GENII RESEARCH, LLC 50 DIVISION AVENUE SUITE 16 MILLINGTON, NJ 07946 (866) MYGENII (866) 694-3644 [email_address] Going Gr...
Top Three Takaways <ul><li>An understanding of the differences between the more common “distributed” network design model ...
Introductions <ul><li>Paul D. Kerness, MSW, LSW, MCP </li></ul><ul><li>Chief Technical Officer </li></ul><ul><li>Genii Res...
Overview <ul><li>Centralized Infrastructure Design Concepts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>History of Centralized Design Models – b...
The Infrastructure Challenge Spam and virus infected email account for over 70% of all email sent today email is becoming ...
Network Design Goals <ul><li>Efficient Use of Resources </li></ul><ul><li>Economy of Scale </li></ul><ul><li>Provide a Sec...
Distributed or Centralized?
Centralized Network Design <ul><li>Server-Based Computing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nothing New – Mature Technology </li></ul>...
Distributed Network Design <ul><li>Resources are Distributed </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Applications are deployed, supported, a...
Distributed Resources Network
 
Centralized Network Design <ul><li>Resources are Centralized </li></ul><ul><ul><li>all applications are deployed, supporte...
Centralized Network Design <ul><li>Resources are Centralized </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Only keystrokes, mouse clicks, and the ...
Distributed vs. Centralized Network T1-VPN T1-VPN Cable/DSL Cable/DSL Cable/DSL
More Efficient Resource Utilization
Change IT’s Role
Change IT’s Role
Centralized vs. Distributed
Virtualization <ul><li>What is “Virtualization” and how does it work?  </li></ul><ul><li>What can be virtualized? </li></u...
Common Virtualization Tools <ul><li>Common Virtualization Tools </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Softgrid </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>...
Server (Hardware) Virtualization <ul><li>Server virtualization is a hot topic in the IT world because of the potential for...
Application Virtualization <ul><li>Benefits: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Data can be centralized in one location to improve secu...
Accessing a Remote Application <ul><li>Users can access TS RemoteApp in a number of ways:  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Double-cl...
Application Virtualization
Application Virtualization
Application Virtualization
Typical Remote Session Internet Any Internet Connected PC Data Center Keyboard Strokes & Mouse Movements Screen Updates & ...
TS Session Directory with Load-Balancing TS-1 TS-2 TS-3 Load-Balancer (LB-1) Session Directory TS-3 User Session on TS-3 1...
Putting It Together <ul><li>Terminal Services and Centralization </li></ul><ul><li>Server Consolidation </li></ul>
Server Consolidation Windows 2008 Host Server
Thin Computing Benefits <ul><li>Less Environmental Impact </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Production </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Less...
Thin Computing Benefits <ul><li>Security </li></ul><ul><ul><li>No local storage  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>not vulnerable...
Thin Computing Benefits <ul><li>Manageability </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Thin clients are much easier to deploy and configure  ...
Thin Computing Benefits <ul><li>Availability </li></ul><ul><ul><li>solid-state technology,  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>no ...
Thin Client Benefits <ul><li>Reliability </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Thin clients are many times more reliable than PCs </li></u...
Thin Computing Benefits <ul><li>Total Cost of Ownership </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The average annual maintenance costs for a P...
Thin Computing Benefits <ul><li>Scalability </li></ul><ul><ul><li>With thin computing, the only set up required for a new ...
Thin Client vs. PC -- Energy Requirement with Server Share Costs in Dollars - One Year   Thin Client Thin Client with serv...
CO2 Wastage with Server Share Pounds of CO2 - One Year   Thin Client Thin Client with server pro rata + server cooling 3 P...
Calculating ROI
So You Can: <ul><li>Deliver anytime, anywhere access to email </li></ul><ul><li>Enable collaboration self-service </li></u...
Q & A
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  • 05/21/10 14:49 © 2003-2004 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. This presentation is for informational purposes only. Microsoft makes no warranties, express or implied, in this summary. References: Meta Group, Pew Research Center, Gartner, Postini, Dynamic Markets Ltd., Accenture Key Objectives of this slide: the goal of this slide is to provide a summary view of the current situation for IT infrastructure. Keeping the systems running with all of the demands placed on information technology (IT) professionals today is a significant challenge. As software, hardware and networks have become ubiquitous, businesses increasingly cannot run unless their IT systems are also up and running. A new study conducted by research firm Dynamic Markets found that sixty eight per cent of users become irate with as little as thirty minutes of email downtime. In fact over a third of the IT Managers contacted in the study said they would rather suffer a divorce than deal with a catastrophic failure that shut down email for a week or more. Here are some of the drivers stressing IT environments today: Escalating End User Needs The world of email has changed significantly in the last ten years. Organizations are increasingly dependent on electronic communication as the primary means of conducting business. A Meta Group survey found that a majority of organizations believe email is now more important than phone2. If the email system is down, not only are organizations unable to communicate internally, but they are also unable to communicate and conduct business with their customers and partners. Today, business communication includes more than checking email from the office desk. The Internet has enabled a new group of mobile workers to be productive while on the go. This group includes road warriors such as sales professionals who travel frequently; workers who are in the office but spend most of their day away from their desk in meetings; and, telecommuters who work at home. These individuals are taking advantage of the Internet as well as wireless networks and devices to stay plugged in and productive where ever they are. In the United States last month, over 40% of all individuals connected to the Internet used a wireless laptop or email-enabled cell phone.3 Just as individuals have been using email to get their jobs done, increasingly teams are leveraging Internet technologies such as web sites for collaborating easily and securely with co-workers, partners and customers. One of the primary means of sharing information between team members today is through the sharing of documents—documents that are often tucked away on individual computers and sent around as email attachments. These silos of information and ad hoc workflows cause a numbers of challenges with people being able to work together efficiently. It also taxes the network and storage infrastructure. With an estimated 80% of corporate assets being stored on individual’s computers4, and with increasingly strict industry and government compliance regulations, businesses are beginning to focus on helping teams collaborate more effectively and securely. Increasing IT Burden : IT has a core responsibility to keep the business running . Some of the challenges include: Difficult to improve service levels, maintain high availability to customers and deliver new functionality. The cost of system downtime adversely affects productivity, delivery schedules, commitments, and credibility Vulnerable to virus attacks that shut down business The need to build redundancy and disaster recovery into IT Services All IT departments have a mandate to reduce cost , not just acquisition costs but Total Cost of Ownership over the life of the Solution or Service. Server sprawl, on average every new application requires up to 3 new servers. This is often reflected in IT doubling the number of Servers every 18-24 months. This leads to increased operations and support costs Legacy platforms often lack solid management and administration tools. This lead to increased administration and support costs. Development, deployment, and maintenance of multiple IT platforms is complex and is a significant percentage of IT Cost. Costly to monitor security compliance and keep systems up-to-date with the latest software and security updates User desktops and user support lead to costly and time-consuming manual troubleshooting and repair tasks At the end of the day, IT is charged with the task to reduce complexity, deliver measurable value and lower risk Further more the drive to reduce complexity and simplify IT Management and operations is a huge burden to IT. Managing, deploying and operating IT infrastructure is labor intensive and complex Perceived loss of control and difficulties managing and maintaining consistent configurations throughout organization with server and desktop sprawl Planning migration projects for new desktops and servers perceived as complex Challenging to manage system security and consistent identities Difficulty automating some of the basic IT operations tasks The need to centrally view and manage applications that are distributed out across a set of servers ___________________________________________________ References: Email volume: “ 80% of 347 organizations surveyed felt that access to email was more important than the telephone.” Meta Group Survey April 2003 Mobile workers: * 41% of Internet users - have within the last month used a laptop that can connect wirelessly to the Internet and a cell phone that lets them send and receive email.--March 2004 study by Pew Internet and American Life Project http://www.pewinternet.org/reports/pdfs/PIP_Wireless_Ready_Data_0504.pdf Information sharing: * More than 80% of an enterprise&apos;s information reside in personal files—Gartner The knowledge worker investment paradox http://www4.gartner.com/DisplayDocument?doc_cd=108326 Keep the business running * &lt;Need reference from IOE team&gt; Reduce Costs * &lt;Need reference from IOE team&gt; Time pressures: IT professionals spend up to 70 percent of their time maintaining existing systems.—Accenture http://www.microsoft.com/mscorp/execmail/2004/04-28manageability.asp
  • This is not new technology, in fact it has been integrated into Windows since NT 4.0. Since it’s introduction, Microsoft and others have continually improved and developed the technology.
  • Applications can be run in one location, but controlled in another, through presentation virtualization. Presentation virtualization creates virtual sessions in which applications present their user interfaces remotely—processing happens on the server while graphics, keyboard, mouse, and other end-user input/output (I/O) are handled at the end-user terminal. Each virtual session might run only a single application, or it might present its user with a complete desktop offering multiple applications.
  • Unlike PCs, thin clients have no local storage devices. So thin clients are not vulnerable to viruses and other malware as long as the servers are protected. Since there is no way to store and remove proprietary information from thin clients, that data is always safe on the server, and compliant with privacy regulations. And since nothing is stored on the desktop, there is nothing of easy value for thieves to physically remove. Security software is also easier to maintain, update, and upgrade on a few servers instead of hundreds or thousands of desktop systems.
  • Thin clients are much easier to deploy and configure for the simple reason that the software is delivered from the server. So there is very little hands-on installation required (other than connecting the cables). Backing up data is also easy, since all the data resides on the server. There is no concern about employees forgetting to back up their local hard drives or forgetting to leave their computer connected for regular back ups. Since all applications are stored and delivered from the server, updates can be performed at the server level, eliminating the need for manual updates of individual systems. This also improves version control for applications.
  • Because thin clients have solid-state technology, there are no moving parts to fail. And with no local storage, there is no chance for an individual system to come under attack from viruses and malware. Plus, should a thin client ever fail, the data is always instantly available from another system. This lack of local storage, and the problems associated with it, make data much more available to the people who use thin clients than those working on PCs.
  • Thin clients are nine times more reliable than PCs because there are no mechanical parts, such as fans or disk drives, to break down. With no local storage of applications or data, it is impossible to download viruses, malware, or software that causes conflicts with more mission-critical applications. By avoiding the introduction of downloaded software while pushing storage and computing power to more reliable servers, thin computing dramatically increases the reliability of the entire infrastructure.
  • The greatest challenge for rapidly expanding enterprises, businesses, and organizations is rapidly deploying systems. With thin computing, the only set up required in a remote office is plugging in three or four cables. The rest of the set up can take place in the data center. Additionally, a well-designed thin-computing solution can support up to 40,000 thin clients. Giving an enterprise of any size the ability to grow quickly and cost-effectively.
  • 05/21/10 14:49 © 2003-2004 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. This presentation is for informational purposes only. Microsoft makes no warranties, express or implied, in this summary. Doing more with less for the Connected Productivity Infrastructure means customers should be able to: Reducing the complexity and operating costs of existing systems: finding ways to simplify the sprawl created by the layers of directories, servers and sites added as the organization has grown and changed over the years. Customers such as Siemens, Timex, Pella and Pacific Life have been able to significantly reduce their costs and complexity by upgrading to Exchange 2003. This can mean reducing down to a single messaging data center, cutting email servers by a third and costs by as much as 50% Improving the overall integrity of the systems: hardening the infrastructure from the hostile Internet environment of security attacks, viruses and spam; proactively managing the system to stay ahead of problems; and, minimizing unplanned down time and ensuring a fast, graceful recovery in the event of a disaster. Customers such as AGI Media, Abbey Bank and Hughes, Hubbard and Reed have been able to realize these benefits. In fact, Microsoft’s own OTG completed an ambitious project this past year to upgrade to their infrastructure, reducing from 76 to 7 sites and from 114 to 38 Exchange servers. In the process they were able to realized some impressive results a chieve 99.99% messaging availability and getting restore-time SLAs to under an hour. Supporting the service levels and capabilities demanded by the business, today and tomorrow: focusing on strategic projects that deliver new value to the organization; providing individual employees with email access anywhere they need it; and, enabling teams to be more productive by delivering collaboration services for sharing documents and information securely.
  • Session slides by Paul Kerness

    1. 1. GENII RESEARCH, LLC 50 DIVISION AVENUE SUITE 16 MILLINGTON, NJ 07946 (866) MYGENII (866) 694-3644 [email_address] Going Green: Saving Cash and Carbon through Virtualization, Server Consolidation and Centralized Infrastructures
    2. 2. Top Three Takaways <ul><li>An understanding of the differences between the more common “distributed” network design model (used by most nonprofits) and a centralized one. </li></ul><ul><li>An understanding of how to save your organization time and money with centralized network infrastructures that make use of modern virtualization technologies. </li></ul><ul><li>End user tools and knowledge that will help you decide whether this type of design strategy can help your organization stretch IT dollars and, if so, by how much. </li></ul>
    3. 3. Introductions <ul><li>Paul D. Kerness, MSW, LSW, MCP </li></ul><ul><li>Chief Technical Officer </li></ul><ul><li>Genii Research, LLC </li></ul><ul><li>Microsoft Small Business Specialist </li></ul><ul><li>50 Division Avenue </li></ul><ul><li>Suite 16 </li></ul><ul><li>Millington, NJ 07946 </li></ul><ul><li>(866) MYGENII </li></ul><ul><li>(866) 694-3644 </li></ul>
    4. 4. Overview <ul><li>Centralized Infrastructure Design Concepts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>History of Centralized Design Models – back to the future </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Distributed vs. Centralized Network Architectures </li></ul></ul>
    5. 5. The Infrastructure Challenge Spam and virus infected email account for over 70% of all email sent today email is becoming more important than the phone Communication Staff increasingly want, need and expect the ability to work from home or on the road Mobile Workers Units need to work together and share information more quickly than ever Collaboration User tolerance for email downtime is less than 30 minutes Increasing complexity, security and regulatory concerns + + + + Sources: Meta Group, Pew Research Center, Gartner, Computer Security Institute/FBI, Dynamic Markets LTD. , Accenture Escalating End User Needs Increasing IT Burden Security Service Levels Management and Costs
    6. 6. Network Design Goals <ul><li>Efficient Use of Resources </li></ul><ul><li>Economy of Scale </li></ul><ul><li>Provide a Secure Infrastructure </li></ul><ul><li>Reduce Organizational Risk </li></ul><ul><li>Provide Remote Access to Entire Network </li></ul><ul><li>Provide Collaboration Tools </li></ul><ul><li>Provide Document Management </li></ul><ul><li>Reduce Paper Forms </li></ul><ul><li>Increase Access to Real Time Organizational Information </li></ul>
    7. 7. Distributed or Centralized?
    8. 8. Centralized Network Design <ul><li>Server-Based Computing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nothing New – Mature Technology </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sometimes referred to as: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>server-centric </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>application-server </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Terminal server </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Access Infrastructure </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Software as a Service (SaaS) </li></ul></ul></ul>
    9. 9. Distributed Network Design <ul><li>Resources are Distributed </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Applications are deployed, supported, and executed on geographically distributed PC’s and servers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Data is stored on hard disks of many geographically distributed PC’s and Servers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Limited Access from Remote Locations </li></ul></ul>
    10. 10. Distributed Resources Network
    11. 12. Centralized Network Design <ul><li>Resources are Centralized </li></ul><ul><ul><li>all applications are deployed, supported, and executed at the server, not at the user desktop/PC. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>All data is stored in the datacenter/server. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A single “locked down” desktop is shared by everyone </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A single application installation is shared by everyone </li></ul></ul>
    12. 13. Centralized Network Design <ul><li>Resources are Centralized </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Only keystrokes, mouse clicks, and the screen images travel across the network (or the Internet). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>All applications are displayed on the desktop device. This desktop device can be a text terminal, a Mac, a PC, a PDA/Mobile device, and/or a thin client. </li></ul></ul>
    13. 14. Distributed vs. Centralized Network T1-VPN T1-VPN Cable/DSL Cable/DSL Cable/DSL
    14. 15. More Efficient Resource Utilization
    15. 16. Change IT’s Role
    16. 17. Change IT’s Role
    17. 18. Centralized vs. Distributed
    18. 19. Virtualization <ul><li>What is “Virtualization” and how does it work? </li></ul><ul><li>What can be virtualized? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Hardware Layer </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Disk Virtualization </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Operating System Layer </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Presentation Layer </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Application Layer </li></ul></ul>
    19. 20. Common Virtualization Tools <ul><li>Common Virtualization Tools </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Softgrid </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>VMWare </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Windows 2008 and Virtualization </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Thin Clients </li></ul></ul>
    20. 21. Server (Hardware) Virtualization <ul><li>Server virtualization is a hot topic in the IT world because of the potential for serious economic benefits. </li></ul><ul><li>Server virtualization enables multiple operating systems to run on a single physical machine as virtual machines (VMs). </li></ul><ul><li>You can consolidate workloads of underutilized server machines onto a smaller number of fully utilized machines. </li></ul><ul><li>Fewer physical machines can lead to reduced costs through lower hardware, energy, and management overhead, plus the creation of a more dynamic IT infrastructure. </li></ul>
    21. 22. Application Virtualization <ul><li>Benefits: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Data can be centralized in one location to improve security and availability. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Management costs can be reduced by only having to manage a single copy of the application on the server. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>More basic terminal hardware and thin clients can be used in placed of complete desktop systems, helping lower costs. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Bandwidth can be used more effectively, leading to potential performance improvements. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Deploy applications that integrate seamlessly with the user’s local desktop. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide access to centrally managed Windows desktops. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enable remote access for existing “WAN-unfriendly” applications. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Highly secure applications and data within the data center—no need to worry about lost laptops. </li></ul></ul>
    22. 23. Accessing a Remote Application <ul><li>Users can access TS RemoteApp in a number of ways: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Double-clicking a program icon on their desktop or Start menu that has been created and distributed by their administrator </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Double-clicking a file which has an extension associated with a TS RemoteApp </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Accessing a link to the TS RemoteApp on a Web site by using TS Web Access </li></ul></ul>
    23. 24. Application Virtualization
    24. 25. Application Virtualization
    25. 26. Application Virtualization
    26. 27. Typical Remote Session Internet Any Internet Connected PC Data Center Keyboard Strokes & Mouse Movements Screen Updates & Print Jobs
    27. 28. TS Session Directory with Load-Balancing TS-1 TS-2 TS-3 Load-Balancer (LB-1) Session Directory TS-3 User Session on TS-3 1. User connects to Load Balancer 2. Load Balancer routes user to “least-busy” server 3. Server responds 4. User enters credentials SamanthaSmith *********** 5. Server authenticates “SamanthaSmith” and checks Session Directory for existing session 6. SD informs TS that user has a session on TS –3 7. TS returns user credentials with token and tells client to reconnect 8. Session broken down on TS-2. Client reconnects to load-balancer with token and credentials 9. Load-balancer examines token and directs connection to TS3, passing through credentials 10. Original session from TS3 presented to user SamanthaSmith LB-1 TS-3 SamanthaSmith *********** TS-1 TS-2 TS-3 Load-Balancer (LB-1) Session Directory 1. User connects to Load Balancer
    28. 29. Putting It Together <ul><li>Terminal Services and Centralization </li></ul><ul><li>Server Consolidation </li></ul>
    29. 30. Server Consolidation Windows 2008 Host Server
    30. 31. Thin Computing Benefits <ul><li>Less Environmental Impact </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Production </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Less to Transport </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use Less Energy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Endurance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Disposal </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Infrastructure Benefits </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Security </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Manageability </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Availability </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reliability </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Total Cost of Ownership </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Scalability </li></ul></ul>
    31. 32. Thin Computing Benefits <ul><li>Security </li></ul><ul><ul><li>No local storage </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>not vulnerable to viruses and other malware </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>no way to store and remove proprietary information </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>nothing is stored on the desktop, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Security software is also easier to maintain, update, and upgrade on a few servers instead of many desktop systems. </li></ul></ul>
    32. 33. Thin Computing Benefits <ul><li>Manageability </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Thin clients are much easier to deploy and configure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Backing up data is also easy, since all the data resides on the server. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>updates are performed at the server level, eliminating the need for manual updates of individual systems. </li></ul></ul>
    33. 34. Thin Computing Benefits <ul><li>Availability </li></ul><ul><ul><li>solid-state technology, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>no moving parts to fail. And with no local storage, there is </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>data is always instantly available from another system. </li></ul></ul>
    34. 35. Thin Client Benefits <ul><li>Reliability </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Thin clients are many times more reliable than PCs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>MTBF (Mean Time Between Failures) of 150,000 hours </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>By avoiding the introduction of downloaded software while pushing storage and computing power to more reliable servers, thin computing dramatically increases the reliability of the entire infrastructure. </li></ul></ul>
    35. 36. Thin Computing Benefits <ul><li>Total Cost of Ownership </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The average annual maintenance costs for a PC are four to seven times the acquisition costs. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This is not true for thin clients. On average, thin clients can save you more than $1000 per seat per year in maintenance costs. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This can be as much as a 40-percent savings for most IT departments </li></ul></ul>
    36. 37. Thin Computing Benefits <ul><li>Scalability </li></ul><ul><ul><li>With thin computing, the only set up required for a new user or in a remote office is plugging in three or four cables. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The rest of the set up can take place in the data center. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A well-designed thin-computing solution can support up to 40,000 thin clients. </li></ul></ul>
    37. 38. Thin Client vs. PC -- Energy Requirement with Server Share Costs in Dollars - One Year   Thin Client Thin Client with server pro rata + server cooling 3 PC Power consumption 1 16 W 41 W 85 W x 8 hours per day 128 Wh 328 Wh 680 Wh x 220 working days per year 28 kWh 72 kWh 149 kWh Costs for 1 working station per year 2 $ 5.67 $ 14.54 $ 30.03 - 10 working stations $ 56.70 $ 145.40 $ 300.30 - 100 working stations $ 567.00 $ 1,454.00 $ 3,003.00 - 1,000 working stations $ 5,670.00 $ 14,540.00 $ 30,030.00 Savings TC compared to PC 81% 51%   Note 1 -- average active power Note 2 -- electricity tariff = 0.15 kWh Note 3 -- Worst case: 20 User / Server
    38. 39. CO2 Wastage with Server Share Pounds of CO2 - One Year   Thin Client Thin Client with server pro rata + server cooling 3 PC Power consumption 1 16 W 41 W 85 W x 8 hours per day 128 Wh 328 Wh 680 Wh x 220 working days per year 28 kWh 72 kWh 149 kWh CO2 resulting from 1 working station per year 2 38.89 lbs 100.00 lbs 206.95 lbs - 10 working stations 388.90 lbs 1,000.00 lbs 2,069.50 lbs - 100 working stations 3,889.00 lbs 10,000.00 lbs 20,695.00 lbs - 1,000 working stations 38,890.00 lbs 100,000.00 lbs 206,950.00 lbs Note 1 -- average active power Note 2 -- The production of one kWh from the electricity network gives rise to 1.39 lbs CO2 Note 3 -- Worst case: 20 User / Server
    39. 40. Calculating ROI
    40. 41. So You Can: <ul><li>Deliver anytime, anywhere access to email </li></ul><ul><li>Enable collaboration self-service </li></ul><ul><li>Deliver anytime, anywhere access to Desktop </li></ul><ul><li>Provide IT Staff with state of the art tools </li></ul>Connected Productivity Infrastructure <ul><li>Achieve high system availability </li></ul><ul><li>Stop the spam and virus problem </li></ul><ul><li>Deal with compliance issues (HIPAA) </li></ul><ul><li>Protect against catastrophic loss </li></ul><ul><li>Consolidate to a single location </li></ul><ul><li>Predictable IT Costs </li></ul><ul><li>IT as a utility </li></ul>Desired IT 45% New Capability 55% Existing Capability Manage cost and complexity Keep the business running and secure Deliver new capacity value
    41. 42. Q & A

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