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Yesterday was a Microsite. Facebook is Today. What will Tomorrow Be?
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Yesterday was a Microsite. Facebook is Today. What will Tomorrow Be?

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For some time, microsites acted as a core component of many marketing campaigns. They provided fast, shorter-term focal points to introduce new lines or new promotions. But not so much anymore. The ...

For some time, microsites acted as a core component of many marketing campaigns. They provided fast, shorter-term focal points to introduce new lines or new promotions. But not so much anymore. The inability to scale individual microsites or connect them in your marketing efforts pushed them away from the forefront. Today's quickly evolving landscape offers many solutions for listening, engaging, and interacting with consumers, creating relationships in social networks. But how can you translate those efforts into a comprehensive strategy, with the right tools and technology to scale your efforts long term?
In this webinar, you'll learn how to quickly deploy a more engaging and scalable microsite model that can both connect and scale your social marketing. You'll get answers to the following questions:

• How can you scale your social media strategy across the Internet?
• How do you put user generated content to work for you?
• How do you find advocates and then unlock their value in more places than one?

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  • Yesterday was a Microsite. Facebook is Today.What will Tomorrow Be?Date: Wednesday, March 31st, 2010Time: 2:00 PM ETFor some time, microsites acted as a core component of many marketing campaigns. They provided fast, shorter-term focal points to introduce new lines or new promotions. But not so much anymore. The inability to scale individual microsites or connect them in your marketing efforts pushed them away from the forefront. Today's quickly evolving landscape offers many solutions for listening, engaging, and interacting with consumers, creating relationships in social networks. But how can you translate those efforts into a comprehensive strategy, with the right tools and technology to scale your efforts long term?In this webinar, you'll learn how to quickly deploy a more engaging and scalable microsite model that can both connect and scale your social marketing. You'll get answers to the following questions:How can you scale your social media strategy across the Internet?How do you put user generated content to work for you?How do you find advocates and then unlock their value in more places than one?
  • Ripple6 is for companies interested in creating meaningful and measurable connections with people in social networks .Ripple6 provides a full suite of social media solutions that drive measureable results against business goals.
  • AS:“In acting, they tell you, “Don’t just talk; don’t just let the words come out of your mouth.” Go and geet inside the heart.” This guy has the ability to do that.Recalled his 2003 campaign… Clinton and the Democratic machine came west to boost Gray Davis… and it cast Arnold as David, not Goliath. “Obama.. up against the little guy no one has ever heard of before.”“People change very quickly.”Of Obama… “He let other people do the negotiating.” “If you want to put our fires all over the world, OK. But you’ve got to be therfo those negotations.
  • AS:“In acting, they tell you, “Don’t just talk; don’t just let the words come out of your mouth.” Go and get inside the heart.” This guy has the ability to do that.Recalled his 2003 campaign… Clinton and the Democratic machine came west to boost Gray Davis… and it cast Arnold as David, not Goliath. “Obama.. up against the little guy no one has ever heard of before.”“People change very quickly.”Of Obama… “He let other people do the negotiating.” “If you want to put our fires all over the world, OK. But you’ve got to be there for those negotations.
  • We also discovered we were under-exploiting the scale of this company. ... Many analysts covering our company think size is a detriment. They believe in the law of big numbers -- the larger you get, the harder it is to deliver the same percentage growth. Size doesn't matter. What matters is turning size into scale and turning that scale into accelerated growth. ---------------------AG Lafley. Took over as CEO of P&G in 2000.Announced last month that he was retiring.“So we expanded our mission to include the idea that "the consumer is boss." In other words, the people who buy and use P&G products are valued not just for their money, but as a rich source of in­formation and direction. If we can develop better ways of learning from them -- by listening to them, observing them in their daily lives, and even living with them -- then our mission is more likely to succeed.”===========Robert McDonaldI would argue social networks and digital media are scale at playhttp://adage.com/article?article_id=141536Convince Jack to use all 25 P&G brands.Using their products… they have a presence. They some way participate in our lives.=================    P&G CEO Bob McDonald on Why Size Doesn't MatterLafley Successor Says World's Biggest Spender Under-Leverages Its ScaleByJack NeffPublished: January 18, 2010 BATAVIA, Ohio (AdAge.com) -- The last decade at the world's biggest marketing spender belonged to A.G. Lafley, but this one belongs to Bob McDonald. In an interview with Advertising Age, the Procter & Gamble Chairman-CEO explains how he's different from his longtime mentor -- and it's more than being an Army guy trained in jungle and desert warfare vs. a Navy guy who operated a store. Bob McDonald Mr. McDonald keeps no paper files and wants to fully digitize P&G, and to the extent possible, it's marketing. He thinks all Cannes Lions should be titanium ones, because the idea always trumps the medium. He believes the company's massive size is an advantage. And he says his drive to add a billion consumers to the P&G stables over the next five years -- largely in developing markets -- doesn't mean forgoing "discontinuous innovation" in developed ones. In fact, he said this year's P&G innovation program may be the best in his 30-year career there. Ad Age: How are you different from A.G.? Mr. McDonald: We're very different. He studied the liberal arts. I studied engineering. He went in the Navy and worked in retail stores. I'm an airborne infantry ranger -- desert warfare, jungle warfare. Military experience may be common, as it is for many people in our generation, but I would argue those two are very different. If you look at the number of countries I've lived in around the world, it's very different from A.G., who lived in Japan for three or four years with P&G [Mr. McDonald has spent 15 years stationed outside the U.S., and his children had most of their primary and secondary education overseas.] The company was more deliberate about getting me ready, which is why I had more of those international experiences. Ad Age: A lot of the things you've been talking about -- touching more lives in more places more often, increasing business in developing markets -- started under A.G. Mr. McDonald: As we talked about succession, we talked about continuity with change. We want to preserve the things A.G. started, which are valuable to the company and which in his time led to doubling the business and quintupling the profit. But we also, given the deliberateness of the succession plan, did a lot of work on what was missing and what could take it to the next level. And of course A.G. was part of that. As I did that work , I led it; I discovered our purpose of touching and improving lives was incredibly powerful but underexploited. When I would go to campuses to recruit, and I typically am on a college campus once a quarter, Bear Stearns didn't exist anymore. Lehman didn't exist anymore. I'd have the largest audience I ever had at Harvard Business School. And as I talked to the students, I discovered they were looking for professions that would provide meaning for their lives. I think all of us as human beings need meaning. And it got me to realize that most people joined this company because of that purpose. Our agency partners also felt our purpose was meaningful but under-exploited. ... So I had a number of inputs telling me that what we needed to do was get us back to our purpose. And from that we developed this idea of purpose-inspired growth. We also discovered we were under-exploiting the scale of this company. ... Many analysts covering our company think size is a detriment. They believe in the law of big numbers -- the larger you get, the harder it is to deliver the same percentage growth. Size doesn't matter. What matters is turning size into scale and turning that scale into accelerated growth. So you'll see more multi-brand commercial innovation. We've created a new team, which we call the Vice Chair Team, which includes myself, [Chief Financial Officer] Jon Moeller and the vice chairmen, who get together weekly, plan personnel moves, look at our programs focused on various competitors and countries, and work to make sure we're showing up as one company and our scale is having an impact. [Another strategy is] simplification. The natural tendency of a company is to become bureaucratic, hierarchical and slow-moving. We're trying to [combat] that through the removal of layers and hierarchy and the use of technology, which frankly fits my engineering background and the fact that I studied computer science. ... We're going to use technology to make this company operate like a $10 billion company rather than an $80 billion one. Ad Age: Some people see you as more operations-focused than brand-focused. Mr. McDonald: Over a 29-year career, I was head of global operations from 2004 to 2009. The last five years tended to define me, but like everyone else, I spent a lot of time in marketing. I was the Cascade brand manager in 1983 here in the U.S. The Tide brand manager in 1984. And brand building is what I love doing. Ad Age: You led the integration of Gillette, and P&G had never acquired a company considered a competitor for leadership in industry best practice. Did that make a difference? Mr. McDonald: I think a lot of people have lost that story. I don't know of any other case where a company that did the financial acquisition also made a deliberate attempt to allow the acquired company to in many ways contribute to the new culture. Ad Age: Was it disappointing you didn't keep more of the senior people from Gillette, or was it just inevitable because of the incentive structure for the Gillette people? Mr. McDonald: Are we disappointed? Yes. Was it inevitable? Yes. I could go name by name and tell you of my disappointment but also of their personal plans that led to it. ... But I'm thrilled [Vice Chairman Global Beauty] Ed Shirley is here. I'm thrilled about Paul Fox [who heads the corporate external relations team]. ... 40% of P&G leaders now started their careers somewhere other than P&G, and that's probably the largest percentage in my career and probably ever. Ad Age: The financial markets responded favorably to you talking about taking market share again. How would you assess the impact of making that a focus? Mr. McDonald: In August, when A.G. and I did the [earnings] call, I made the statement that losing market share was no longer acceptable. It was never acceptable. But we had a different goal in the prior 12 months. That was to get the financial structure of our business right. We faced $4 billion of currency revalutation, $2 billion of incremental commodity costs on top of $1 billion the previous year. Last year was not one we're proud of. It was the most difficult one we've been through. But thank goodness we did what we did, because now we're in a position to invest in the strongest innovation program we've had in my career. And that's paying off. We promised we'd return to [organic sales] growth in the October-December quarter. We brought that forward one quarter. We only grew 2%, which isn't great, but we did grow. ... It's going to be a good year. Ad Age: Your goal to add a billion consumers in five years is a lot of people, and it seems like most would have to come from the poorest countries or poorest tiers of developing countries. Mr. McDonald: Not necessarily. You're one of them. Ad Age: I'm already there. Mr. McDonald: We've got 25 product categories in the U.S., and you're not using all 25. Ad Age: That's true, though I did buy diapers this week. Mr. McDonald: You could shave a little more. Ad Age: That's true. Mr. McDonald: In fact, you could shave your head. You use more blades that way. Certainly, developing markets is a big part of it. We've got a $25 billion business in developing markets now. That's larger than a lot of our large competitors. Again we've got to turn that size into scale and scale into growth. ... A lot of the opportunities in these markets [aren't] about switching people from a competitor. It's about getting them to use a product at all, whether it be disposable diapers, feminine care products. Or if you get into some parts of the world, you find people using the same soap to wash their hair, their bodies, their clothes, their dishes, their walls. It's a huge opportunity. But I don't want you to take away from that that we're not serious about growing our business in developed markets, because we are. We need more new categories, more new Swiffers, more new Febrezes, more discontinuous innovation, and we're working on that ... And that's the kind of thing that will provide important step change in developed markets, as well as we need better loyalty to all of our brands in all of our categories, and we're working on those things as well. Multi-brand commercial innovation is one example. If you look at our Olympic sponsorship or NFL sponsorship, it's about scale, multiple brands and increasing the size of the market basket for American consumers. Ad Age: There are people who think, in the age of social and digital media, scale isn't going to matter as much. Do you think that's true? Mr. McDonald: I actually think the reverse. I would argue social networks and digital media are scale at play. One of the things that came out of Cannes for [Global Brand-Building Officer] Marc Pritchard and me both was the scale impact of social media. The Cannes idea is a bit outdated. ... The way I see it, the awards now should all be titaniums -- you start with the idea now before you even think about a medium, and you take the idea, which is rooted in consumer insight, and only then do you figure out how to use the media, and you use every medium. And then what the marketer needs to be able to do is be able to let go ... And the best ideas were like this warden of the Great Australian Reef, where, rather than running a tourism campaign, the government decided to put a want ad in several papers around the world for a warden for the Australian reef. And they asked for videos, which is another example of what we're doing. And they let it go. So you had this guy in an icebreaker in Greenland talking about how he was the best guy. Another [takeaway] was the ubiquity of social media and how an idea can take off and you don't have to pay for it. What I worry about is that it democratizes scale. It allows the little guy to get scale almost instantaneously. And we've got to make sure we don't give up that opportunity. That's why we're talking about transforming the company through digitization, visualization, virtualization. And that's my job, which is to change the way we work by digitizing the entire company end to end. Ad Age: It looks like the battles will be particularly heated this year. How do you win in that environment? Mr. McDonald: We have more runway. We have $25 billion of business in developing and emerging markets, but it's only about 30% of our business. For Colgate and Unilever, it's a much higher percentage. We have a much broader footprint than many of our competitors, who have a footprint that looks like the colonization of the countries they came from. We can also take advantage of our scale. We don't want to go head to head in a battle with a competitor and lose value in a category. But we have enough categories to choose from that we can build infrastructure in a country in a category that might not be competitive to begin with. I think that augurs well. I think it helps that I've lived and worked in those markets. Go through the lists of CEOs for those other companies and see how many have lived and worked in the Philippines. Ad Age: You've worked in just about all regions of the world, haven't you? Mr. McDonald: [Counting] my military life, too, when I lived and worked in the jungles of Panama. That's where the Army has its jungle-warfare school. I was joking with president Martinelli of Panama -- he's also the largest retailer in Panama, so we've known him for some time -- I was joking with him that I probably know every black palm tree in Panama, but I hadn't been in his office before. Black palms have these needles, and as you're moving through the jungle at night, often you can trip and fall. Your immediate human reaction is to put your hands out. Well, these needles have poison on them, so I made sure all my soldiers were wearing gloves to deflect the needles. You learn a lot of things. We were in the Philippines almost an entire year without electricity. They had built a nuclear power plant on top of an earthquake fault. Cory Aquino built it, and President Ramos never started it up, for good reason. There was also some graft involved, and some other things. Literally we were day to day on power. ... When you live in a place like that, and you only have running water in the house a half hour a day ... it creates a sensitivity that resonates with you the rest of your life, and your family. So I don't offer flippantly that it makes a difference. Ad Age: When you consider the shift of focus to developing markets, the need to build margins in developed markets to compensate for lower margins in developing ones, the fact that digital marketing is different and often less expensive than traditional marketing, have we already seen the all-time record level of marketing spending for P&G in the U.S.? Mr. McDonald: Oh, no. We have to get in touch with our consumers. You said the spending. I don't know that I want to deal with spending. But I'm happy to talk about reach, awareness, because we're looking for the most efficient ways possible to reach consumers. But for any company that prides itself on innovation, that wants to create not just new brands but new categories of products, we're going to have to communicate with people. While people increasingly will do it digitally, there's no question that everybody won't be ready for digital communications until deep in the future. It's a fallacious connection that developing markets have lower margins and as a result you have to raise margins in developed markets. ... Our after-tax margins in developing markets are consistent with our margins in developed markets. We are not a company that doesn't challenge our organization. We don't tell people you're going into a developing market and your margin goal is half that of a developed market. Ad Age: P&G's done a very good job of fostering diversity over the years, and probably better than most of your global competitors. But over the past couple of years the senior leadership has become a bit more male, American and white, and there have been some losses of diversity at the [marketing] director level. Is that a concern? Mr. McDonald: Diversity journey is never done. And because diversity can sometimes boil down to one or two individuals, you end up having moments in time where you may not be as proud of where you are as before. For example, [former P&G President-Global Business Units Susan Arnold's] departure, while all of us knew it was coming, while she had said from the very beginning she was going to retire when she was 55, is a loss of diversity. We've made progress. Over half of our leadership team is non-American. We have Mel Healey now leading North America. I'm becoming personally responsible now. I'm the diversity leader of the company. But I will partner with MoheetNagrath, who's our global human resources officer, and we are going to promote Linda Clement-Holmes, one of our top talents in global business services, and she's from the same hometown as me in Gary, Indiana, to head our diversity efforts. I am absolutely committed and focused on that, and you're about to see that in a raft of announcements. It will be something that will occur during my tenure, because I know without it we can't be innovative. And I know it's the right thing to do. And I do the right thing, or I try to. Ad Age: Will the next CEO of P&G be a woman? Mr. McDonald: It's possible. We have a lot of talented women. It could be a man. ... It's my job to make sure there's a choice. Ad Age: There's been some movement to reshape the marketing organization and administration around consumer cohorts rather than product categories [such as organizing around male and female consumers in beauty care]. How far will that go? Mr. McDonald: The first thing we did was create an integrated brand-building organization [encompassing marketing, design and public relations]. That was my thing. And getting a guy like Marc Pritchard to lead it ... [and] also getting a very talented team of experts like [Global External Relations Officer] Christopher Hassall, Joan Lewis in market research, Phil Duncan who's a master of design. One of the things I've challenged Marc [Pritchard] on is that country boundaries are becoming less important. I'm a big believer in Sam Huntington's book "Clash of Civilizations," written in the 1980s. In essence, you could argue Huntington predicted 9/11, or at least what might happen. But what I challenged Marc is, in a digital world, what stops us from marketing to consumer cohorts without regard to country boundaries? When I was in Asia, most of the economies are run by people of Chinese descent, whether it's the Chinese who emigrated years ago from China to the Philippines, or the other Chinese groups who run the economy in Indonesia. So why, if we develop a good product that works well in China, couldn't we expand to all the Chinese in Asia, rather than think about the Chinese in Indonesia as being different from the Chinese elsewhere? The Chinese in Indonesia still speak Chinese. They still read Chinese newspapers. They still have Chinese street signs. The ultimate in marketing is marketing to the individual and customizing products to the individual. But then you have a continuum from the post-World War II mass marketing to the individual marketing of the digital age. And anything that helps us generalize or group or simplify the marketing to people over time we will do that until we get to the ultimate, which is one on one. And I think marketing civilizations, as I call it, or cohorts, is one of those routes. Ad Age: Is there another Swiffer or Febreze in the pipeline for P&G? Mr. McDonald: Well, there'd better be. I talked about the importance of discontinuous innovation. And we're working on a lot of discontinuous innovation. Each one of our vice chair organizations has a new business development organization that's charged with developing new categories or brands. The periods of time historically of growth for the company were when we acquired or launched new categories and new brands, so it's not rocket science. I was talking with John Smale recently, and you could just see it in the history of his time as CEO. I had lunch with DurkJager last week, and we were talking about the discontinuous innovation he brought to the company. We've got to do it. We have the strongest innovation program now that I can ever remember. And a lot of it will be revealed over the next six months. ... Remember the strategy of touch more lives more completely in more parts of the world. When I talk to business units, it's to ask why isn't Febreze in every part of the world. What's it going to take to get oral care into every part of the world? How long is it going to take? And I'm impatient. Ad Age: What keeps you awake at night? Mr. McDonald: The biggest thing is the parable of the frog in the boiling water. That's why today, of the Fortune 50 from 1955, only nine of those companies still exist. P&G is one of them. I want P&G to be on that list 172 years from now, because that means we're touching and improving more lives. The only thing that can kick us off that list is complacency or inability to learn new things or unwillingness to change.Copyright © 1992-2010 Crain Communications | Privacy Statement | Contact Us
  • Heather McNamara6 organs removed“It was.. I mean, the most amazing experience of all was knowing that she just wasn’t a patient… they cared. Everybody cared. It was about Heather getting better.”This is a story about institutions realizing that people are what is important, and findListening and engaging – and genuinely succeeding is based upon this principle.Look at her face; go back and listen to the video – what you have there is an advocate for what
  • 9 years ago:Yahoo was still king.No Facebook. No myspace. Not even Blogs.Yankees were about to win the World Series for the 3rd time.In a minute back to the last 9 months.-----
  • http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/03/29/has-viral-gone-viralMarch 29, 2010, 6:33 pmHas Viral Gone Viral?By NICK BILTON Over the last year, we’ve seen the rapid development of the real-time Web, incorporating the spread of news, status updates and the entertainment we share and consume. It’s as if the idea of “going viral” has, well, gone viral itself.A case in point: when Michael Jackson died last year, it took only minutes for traffic to spike worldwide on NYTimes.com. AOL’s instant messenger service almost crashed as people tried to share the information of his death as quickly as possible and Twitter saw strains as the news unfurled.In a 1960 television interview, Marshall McLuhan, the famous media professor and theorist, explained that even then, the spread of media allowed information to travel through space and time like never before.McLuhan said, “These new media have made our world into a single unit. The world is now like a continually sounding tribal drum, where everybody gets the message all the time.”Today, not only is this exacerbated by more news outlets, but by who delivers this information. In the 1960s, large media outlets, including daily newspapers and the nightly television news, were the first to spread information at viral speeds. But today, it seems that everyone can do it. Let me give you an example. Over the last few months, there’s been a tremendous amount of media coverage about the Web site Chatroulette, which randomly connects webcam-equipped users for face-to-face interactions. Two weeks ago, when I sat down with AndreyTernovskiy, the 17-year-old founder of the site, for a One on One interview, I asked him if there was a single moment when traffic spiked on the site. Mr. Ternovskiy said that growth was just continual. There wasn’t a single news site, blog, or social network that created a spike in the number of users.He explained that last November, when he started the Web site, he logged less than 500 visitors for the month. Just three months later, without any advertising or promotion, he had 30 million unique users visiting the site — an average of a million unique visitors a day.He said that the day he started Chatroulette, he saw 20 users on the site and it just grew instantly and organically from there. “The site doubled and it continued to double every day since then,” Mr. Ternovskiy said.Granted, Chatroulette doesn’t require a sign-up process: you just click a button, and you’re on your way.But the sites that helped spread the word of Chatroulette — Twitter, Facebook and other social Web sites — sometimes took years to see 30 million unique users. Chatroulette’s viral growth, aided by social media, suggests that the already speedy clock of Internet time is running faster than ever.
  • No debate, It started with Hotwired.Cutting edge use of the technology was a flat graphic, and a creative message.Volvo… safe in a way… but in hindsight prescient. Click the ad, you fill out a questionnaire that was MAILED to you. The goal? Establish a relationship.This was about creating connections.
  • And the cutting edge for creating connections meant you had to send them to your web site… which was essentially a brochure…
  • So here’s what an analyst had to say in Red Herring at the time. They were still HUGE back then.NOTE THE FOCUS ON USER EXPERIENCE.http://www.redherring.com/Home/7262Analyst View: The emergence of rich mediaPrintAll ArticlesLetter to the editorPodcaston 23 January 2001, 22:00by staffVideo, audio, and Internet technologies are used by hundreds of millions of people and generate billions of dollars in advertising and commercial revenues. Until recently, these technologies were independent of each other, with the Internet mainly used as a mechanism for communicating textual information with associated two-dimensional (2D) graphics.But recent technological advancements in digital video creation, streaming, compression, caching, bandwidth, and other content-delivery technologies are bringing video, audio, and the Internet together as rich media.We define rich media as the use (or combination) of video, voice, data, and other technologies, such as animation over IP networks, to create an otherwise unattainable user experience. And according to a 1971 study by University of California at Los Angeles professor Albert Mehrabian, body language and facial expressions represent about 55 percent of the information that people interpret. Rich media also takes advantage of the Internet's reach, interactivity, and data orientation to deliver the communicative power of video or animation. It adds the dimensions of context and personalization to provide relevance that cannot be matched by other communications or broadcast media. For this reason, we expect that rich media will significantly add to the user experience and, therefore, will be the Internet's next "killer app."While much has been written about rich media's role in the world of online content, very little has focused on its use in the enterprise. Because the need to attract, retain, collaborate with, and better service customers has become more critical in today's environment, we anticipate that companies will look to rich media to gain an advantage. In our opinion, rich media is a compelling array of technologies that will "raise the bar" for e-commerce and enterprise communications.A RICH OPPORTUNITY FOR GROWTHWe forecast the rich media market to reach $34 billion by 2004 (with a compounded annual growth rate of 53 percent) and expect that e-commerce will be a major driver for rich media use. META Group forecasts that by 2002, more than 66 percent of Global 2000 Web sites will be rich media-enabled. By 2003, it suggests that more than 75 percent of Global 2000 firms will have consistent rich media branding involving sight, sound, and interaction. And a Forrester Research survey shows that 47 percent of enterprises plan to start developing broadband content in the next 12 months; by 2004, Forrester sees rich client interfaces driving the majority of consumers' PC-based Web experiences.Rich media will become a supporting technology in several revenue-generating and cost-saving applications and will be used by enterprises to attract prospective customers as well as retain and further penetrate existing accounts. Rich media will be deployed to improve the effectiveness of online advertising, Web marketing, sales, customer interaction centers, channel/partner management, collaboration, and training. We also anticipate that rich media technologies will be used to enhance online service and self-help experiences for users.Of the 184 million abandoned online transactions in 1999, Datamonitor estimates 8 percent, or $1.6 billion in sales, could have been saved by implementing some form of online customer service. They forecast that those losses will double to $3.2 billion in 2000. In our opinion, rich media applications will optimize the user experience by integrating with enterprise database and other IT applications, allowing users to access or be presented with desired information at the optimal time. This combination will present immersive, targeted, and relevant content to users on many types of devices.Because of their complex nature, specialized tools are required to coördinate, manage, aggregate, and distribute rich media assets within enterprise functional groups as well as across public and proprietary networks. The rich media market is currently in an early stage of development, with four logical markets emerging today: content creation, asset management, distribution technologies, and content access and aggregation.THE KEY AREAS OF RICH MEDIAContent creation: Includes applications and services that enable the creation, editing, production, and encoding of digital video/audio, animation, and graphics production. These tools create and edit the original content that end-users see. We expect immediate growth will occur with graphics and animation tools. Without making any judgment concerning the associated stocks, the products in this sector includeMacromedia (Nasdaq : MACR)'s Flash; Adobe Systems (Nasdaq : ADBE)'s LiveMotion; privately held Pulse Entertainment's Creator; and Brilliant Digital Entertainment (AMEX : BDE)'s b3d Studio and similar technologies. These tools facilitate the creation of content that grabs users' attention without using tremendous amounts of bandwidth. There are also new technologies that offer advantages over video by providing a realistic, digital representation of a person that can be animated and controlled interactively over low bandwidths, such as digital stand-in technology produced byLifeFX (Nasdaq : LEFX). Rich media asset management: Includes applications and services that catalog, index, and annotate original content as well as facilitate the repurposing and the search and retrieval of rich media content. These applications allow for video content to be incorporated into enterprise databases and integrated into other IT applications. Asset management applications also handle production management, distribution preparation, syndication management, rights management, and security. This category provides a most compelling set of investment opportunities, in our opinion, since it is here that rich media assets will be managed and made usable on the Internet, and in particular, IT infrastructures. Again, without making any judgment concerning any securities involved, those that participate in this area include a mix of public and private companies: Artesia Technologies,Chuckwalla, Convera (Nasdaq : CNVR), eMotion, IBM (NYSE : IBM)'s Digital Library, Informix (Nasdaq : IFMX)'s Media 360, MediaSite, The Bulldog Group, QB, and Virage (Nasdaq : VRGE). Distribution technologies: Includes methods and services that facilitate the distribution of rich media assets over corporate networks and the Internet. This includes content distribution, ad insertion, reporting and analysis tools, services, and storage. We anticipate that the distribution market will look to supplement their offerings with added-value technologies to round them out. Akamai Technologies (Nasdaq : AKAM)'s acquisitions of streaming media providers Network24 and Intervu and Inktomi (Nasdaq : INKT)'s acquisition of Fastforward are recent examples.Content access and aggregation: Includes product companies that develop end-user interfaces to rich media content (e.g., streaming players) in addition to services-based companies that provide content repurposing, aggregation and hosting, integration, syndication, and billing. This area also includes companies, such asVastvideo, that are focused on providing content that can be delivered easily in a compelling, contextually relevant manner. WHAT'S NEXT?In a post-2000 Internet era, the tough question that needs to be addressed is not whether the Global 2000 will continue to spend on e-commerce initiatives, online advertising, and online customer care, but how and where will these investments be made? The Internet is an increasingly important aspect of not just e-business but business, period. The use of the Web is not going away; in fact, its adoption is growing faster than any other medium in history.We are in the relatively early stages of learning how to use the Internet to its best effect as a powerful business infrastructure tool. Companies will continue to advertise and provide customer support, and they cannot afford to ignore this medium; advertisers and the technology they use will catch up with the opportunity and rich media will improve its effectiveness.Disappointments are inevitable, especially if expectations are excessive, as has been the case recently. With such disappointments and signs that IT expenditures are softening in certain areas, many technology stocks have faltered lately. At times like this, it is important to be highly selective. The winning stocks will be those that provide technology with a high, tangible value proposition and a demonstrable return on investment.
  • Fast forward to 2001. A lot of money was made and lost in between there… but the big advertising innovation that came to emerge was how to make those ads more creative than they were.Indeed you can also connect THAT to your web site.Red Herring”:We define rich media as the use (or combination) of video, voice, data, and other technologies…to create an otherwise unattainable user experience… It adds the dimensions of context and personalization to provide relevance that cannot be matched by other communications or broadcast media… we expect that rich media will significantly add to the user experience and, therefore, will be the Internet's next "killer app."
  • Microsites Still Have Marketers' AttentionAPRIL 28, 2008 But success is not guaranteed.If you build a microsite, they will come, they will engage and you can get the data to prove it. That is the main finding of a newly released Keynote Competitive Research study conducted in October 2007. The company tracked reactions of consumers planning to buy an automobile within the next six months as they interacted with microsites for various car models, including the Toyota Yaris. Need data for presentations? eMarketer subscribers can download charts instantly — over 50,000 choices.Learn About an eMarketer SubscriptionKeynote said the Yarismicrosite demonstrated that "the more engaged people are with product and brand microsites, the more satisfied they will be and conversion rates will be higher than for people less engaged." That is great if you are trying to sell a Yaris, but what does the study say about using microsites for other brands? Even the Keynote study found differences in engagement levels, time spent at the microsite and other metrics, depending on the car brand in question. Were those differences the result of the types of consumers who were predisposed to pick a certain brand or the microsites themselves? Keynote did not offer an analysis and, as with other Website comparisons, it may be less productive to compare the sites to each other than to judge them on their own merits: Did they reflect the proper brand attributes? Did they appeal to the target audience? Microsites still have tactical appeal to many online marketers. About as many marketers surveyed in late 2007 by Scene7 used microsites as used video. Similarly, MarketingSherpa readers surveyed last year rated microsites highest in terms of delivering "great results." As with many online tactics, microsite metrics are getting better all the time. Don Aoki, senior vice president of Keynote, said that in the end, metrics are what reveal success, which depends on engagement. "User perceptions change within [microsites], and the end result will be different depending on the elements interacted with," said Mr. Aoki. "With interactive advertising, the consumer must be presented compelling content to draw him or her into the interaction. The consumer must be engaged," he said. Learn which other tactics are getting online advertisers' attention. US Online Advertising: Resilient in a Rough Economy .
  • http://www.imediaconnection.com/content/18515.imcThe difficulties in managing ongoing multiple interactions with the consumer in many places.This campaign is one thing… the next campaign it may be something else. How do I tie them tofgether?Not just managing the cost of creation and ideas; but delivering an ongoing return from these efforts.Comments:Instead, having a responsible agency (to Dan's point above) develop a micro-site with a custom tailored SEM/SEO campaign and an advanced analytics scheme allows that product manager not only to sell more widgets, but also to continuously track & optimize a campaign at each point along the demand-gen path.A really good example of how a microsite can drive your business is the widely successful elfyourself.com site for Office Max. But, then again I'm sure you knew that :)
  • TheMicrosite began the migration away from just the corporate site and into the consumer’s backyard. Those places where they play and where they are more in control.Can it create somethingRicherMore experientialMore emotionalMore focused on Now
  • Fast forward to today….What about the past 9 years, and specifically, the past nine months that have been so ripe with change.Two things.
  • http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/10/weekinreview/10stone.htmlhttp://twitter.com/lrainie
  • http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-us-children-who-own-mobile-phones-2010-1?utm_source=Triggermail&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=SAI_COTD_011910CHART OF THE DAY: One Third Of U.S. 11-Year-Olds Have CellphonesDan Frommer and Kamelia Angelova | Jan. 19, 2010, 3:15 PM | 1,083 | More kids are getting mobile phones: Last year, more than 35% of U.S. children ages 10-11 had cellphones, almost double the amount in 2005, according to Mediamark data, via eMarketer. And even more than 5% of 6-7-year-olds had cellphones last year.Takeaway: The audience for kids-focused mobile content, apps, and advertising is growing rapidly.Follow the Chart Of The Day on Twitter: www.twitter.com/chartofthedayWhile you may not be marketing to 10 year olds….
  • ConnectionsContextCreativityAnalytics & InsightPersonalWord of Mouth
  • As niche networks are quickly becoming the "go-to" for deep discussions around hobbies and common interests, how can your clients overcome the noise and genuinely connect with consumers, while still allowing their message to scale? Learn the seven C's of social marketing: campaigns, conversations, community, clicks, creativity, collaboration, and connections.=============Click-through rates on banner ads are down and consumers are developing increasingly complex social graphs. As niche networks are quickly becoming the “go-to” for deep discussions around hobbies and common interests, how can your client’s brands  overcome the noise and genuinely connect with consumers while still allowing their message to scale?  Join us as we discuss the seven C's of social marketing: Campaigns, Conversations, Community, Clicks, Creativity, Collaboration and Connections.      ================
  • ===============Click-through rates on banner ads are down and consumers are developing increasingly complex social graphs. As niche networks are quickly becoming the “go-to” for deep discussions around hobbies and common interests, how can your client’s brands  overcome the noise and genuinely connect with consumers while still allowing their message to scale?  Join us as we discuss the seven C's of social marketing: Campaigns, Conversations, Community, Clicks, Creativity, Collaboration and Connections.     
  • ==================Wendy Clark.SVP, Integrated Marketing and Communications Capabilities, Coca-Cola.=================“We must let the conversations take place.”“Advertising was 2008. 2009 and beyond is about Communities and Connections.” “If you build it…”“Curate…”=================There is no way to shut down the conversations that are happening. When you realize that, you can begin to leverage those conversations by participating in them.Now and in the future, Ad Managers will be more like Content Managers. They will focus on finding and connecting with those who are creating many of these messages. Some will be advocates and some will not. Regardless, they are important part of shaping YOUR message.You must go into the consumer’s backyard and participate with them.Curate content… co-create with users… engage and interact with all that is there.===========================================From Mashable: http://mashable.com/2009/11/17/coke-expedition-206/ With Expedition 206, Coke is really doing something unique. Not only are they letting the winners travel the globe to visit all 206 markets, they are going to utilize the social web along the way.This is how it works: other than airfare, the team members will have to make their own way across the world. They have a schedule of stops, but they have to get their own food, find their own places to stay and meet up with the locals themselves. The team is going to be given per diem for food and local travel, but what they do and where they do it is pretty much up to the team members — and the people at home interacting with the Expedition 206 team online.The team will be visiting the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics, the FIFA World Cup in South Africa and the World Expo in Shanghai. They will be sharing their updates on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube (), Flickr (), and other social networking sites. You can follow the progress on those channels or see the real-time lifestreams at Expedition206.com.Along the way, people at home can recommend places to stay or must-see attractions, restaurants to definitely visit — or avoid — and more. Who knows, if the team happens to be in your area — you might even want to meet up for a Coke or show them something cool in your area.The whole trip is all about interacting with people around the world and sharing the idea of happiness and connecting on a personal level and making connections that can exist beyond just language.
  • Gives women a platform to share their remarkable survival journeys andTo date, over 30,000 celebrations have been created from family and friends with practically no promotional effortOn average, Celebration Chain has a 5-8 minute brand exposureProject Goal: To provide guidance to women with breast cancer from those who have experienced it before them and place Arimidex at the centre of the conversation.Challenge: Over 200,000 people develop breast cancer each year. Each one needs to be given a voice—and a platform to share it.Insight:Breast cancer is a complex experience and women touched by it feel confused, frightened, and distressed, often not knowing where to turn to for support.Women who have experienced it often want to give back to the community
  • ==========================Custom Research for Post Cereals. Embedded in an existing social network.“We were able to reach out to moms in a way that was convenient and comfortable for them. It created honest conversations and feedback about our brand which allowed for solid insights.”Greg Lanides, Brand Manager, Grape Nuts
  • How can you scale your social media strategy across the Internet?How do you put user generated content to work for you?How do you find advocates and then unlock their value in more places than one?
  • So now that we’ve talked about why brands should care and the elements of a social strategy, we want to give you an example of our methodology for enabling a comprehensive social marketing strategy. And we say social “marketing” because it isn’t about using tools, it’s more about marketing to and engaging with consumers. So let’s talk about the hub, the elements of the hub and how they come together to enable your social marketing strategy.
  • Extending the Brand Community
  • So, just to sum it up, we feel like this is the best way to build and deploy a social marketing strategy. It’s:Scalable: based on extending through syndication, distribution through social ads, and connections to other social networksConnected: to your site, your positioningIt’s an asset: This is an asset with data YOU own, not another social network. It’s for you to build a community for your consumers.
  • http://cincinnati.momslikeme.com/members/JournalActions.aspx?g=246570&m=2199742&si=Comments&pi=2#2199769
  • http://cincinnati.momslikeme.com/members/groupabout.aspx?g=1066690
  • Yesterday was a Microsite. Facebook is Today.What will Tomorrow Be?Date: Wednesday, March 31st, 2010Time: 2:00 PM ETFor some time, microsites acted as a core component of many marketing campaigns. They provided fast, shorter-term focal points to introduce new lines or new promotions. But not so much anymore. The inability to scale individual microsites or connect them in your marketing efforts pushed them away from the forefront. Today's quickly evolving landscape offers many solutions for listening, engaging, and interacting with consumers, creating relationships in social networks. But how can you translate those efforts into a comprehensive strategy, with the right tools and technology to scale your efforts long term?In this webinar, you'll learn how to quickly deploy a more engaging and scalable microsite model that can both connect and scale your social marketing. You'll get answers to the following questions:How can you scale your social media strategy across the Internet?How do you put user generated content to work for you?How do you find advocates and then unlock their value in more places than one?

Yesterday was a Microsite. Facebook is Today. What will Tomorrow Be? Yesterday was a Microsite. Facebook is Today. What will Tomorrow Be? Presentation Transcript

  • Social Networking Platform Yesterday was a Microsite. Facebook is Today. What Will Tomorrow Be? March 31, 2010 Rich Ullman rich@ripple6.com
  • Agenda • Introduction • Why Should Brands Care? • Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow • Best Practices • Solving the Brand Marketer’s Problem • Q&A
  • Who is Ripple6? • Founded 2006 • A wholly-owned, independently operated subsidiary of Gannett. Co., Inc. (as of 11/2008) • Sister Companies – Point Roll, ShopLocal, USA Today, HS Sports, BNQT • Social Platform; Strategic Innovation Partner • Partners include Procter & Gamble, Gannett , Meredith, Unilever
  • Why Should You Care?
  • January 2010: Arnold and Scott Brown
  • It’s about scale. Size Doesn’t Matter “I would argue social networks and digital media are scale at play…” Scale Ubiquity The Little Guy Presence http://adage.com/article?article_id=141536
  • Heather McNamara
  • Advertising Week 2009 #adweek “More change in ad business in last 9 months than in last 9 years.”
  • March 29, 2010: “Has Viral Gone Viral?” “These new media have made our world into a single unit. The world is now like a continually sounding tribal drum, where everybody gets the message all the time.” Marshall McLuhan 1960
  • 1994: Online Advertising Begins Click here… go to where? What kind of Volvo would you be interested in? Static GIF’s 476x60 (pre-IAB) Click Though
  • State of the Art Your Web Site Connections 1994 Static Banner Ads
  • January 2001: Rich Media Emerges … an otherwise unattainable user experience… It adds the dimensions of context and personalization to provide relevance that cannot be matched by other communications or broadcast media… we expect that it will significantly add to the user experience and, therefore, will be the Internet's next "killer app."
  • State of the Art Your Web Site Connections Context Creativity Analytics & Insight Rich Media Ads 1994 2001 Static Banner a Ads
  • 2004 - 2007: Cool Microsites Drive Viral b. April 8, 2004 d. ?
  • 2008: Are Microsites Past Their Prime? The Author • Internal Processes & Speaking to the Customer • Is it an Ongoing Destination? • Cost? ROI? The Comments • Integration with Ads • What Memorable Aspects? • SEO, SERPS • Can it create something • Richer • More experiential • More emotional • More focused on Now
  • State of the Art Your Web Site Connections Context Creativity Analytics & Insight Rich Personal Media Participatory Ads 1994 2001 2006 Static Banner a Ads
  • Now What? “More change in ad business in last 9 months than in last 9 years.” ? 1994 2001 Today
  • The Pace of Change “People two, three or four years apart are having completely different experiences with technology. College students scratch their heads at what their high school siblings are doing, and they scratch their heads at their younger siblings. It has sped up generational differences.” Lee Rainie Director of the Pew Internet Project
  • What will be their expectations? Age 10.83 Age 4.25 Source: Business Insider, Silicon Alley Insider
  • Today: What Do YOU Like? The User • Easy • Sharing affinities • They like staying where they are. The Marketer • Advocates • Data • Fragmentation • Targeting • Word of Mouth
  • #1 Barrier: Where to Begin Source: 2009 Marketing Industry Trends Report July 26, 2009 by Equation Research
  • “The 7 C’s of Social Marketing” What Do I Do?
  • Welcome to Tomorrow. • Campaigns • Collaboration • Clicks • Conversations • Community • Creativity • Connected
  • Collaboration Wins. “I’d like to teach the world to sing?”
  • Be a Curator of Conversations 25
  • Deep (and Private) Conversations. • 4 week qualitative study • Embedded in a social network. • 94 moms • 70 topics
  • Connect It. • Create Scale • Engage in Their Backyard • Leverage Consumer Dialogue • Build Continuity in your Efforts
  • Unlocking Value and Connecting Advocates Across the Web
  • Solving the Brand Marketer’s Problem • Social Media can be overwhelming. – There are numerous social media outlets that are disconnected and disjointed • How can you easily manage your social media presence? • How can you easily listen & engage in conversations with your consumers across the web? – And then optimize your experience!
  • 1 2 Scaling Social Efforts • Generate Critical Mass • Distribute It Where They Are • Great User Experience Social Hub 4 • A Distributed Social Channel for Listening and Engaging 3 5 Rich Media Social Ads
  • Benefits Scalable Connected Comprehensive Asset
  • Ripple6 Social Hub Offering Core Platform Analytics Insights Community Social Hub • Full featured rich platform designed for engagement • Robust social analytics • Core connected community • Deep social insights
  • Listening to the Conversation
  • Luvs Brand Community
  • Extension Into Facebook •Brings conversations from affinity sites to your Fan Page •Facebook Connect •Facebook Fan Page Widget •Facebook App •Twitter App/Widgets •iPhone Applications
  • PointRoll/Ripple6 Social Ad
  • Extensions into Mobile Apps
  • Social Media Analytics Dashboard
  • Summary: Tomorrow’s Challenge • Scale • Inspiring advocates to create Word of Mouth • Connecting those advocates anywhere they are. • Managing your ongoing ability to listen and engage. • Building community across your site and your marketing -- and integrating the conversation with social networks
  • Questions? marketing@ripple6.com
  • Yesterday was a Microsite. Facebook is Today. What Will Tomorrow Be? March 31, 2010 Rich Ullman rich@ripple6.com