense is a directly controllable phase, through repetition defense can be counted on to be there every game. This means that a team needs only pitching or offense on any given day to have a 67% opportunity to win. Spend your time efficiently and develop a sound defensive ball club. PITCHING Pitching is the most important factor in a quality defence. The more strike outs recorded by a pitching staff the fewer opportunities for defensive mistakes. The fewer base runners, by either base hits, base on balls or hit by pitches, the less pressure on the defence. CATCHER 1. Defense a. Stop the running game. Arm Strength, glove to glove b. Receiving (Target, calling the game, Framing) c. Blocking 2. Offense a. Power b. Execution * Frame: Bigger body frame: 5’10” to 6’4”. 190# to 235# * Leader of the team, the catcher is the only position that can see the whole field. FIRST BASE 1. Offense a. Power (HR, RBI, 2B) b. AVG. c. Execution 2. Defense a. Receiving (Short hops, Backhands, footwork) b. Needs only to knock down ground balls and keep them in front of his body. c. Throwing, traditionally the weakest arm. THIRD BASE 1. Offense a. Power (RBI) b. Batting Average c. Execution 2. Defense a. Fielding needs quick hands and feet. b. Ability to field the double play. c. A strong and accurate arm d. Intestinal Fortitude.
  7. 7. SECOND BASE 1. Defense a. Fielding needs soft hands and the ability to move efficiently in space b. Double Play c. Arm, strong enough to turn double play 2. Offense a. Execution (Sac, Drag, Hit and Run) AVG b. Speed c. Power SHORT STOP 1. Defense a. Fielding, best defensive infielder b. Arm, strong enough to make the play in the 5/6 hole. c. Ability to turn double play d. Mental toughness, he will lead the team in chances and errors 2. Offense a. Execution b. Speed/Power c. AVG. RIGHT FIELD 1. Offense a. Power (RBI) b. AVG. + Speed 2. Defense a. Strongest outfield arm b. Range CENTER FIELD 1. Defensive a. Range + Glove, best defensive outfielder b. Arm, not as important as the ability to cover ground 2. Offense a. Speed b. OBP/AVG. c. Drag Bunt d. Stolen Bases * Ideal to have as your leadoff hitter LEFT FIELD 1. Offense a. Power + RBI’s b. Speed/OBP/Stolen Bases 2. Weakest arm in the outfield
  8. 8. SIX TYPES OF LINEUPS 1. Speed Used in large ballparks or to counteract a lack of power can exploit a questionable defense. 2. Power Used in small ballpark, fewer bunts, less speed, higher double play ratio. 3. Offensive Against a lesser quality pitcher. 4. Defensive Large ballpark, pitching dual, poor offensive squad 5. Left-handed VS RHP percentages on hitters favor, take away effectiveness of the breaking ball. 6. Right-handed VS LHP CREATE A BATTING ORDER The primary offensive responsibility for a head coach is to create an efficient batting order. A batting order is developed for one reason only and that is to score runs. Despite what many people may thank, runs are the most important aspect of baseball. Baseball is a simple game. Success is dependent upon a team’s ability to score more and prevent runs from scoring. Each of the nine positions in the batting order has general quali ties that can assist in scoring runs. On base percentage is a better gauge of a player value than the batting average. An OBP is found by dividing the sum of a player’s base hits, base on balls and hit by pitches by a player’s total plate appearances ( at bats plus base on balls and hit by pitches). The goal for a player is to have a .400 OBP or higher. Runs cannot be scored unless there are base runners. The more players in the batting order with .400 or higher OBP, the greater the opportunity to score runs. Another factor, when creating a lineup, is the player’s ability to put the ball in play. The more players with a contact ratio of 90% or higher, the greater the opportunity to score. A contact ratio is calculated by dividing strikeouts by overall plate appearances (at bats plus sacrifices, base on balls and hit by pitches). The better a team’s contact ration the more pressure is placed on the defense and the deeper in the hitter can work the count. The ability to go deep in the count and hit with two strikes causes pitch count for starting pitcher to rise. The higher the pitch count the less efficient the pitcher becomes. A successful inning gets a pitcher above 15 pitches per inning. All good offensive teams have the ability to score runs with a limited number of hits and to advance runners with their outs. A batting order with these qualities has the opportunity to beat the very talented pitcher.
  9. 9. BATTING ORDER 1. LEAD OFF 1. On base percentage 2. Speed (60 yd - 7.0 sec. and lower) 3. Threat to steal a base 4. Good Base runner 5. High Contact Ratio 6. Threat of drag or push bunt 7. Probably limited on power 2. TWO HITTER 1. On base percentage (OBP) 2. Left-hand hitter preferable, easier to steal, infield shift, moves runner first to third. 3. Speed 4. Bat Control 5. Drag Bunt 6. Hit and Run Ability 7. Selective, can hit with two strikes 8. Sacrifice Bunt 9. Good Base runner 3. THREE HITTER 1. Best Hitter 2. Power 3. Speed 4. FOUR HITTER 1. POWER, the ability to score a runner from first base. 2. Second best hitter 5. FIVE HITTER 1. Needs to be a good enough hitter that they can’t pitch around the three or four batter. 2. RBI Guy 3. Decent Contact 4. Decent Power 6. SIX HITTER 1. Decent Hitter 2. Decent Power 3. Decent Speed 7. SEVEN HITTER 1. Third best lead off hitter in the lineup 2. Speed 8. EIGHT HITTER 1. Slowest (Maybe a double play guy)
  10. 10. 9. NINE HITTER 1. Second best lead off hitter 2. Good base runner (this hitter becomes extremely important as the batting order turns over.) HE’S A BASEBALL PLAYERHE’S A BASEBALL PLAYERHE’S A BASEBALL PLAYERHE’S A BASEBALL PLAYERHE’S A BASEBALL PLAYER Every player that has ever played the game vows to play hard every game and be a team player. Yet, in reality some players play hard only one game, other five games, some ten games and a few most of the time. The same results are found when you examine how long individuals remain team players. These are two of the areas a player has control over, his attitude and effort. No one can make you become a disruptive turd, which is a choice you make yourself. You can either control your attitude or your attitude will control you. The great philosopher Aristotle seemed to be speaking to each of us when he wrote, “We are what repeatedly do”. Excellence then is not an act but a habit and we have direct control over our habits. The following is a list of individuals that surface on the baseball field and in business. In order to be successful a team needs a majority of Baseball players and Winners. But, just as important the others need to be recognized and attitudes changed or they need to be removed from the program. BASEBALL PLAYERBASEBALL PLAYERBASEBALL PLAYERBASEBALL PLAYERBASEBALL PLAYER This is the greatest compliment I can give to a player. He is ready to play everyday, needs little supervision; few repetitions and can play any position. The coach or boss never has to worry about the individual. WINNERWINNERWINNERWINNERWINNER All goals are team oriented, attempts to make every practice a masterpiece. He always meets the coach half way. Some may not be as talented, but will make up for it with disci pline work ethic and desire. Winners never permit what they cannot do to interfere with what they can do. Beware of the following. COMPETITORCOMPETITORCOMPETITORCOMPETITORCOMPETITOR Don’t be fooled by this guy. He too will attempt to make every day a masterpiece. He will have discipline and work ethic. But, he has the “Disease of Me”, symptoms that only surface when he struggles. This hidden “Disease of ME” can destroy a team. He cannot draw joy from helping the team, but only from personal gain. This individual is intoxicated with himself and intoxicated people do foolish things. Competitors develop an overpowering belief in their own importance 3 TO 5’er3 TO 5’er3 TO 5’er3 TO 5’er3 TO 5’er This is similar to the poor guy who must punch a clock at work everyday. He gets caught just going through the motions. No excitement, no enthusiasm, “it’s just a job”. This individual is wasting his time and the organization’s. Yet many times the main reason for a 3 to 5’ers attitude is the “Fear of Success”. The fear that, if I give a great effort today it will be expected of me tomorrow.
  11. 11. WHINE CONNOISSEURWHINE CONNOISSEURWHINE CONNOISSEURWHINE CONNOISSEURWHINE CONNOISSEUR This individual cries and complains about everything. Does he need cheese with that whine? Nothing is satisfactory, he always sees the negative, something is always wrong. Happiness is not the absence of problems but the ability to deal with them. Each day you make a choice on how you will react to situations, but not to the situation. Most situations are out of our control. There are always flowers for those who want to see them. This person only sees weeds. Complaining, whining and making excuses just keeps him out of the present. Self-control can only be found in the present. CLUB HOUSE LAWYERCLUB HOUSE LAWYERCLUB HOUSE LAWYERCLUB HOUSE LAWYERCLUB HOUSE LAWYER This is a dangerous “shyster” pleading his case. The only problem is that he defends only himself. He is the “Johnny Cochrane” of the dugout. One who can spin everything to his own advantage not the team’s. CHIPPERCHIPPERCHIPPERCHIPPERCHIPPER The chipper is worse than the Whine Connoisseur because he is a gossip. He chips or complains secretly. The weight end ups falling on teammates shoulders. Always remember champions train and losers complain. TOURISTTOURISTTOURISTTOURISTTOURIST This guy shows up to test the waters, see how much work is expected and is the competition. He may be around for 1-3 weeks. This is Cliff Claven of Cheers, the fellow who exaggerated about his vacations. The tourist wants to be able to say, “Oh Yeah, I played at Citrus” without the discipline and skill it takes to compete. He is just around to collect souvenirs. CREAM PUFFCREAM PUFFCREAM PUFFCREAM PUFFCREAM PUFF Soft, sweet and too much makes you sick. A soft individual will always give in when going gets tough. ONE ARMED BANDITONE ARMED BANDITONE ARMED BANDITONE ARMED BANDITONE ARMED BANDIT Just like in Las Vagas, this person takes, takes and takes while giving nothing back in return. This is the spoiled player, mommies special little angel. Remember the team is always the star not the individual. FAIR WEATHER BALL PLAYERFAIR WEATHER BALL PLAYERFAIR WEATHER BALL PLAYERFAIR WEATHER BALL PLAYERFAIR WEATHER BALL PLAYER A true front-runner, a great player when everything is just perfect. But most situations are not perfect. You have got to be able to perform everyday no matter what climate or circumstances. In the mid fifties the St. Louis Cardinals were taking batting practice and journeyman Wally Westlake was driving the ball all over the park. Westlake turned to Hall of Famer, Stan Musial and asked, “Hey Stan, ever feel like you could go five for five”, and Musial replied “Every day Wally, every day”. That is why everyone knows Stan Musial and no one remembers Wally Westlake, because Stan Musial could do it every day.
  12. 12. ALIBI IKEALIBI IKEALIBI IKEALIBI IKEALIBI IKE This guy has never yet made a mistake. “Yeah but,” is his mantra. Excuses are like noses everyone has one. By giving an alibi he attempts to justify or condone what he is doing or blame it on some one else. You generalize away mistakes and no growth will take place. Failures always blame someone or something. APATHETIC BALL PLAYERAPATHETIC BALL PLAYERAPATHETIC BALL PLAYERAPATHETIC BALL PLAYERAPATHETIC BALL PLAYER You have to chase this individual down to get him to work. This guy is always looking for the easy way out. The coach has to meet this guy beyond halfway and corral him to get work done. He needs constant direction supervision and motivation and that is not condu cive to excellence. It is important to remember that you will always have control over your day-to-day attitude and approach to work. None of us want o be one of these disruptive individuals. The key is recognition, what type of person do I want to be? You can never be who you want to be by remaining who youare. For some of you this change will be difficult, but there is no elevator to success, you must always take the stairs. And remember the stairs can either lead to the basement or the penthouse; you have control over the choice of direction.
  13. 13. STARTING LINEUP OPPONENT__________________ 1.___________________ _______ PITCHING CHART_____________________ 2.___________________ _______ SCOUTING REPORT___________________ 3.___________________ _______ CITRUS HITTERS _____________________ 4.___________________ _______ OPP. PITCH CHART____________________ 5.___________________ _______ PITCHER ______________________ 6.___________________ _______ PITCHING COACH_____________________ 7.___________________ _______ CATCHER ______________________ 8.___________________ _______ MIDDLE INFIELD______________________ 9.___________________ _______ CORNERS ______________________ STARTER ____________________ SCOREBOOK ______________________ LONG ____________________ PITCHES — 2B ______________________ ____________________ PITCHER MOVE ______________________ QUICK ____________________ TIMED MOVE ______________________ ONE HITTER ____________________ HELMETS ______________________ ____________________ BALLS ______________________ SET UP ____________________ FOUL BALLS ____________________ 1._____________________________________ CLOSER ____________________ 2._____________________________________ SILVER BULLET(R) _______________ 3._____________________________________ SILVER BULLET(L)________________ 4._____________________________________ RUNNER _____________________ 5._____________________________________ BUNT GROUPS____________________ 6._____________________________________ __________________________________ 7._____________________________________ __________________________________ 8._____________________________________ __________________________________ 9._____________________________________ EXTRAPOLATION PAIRS _______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________
  14. 14. BASEBALL PLAYER ANALYSIS SHEET NAME ____________ 2003 POSITION _________________ HEIGHT ___________ 2004 POSITION _________________ WEIGHT __________ 60 TIME _______________________ PHYSICALABILITY 5 Division 1, J.C. Impact player _____ 4 Maybe D1, w/good off. __________ 3 Solid everyday J.C. Player ________ 2 Maybe Solid J.C. W/good off. _____ 1 Just a Guy _____________________ MOTIVATION Works to improve daily on field, Wt. Room, Classroom, wants to be a good player. ______________________ 5 4 3 2 1 COMPETITIVENESS Plays and practices hard regardless of the Situation. Takes day off? Wants to win on MWF. ______________________ 5 4 3 2 1 COACHABILITY Accepts criticism, carryover, ability to Practice properly w/o supervision, does Not need instant gratification. _______________________ 5 4 3 2 1 ATTITUDE Do you perceive his presence in the dugout, the game, practice and before or after a game or practice as positive or negative. __________________________________ 5 0 TOTAL __________ NAME OF EVALUATOR _____________________________________
  15. 15. TEAMMATE EVALUATION NAME Attitude Work Ethic Commitment to Improve Commitment to Team Quality Individual Lawyer Teammate Selfish Y/N
  16. 16. Mental Preparation
  17. 17. ORDER “““““AAAAA SIXSIXSIXSIXSIX PACKPACKPACKPACKPACK OFOFOFOFOF PsPsPsPsPs””””” FOR SUCCESS PASSIONPASSIONPASSIONPASSIONPASSION 1. Happiness comes from putting our hearts in one’s work and doing it with excitement and enthusiasm. 2. Love what you do; it brings you back to the peak, no matter how difficult or how many times you fail, it is Love that keeps everything in perspective. 3. Passion keeps you going when it is easy to quit. 4. Positive mental attitude will do nothing, but with it everything is possible. It will give you the ability to use all the skills you have required. PURPOSEPURPOSEPURPOSEPURPOSEPURPOSE 1. We all need goals, both individual and group, purpose gives us direction. 2. We need goals, but earning a million dollars, winning championships, leading the league in hitting or E.R.A. are not appropriate goals. They are results. 3. Neither are wants or desires proper goals, they are superficial and only wishes. Never be a wandering generality but always a meaningful specific. 4. How can you hit a target if you don’t have something at which to aim? Remember nothing will happen unless it is planned for. 5. How many times will a person attempt a New Year’s resolution before they quit? Less than 1! 6. You don’t have to like everything you do to be good at it, but the better you get at doing it, the more you will like it. PRIORITYPRIORITYPRIORITYPRIORITYPRIORITY 1. Evaluate what is important to be successful and spend more time in those areas, even if they are the most difficult. 2. Concentrate on things that you have direct control over and forget about those areas left to chance. 3. It is easier to become a self starter with understanding of what is important and what you have direct control over. PROCESSPROCESSPROCESSPROCESSPROCESS 1. It is the process, the love of the day-to-day work that is the some of success. 2. When you become too much concerned about the results or the destination, it will cause tension and anxiety. It is difficult to control the results, but we can always control our approach. 3. Always be detail oriented. Pay attention to details. 4. Big things can be accomplished only by the perfection of the minor details. PREPARATIONPREPARATIONPREPARATIONPREPARATIONPREPARATION 1. Everyone wants to be good, but it is the will to prepare that is the true path of success. 2. The basis of preparation is “Doing the Right Thing at the Right Time”. 3. Process and preparation go hand in hand. 4. Bob Knight, “Failure to prepare is preparing to fail”.
  18. 18. PRESEVERANCEPRESEVERANCEPRESEVERANCEPRESEVERANCEPRESEVERANCE 1. The road to success is uphill for the total journey. 2. To be successful it always takes courage, not the courage to succeed, but the courage to fail. 3. “Prime the Pump”, things worthwhile take time. 4. Learning curve, check out the valley but don’t have a “Pity Party”. 5. The food you grow in the valley, you will eat at the top. 6. Abraham Lincoln - 13 failures, what if he quit? 7. To breathe the air of the summit, you must first have tilled the soil of the valley. 8. Quitting is addictive and contagious. It becomes progressively easier after the first time. Small quitssnowball into a major personality trait. 9. A crisis and an opportunity is the same thing. 10. The only way to become strong is to face adversity head on. 11. Suffering can produce endurance, endurance produces character, character produces hope and hope is the foundation quality of change. Hope in the future is the power of the presence.
  19. 19. DIFFERENCE BETWEEN DESTRUCTIVE SELF-CRITICISMDIFFERENCE BETWEEN DESTRUCTIVE SELF-CRITICISMDIFFERENCE BETWEEN DESTRUCTIVE SELF-CRITICISMDIFFERENCE BETWEEN DESTRUCTIVE SELF-CRITICISMDIFFERENCE BETWEEN DESTRUCTIVE SELF-CRITICISM AND POSITIVE SELF-ANALYSISAND POSITIVE SELF-ANALYSISAND POSITIVE SELF-ANALYSISAND POSITIVE SELF-ANALYSISAND POSITIVE SELF-ANALYSIS Most athletes have a hard time separating themselves from their performances. So as long as there are positive performances, the athlete’s fragile self-image stays in sound shape. Yet let a poor performance or a series of sub-par performances take place, and the player begins to blur everything together. This causes the athlete to be self-critical, building anxieties within himself. These tensions take place in all the various aspects of the game. The athlete will often blur all parts of the game together, judging the whole performance by the weakest part. The following example is one that seems to be most often found in an athlete with a weakness in self-discipline. The problem may start with a slight flaw in technique (hitch, opening early, dropping arm, etc.,). The flaw begins to frustrate the athlete, but rather than observing it as a single flaw: a. He begins to become depressed about his ability to play at all. This depressed state of mind begins to reinforce itself. b. With a loss of confidence, the slump will get worse. c. Self-pity sets in, and he becomes paranoid; negative feelings project throughout the personality d. This attitude then affects his performances, say on defense, even though he may always have been a good defensive player. e. He finally becomes completely depressed about himself in general. Each athlete should make a realistic assessment of his physical ability and measure performance on his own terms. Many become ashamed that they cannot perform at a higher level. If you can realistically say that you can be at a higher level, then isolate your problem and attempt to correct it rather than berate yourself for blowing it. There are questions that must be answered truthfully, and you must understand your physical capabilities. Does it have to do with strength or speed? Is it within your potential? Do you practice seriously enough? You can work on it to master the conflict or, if you don’t feel like doing this, you must admit that you are willing to live with the limitations and drop down a caliber in play (slow pitch or the beer can league). Don’t keep adding frustrations that can never be cured without concentrated effort. THE SELF IMAGETHE SELF IMAGETHE SELF IMAGETHE SELF IMAGETHE SELF IMAGE THE KEY TO A WINNING ATTITUDETHE KEY TO A WINNING ATTITUDETHE KEY TO A WINNING ATTITUDETHE KEY TO A WINNING ATTITUDETHE KEY TO A WINNING ATTITUDE The most important psychological discovery of this century is the discovery of the "self image." Whether we realize it or not, each of us carries about with us a mental blueprint or picture of ourselves. This self image is our own conception of the "sort of person I am"; it may not even be consciously recognizable. It has been built from our beliefs about ourselves. Beliefs about ourselves have unconsciously been formed from our past experience, our successes and failures, our humiliations, our triumphs. From all these we mentally construct a "self," or a picture of a self. Once an idea or a belief about ourselves goes into this picture, it becomes "true" as far as we are personally concerned. Because of this, we must develop a positive structured picture to bring forward a positive self image. We do not question its validity, but proceed to act upon it just as if it were true. The self image becomes a passage way enabling you to develop beyond your present expectation because of two discoveries.
  20. 20. 1. All your actions, feelings, behavior and most important, your abilities are consistent with this self image. In short, the player who conceives himself to be a "failure" type person" will always find some way to fail, in spite of all his good intentions. If you see yourself a loser you will always be one in athletics and in life. The self image is a "premise," a base, or a foundation upon which your entire personality, your behavior and even your circumstances are built. Because of this, our experiences strengthen our self image. For these reasons, we must build a positive self image through preparation (drills), success in development of abilities (confidence). Confidence is the first step toward changing the self image. For example: A young girl who has an image of herself as the sort of a person nobody likes, will indeed find that she is avoided at the school dance. She literally invites rejection. Her woebegone expression, her hang-dog manner, her over-anxiousness to please, her hostility toward those that confront her - all of these acts to drive away those she would attract. 2. The self image can be changed. One of the reasons it seems difficult for a person to change his habits through "Positive Thinking" is that all of these efforts are directed to the circumference of the self rather than changing the inner self. "Positive Thinking" can only reach the surface. Such sayings as, "I will get a job," "I will be more calm this time," "This season I’ll hit 300," are sayings which do not change the self image. The self can only be changed through preparation, confidence and success. To build confidence you must be prepared thoroughly. You must know your subject and yourself from top to bottom. This preparation is the first step toward changing one’s self image. The second step is that of practice and mastery of the subject (success). Remembering your successes, the enjoyment and "feel" of succeeding. The final step is taking the newly developed image and putting it to use. CHARACTER, DISCIPLINE AND ORGANIZATIONCHARACTER, DISCIPLINE AND ORGANIZATIONCHARACTER, DISCIPLINE AND ORGANIZATIONCHARACTER, DISCIPLINE AND ORGANIZATIONCHARACTER, DISCIPLINE AND ORGANIZATION CHARACTER:CHARACTER:CHARACTER:CHARACTER:CHARACTER: Character is the direct result of mental attitude. You can’t wish yourself into character. Character has always been man’s greatest ally. The difference between individuals is certainly in the areas of effort, in unstoppable determination, in the strong will to succeed. But, the true leader in all fields is found to have the ability of sacrifice, self-denial, in love and courage and in modesty and disciplined will. Talent may get you to the top, but it takes character to keep you there. That is the difference between great and little men, between great players and the mediocre ones. DISCIPLINE:DISCIPLINE:DISCIPLINE:DISCIPLINE:DISCIPLINE: Discipline wins ball games, it will reinforce you in the toughest situations. The disciplined athlete maintains correct technique in extreme pressure situations. He will not get caught up in the emotion of the contest, and will stay aloof or above the situation, keeping a clear analytical mind. The disciplined athlete never panics. He will always make the percentage play. No peaks or valleys, just a constant effort to improve and reach his fullest potential. Remember to always stay within your strengths in all situations. We have no control over others, we only have control of ourselves. Sacrifice personal glory for the welfare of the team. Many amazing things have been accomplished if no one cares who gets the credit.
  21. 21. ORGANIZATION:ORGANIZATION:ORGANIZATION:ORGANIZATION:ORGANIZATION: Controls must be placed on young men. Perhaps a better word than control is organization. Without organization and leadership toward a realistic goal, there is no chance of realizing more than a small percentage of your full potential. It isn’t what you do, but how you do it. No system is any good if players are not well grounded in fundamentals. Team play comes from integrating individuals who have mastered the fundamentals into a smooth working unit. Confidence comes from being prepared. The process of success is actually more important than the result. 1. We will work toward the maximum development of both the individual and the group as a whole. 2. No substitute for work, but you must enjoy it. If you are not enthusiastic, you can’t work up to your maximum ability. 3. There must always be a definite purpose and goal if you are to progress. Every drill has a fundamental purpose. 4. If you are not intent about what you are doing, you won’t be able to resist the temptation to do something else that might seem to be more fun. Remember - the best teacher is repetition, day- after-day, throughout the season. Don’t give in to temptation. THE POWER OF YOUR PHYSICAL PRESENCETHE POWER OF YOUR PHYSICAL PRESENCETHE POWER OF YOUR PHYSICAL PRESENCETHE POWER OF YOUR PHYSICAL PRESENCETHE POWER OF YOUR PHYSICAL PRESENCE 1. Outstanding competitors generally have a very powerful physical presence. They physically exude confidence, strength, calmness and energy. 2. The strong physical presence of a good performance often intimidates opponents. 3. We can substantially control how we feel on the inside by controlling how we appear on the outside. 4. If you want to feel confident, start acting confident on the outside. 5. If you want to generate positive intensity, start looking intense on the outside. 6. Three methods to improve physical presence: a Control what you think; b. Control what you visualize; c. Control how you look on the outside. 7. Make a commitment to improve your physical image every time you play or practice. 8. When the world has turned against you in competition, when you’ve lost your confidence, and you’re feeling negative, fight the feelings by controlling how you look on the outside. 9. Throw your shoulders back, pick up your walk and start manufacturing confidence. If you don’t feel confident, start acting as if you do. 10. Work hard to develop and maintain the physical presence of a champion - no matter how you feel.
  22. 22. CONCENTRATIONCONCENTRATIONCONCENTRATIONCONCENTRATIONCONCENTRATION DEFINITION:DEFINITION:DEFINITION:DEFINITION:DEFINITION: Concentration - a natural state of man. It is the distractions that are unnatural. The master skill of anything that involves human excellence. It is an art that takes practice. To still the mind you must learn to put it somewhere else. You’ve got to park it. Concentration is the act of focusing one’s attention. As the mind is allowed to focus on a single object, it stills. Concentration means keeping the mind here and now. Most players look at the ball or the general area surrounding the target or ball, but most of the time will fall short of achieving concentration. They look at a target, but at the same time they are thinking about how to hit it; how to throw a certain pitch; about the score and what might happen if they fail; or, worse yet, about the bench jockeys on the sidelines. This is not occupying the mind or stilling it, it is not here and now. These "what if’s" blur the view of objects and make a clear object seem faster or a large target shrink. Concentration is a discipline, but a discipline with interest. We must be concerned with what is happening and not what has happened or will happen. Calm the mind and keep it interested and attentive and it becomes easy to stay here and now. The following techniques won’t force concentration, but will give opportunities to concentrate and keep the mind’s attention. 1. Watching the Ball: It’s easy to see the ball but not as easy to notice the pattern made by the seams as it spins. It interests the mind. When looking for the pattern made by the seams, one naturally watches the ball all the way to one’s bat or glove and begins to focus his attention on it earlier than before. Sometimes the ball even begins to appear bigger or to be moving slower. These are natural results of concentration and one of the main reasons we use the Centering Technique. The ball has one quality which makes it a very good object for concentration, if it is moving. The mind is attracted by moving objects and has been since birth. Concentrations not staring hard, it is not trying; but, by following seams you will fall into relaxed concentration. No squinting or straining, but relaxation. 2. Listening to the Ball: Listening to the ball is another valuable form of concentration. When it hits the bat it makes a distinct sound, the quality of which varies considerably, depending upon the point of contact. If you listen closely, you will soon be able to distinguish a number of different kinds and qualities of sounds. The sounds of the bat, when hit solid or when jammed. The practice of listening to the ball isbest used during practice. It will automatically improve your initial reaction or jump. By becoming sensitive to sound in practice, you will find that you will then use sound automatically during a game. The idea of concentrating on sound is also a practice technique on here and now centering. 3. Feeling and Awareness: Few players understand the importance of concentrating attention on feeling and awareness. The easiest away to get such training is simply to focus attention on the body during practice. It is critical to for this sense of feel or touch. During practice focus attention on your body, how the movements feel, the action, as well as images. When concentrating in the areas of feeling and awareness, don’t expect success in location of pitch or solid contact at the plate, remember, you can only do one thing at a time.
  23. 23. Important areas of feel: a. Hitters - Hitter must know where the ball is and where the barrel of the bat is at all times. The understanding of barrel location on all pitches is important to the success of the aggressive hitter. b. Pitchers - Pitcher must know where the target is and at all times throughout the windup where the hand is located and where it properly should be at all times. c. Infielders - Where the ball is and the movement and location of the glove at all times. TOTAL CONCENTRATIONTOTAL CONCENTRATIONTOTAL CONCENTRATIONTOTAL CONCENTRATIONTOTAL CONCENTRATION Total concentration is the ability to immerse yourself in a task without becoming distracted or pulled off task. Skilled players talk about concentration as a state of "flow", being "in the bubble", or "in a cocoon", during which nothing can penetrate their focus. Concentration involves several elements. These include knowing what cues to focus on; staying focused on those relevant cues; keeping narrow and external focus; being able to shift attention; refocusing when distracted; and controlling your thought process. 1.1.1.1.1. FOCUS ON THE PRESENT MOMENT.FOCUS ON THE PRESENT MOMENT.FOCUS ON THE PRESENT MOMENT.FOCUS ON THE PRESENT MOMENT.FOCUS ON THE PRESENT MOMENT. To play your best, you must keep your mind in the present mo ment, focused on the requirements of the task at hand. One of the biggest errors you can make is thinking ahead about the results, or thinking about what happened on a previous play. You must be aware of when you lose your focus, and then refocus attention on what you need to do to execute. 2.2.2.2.2. THINK ONLY ABOUT THAT ONE PITCH.THINK ONLY ABOUT THAT ONE PITCH.THINK ONLY ABOUT THAT ONE PITCH.THINK ONLY ABOUT THAT ONE PITCH.THINK ONLY ABOUT THAT ONE PITCH. To help you stay focused in the present, think about playing one pitch, one play at a time. Separate that one pitch or play from the rest and try to look at it as a game in itself. 3.3.3.3.3. FOCUS ON PERFORMANCE CUES.FOCUS ON PERFORMANCE CUES.FOCUS ON PERFORMANCE CUES.FOCUS ON PERFORMANCE CUES.FOCUS ON PERFORMANCE CUES. A prepitch routine focuses your attention by giving you specific performance cues to follow. If you don't have a routine, your mind wanders aimlessly as you prepare to perform. Your routine should help you assess the conditions and narrow your focus on the task. Your routine also locks your mind into the cues that you must focus on to execute. If you have trouble focusing on execution, it's time for you to develop a specific prepitch routine. 44444 RELAX YOUR FOCUS WHILE YOU WAIT.RELAX YOUR FOCUS WHILE YOU WAIT.RELAX YOUR FOCUS WHILE YOU WAIT.RELAX YOUR FOCUS WHILE YOU WAIT.RELAX YOUR FOCUS WHILE YOU WAIT. There are not many players who can focus for three hours straight. It is important to be ready to perform when it is your turn, but you don't want to grind on over analyze your next pitch or play. 5.5.5.5.5. USE A WARM UP ROUTINE.USE A WARM UP ROUTINE.USE A WARM UP ROUTINE.USE A WARM UP ROUTINE.USE A WARM UP ROUTINE. All good players use a warm-up ritual starting one hour before the game to help them focus their mind for play 6.6.6.6.6. CUE YOURSELF TO CONCENTRATE.CUE YOURSELF TO CONCENTRATE.CUE YOURSELF TO CONCENTRATE.CUE YOURSELF TO CONCENTRATE.CUE YOURSELF TO CONCENTRATE. You must lock in your concentration once it is your time to perform. To help click in, try using a physical trigger to focus your mind, such as tightening the strap on your glove or batting glove before starting. At this point you want to turn your attention to preparation and execution and if anything else enter your mind. Let it pass through. 7.7.7.7.7. REHEARSH WHILE YOU WAIT.REHEARSH WHILE YOU WAIT.REHEARSH WHILE YOU WAIT.REHEARSH WHILE YOU WAIT.REHEARSH WHILE YOU WAIT. Physically and mentally rehearsh while you wait. When it is your turn, it will be second nature.
  24. 24. GOAL SETTINGGOAL SETTINGGOAL SETTINGGOAL SETTINGGOAL SETTING Most people set many goals in their lives without realizing they are doing it. Goals give individuals a sense of direction. As a college baseball player it is important to set both long and short range goals. It will enable you to set priorities and assist in reaching your full potential. Effective goal setting will initiate a motivation that will allow you to focus attention, energy and activity in a more effective manner. Research in the area of sport performance reveals that the consistently best performances are accomplished by those individuals who set goals in practice or training as well as during competition. Goal setting should also be practiced with your personal and family lives. THE PURPOSE OF GOAL SETTING...THE PURPOSE OF GOAL SETTING...THE PURPOSE OF GOAL SETTING...THE PURPOSE OF GOAL SETTING...THE PURPOSE OF GOAL SETTING... 1. Provide MOTIVATIONMOTIVATIONMOTIVATIONMOTIVATIONMOTIVATION (mobilizes your effort). 2. Provides DIRECTIONDIRECTIONDIRECTIONDIRECTIONDIRECTION (a mission to accomplish). 3. Provides FEEDBACKFEEDBACKFEEDBACKFEEDBACKFEEDBACK (positive or negative). 4. Develops COMMITMENTCOMMITMENTCOMMITMENTCOMMITMENTCOMMITMENT and PERSISTENCEPERSISTENCEPERSISTENCEPERSISTENCEPERSISTENCE. 5. Develops CONFIDENCECONFIDENCECONFIDENCECONFIDENCECONFIDENCE. 6. Develops SELF-DISCIPLINESELF-DISCIPLINESELF-DISCIPLINESELF-DISCIPLINESELF-DISCIPLINE. 7. Increases the QUALITYQUALITYQUALITYQUALITYQUALITY of training and practice. GUIDELINES FOR EFFECTIVE GOAL SETTING...GUIDELINES FOR EFFECTIVE GOAL SETTING...GUIDELINES FOR EFFECTIVE GOAL SETTING...GUIDELINES FOR EFFECTIVE GOAL SETTING...GUIDELINES FOR EFFECTIVE GOAL SETTING... 1. Set specific - measurable goals. a. Examples of goals that are too vague or general: "I want to pitch well." "I want to go nine innings." "I want to be more competitive." b. Examples of a specific goal. "I want to get my first pitch in for a strike." "I need to track the pitch better." 2. Set performance not outcome goals. a. Example: (Performance Goal) "I want to maintain my intensity, rhythm and location." Example: (Outcome Goal) "I want to walk fewer hitters." 3. Set positive goals. a. Example: (Negative Goal) "I don’t want to hang this one." Example: (Positive Goal) "I am challenging with this one." 4. Outline a plan to achieve goals. a. Example of a poor plan. "I am going to work harder in practice." b. Example of an effective plan: (Have at least 2 goals each day): "I am going to work on my alignment to improve throwing accuracy." "I am going to work on a loose arm in the bullpen."
  25. 25. 5. Set short, medium and long range goals. a. Pitch, hitter or at bat, inning, game. b. Daily, series of at bats or games, monthly, season. 6. Foster a commitment to your goals. DISCIPLINE yourself to set and strive to reach your goals. 7. Establish practice and game goals. 8. Find support for your goal attainment. Example: Teammates or coach, "someone who runs or lifts with you." 9. Evaluate and re-adjust goals. Remember failure is a positive feedback. 10. Establish a target date to accomplish each goal. "I want my fastball at 80% by Thanksgiving break." TYPES OF GOALSTYPES OF GOALSTYPES OF GOALSTYPES OF GOALSTYPES OF GOALS 1. Mechanical (skills), techniques). 2. Performance (PERCENTAGES, but not B.A., wins, strikeouts or homeruns.) 3. Strategic (Execution). 4. Mental (Self-Control, routines, one-step-at-a-time.) 5. Personal. PROBLEMS IN GOAL SETTINGPROBLEMS IN GOAL SETTINGPROBLEMS IN GOAL SETTINGPROBLEMS IN GOAL SETTINGPROBLEMS IN GOAL SETTING 1. Set too many goals. 2. Not given enough time to achieve the goal. 3. Failure to recognize individual differences, and modify goals. 4. Goals are to general. 5. Failure to create a supportive goal setting atmosphere. THE MENTAL PICTURETHE MENTAL PICTURETHE MENTAL PICTURETHE MENTAL PICTURETHE MENTAL PICTURE A PERSONAL PRACTICE SESSIONA PERSONAL PRACTICE SESSIONA PERSONAL PRACTICE SESSIONA PERSONAL PRACTICE SESSIONA PERSONAL PRACTICE SESSION Mental pictures offer you an opportunity to "practice" new skills and attitudes. This is possible because your nervous system can’t tell the difference between a physical experience and one that is vividly imagined. If we picture ourselves performing a phase of the game it is nearly the same as the actual performance. Mental practice helps to make perfect. A good example is for a pitcher to mentally rehearse each pitch just before throwing it. He throws "his" strike perfectly in his imagination, "feels" the coil and balance just as it should, "feels" himself exploding, releasing the ball correctly and following through. He then begins his windup and depends on what is called "muscle memory" or the unconscious to carry out the pitch just as he has imagined it. The important thing is to make these pictures as vivid and detailed as possible. Before you can have a clear mental picture that is beneficial to you, you first must become acquainted with the correct physical fundamentals. The human brain is an automatic goal-seeking machine which steers its way to our target or goal by use of past experience and stored information, automatically correcting faults when necessary. This goal-seeking machine within you can operate in only one way. It must have a target to shoot at, whether it is making solid contact at bat, fielding a ground ball correctly or throwing a strike. You must first clearly see a thing in your mind before you do it. When you do see, the rhythm of the ground ball, fielding it out in front, looking it into the glove and making the throw, "your creative success mechanism" within takes over and does the
  26. 26. job better than you could do it by conscious effort or will power. A good example of this is if you begin "thinking" while in the batters’ box, you often find the ball being thrown right by you. When you get into the box, the only thing on your mind should be "hit the ball." All your mental work is done outside the box; inside the box you let your "muscle memory" or unconscious do the work. Remember, it doesn’t matter what happened at your last at bat, your last pitch or last fielding chance, see yourself acting, feeling, being as you want it to be! If you hold a picture of yourself long and steadily enough in your mind’s eye, you will be drawn toward it. Picture yourself vividly as defeated and that alone will make victory impossible. The mental picture in athletics builds and reinforces practice. It gives you a new self-image. You will find yourself "acting differently," doing things correctly, automatically and spontaneously. Don’t confuse this method with wishful thinking or fantasizing, it is the practice of doing. There is a high rate of forgetting in learning of any motor skill, and for this reason, if the athlete can have reminders in front of him (mental picture) it becomes easier to believe and establish technique. Technique for Mental PicturesTechnique for Mental PicturesTechnique for Mental PicturesTechnique for Mental PicturesTechnique for Mental Pictures 1. Break movement down into details. 2. Make the play in slow motion - eyes open. 3. Make the play in slow motion - eyes closed, get a feel. 4. Make the play at normal speed - eyes closed 5. When a successful action has been completed, replay it instantly and establish the feel needed to perform the skill. Facts that Improve PerformanceFacts that Improve PerformanceFacts that Improve PerformanceFacts that Improve PerformanceFacts that Improve Performance 1. Your level of performance is a direct reflection of the way you feel inside. 2. When you feel right, you can perform right. 3. Playing well is a natural consequence of the right kind of internal feelings. 4. Playing as well as you can at the moment occurs automatically when the right emotional balance has been established. 5. Mental toughness is the ability to create and maintain the right kind of internal feeling regardless of the circumstances. 6. The most important step you can take to perform to your best is to create a particular climate within yourself and maintain it, no matter what! YOU WILL PERFORM BEST WHEN YOU EXPERIENCEYOU WILL PERFORM BEST WHEN YOU EXPERIENCEYOU WILL PERFORM BEST WHEN YOU EXPERIENCEYOU WILL PERFORM BEST WHEN YOU EXPERIENCEYOU WILL PERFORM BEST WHEN YOU EXPERIENCE THE FOLLOWING FEELINGSTHE FOLLOWING FEELINGSTHE FOLLOWING FEELINGSTHE FOLLOWING FEELINGSTHE FOLLOWING FEELINGS 1. When you feel relaxed and loose. 2. When you feel a sense of calmness and quiet inside. 3. When you feel no anxiety or nervousness. 4. When you feel charged with high energy. 5. When you feel optimistic and positive. 6. When you feel a genuine sense of fun and enjoyment in your play. 7. When your performance feels effortless. 8. When you feel automatic and spontaneous in your play. 9. When you feel mentally alert. 10. When you feel mentally focused and tuned in. 11. When you feel highly self-confident. 12. When you feel in control of yourself.
  27. 27. SAMPLE THOUGHTS THAT PRODUCE PRESSURESAMPLE THOUGHTS THAT PRODUCE PRESSURESAMPLE THOUGHTS THAT PRODUCE PRESSURESAMPLE THOUGHTS THAT PRODUCE PRESSURESAMPLE THOUGHTS THAT PRODUCE PRESSURE 1. What if I don’t do well? 2. What if I blow it now, I’ll never be the same. 3. The pressure is awesome! 4. I’ll never live it down if I lose. 5. My career or scholarship is on the line. 6. Just think of what I’ll lose if I don’t pull this one out. SAMPLE THOUGHTS THAT REDUCE PRESSURESAMPLE THOUGHTS THAT REDUCE PRESSURESAMPLE THOUGHTS THAT REDUCE PRESSURESAMPLE THOUGHTS THAT REDUCE PRESSURESAMPLE THOUGHTS THAT REDUCE PRESSURE 1. I’m simply going to focus on doing my job the best I know how. 2. I’m going to have one hell of a lot of fun out there, no matter what. 3. Pressure is something I put on myself. 4. Even If I’m not the greatest today, it won’t be the end of the world. 5. Winning and losing is for the fans; I simply perform. 6. I love tough situations; the tougher the situation, the better I perform. 7. I’m going to be OK - no matter what. CONTROLLING ATTITUDESCONTROLLING ATTITUDESCONTROLLING ATTITUDESCONTROLLING ATTITUDESCONTROLLING ATTITUDES 1. Pressure is something I put on myself. 2. Winning will take care of itself; I simply perform. 3. Hard work can be fun. 4. When I can enjoy, I can perform. 5. Choking is not a weakness of character. 6. I accept full responsibility for myself. 7. I simply focus on doing the best I can at every moment. 8. Mistakes simply represent feedback and are a necessary part of learning anything well. ENERGIZING ATTITUDESENERGIZING ATTITUDESENERGIZING ATTITUDESENERGIZING ATTITUDESENERGIZING ATTITUDES 1. I will always give my best effort. 2. I take pride in what I represent. 3. I am going to thoroughly enjoy myself as I perform. 4. Having fun is an important key to playing well. 5. My attitude is offensive rather than defensive. 6. I strive to be positive and enthusiastic no matter what. 7. I’m willing to pay the price, no matter what. 8. I will be successful.
  28. 28. SELF-CONTROL AND CONTROL SPEEDSELF-CONTROL AND CONTROL SPEEDSELF-CONTROL AND CONTROL SPEEDSELF-CONTROL AND CONTROL SPEEDSELF-CONTROL AND CONTROL SPEED Self-control is the command of both a disciplined mental attitude and physical movement during any given situation. It is the confidence that one can handle any situation with the poise and coolness needed to perform efficiently. The major tests for self-control fall into three areas, PRESSURE, FAILURES and ANGER. Pressure, as we will more clearly cover later, causes the adrenaline to build. This adrenaline, or "excitement" can be used in two completely different ways. If you use this excitement correctly, it can give you strength, power, and enable you to make plays you would not normally be able to make. But, if the excitement turns to timidness or fear it can rob you of your skill and ability you ordinarily have to call upon. Failures fall into two categories, personal and teammate. If too much emphasis is placed on the mistake, fear begins to tear apart one’s confidence. Fear or anger at a teammate’s error leads to a do-nothing situation. You begin to fear you will make a mistake, or try to make up for one error by overcompensating and breaking your own self-control. Anger is probably the most common deterrent to self-control. The umpire may miss one, a teammate may boot one or the pitcher may brush you back. If you become so enraged that you lose control of yourself, you will also lose the physical factors needed for maximum performance. To develop self-control, a ballplayer must first understand the phrase, "Under Control Speed." A good definition of Control Speed is the ultimate speed you can execute and still perform efficiently. A vivid example would be a pitcher. If he rears back and fires a pitch at 100% it’s liable to hit half-way up the backstop. So the smart pitcher finds his rhythm and control speed; or how hard am I able to throw and still throw strikes, usually its around 90%. When reading about Control Speed a word that often appears is Rhythm. The young infielder and outfielder must learn to vary his rhythm with the speed of a ground ball or when throwing a runner out. He must be able to learn when to charge the ground ball (slow roller, short hop) and when to adjust, lay back (smash). Learning to develop this radar sense on ground balls is not an easy task. It takes hundreds of ground balls for the infielder or outfielder to find the maximum control speed at which he can perform efficiently. The pitcher also is dependent upon Rhythm. Without precise control and knowledge of his body actions the pitcher loses his effectiveness for adjustment and consistency. The development of both Self-Control and Control Speed is not easily accomplished - it will take hours of disciplined practice and self-appraisal. As a coach or a ball player, you must be concerned with the plays that most often break control speed; these are called "Hurry Situations" and should be practiced most frequently. The word hurry should be a sin and never used on the baseball diamond. Anytime you must hurry, you will break control speed and usually commit the error. As written previously, the good practice session is geared to cover these pressure situations and allow the ballplayer to learn to adjust his speed to the situations. The following pages are lists of both Hurry Situations and Do-Nothing Situations. HURRY SITUATIONSHURRY SITUATIONSHURRY SITUATIONSHURRY SITUATIONSHURRY SITUATIONS - These are situations that force you to hurry. You must learn to overcome these situations by practice and confidence. You must be able to perform an action correctly under pressure and at control speed.
  29. 29. HURRY SITUATIONS IN HITTINGHURRY SITUATIONS IN HITTINGHURRY SITUATIONS IN HITTINGHURRY SITUATIONS IN HITTINGHURRY SITUATIONS IN HITTING 1. Pitcher with real good stuff. 2. Pitcher with "junk." 3. Pitcher that uses extra fast ball. 4. When the pitcher has got you jammed. 5. After the pitcher "knocks" you down. 6. When you have 2 strikes. 7. In a tight game with runners in scoring position. 8. Some ball player or fan heckling you. 9. Umpire misses one on you. 10. After striking out last time or times before. 11. When the pitcher throws the ball by you. 12. When you are trying to impress someone. DO-NOTHING SITUATIONSDO-NOTHING SITUATIONSDO-NOTHING SITUATIONSDO-NOTHING SITUATIONSDO-NOTHING SITUATIONS - These are situations when you become afraid, lose your confidence, let yourself become discouraged, or you let "other things" not related to baseball enter your mind. DO-NOTHING SITUATIONS IN HITTINGDO-NOTHING SITUATIONS IN HITTINGDO-NOTHING SITUATIONS IN HITTINGDO-NOTHING SITUATIONS IN HITTINGDO-NOTHING SITUATIONS IN HITTING 1. When you let other things enter your mind besides hitting the ball. 2. When you are overly concerned about "hurrying" (Don’t be afraid to be a little aggressive in this situation.) 3. When you have swung at a bad pitch. 4. When you are playing a club that you feel is inferior. 5. When you are trying to impress someone - stay at your control speed. HURRY SITUATIONS IN FIELDINGHURRY SITUATIONS IN FIELDINGHURRY SITUATIONS IN FIELDINGHURRY SITUATIONS IN FIELDINGHURRY SITUATIONS IN FIELDING 1. Slow hit ground ball. 2. Not knowing how to play the hops on a bounding ground ball - be in rhythm with the ball. 3. Ground ball that hugs the ground - because this is the lowest point to field a ground ball - want to come up soon - stay down on the ball. 4. When you kick the ball, and keep it in front of you - the tendency is to hurry and either throw the ball away or to kick the ball again. 5. After you make an error and try to make up for it. 6. A pressure situation of when a player with good speed hits a ground ball or is running the bases - you either have him or you don’t - so what’s the rush. 7. Trying to impress someone - be yourself, that’s why they are watching you in the first place. 8. (Outfielders) throwing runner out on a ground ball. 9. (Outfielders) throwing runner out at the plate on a ground ball or fly ball. DO-NOTHING SITUATIONS IN FIELDINGDO-NOTHING SITUATIONS IN FIELDINGDO-NOTHING SITUATIONS IN FIELDINGDO-NOTHING SITUATIONS IN FIELDINGDO-NOTHING SITUATIONS IN FIELDING 1. When you feel you might hurry. 2. When you do not know how to play the hops on a ground ball, you lay back on the ball instead of charging it for the short hop - be in rhythm with the ball. 3. When you think you might kick the ball or throw it away, this is caused by lack of confidence and practice. 4. When you say, "I hope he doesn’t hit the ball to me."
  30. 30. HURRY SITUATIONS IN PITCHINGHURRY SITUATIONS IN PITCHINGHURRY SITUATIONS IN PITCHINGHURRY SITUATIONS IN PITCHINGHURRY SITUATIONS IN PITCHING 1. When they are hitting shots off of you and you don’t adjust. 2. When you are not throwing strikes and you refuse to adjust. 3. When a good hitter is at bat. 4. When your fielders kick a couple. 5. When the umpire misses a couple. 6. A fast runner on base. 7. After someone has knocked one downtown. 8. When you are in a jam, bases loaded, etc In all of these situations, the pitcher must learn to keep his cool and his poise.In all of these situations, the pitcher must learn to keep his cool and his poise.In all of these situations, the pitcher must learn to keep his cool and his poise.In all of these situations, the pitcher must learn to keep his cool and his poise.In all of these situations, the pitcher must learn to keep his cool and his poise. DO-NOTHING SITUATIONS IN PITCHINGDO-NOTHING SITUATIONS IN PITCHINGDO-NOTHING SITUATIONS IN PITCHINGDO-NOTHING SITUATIONS IN PITCHINGDO-NOTHING SITUATIONS IN PITCHING 1. When the mound doesn’t suit you - you’ve got to adjust. 2. When the umpire or your fielders kick a few and you give up. 3. When you are afraid that you might make a mistake. 4. When a poor hitter is at bat (not concerned). 5. When a good hitter is at bat (you become afraid and lose your confidence).
  31. 31. Emotional high, physical explosion, loud and verbal this will be only a momentary high, a deep emotion valley will follow. Setting yourself up for a fall, difficult to rebound. Build a lead, begin to be successful, probably feel the fight is over. Lack of concentration, inability to approach game one pitch at a time. Overly pleased with yourself, success leads to lack of concentration, build an early lead and sit on your laurels, score early and stop. Great play, home run, taking the lead, recognition, evaluate, visualize and move on. Error, strikeout, bad pitch, failure to execute, falling behind. Regcognition, evaluate, visualize and move on. Panic, hurry in pressure situation, "anxiety, loss of routines, result oriented" Expectation of failure, negative actions "blame it on someone, coach, umpire or teammate. Emotional death valley, bottomless pit no breaks, everyone or everything, is against me, feel sorry for yourself. ** SUCCESSFUL STATE OF MIND **** SUCCESSFUL STATE OF MIND **** SUCCESSFUL STATE OF MIND **** SUCCESSFUL STATE OF MIND **** SUCCESSFUL STATE OF MIND ** +4 +3 +2 +1 -3 -2 -4 PIGSKIN SYNDROME OVER CONFIDENT LACKADAISICAL IINABILITY TO REMAIN IN PRESENT FAILURE FIXATION CONTROLLED EXCITEMENT CONTROLLED EMOTIONS COMPLACENT THE EMOTIONAL ROLLER COASTERTHE EMOTIONAL ROLLER COASTERTHE EMOTIONAL ROLLER COASTERTHE EMOTIONAL ROLLER COASTERTHE EMOTIONAL ROLLER COASTER POINT OF NO RETURN -1
  32. 32. THE REALITIES OF BASEBALL THAT ARE EASY TO FORGET 1. YOU PLAY THE GAME BECAUSE YOU LOVE THE GAME, NOT BECAUSE YOU MUST BE A STARTER. 2. YOU CANNOT MAKE UP FOR A MISTAKE (FAILURE TO BUNT, A BASE ON BALLS, FAILURE TO MOVE A MAN, A DROPPED THROW, A PASSED BALL ETC.) 3. YOU CAN MOVE ON TO THE NEXT MOMENT OR SITUATION AND BECOME ENGROSSED IN THE DETAILS OF SUCCESS. 4. NOR CAN YOU IGNORE A MISTAKE, IT IS REALITY, IT HAPPENED. NOW YOU MUST LEARN, ADJUST AND VISUALIZE WHAT YOU EXPECT TO HAPPEN. AN ALIBI WILL NOT CREATE A PERSONAL POSITIVE ENVIRONMENT. 5. THE CONSTANT EXPECTATION AND VISUALIZATION OF SUCCESS KEEPS YOU IN POSITIVE FRAME OF MIND. 6. ROUTINES KEEP YOU IN THE MOMENT. THEY HELP REMOVE ANXIETY AND ALLOW YOU TO BE AWARE OF YOUR SENSES AND GOALS. 7. ANGER AT A TEAMMATE WILL NOT HELP THE SITUATION. MOST LIKELY YOU ARE NOT ANGRY AT THE TEAMMATE BUT AT THE SITUATION, THE COACH, OR YOUR OWN PERFORMANCE. 8. IT IS TO LATE TO FEEL SORRY FOR YOURSELF AND ANGRY ABOUT YOUR SITUATION, YOUR ROLE HAS EVOLVED OVER TIME AND IS NOT GOING TO CHANGE IN AN AFTERNOON. 9. SELFISHNESS IS A CHARACTER FLAW. BE A QUALITY PERSON AND A GREAT TEAMMATE. 10. TAKE PRIDE IN YOUR DISCIPLINE, SELF CONTROL AND EXECUTION.
  33. 33. BEWARE OF THE PROZAC PHRASES The current athlete has developed a very bothersome and unproductive behavior that is now appearing at all levels, professional, collegiate and scholastic. When faced with the reality of adversity, mistakes, errors or failure players turn to a crutch, a Prozac Phrase, to alleviate the pain and depression or responsibility of their actions. There are three Prozac Phrases that are most often used by the current athlete, each has it’s own characteristics, yet all promote a mentality not conducive to individual growth. YEAH, BUT These two words are usually followed with an excuse or things like my high school coach, My dad told me .., It doesn t feel comfortable or the ever present “What if” ... Always keep in mind it is not “What if”, it is “What is”. We need not concern ourselves with the anticipation of what might happen. We only need to be concerned with those areas in which we have direct control. “YEAH, BUT” is an easy way for uncoachable players to negate instruction, giving them an alternative reason not to comply. MY BAD The most popular of the Prozac phrases is My Bad. It is the cool way to say, I’m sorry. An apology is never needed on the playing field. Everyone knows if you made mistake, your parents know, so does your boy or girlfriend, the fans know and especially your teammates. They all know it was “ Your Bad “. My Bad is a distraction from the standpoint that nothing is being accomplished to correct or adjust the mistake. The player is attempting to draw attention away from the error or mistake. This is selfish attempt to place the focus on the athlete so that teammates will offer encouragement in this time of distress. He wants to remove the guilt of failure or stupidity, to be told, “ it will be okay “. This is the easy way out rather than looking for the more constructive and more difficult avenue of what caused the error or mistake. The athlete needs to be reminded that no one thinks that he intentionally made a mistake; everyone understands it was not done on purpose. To stop feeling sorry for yourself, be a Warrior, use your frustration to create motivation, not the need to be cradled in your mother s bosom and told everything will be okay when it is not. OH YEAH. Usually followed by (I forgot). This is an unacceptable response. It is the head coaches responsibility to create repetitions to engrain proper reactions. It is the player’s responsibility to remember and execute. “OH YEAH “ is no more than an excuse for getting, ignoring or being emotionally weak and undisciplined. It is an attempt to free responsibility of carrying out a difficult task that must be practiced. Remember mentioning fault cannot mend wounds; it is a selfish act, one only done to make oneself feel better. It does not fix anything. Level with yourself in the face of adversity, an Alibi Ike will return to that well time and time again.
  34. 34. VISION: GET MEANING FROM WHAT YOU SEEVISION: GET MEANING FROM WHAT YOU SEEVISION: GET MEANING FROM WHAT YOU SEEVISION: GET MEANING FROM WHAT YOU SEEVISION: GET MEANING FROM WHAT YOU SEE If a player understands the importance of the eyes, then he can appreciate the fact that vision is getting meaning from what you see. In the game of baseball, when the eyes are centered on the ball, the individual is attempting to gather information such as rotation, pitch trajectory, velocity and movement or as a defensive player, angles, hops and speed of the ground ball. It is more than just "keeping-your-eye-on-the-ball," it becomes the process that enables the player to make split second unconscious adjustments. DON’T IGNORE PRESSURE! EXPLORE IT!DON’T IGNORE PRESSURE! EXPLORE IT!DON’T IGNORE PRESSURE! EXPLORE IT!DON’T IGNORE PRESSURE! EXPLORE IT!DON’T IGNORE PRESSURE! EXPLORE IT! The difference between a "Pressure Ball Player" is not some inherent quality that one has and another hasn’t. It is largely a matter of how they learned to react to pressure situations. See pressure as an opportunity to prove oneself, don’t ignore pressure - explore it! Turn every crisis into an opportunity. A pressure situation can either make you or break you. The situations cause an excitement in you. If you use this excitement correctly, it can give you strength, power and quickness you do not ordinarily possess. But, if the excitement turns to timidness, fear of making mistakes, or a lack of confidence, it can rob you of your skill, self-control, and ability that you ordinarily have to call upon. The pressure player, in sports or business, is the person who comes through in the clutch. He uses his excitement to perform better under the pressure of a challenge. This individual is invariably the person who has learned to react consciously or unconsciously to a pressure situation. The pressure player thrives on clutch situations. He always remains in an analytic mind, never getting caught up in the emotion of the situation. Coaches should try to encourage their athletes to be above or aloof to the action. By keeping aloof, the young player can evaluate his responsibilities and stay under control, always making the disciplined decision. The only way this attitude can come to life is to develop confidence in yourself and your skills in given situations. To respond to the challenge in the situation rather than the menace; turn all crisis into opportunities, to grow as an individual. This is achieved only by practice and repetition, so when a pressure situation does arrive you react unconsciously and make the play. This is the reason we practice "Pressure Situations" everyday, so when it does happen in the game, you react positively because you have made the same play under pressure successfully hundreds of times before. CPR MANEUVER FOR THE BASEBALL FIELDCPR MANEUVER FOR THE BASEBALL FIELDCPR MANEUVER FOR THE BASEBALL FIELDCPR MANEUVER FOR THE BASEBALL FIELDCPR MANEUVER FOR THE BASEBALL FIELD The word "choke" is a dirty five-letter word in the sport, especially if it leads to failure. No one will admit to others that they choked. But everyone is choking their head off out on the field. It's how you handle it. The issue isn't whether you choked or not. What is more important is how you handle yourself when it happens. What does it mean to choke? First, choking is a response to perceived pressure. When you feel pressure to succeed, the mind kicks into motion. The end result is that a player doesn't produce good pitches or at bats compared to what he or she is capable of doing. Choking basically starts with poor focus of attention. In other words, your mind gets sidetracked in all the "hype" of the event. The fear of failure looms even larger when the stakes are higher. Now the mind begins to race with all sorts of thoughts that are unrelated to the task. The physical manifestations of anxiety set in. Your mouth gets dry, your hands sweat, your breathing becomes labored, and you feel like someone is strangling you. The key is to not get sidetracked and strangle yourself in the first place. But if your mind wanders under pressure, here are some suggestions for getting back on track. 1.1.1.1.1. CHALLENGE YOURSELF TO PLAY YOUR BEST.CHALLENGE YOURSELF TO PLAY YOUR BEST.CHALLENGE YOURSELF TO PLAY YOUR BEST.CHALLENGE YOURSELF TO PLAY YOUR BEST.CHALLENGE YOURSELF TO PLAY YOUR BEST. Many players take a defensive approach to their game when they feel the heat. Instead of playing defensive and trying to avoid a negative outcome, challenge yourself to play your best. Take a positive approach, Use an aggressive mindset instead of an "avoidance" mindset. If you try to avoid failure, most likely you will focus more on that thing you fear the most
  35. 35. 2.2.2.2.2. PLAY LIKE YOU DON'T CARE.PLAY LIKE YOU DON'T CARE.PLAY LIKE YOU DON'T CARE.PLAY LIKE YOU DON'T CARE.PLAY LIKE YOU DON'T CARE. One of the problems you face is that you care so much about suceeding that you try too hard to make it happen. You need to play like you don't care, but if you work at something your whole life, It's hard not to care, 3.3.3.3.3. TAME THE DEMONS OF THE PAST.TAME THE DEMONS OF THE PAST.TAME THE DEMONS OF THE PAST.TAME THE DEMONS OF THE PAST.TAME THE DEMONS OF THE PAST. Memories from the past can also play a role in how we handle ourselves during times of adversity. Some players draw from their past to help them succeed. Yet others focus on the negative experiences and this sabotages their play, those memories of the past will haunt you. Use it only if it is to your advantage. If you had a negative experience, Don't let your mind wander on the present matters. If you have a positive experience to draw from, use it to feel confident. 4.4.4.4.4. BE YOUR OWN COACHBE YOUR OWN COACHBE YOUR OWN COACHBE YOUR OWN COACHBE YOUR OWN COACH..... What you say to yourself can have a big effect on how you feel and behave. Positive self-talk can be one of your most powerful assets during the game. Pay attention to what you say to yourself. Your self-talk should always be encouraging and supportive. Use your inner coach to pump yourself up, calm yourself down, or to help focus your mind on the present if necessary. 5.5.5.5.5. STAY TASK ORIENTED.STAY TASK ORIENTED.STAY TASK ORIENTED.STAY TASK ORIENTED.STAY TASK ORIENTED. Most of your fear relates to the outcome of the event. The fear causes you to get ahead of yourself rather than focus on the task at hand. The best way to deal with pressure is to separate the task from the consequences of your actions. Focus on what you can control, which is execution and staying in present. Be process oriented rather than result oriented. FOCUS AND FLOWFOCUS AND FLOWFOCUS AND FLOWFOCUS AND FLOWFOCUS AND FLOW FOCUSFOCUSFOCUSFOCUSFOCUS is the complete attention to the execution of the skill FLOWFLOWFLOWFLOWFLOW is the state of being completely engrossed in the execution of a performance to the exclusion of everything else. All your attention is FOCUSEDFOCUSEDFOCUSEDFOCUSEDFOCUSED either On the skills or routine performed Or on the input from your senses relevant to the sport You are fully focused of the activities being performed, and are: Not aware of your own awareness, consciousness of self or ego Not evaluating the quality of skills during performance Not concerned with distractions such as results or other peoples expections Not making any conscious decisions in your mind or reasoning with words - you are trusting your body to follow its prepartation You are in complete control of actions and reactions You feel almost in an altered state of consciousness: achieving flow is exhilarating, and gives a powerful feeling of competence. DO NOT PERMIT WHAT YOU CANNOT DO TO INTERFERE WITH WHAT YOU CAN DO.DO NOT PERMIT WHAT YOU CANNOT DO TO INTERFERE WITH WHAT YOU CAN DO.DO NOT PERMIT WHAT YOU CANNOT DO TO INTERFERE WITH WHAT YOU CAN DO.DO NOT PERMIT WHAT YOU CANNOT DO TO INTERFERE WITH WHAT YOU CAN DO.DO NOT PERMIT WHAT YOU CANNOT DO TO INTERFERE WITH WHAT YOU CAN DO. REPEAT YOUR SWING AT YOUR PITCH EVERYTIME, THROW YOUR PITCHES IN YOURREPEAT YOUR SWING AT YOUR PITCH EVERYTIME, THROW YOUR PITCHES IN YOURREPEAT YOUR SWING AT YOUR PITCH EVERYTIME, THROW YOUR PITCHES IN YOURREPEAT YOUR SWING AT YOUR PITCH EVERYTIME, THROW YOUR PITCHES IN YOURREPEAT YOUR SWING AT YOUR PITCH EVERYTIME, THROW YOUR PITCHES IN YOUR RHYTHM ON EVERY PITCH.RHYTHM ON EVERY PITCH.RHYTHM ON EVERY PITCH.RHYTHM ON EVERY PITCH.RHYTHM ON EVERY PITCH.
  36. 36. Failure F – Frustration Not succeeding as fast as we want. Remember the Scientist who said, “ At the best research is about 99 percent failure and 1 percent success and the 1 percent the only thing that counts. “Baseball is similar to Science, there are to many failures to get caught up in each one. Replay the successes, see it happen, feel it happen and forget the rest. The world’s most successful people have been the biggest failures. A – Anger (Misdirected Aggression) Man cannot control what happens to him, but he can control how he responds to his failures. Remember, Luck (good or bad) can’t last a lifetime unless you die young. I – Insecurity (Can’’’’’t cut it anymore) Never accept failure before it has taken place. What worries you, masters you. If you are to fail, fail while attempting to succeed. L – Leadership (Abandon it!) All great leaders are like a rubber ball, they rebound after every defeat. You must get up off the ground because in every failure is the seed of an equal or greater benefit. U – Undisciplined (Result vs. Process) Pay attention to the details (Fundamentals) R – Resentment ( Self- pity, becomes the victim) The only water that can sink a ship is the water that gets inside. Life is formed from the inside out. What you are inside determines the issues in the battle of life. Always separate the event from yourself. E – Excuses (Never my fault) Don’t generalize away your mistakes. He who hopes to avoid all failure and misfortune is trying to live in a Fantasyland. The only place where a dream becomes impossible is in your own thinking.
  37. 37. PROCESSPROCESSPROCESSPROCESSPROCESS WINNING AND WINNERSWINNING AND WINNERSWINNING AND WINNERSWINNING AND WINNERSWINNING AND WINNERS Winning is overcoming obstacles to reach a goal. But the value in winning is only as great as the value of the goal reached. "You’re still going to win with preparation, dedication and plain old desire. If you don’t have genuine desire, you won’t be dedicated enough to prepare properly." Bear BryantBear BryantBear BryantBear BryantBear Bryant "Winning is peace of mind. Knowing that we have done our best. We have no control over others, we only have control of ourselves. We must strive to reach our fullest potential." John WoodenJohn WoodenJohn WoodenJohn WoodenJohn Wooden "Winning and goals go together. Remember, winning implies forward movement a n d sense of purpose (goal)." Dr. Maxwell MaltzDr. Maxwell MaltzDr. Maxwell MaltzDr. Maxwell MaltzDr. Maxwell Maltz "The winning in life formulates goals that are worthwhile for him. He achieves them by rising above self-doubt and inhibition to realize his full potential as a human being. Dr. Maxwell MaltzDr. Maxwell MaltzDr. Maxwell MaltzDr. Maxwell MaltzDr. Maxwell Maltz * Winners turn crisis into opportunity. * Winners hunger for success. A single-minded drive for victory and he wants everyone to know it. * Winners relish every second of the fight. Every disciplined situation is used as a psychological booster to pump extra reserves of confidence and drive into his game. * At Citrus we give an image of "look at us. This is Citrus at work, doing what we do best! We have a worthy opponent and no matter what, we’re going to beat him." * When an opponent faces Citrus he must feel our will to win and know we are out to beat them - no matter what you do or how long it takes. It becomes somewhat frightening to the opponent. * No one has ever become a champion in any sport without possessing a high degree of drive. That surging compulsion for success, which propels you forward through the barriers of pain and effort to achieve your goal, is indispensable to the winner.
  38. 38. PROCESSPROCESSPROCESSPROCESSPROCESS We must enjoy the process of striving toward our goal. That goal could be the purchase of a home, a car, preparing for a marriage, raising a family, graduating from college, being a success in the business world, or in relationships with family and friends. If this team has an area that it needs to improve it is in the intensity and the discipline of our daily work. We need to gather ourselves before practice, get into the frame of mind that "I will practice like a champion and respect the effort and discipline of practice." There is only so much time to prepare, we need to appropriate and wisely use that time. Understand and incorporate the following terms: INDIVIDUAL MODIFICATIONINDIVIDUAL MODIFICATIONINDIVIDUAL MODIFICATIONINDIVIDUAL MODIFICATIONINDIVIDUAL MODIFICATION (Practice)(Practice)(Practice)(Practice)(Practice) Each individual must take the basic fundamentals of a skill or technique and adapt those fundamentals to their specific strengths. STATIC TECHNICAL ROUTINESTATIC TECHNICAL ROUTINESTATIC TECHNICAL ROUTINESTATIC TECHNICAL ROUTINESTATIC TECHNICAL ROUTINE (Stubborness)(Stubborness)(Stubborness)(Stubborness)(Stubborness) Ego and the fear of failure are strange compansions. They combine to form a stubborn resistance to adjustments and change. This is what got me here and I'm not going to change now attitude. This attitude will not allow the individual to catch up with the rapid changing environment. STRATEGIC FLEXIBILITYSTRATEGIC FLEXIBILITYSTRATEGIC FLEXIBILITYSTRATEGIC FLEXIBILITYSTRATEGIC FLEXIBILITY (Game)(Game)(Game)(Game)(Game) The awareness of what is taking place around the individual, the ability to adapt during an activity to changes and approaches in a fundamental way that will lead to a greater percentage of success. In each of these terms the ability to adjust plays the dominant role. ADJUST -ADJUST -ADJUST -ADJUST -ADJUST - The ability to make changes that allow for a greater opportunity of success. "The name of the game is adjustment. You can look at a guy’s speed, arm strength, all those kinds of tools, but to me the most important tool a player can have is the ability to adjust. It doesn’t matter how good he is, he won’t reach his highest level unless he can learn to adjust." Karl KuehlKarl KuehlKarl KuehlKarl KuehlKarl Kuehl Director of Player DevelopmentDirector of Player DevelopmentDirector of Player DevelopmentDirector of Player DevelopmentDirector of Player Development Oakland AthleticsOakland AthleticsOakland AthleticsOakland AthleticsOakland Athletics
  39. 39. SKILLS THAT ASSIST ADJUSTMENTSSKILLS THAT ASSIST ADJUSTMENTSSKILLS THAT ASSIST ADJUSTMENTSSKILLS THAT ASSIST ADJUSTMENTSSKILLS THAT ASSIST ADJUSTMENTS 1. AWARENESS:AWARENESS:AWARENESS:AWARENESS:AWARENESS: An overall view of the surroundings. An understanding of what is needed to achieve the task at hand. Removing oneself from the "emotional entanglement," or the pressure of the situation. (Aloofness, play above the game) 2. INTELLIGENCE:INTELLIGENCE:INTELLIGENCE:INTELLIGENCE:INTELLIGENCE: The ability to realize that to achieve the task at hand changes maybe needed to reach the goal. The stubbornness of strength versus strength does not always win the battle. Adaption to a changing environment allows oneself to constantly be on the aggressive. 3. KNOWLEDGE:KNOWLEDGE:KNOWLEDGE:KNOWLEDGE:KNOWLEDGE: To make positive, reasonable changes one must have a proper background in the fundamentals of the situation a clear understanding of the cause and effect in the skill components must be understood before common sense changes can be executed. 4. CONFIDENCE:CONFIDENCE:CONFIDENCE:CONFIDENCE:CONFIDENCE: Anhonestbeliefinone’sabilitytosucceed.Thisbeliefisextremelyimportant, otherwise, the fear of the unknown will not allow the proper changes to be initiated. THE IMPORTANCE OF ROUTINESTHE IMPORTANCE OF ROUTINESTHE IMPORTANCE OF ROUTINESTHE IMPORTANCE OF ROUTINESTHE IMPORTANCE OF ROUTINES Every good performance has routines. Some are more obvious and elaborate than others. They’re easy to see when athletes hit and pitch in baseball, serve and return serve in tennis, dive, golf, and shoot free throws in basketball. Although unrelated to the mechanics of a stroke or movement, rituals can become powerful triggers for creating your ideal performance state (the internal conditions at which you will perform your best). They help in deepening concentra- tion, turning on the automatic, raising your intensity, staying loose, and more. Unfortunately, when things start to go badly or when we start to feel pressure, we often short circuit our routines. We start rushing. Even though we are not aware of it, we may take fewer deep breaths, visualize differently, cut down on pre-performance time or even drastically increase pre-performance time. In difficult situations, we must be sure to take more than enough time to prepare prior to execution and complete our pre-performance routine in its entirety. Ask yourself the following: • Do you have a routine that helps you feel loose, confident, energized, etc.? • Do you practice your pre-performance routine so that it becomes a powerful trigger for your ideal performance state? • Do you short circuit your routine when you start struggling? • Do you study the routines of other top competitors in your sport that you admire? (I know you all do) (Taken with modifications from Mental Toughness Training For Sports (1982 by James E. Loehr.)
  40. 40. RECOGNITIONRECOGNITIONRECOGNITIONRECOGNITIONRECOGNITION Display, Removal, Netutralize of Emotion STERNUM UPSTERNUM UPSTERNUM UPSTERNUM UPSTERNUM UP TURN IT AROUNDTURN IT AROUNDTURN IT AROUNDTURN IT AROUNDTURN IT AROUND PERFORMANCE PERFORMANCE PERFORMANCE PERFORMANCE PERFORMANCE Coreect/Incorrect Rhythem,Technique REGULATE REGULATE REGULATE REGULATE REGULATE SELF SELF SELF SELF SELF Relaxed/Excited Focused/PoorVisualization Hurried/Controlled PROGRAM PROGRAM PROGRAM PROGRAM PROGRAM Adjustm entAwareness Energize orRelaxation PhysicalProcessneeded to Execute "Visualize,Feel" GOALGOALGOALGOALGOAL Center on responsiblity at hand The job to be accoumplished REFOCUSREFOCUSREFOCUSREFOCUSREFOCUS FULLFOCUSED FULLFOCUSED FULLFOCUSED FULLFOCUSED FULLFOCUSED SoftCentertoFineCenter CleartheMind RELAXATION RELAXATION RELAXATION RELAXATION RELAXATION STERNUM UP STERNUM UP STERNUM UP STERNUM UP STERNUM UP RESPOND RESPOND RESPOND RESPOND RESPOND LETITHAPPEN LETITHAPPEN LETITHAPPEN LETITHAPPEN LETITHAPPEN Trustyourself,youhave EMOTIONALEMOTIONALEMOTIONALEMOTIONALEMOTIONAL MAINTENANCEMAINTENANCEMAINTENANCEMAINTENANCEMAINTENANCE ROUTINEROUTINEROUTINEROUTINEROUTINE "The Six Rs""The Six Rs""The Six Rs""The Six Rs""The Six Rs" FOCUS AWARENESSFOCUS AWARENESSFOCUS AWARENESSFOCUS AWARENESSFOCUS AWARENESS Here and Now ROUTINE AWARENESSROUTINE AWARENESSROUTINE AWARENESSROUTINE AWARENESSROUTINE AWARENESS Positive Habits Confidence Security AWARENESS REMOVES PRESSUREAWARENESS REMOVES PRESSUREAWARENESS REMOVES PRESSUREAWARENESS REMOVES PRESSUREAWARENESS REMOVES PRESSURE Awareness allows: 1. An aloofness (above the situation) that will remove you from the anxiety and emotion of the situation. 2. Analytical judgement rather than an emotional reaction. ACTIVATIONACTIVATIONACTIVATIONACTIVATIONACTIVATION To increase the energy level (ENERGIZE): Center on the INHALE & AGGRESSIVE SELF TALK. To decrease the energy level (RELAXATION): Center on the EXHALE & CALMING SELF TALK.
  41. 41. OFFENSE
  42. 42. HITTING PARAMETERS 1. Timing is being in the right place at the right time. Good hitters are on line and on time. 2. The bigger the separation of the belly button and the hands the better the hitter. 3. The longer the bat can remain on the path of the pitch the better the hitter. 4. Any movement out of sequence means strength out of sequence and a break down of the swing. 5. Hitting is a linear movement, a rotation around an axis and a directional movement of the hands. 6. The hands need to remain close to the body during hip rotation. This is a rotational movement not a pushing action. 7. When the heel of the stride foot hits the ground the hips must then begin to open. 8. At “Point of Contact” the rear leg is no longer weight bearing. 9. When the pitcher separates his hands, the hitter should weight transfer back to the rear instep, stride and separate. All pre pitch movement should be done slow, easy and early. 10. The stride foot should hit the ground at the release of the pitch. 11. Hitters using an open stance should use a “Tap and Go” method. 12. The lead elbow is a hitter’s compass.
  43. 43. MENTAL PREPARATION FOR HITTINGMENTAL PREPARATION FOR HITTINGMENTAL PREPARATION FOR HITTINGMENTAL PREPARATION FOR HITTINGMENTAL PREPARATION FOR HITTING A. GETTING DRESSED FOR GAME Things You Do First preparation per game A. Separation from daily routine & personal issues You are putting on the ultimate baseball player Check all your equipment Special music you listen to B. ARRIVAL AT THE FIELD Setting up equipment B. Warm up with team Stretching-feel where you are at on this day. Stretchyour body into centered perspective Running-feel body coming together C. BATTING PRACTICE 1. Performance C. Warm up by swinging bats Slowly begin to get into hitting Work out kinks Good practice swings 2. Concentration Establish goals for B.P. 3. Coping Warm ups are not the game imagery D. BEFORE THE GAME 1. Performance D. Study the pitcher warming up-determine release point Image self making good contact Check scouting information Plan your strategy 2. Concentration Maintain or obtain proper arousal level Feel confidence, intensity, inner strength You are comfortable, in control 3. Coping Techniques Relaxation/activation procedures Breathing techniques Monitoring self-talk Stretching Talk to teammates, humor, etc.
  44. 44. E. IN THE HOLE 1. Performance E. Bat selection & preparation Stretching - get body loose Put on batting glove-ultimate hitter arrives 2. Concentration Study the pitcher-learn from every pitch he throws Relate before game information You are getting mentally and physically ready 3. Coping Techniques Whatever is productive Monitor your self-talk F. ON DECK 1. Performance F. Final loosening up Imagery of hitting ball 2. Concentration As you step into circle, concentration focuses in deeper Fine tune body and thoughts Get in the groove Crisp, quick images-feel contact Allow energy (color) to fill every cell of your body-awesome 3. Coping Use your techniques Focal point in stadium Monitor self-talk G. MOVING TO PLATE 1. Concentration G. With each step concentration intensifies Confidence, awesome H. TAKE SIGNAL 1. Performance H. Breathe nice and easy-THINK Take signal-quick image of successful execution 2. Concentration Clear, know what you need to do
  45. 45. I. STEPPING INTO THE BOX 1. Performance I Centering self in the box-balance point Quickly scan and relax body Warm up swings Make immediate adjustments to meet demands of situation Breathe-relax (concentration narrows) Release the shoulders, feel hands (trigger point) 2. Concentration Shifts of focus of attention Smart, quick and strong Ready-you and the pitcher Centered within 3. Coping Focus on pre-hitting routine J. NOW SHIFT ATTENTION TO PITCHER 1. Performance J. Once centered within, attention shifts to pitcher’s shoulder Fine tune to release area 2. Concentration Focused and ready Tunnel vision Cocoon of silence K. RESPOND TO THE SITUATION L. FEEDBACK 1. Performance L. Process feedback: More information on the pitcher & situation Use it to your advantage Stay positive Make adjustment to the pitcher 2. Concentration Process information Let go of previous pitch Keep it positive Go to pre-hitting routine 3. Coping Monitor self-talk Imagery
  46. 46. M. STEP OUT OF THE BOX 1. Performance M. Step out of the box and reload Trace your centering point Take breath-clearing technique Take signal Your own methods 2. Coping Use focal points Center Keep it positive N. REGAINING YOUR FOCUS AT THE PLATE-CLEARING Step out of the box Turn away from the pitcher Tighten-release Some routine to LET GO Turn to focal point Take a breath Turn to pitcher-totally focused on next pitch Apply your pre-hitting routine
  47. 47. OWL SWING GLOSSARYOWL SWING GLOSSARYOWL SWING GLOSSARYOWL SWING GLOSSARYOWL SWING GLOSSARY AccelerationAccelerationAccelerationAccelerationAcceleration The increasing change of velocity of the hands, arms and barrel head from the beginning of the swing through contact. Angle of ApproachAngle of ApproachAngle of ApproachAngle of ApproachAngle of Approach The angle at which the barrel head approaches the pitch. AxisAxisAxisAxisAxis An imaginary straight line through the center of the body, around which it should rotate during the swing. Cast (Out and Around)Cast (Out and Around)Cast (Out and Around)Cast (Out and Around)Cast (Out and Around) To release the wrists prematurely on the swing, causing the barrel head to arrive ahead of the hands and arms. Often caused by top hand dominate swing. Center of GravityCenter of GravityCenter of GravityCenter of GravityCenter of Gravity The point in the body, somewhere in the pelvic area, where the torso, legs and hips all balance. Zen followers call this the "one" position. Center of RotationCenter of RotationCenter of RotationCenter of RotationCenter of Rotation The axis around which the body winds and unwinds, usually referred to as rotation of the "one" into the pitch. Clearing the Left HipClearing the Left HipClearing the Left HipClearing the Left HipClearing the Left Hip Reaction to the pitch, by opening the front hip, and allowing rotation and the hands to remain inside the pitch Come Off the PitchCome Off the PitchCome Off the PitchCome Off the PitchCome Off the Pitch Premature opening of the lead shoulder. ConnectionConnectionConnectionConnectionConnection The coordination of the hips and hands. Keeping the elbows and hands close to the body during rotation and the barrel behind the hips. Centrifugal force will release the hands from inside the pitch. Directional HittingDirectional HittingDirectional HittingDirectional HittingDirectional Hitting Intentional opposite field hitting. Contact is made over the plate and with the inside half of the ball. Drop KneeDrop KneeDrop KneeDrop KneeDrop Knee Emphasis on the rear knee working as a balancing and directional device. Hands InsideHands InsideHands InsideHands InsideHands Inside Describes the swing path in which the barrel head approaches the pitch from inside and accelerates through the pitch. HookHookHookHookHook Describes swing path in which the barrel head approaches the pitch from outside and then pulls across. Knob DownKnob DownKnob DownKnob DownKnob Down Initial action of the bottom (lead) hand. It shortens path to the pitch and assists in keeping inside the pitch. Out to InOut to InOut to InOut to InOut to In Anticipation of pitch away, continuation of rotation of the hips for a ball inside. Power FadePower FadePower FadePower FadePower Fade A swing path from inside to out that imparts backspin. Insures contact without sacrificing power. Pre-performance RoutinePre-performance RoutinePre-performance RoutinePre-performance RoutinePre-performance Routine A ritual used before every pitch to initiate the vision sequence and help the batter remain in the moment.

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