7 C's of Social Marketing - iMedia Agency Summit Dec '09

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As niche networks are quickly becoming the "go-to" for deep discussions around hobbies and common interests, how can your clients overcome the noise and genuinely connect with consumers, while still …

As niche networks are quickly becoming the "go-to" for deep discussions around hobbies and common interests, how can your clients overcome the noise and genuinely connect with consumers, while still allowing their message to scale? Learn the seven C's of social marketing: campaigns, conversations, community, clicks, creativity, collaboration, and connections.

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  • As niche networks are quickly becoming the "go-to" for deep discussions around hobbies and common interests, how can your clients overcome the noise and genuinely connect with consumers, while still allowing their message to scale? Learn the seven C's of social marketing: campaigns, conversations, community, clicks, creativity, collaboration, and connections. ============= Click-through rates on banner ads are down and consumers are developing increasingly complex social graphs. As niche networks are quickly becoming the “go-to” for deep discussions around hobbies and common interests, how can your client’s brands  overcome the noise and genuinely connect with consumers while still allowing their message to scale?  Join us as we discuss the seven C's of social marketing: Campaigns, Conversations, Community, Clicks, Creativity, Collaboration and Connections.      ================ Nancy Galanty mentioned that she would like the presentation to touch on the key question of “how do we define measurement in social?” Nancy also said that it would be great to see how the Grape Nuts case example ties into this conversation about measurement.
  • =============== Click-through rates on banner ads are down and consumers are developing increasingly complex social graphs. As niche networks are quickly becoming the “go-to” for deep discussions around hobbies and common interests, how can your client’s brands  overcome the noise and genuinely connect with consumers while still allowing their message to scale?  Join us as we discuss the seven C's of social marketing: Campaigns, Conversations, Community, Clicks, Creativity, Collaboration and Connections.     
  • The opportunity of social is a long term relationship with your customers Once you become a fan, show me the love Ignite with a campaign-like object, but use it longer term Not the optimal use of Social Currency Once I am a fan, I expect some love, not just a one night stand
  • Ad Age Editor Jonah Bloom told us another way to get smarter: Will.i.am -- Marketer of the year Marketing is continuous. Consumers don’t switch on/off. Campaigns only do because They don’t need to. Mostly can’t afford to. “ The END” – it’s a diary. It’s about collaboration. “ While most brands still treat branded entertainment as a chance to insert their name in a show in a way that'll challenge our TiVo skills, Will.i.am sees platforms, distribution, mutual benefit.” Jonah Bloom: Will.i.am is my marketer of the year. Most brands are still grappling like first-time makeout artists with the most fundamental shift of the last decade -- from marketer as message-pushing machine to marketer as creators of stuff consumers will actually pull toward them. But the Black Eyed Peas, having mastered that shift, are already showing an understanding of perhaps the second-most important change: from campaign to continuous conversation. ====================== http://adage.com/columns/article?article_id=139138 The Black Eyed Peas Frontman Understand That Consumers Don't Switch on and off by Jonah Bloom Published: September 21, 2009 Will.i.am is my marketer of the year. Sure, marketing begins with product, and we could certainly question the quality of the Black Eyed Peas' music. But here's what we know: Will.i.am, Fergie and MCs, Apl.de.ap and Taboo, deliver something people want. The Peas have been at the top of Billboard Hot 100 for 24 weeks as this goes to press -- by far the longest No. 1 run in the chart's 51-year history. What they do is hard to describe, so I'll borrow from Jody Rosen in Rolling Stone: "They have made a kind of spiritual practice of recording dumb songs -- a total aesthetic commitment that extends from their garish wardrobes to their United Colors of Benetton worldview." But beyond the product -- and simultaneously inseparable from it -- is Will.i.am's understanding of today's social-marketing world. Most brands are still grappling like first-time makeout artists with the most fundamental shift of the last decade -- from marketer as message-pushing machine to marketer as creators of stuff consumers will actually pull toward them. But the Black Eyed Peas, having mastered that shift, are already showing an understanding of perhaps the second-most important change: from campaign to continuous conversation. Consumers don't switch on and off, and products don't sell for two weeks and then disappear from retail channels, but most marketers still do the vast majority of their work in sporadic bursts, often going whole quarters, even years between one one-way push and the next. However, our lovely-lady-lump creators are doing it differently. Their 2009 album, "The END," was not only a nice sales gimmick -- playing off speculation about Fergie going entirely solo and thus essentially squishing the Peas -- but also a big idea. "The END" is supposed to stand for The Energy Never Dies and the idea is that it's a live, evolving, co-created piece of work. "It's a diary ... of music that at any given time, depending on the inspiration, you can add to it," Wil.i.am told Billboard.com. "When it comes out, there'll be 12 songs on it, but the next day there could be 100 songs, 50 sketches, 1,000 blogs all (online) around 'The End,' so the energy really, truly never dies. I'm trying to break away from the concept of an album. What is an album when you put 12 songs on iTunes and people can pick at it like scabs? That's not an album. There is no album anymore." Exactly. Then there's Will.i.am's understanding of collaboration. I recently read Seth Stevenson in Slate calling the Peas' "I Got A Feeling" ad for Target an abomination. The (rather nifty) headline: "Will.i.shill." Well, yes, he definitely shills. In fact if there's a living, breathing example of the fact that the alleged walls between most content and commerce are not just crumbling but gone, the Black Eyed Peas would be it. And, regardless of how you feel about that from a cultural standpoint, what that ad -- and many of Black Eyed Peas videos and lyrics -- demonstrated in business terms, was a clear understanding of the potential of collaboration between content creators and brands. While most brands still treat branded entertainment as a chance to insert their name in a show in a way that'll challenge our TiVo skills, Will.i.am sees platforms, distribution, mutual benefit. He also knows how to integrate the band into popular culture, and, again, simultaneously create culture. His Obama-boosting music video "Yes We Can," was not only lauded by some critics as the best commercial of the year, but it epitomized the way an individual -- especially one with lots of famous friends -- can make a mark. As he told the L.A. Times at the time: "It's not part of a campaign. There's no corporation behind it -- the record company couldn't get involved. I did it on my own." Most remarkably, he shot it, cut it and distributed it in 48 hours. (Exactly the kind of nimble, reactive, fast-turnaround approach so many brands need, but don't have.) So, let's get this started: If Will.i.am is my Marketer of the Year, who is yours?
  • ================== Wendy Clark. SVP, Integrated Marketing and Communications Capabilities, Coca-Cola. And last week she said this (among other things) during a speech to about 300 marketers in Chicago. ================= “ We must let the conversations take place.” “ Advertising was 2008. 2009 and beyond is about Communities and Connections.” “ If you build it…” “ Curate…” ================= There is no way to shut down the conversations that are happening. When you realize that, you can begin to leverage those conversations by participating in them. Now and in the future, Ad Managers will be more like Content Managers. They will focus on finding and connecting with those who are creating many of these messages. Some will be advocates and some will not. Regardless, they are important part of shaping YOUR message. You must go into the consumer’s backyard and participate with them. Curate content… co-create with users… engage and interact with all that is there. =========================================== From Mashable: http://mashable.com/2009/11/17/coke-expedition-206/ With Expedition 206, Coke is really doing something unique. Not only are they letting the winners travel the globe to visit all 206 markets, they are going to utilize the social web along the way. This is how it works: other than airfare, the team members will have to make their own way across the world. They have a schedule of stops, but they have to get their own food, find their own places to stay and meet up with the locals themselves. The team is going to be given per diem for food and local travel, but what they do and where they do it is pretty much up to the team members — and the people at home interacting with the Expedition 206 team online. The team will be visiting the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics, the FIFA World Cup in South Africa and the World Expo in Shanghai. They will be sharing their updates on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube () , Flickr () , and other social networking sites. You can follow the progress on those channels or see the real-time lifestreams at Expedition206.com . Along the way, people at home can recommend places to stay or must-see attractions, restaurants to definitely visit — or avoid — and more. Who knows, if the team happens to be in your area — you might even want to meet up for a Coke or show them something cool in your area. The whole trip is all about interacting with people around the world and sharing the idea of happiness and connecting on a personal level and making connections that can exist beyond just language.
  • Nancy Galanty mentioned that she would like the presentation to touch on the key question of “how do we define measurement in social?” =============== Test your way into establishing ROI Utilize traditional media metrics Clicks, engagement, views Leverage social “Listening” Sentiment 1. Tremendous data can be generated 2. Tools for analysis are critical to success 3. Filtering conversations is not convenient, it’s required. 4. Cross reference with rich social data ========================== What kinds of relationships are forming? How do people prefer to communicate? What do they find important or valuable? ========================== http://www.marketersstudio.com/2009/11/100-ways-to-measure-social-media-.html 100 Ways to Measure Social Media Originally published in MediaPost's Social Media Insider If there's anyone out there left who says you can't measure social media, here are a hundred answers.At most of the events I've been to lately, measurement continues to be a hot topic. The first question that comes up is, "What can I measure?" That's where this cheat sheet can come in handy: a list of 100 thought-starters. Some entries here can be interpreted several ways. Depending on how you define them, some of these metrics may seem redundant, while others may seem so broad that they can be broken out further. Many of these can be combined with each other to create new metrics that can then be tracked over time. It's a start, though, so dive in and consider which ones may apply to programs you're working on. 1.     Volume of consumer-created buzz for a brand based on number of posts 2.     Amount of buzz based on number of impressions 3.     Shift in buzz over time 4.     Buzz by time of day / daypart 5.     Seasonality of buzz 6.     Competitive buzz 7.     Buzz by category / topic 8.     Buzz by social channel (forums, social networks, blogs, Twitter, etc) 9.     Buzz by stage in purchase funnel (e.g., researching vs. completing transaction vs. post-purchase) 10.  Asset popularity (e.g., if several videos are available to embed, which is used more) 11.  Mainstream media mentions 12.  Fans 13.  Followers 14.  Friends 15.  Growth rate of fans, followers, and friends 16.  Rate of virality / pass-along 17.  Change in virality rates over time 18.  Second-degree reach (connections to fans, followers, and friends exposed - by people or impressions) 19.  Embeds / Installs 20.  Downloads 21.  Uploads 22.  User-initiated views (e.g., for videos) 23.  Ratio of embeds or favoriting to views 24.  Likes / favorites 25.  Comments 26.  Ratings 27.  Social bookmarks 28.  Subscriptions (RSS, podcasts, video series) 29.  Pageviews (for blogs, microsites, etc) 30.  Effective CPM based on spend per impressions received 31.  Change in search engine rankings for the site linked to through social media 32.  Change in search engine share of voice for all social sites promoting the brand 33.  Increase in searches due to social activity 34.  Percentage of buzz containing links 35.  Links ranked by influence of publishers 36.  Percentage of buzz containing multimedia (images, video, audio) 37.  Share of voice on social sites when running earned and paid media in same environment 38.  Influence of consumers reached 39.  Influence of publishers reached (e.g., blogs) 40.  Influence of brands participating in social channels 41.  Demographics of target audience engaged with social channels 42.  Demographics of audience reached through social media 43.  Social media habits/interests of target audience 44.  Geography of participating consumers 45.  Sentiment by volume of posts 46.  Sentiment by volume of impressions 47.  Shift in sentiment before, during, and after social marketing programs 48.  Languages spoken by participating consumers 49.  Time spent with distributed content 50.  Time spent on site through social media referrals 51.  Method of content discovery (search, pass-along, discovery engines, etc) 52.  Clicks 53.  Percentage of traffic generated from earned media 54.  View-throughs 55.  Number of interactions 56.  Interaction/engagement rate 57.  Frequency of social interactions per consumer 58.  Percentage of videos viewed 59.  Polls taken / votes received 60.  Brand association 61.  Purchase consideration 62.  Number of user-generated submissions received 63.  Exposures of virtual gifts 64.  Number of virtual gifts given 65.  Relative popularity of content 66.  Tags added 67.  Attributes of tags (e.g., how well they match the brand's perception of itself) 68.  Registrations from third-party social logins (e.g., Facebook Connect, Twitter OAuth) 69.  Registrations by channel (e.g., Web, desktop application, mobile application, SMS, etc) 70.  Contest entries 71.  Number of chat room participants 72.  Wiki contributors 73.  Impact of offline marketing/events on social marketing programs or buzz 74.  User-generated content created that can be used by the marketer in other channels 75.  Customers assisted 76.  Savings per customer assisted through direct social media interactions compared to other channels (e.g., call centers, in-store) 77.  Savings generated by enabling customers to connect with each other 78.  Impact on first contact resolution (FCR) (hat tip to Forrester Research for that one) 79.  Customer satisfaction 80.  Volume of customer feedback generated 81.  Research & development time saved based on feedback from social media 82.  Suggestions implemented from social feedback 83.  Costs saved from not spending on traditional research 84.  Impact on online sales 85.  Impact on offline sales 86.  Discount redemption rate 87.  Impact on other offline behavior (e.g., TV tune-in) 88.  Leads generated 89.  Products sampled 90.  Visits to store locator pages 91.  Conversion change due to user ratings, reviews 92.  Rate of customer/visitor retention 93.  Impact on customer lifetime value 94.  Customer acquisition / retention costs through social media 95.  Change in market share 96.  Earned media's impact on results from paid media 97.  Responses to socially posted events 98.  Attendance generated at in-person events 99.  Employees reached (for internal programs) 100.  Job applications received
  • Nancy Galanty mentioned that she would like the presentation to touch on the key question of “how do we define measurement in social?” Nancy also said that it would be great to see how the Grape Nuts case example ties into this conversation about measurement . ========================== Custom Research for Post Cereals. Embedded in an existing social network. “ We were able to reach out to moms in a way that was convenient and comfortable for them. It created honest conversations and feedback about our brand which allowed for solid insights.” Greg Lanides, Brand Manager, Grape Nuts
  • Gives women a platform to share their remarkable survival journeys and To date, over 30,000 celebrations have been created from family and friends with practically no promotional effort On average, Celebration Chain has a 5-8 minute brand exposure Project Goal: To provide guidance to women with breast cancer from those who have experienced it before them and place Arimidex at the centre of the conversation. Challenge: Over 200,000 people develop breast cancer each year. Each one needs to be given a voice—and a platform to share it. Insight: Breast cancer is a complex experience and women touched by it feel confused, frightened, and distressed, often not knowing where to turn to for support. Women who have experienced it often want to give back to the community
  • Community , Chantics – smoking cessation drug from Pfizer You can’t guilt people into it. Herb from Tuscaloosa 25-30 people… curating their stories. Advertising is becoming very personal Real People. Real Stories. Hear from smokers who quit with CHANTIX and support If you're thinking about quitting smoking, you know it's a personal decision. And you also know that the reasons to quit are different for everyone. And so are the challenges. But it can be done. Explore the videos below to meet quitters and hear their personal quit stories. Also hear from a Pfizer scientist about how his experience of quitting cold turkey led to the development of CHANTIX. Project Goal: Empower successful users of Chantix to connect with aspiring quitters and support current participants of the GetQuit Program. Approach: Reinforce the strategic shift from “a pill” to “a plan”. Provide tutorials, forums, social media tools and shareable content for ambassadors to more effectively support participants. Insight: When smokers are able to successfully quit after numerous failed attempts, they are proud of the achievement and want to help others Participants in GetQuit clinics research expressed interest in an ongoing group support following attendance at the in-person clinic An abundance of online Smoking Cessation groups exist online but none supported by a product or brand Increased awareness of quitting smoking and encourage people to visit a doctor to develop a cessation plan Overcame adverse events in category Implemented program during holiday timeframe to capitalize on New Year’s resolutions To-date, several thousand people have committed to stop smoking and have submitted their photo via website, cell phone or street photographers Positive press in both trade and mainstream publications
  • Build communities around positioning. Community fosters participation and ownership of the brand, creating trust Discover brand advocates Develop knowledge for strong brand community Spread the word and develop awareness of a product they may have never seen before. Enable word of mouth. ============= Don’t get more “creative.” Don’t create more bad direct marketing. Don’t create TV-like messages in a box.  http://adage.com/article?article_id=139931 Online Advertising Needs a Different Kind of Creativity An Ad Age Editorial Published: October 26, 2009 It's become clear that those creating online ads need to step up the creative game. But before marketers and agencies rush to hire Cannes winners to lovingly craft a new crop of banner ads, they should perhaps redefine the word "creative." Last week, Dynamic Logic released a study indicating that it's bad creative that makes online advertising ineffective. The study determined that creative factors such as persistent branding, strong calls to action and even human faces -- and not super-targeted or high-profile ad placements -- make for better ad recall, brand awareness and purchase intent. But we're not so sure branding, human faces and logos -- the most traditional aspects of traditional advertising -- are the sort of creativity needed in online advertising. That seems an extension of too much current online advertising, which is either bad direct marketing in ad form, or TV-ad thinking in a box online. Creativity, in this case, should revolve around interactivity and utility. To get a consumer to engage with an online ad -- an ad that will take her away from the content she is reading -- marketers will have to find a creative solution to give the consumer something she needs. Give her tips, invite her to contribute her own thoughts. Offer her other online resources dealing with your brand. Better yet, couple the creativity with courage -- the courage to link comments or tweets about your brand (or the subject) at hand. Yes, even the bad ones. If a company so believes in its product or service, then why not also include links to product reviews at independent sites or objective professional reviews (which is not the same as cherrypicking quotes out of reviews). Perhaps a smart marketer could persuade Consumer Reports itself to let advertisers link to ConsumerReports.org reviews. On the web, a marketer isn't trying to entertain a passive couch-surfer. It's interrupting an active user, ferreting around for information or entertainment. It may be harder to capture that user's attention, but if you can hook into that consumer's interest and passion, she may prove more valuable to your brand. In short, when advertising online, there has to be a way to make your message less like advertising and more like content. And that's the creative yardstick by which marketers should measure their efforts.
  • In Social: KISS Leverage existing behavior KISS Project Goal: Establish on-going relationships with Friday’s customers while reinforcing the restaurant as a party destination. Approach: Use social media as a promotions platform for giving out free burgers. The first 500k to friend “Woody” get a free burger at the restaurant. Insight: Capitalize on the communal nature of our target audience, the “PartyMaker”, by giving them a place to express themselves. Attention-worthy promotions can spark scaled social activity rapidly Outcome: Woody reached 500K fans in 12 days, prompting the client to extend the bet to 1MM fans At the close of the promotion Woody had over 970K fans and had captured over 500K email addresses within the custom application Fan interactions totaled over 150K
  • Your site… Where people go to learn about your brand Affinity Networks… Where people go to connect with people like them Pure Play social Nets… Where people go to connect with their friends The Web: Where people go

Transcript

  • 1. "The Sevens C's of Social Marketing” Advertising in Social Doesn't Work, and Facebook isn't a Strategy. What Do I Do? Chris Andrew Rich Ullman
  • 2. Welcome to Tomorrow.
    • Campaigns
    • Collaboration
    • Clicks
    • Conversations
    • Community
    • Creativity
    • Connected
  • 3. “ Campaigns” in Social: vs
  • 4. Campaigns are Dead. “ Mastering the art of the continuous campaign.”
  • 5. Collaboration Wins. “ I’d like to teach the world to sing?”
  • 6. Clicks? No. “ Measurement? Yes!!!
  • 7. Conversations Can Go Deep.
    • 4 week qualitative study
    • Embedded in a social network.
    • 94 moms
    • 70 topics
  • 8. Be a Curator of conversations
  • 9. Communities take it personally. Curate stories. Provide support.
  • 10. Creativity looks like content. Easy Entertaining vs. Coffee Machine. “ I just looked into this more, and wow wow wow- it's more than just a coffee machine - oo la la!”
  • 11. Creativity-sometimes KISS
  • 12. Connect It.
    • Text
    Your Site Affinity Social Networks The Web Pure Play Social Nets You and Your Strategy
  • 13. Thank you. Chris Andrew Rich Ullman