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Making a Complaint (Scotland)

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  • 1. Information Making a complaint: a guide for disabled learners in Scotland • You may photocopy this information booklet • You may quote from this information booklet if you acknowledge the source • Skill information booklets are available in standard print, large print, Braille, tape and disk formats • Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy. However, Skill cannot guarantee factual content Skill Scotland Norton Park, 57 Albion Road, Edinburgh EH7 5QY Tel: 0131 475 2348 Email: admin@skillscotland.org.uk Web: www.skill.org.uk Information service: Monday to Thursday 1.30pm – 4.30pm 0800 328 5050 (voice/text) E-mail: admin@skillscotland.org.uk Skill is a company limited by guarantee (2397897) and a registered charity (801970) also registered in Scotland (SC039212)
  • 2. Making a complaint: a guide for disabled learners in Scotland Contents Page 1. Introduction 2 2. Support when making a complaint 3 3. Initial planning 3 4. Making a complaint at college/university 5 5. Making a complaint in adult or community education 7 6. Making a complaint in privately funded education or training 8 7. Making a complaint in training 8 8. Appealing exam results 9 9. Making a complaint to SAAS 10 10. Making a complaint to social work 11 11. Making a complaint related to welfare benefits 12 12. Complaint of disability discrimination 14 13. Making a complaint about a public body 17 14. Useful publications 19 15. Useful contacts 22 2
  • 3. 1. Introduction This information booklet sets out what to do when things go wrong in post-16 education or training in Scotland and you are not satisfied with the service you are receiving. Discussing difficulties with those directly involved in the college or university, such as a tutor or course organiser, can often be the quickest and simplest route to a resolution. However, depending on the nature of your complaint, such discussions are not always appropriate or preferable. This booklet sets out the rights you have and the ways in which you can make a complaint. It is important to note that making a formal complaint can be time-consuming and stressful, and is no guarantee of success. However, you do have the right to formally complain and this can often be an effective way of getting a resolution and changing future policies and practice. 3
  • 4. 2. Support when making a complaint You may find additional support beneficial when making a complaint. It can sometimes be useful to ask someone to act as an independent ‘advocate’ for you and liase with the relevant body or institution. An independent ‘advocate’ is someone who aims to help you to get your point of view across. An ‘advocate’ would do this through a number of means, such as through speaking on your behalf at meetings, by helping you to prepare what you want to say, or by assisting you to understand information when it is confusing. An ‘advocate’ is not impartial, but would be on your side in any action you take to resolve difficulties or make a complaint. Most advocacy services are free of charge, although some do charge a fee. Many specific disability organisations offer an advocacy service. There are also organisations that hold details of local advocacy services. For further details see Page 22 onwards. 3. Initial planning It may be useful to think about the exact nature of your complaint using the following questions: • What is the background to your complaint? • When did the subject of your complaint arise? • Is your difficulty part of an ongoing problem, or a one-off experience? • Is anyone else you know experiencing the same difficulty? 4 • What has been the impact on your learning and well-being?
  • 5. • What do you want the college or university to do to resolve your complaint? It is useful to keep a written record of your experience, including names of people you have dealt with and dates of events. Make sure you photocopy all relevant documentation. Your rights You may want to think about your legal and consumer rights, and get more information about these. As a consumer of education or training in Scotland, you have the right to insist that the institution or organisation provides what it has declared that it will, and treats you fairly. You could look at the initial information which the provider gave you. For example, in a college or university, you could look at the institution’s prospectus, disability statement, web content, and any other initial documentation they provide to students. Some organisations have a Customer Charter, and colleges and universities sometimes have a Student Charter, which sets out your rights and what you can expect from the education or training provider. See Page 19 for more details of some relevant Charters. As a disabled learner, you have the right not to be discriminated against - see Page 16 for further details of this right. You also have other kinds of protection under the law such as the right not to be discriminated against for race or gender related reasons – see Page 22 for contact details of organisations that can provide further advice on these rights. You may find it useful to get further general or legal advice from support organisations. Different organisations can help with different kinds of complaints – see Page 22 for further details on bodies that can give advice. 5
  • 6. 4. Making a complaint at college or university First steps Depending on the nature of your complaint, the first step to resolve a difficulty quickly might be to approach your tutor, Learning Support Adviser or Disability Adviser within your college or university. They may be able to take direct action to sort out the problem. You may want to discuss with them your disability- related and other rights in education. It can often be useful to make a written agreement of a resolution to your complaint, and keep a personal copy of this. If you are on a further education course, you could note this agreement in your Personal Learning and Support Plan. Internal complaints procedure You can find out about the college or university complaints procedures from the student services or welfare department. The complaints procedure should set out who will be involved in dealing with your complaint, the timescale for reaching a final decision, and your role in the procedures. It is useful to note any important dates in this process to ensure that you are fully ready for each stage. The student association, union or NUS representative within your institution may be able to provide further advice or support when pursuing a complaint. There may also be a Students with Disabilities Officer in the student association who can provide specific disability-related support. If your complaint is disability-related, you may be able to take action under the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) at the same 6
  • 7. time as pursuing an internal complaint – see Page 17 for further information. If the internal complaints procedure did not specifically include the Principal, Chancellor or Rector of your institution, you may want to write to them or request a meeting with them to explain the nature of your complaint and to ask them to take action. Taking the complaint further If you are not satisfied with the outcome of the internal complaints procedure, you can take your complaint to the Scottish Public Services Ombudsman (unless your complaint relates to academic standards) – see Page 17 for details. If you need to take a further step Any person can contact their Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP) about a complaint they have against an education provider. It is useful to provide the MSP with photocopies of any correspondence or documentation that you have had about your complaint, and think beforehand about what action you would like your MSP to take. You can find out who your MSPs are by contacting the Scottish Parliament Information Service – see contact details on Page 28. You could also contact the Minister for Enterprise and Lifelong Learning who is responsible for all further and higher education in Scotland – see contact details on Page 26. 5. Making a complaint in adult or community education The first step is to try to resolve the complaint with the education provider e.g. the voluntary organisation or Local Authority running 7 the course. Depending on the nature of your complaint, it may be
  • 8. useful to either arrange to meet with your tutor, or to put your complaint in writing detailing exactly what happened and what you would like to be done now. You could also ask for a copy of their internal complaints procedures, and pursue this as instructed. Remember that it is useful to keep a written record of your experience, including names of people you have dealt with and dates of events. Make sure you photocopy all relevant documentation. If your complaint is with your Local Authority as education provider and you are not satisfied with their response, you could pursue a complaint against them through the Scottish Public Services Ombudsman – see Page 17 for details. In addition, if your complaint is disability-related, you may be able to pursue a complaint under the DDA – see Page 14 for further information. 8
  • 9. 6. Making a complaint in privately funded education or training As a consumer of private education or training, you can expect the same consumer rights and fairness of treatment as with any goods or services provider. You should first make a complaint by following the internal complaints procedures, or if this does not exist, by writing to the manager of the education/training provider. If you are not satisfied with their response, you could contact the Scottish Consumer Council for further information and advice – see their contact details on Page 27. If your complaint is disability-related, you may be able to pursue a complaint under Part 3 of the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) – see Page 14 for further information. 7. Making a complaint in training If you feel you have grounds for complaint whilst in work-based training, and depending on the nature of your complaint, you could first talk to the people involved. If you are not satisfied with their response, ask the training provider about their complaints procedure. If the situation cannot be resolved by the training provider, you can take your complaint to your Local Enterprise Company. You can get your Local Enterprise Company’s contact details by contacting the Scottish Enterprise helpline – see Page 27 for details. If you complete the Local Enterprise Company’s internal complaints procedures but are not satisfied with their response, you can take your complaint to Scottish Enterprise, or Highlands 9
  • 10. and Islands Enterprise, depending upon where you live. Their complaints procedures are detailed in their Customer Service Charter - this is available on the appropriate website or by contacting them directly – see Page 19 onwards for details. You can telephone, email or write to them with your complaint, and they will respond in at least 5 working days to inform you either of their conclusions, or to let you know their progress if further investigation is required. If you are not satisfied with the Scottish Enterprise or Highlands and Islands Enterprise response, you can then take your complaint to the Scottish Public Services Ombudsman – see Page 17 for details. 8. Appealing exam results If you do not get the results that you expected in your exams, there are different ways of appealing, depending on who set the examination: • Scottish Qualifications Authority(SQA) The SQA is responsible for most exams and assessments in school and college – you can check with your teacher or tutor if you are not sure if your course is SQA examined. If you do not achieve the result which your school or college expected, an appeal to the SQA can be submitted on your behalf, as long as you attempted all parts of the assessment and if your school or college have evidence to support their appeal. You cannot make the appeal directly – appeals can only be made by your school or college. Your school or college will tell you the result of the appeal, which is usually decided by October each year. • Other examination or awarding bodies If your exam or assessment is not set by the SQA but by another awarding body, such as your university, you should ask them if 10
  • 11. they have an exams appeals policy. It is often useful to provide them with any evidence of your previous work and the reasons for your lack of achievement on the day of the exam or assessment. If you had difficulty in your exam or assessment because of a lack of disability-related adjustments or support, you may be able to pursue a complaint under the Disability Discrimination Act – see Page 14 for further information. 9. Making a complaint to SAAS SAAS is the Students Awards Agency for Scotland. If you are not satisfied with the way in which your application for student support in higher education e.g. bursary support or Disabled Students Allowance was handled, you should first write to SAAS to explain the nature of your complaint. You should enclose photocopies of any relevant correspondence and mark your letter ‘Complaint’. SAAS should respond within 14 days of receiving your letter. If you are not satisfied with the response from SAAS, you can then write directly to the Chief Executive of SAAS, asking them to take action. If you are not satisfied with the Chief Executive’s response, you can take your complaint to the Scottish Public Services Ombudsman – see Page 17 for details. 10. Making a complaint to social work Your local social work department may have assessed your needs and be providing funding for personal care, extra travel costs or another disability-related need, or be funding a placement at a residential specialist college or training centre. 11
  • 12. If you believe your needs are not being met or you are otherwise dissatisfied with the service being provided, you can pursue a complaint by using both or either of these routes: • Making an internal complaint To make an internal complaint, you should contact your social work department and ask for a copy of its complaints procedures. Each individual social work department has its own procedure. • Making a complaint to the Care Commission Complaints to the Care Commission can be made in writing, by telephone, by e-mail or in person –see contact details on Page --. The Care Commission will always suggest that you pursue an internal complaint, as outlined above, firstly but regardless of whether this option is taken up, your details will be recorded. Within 3 working days you will receive a letter of acknowledgement of your complaint. The Commission may investigate your complaint in a number of different ways such as by interviewing you and the care provider and reading all associated documents. If you are not satisfied with the response to your complaint, you could contact the Scottish Public Services Ombudsman – see Page 17 for details. 11. Making a complaint related to welfare benefits You may find that you disagree with a particular decision that has been made about your benefits. You should receive notification in writing of this decision, known as the ‘decision letter’. If you feel that the decision is wrong, your first step should be to contact the 12
  • 13. relevant agency (different benefits are awarded by different bodies). These are the places you are likely to appeal to: • Jobcentre Plus You should appeal to your local Jobcentre Plus office if you disagree with a decision about a working age social security benefit, such as Jobseekers Allowance, Income Support or Incapacity Benefit. • Local Council You should contact your local council office if you disagree with a decision about your Housing Benefit or Council Tax Benefit. • The Inland Revenue You should contact the Inland Revenue if you disagree with a decision about your Working Tax Credit or Child Tax Credit. How to appeal a decision It is important that you act within one month of receiving the initial decision letter. If you feel you have not been given enough information in this letter, you can ask the relevant agency for an explanation of the reasons the decision was made. If you feel the decision is wrong, you can ask the agency to review it and/or you may be able to make an appeal to an independent tribunal. The tribunal members will be experts on the subjects involved in your appeal but will be independent of the agency that made the original decision. The decision letter should advise on whether or not you have the right to appeal to an independent tribunal. If you are making an appeal to an independent tribunal, you may be able to get advice from a legally aided solicitor, and/or benefit from further legal or welfare benefits advice – see Page 22 onwards for details of organisations who can help. 13
  • 14. If you are not satisfied with the outcome of the independent tribunal, you may be able to appeal to the Social Security Commissioners. The Commissioners can decide appeals on points of law from tribunals in social security, tax credit, child support, housing benefit and council tax benefit cases. You must decide if you want to appeal the tribunal decision within one month of the decision being sent to you in writing. You can get more information about how to appeal to a Commissioner from the Commissioners Office or website – see Page 31 for contact details. The Disability Law Service can also provide free initial advice, and can represent you if you decide to appeal to the Commissioners – see Page 22 for contact details. For further information on the appeals procedure, you can obtain a leaflet by ringing the Benefits Enquiry Line – see Page 25 for contact details - or by contacting the agency that awards your benefit. Maladministration If your complaint is about maladministration, you should contact the Scottish Public Services Ombudsman about a Local Authority’s actions, or contact the Parliamentary Ombudsman via your MP for complaints related to all other benefits agencies. Maladministration is defined as: • The agency took too long to do something • The agency did not follow its own rules or the law • The agency has broken its promises • The agency has treated you unfairly • The agency has given you the wrong information • The agency has not made a decision in the correct way. See Page 17 for further details on how to pursue a complaint through an Ombudsman. 14
  • 15. 12. Complaint of disability discrimination As a disabled person, you have legal rights not to be discriminated against by any education provider because of your disability. Private education providers and work-based training providers are covered by the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) Part 3, and colleges and universities are covered by the DDA Part 4. In the DDA Part 3, a service provider cannot discriminate against a disabled person by : • refusing to provide a service it provides to members of the public, or • providing a lower standard of service, or • providing a service on worse terms, or • a failure to make reasonable adjustments which has the effect of making it impossible or unreasonably difficult for the disabled person to make use of the service. In the DDA Part 4, discrimination is defined as : • less favourable treatment, or • a failure to make reasonable adjustments to ensure that the disabled learner is not placed at a substantial disadvantage. For more details, you could read Skill’s information booklet titled The Disability Discrimination Act (1995), or get further information from the Disability Rights Commission publications or website – see Pages 22 onwards for details. 15
  • 16. If you have been discriminated against because of your disability, you could use the Skill ‘5-Step Test’ to help you work out whether your situation is covered by the DDA – see Page 19 for details. You can also contact Skill’s Information Service to talk through your complaint, to talk about how the DDA applies to your situation, and discuss your options for resolution. If you think your complaint may be discrimination as defined by the DDA, you can contact the Disability Rights Commission (DRC) – see contact details on Page 22. The DRC is an independent body, set up by the government, to end discrimination against disabled people and to promote equality of opportunity. The DRC can provide further information or advice about the DDA. They can discuss your complaint with you and establish the best ways of reaching a resolution. Sometimes, the DRC can contact your institution on your behalf to explain your rights under the DDA and discuss the action they should be taking to ensure that you are not disadvantaged because of their disability. There are also two more formal options you can pursue to get your DDA rights, through the DRC. See below for further information: • Conciliation Conciliation is a way of resolving complaints with the help of a third-party – the Disability Conciliation Service. Conciliation can help reach a negotiated outcome more quickly and at less cost than taking a case to court. It will usually involve a meeting between yourself, someone from the institution, and the Conciliation Service where they will facilitate discussion of your case on the basis of your DDA rights. However, if the outcome of conciliation is not satisfactory, you can still take a case to court 16
  • 17. and you will be given extra time to do so. To be referred to conciliation, you should first contact the DRC who will establish if your case falls within the Disability Discrimination Act. They will then refer you to the Disability Conciliation Service if this is the best way forward. • Legal Action You may be able to take your dispute further by taking a civil action in the Sheriff Court in Scotland. You need to take your complaint to court within six months of the date when the alleged discrimination took place, and if you have been discriminated against over time, the six months begins at the date of the last incident (although this timescale can be extended to 8 months if you have pursued conciliation). If your court case is successful, you could be awarded compensation. You may also seek an interdict to stop further discrimination, or to make your education provider take positive action to avoid discrimination. For details of who to contact for legal advice or to help you take a case, see Page 24. 13. Making a complaint about a public body Public bodies are any organisations or agencies which are fully funded by Government to provide a service to members of the public or to a particular group in society. If you have a complaint about the service provided by a public body, you should first follow their internal complaints procedures. Remember that it is useful to keep a written record of your experience, including names of people you have dealt with and dates of events. Make sure you photocopy all relevant documentation. If you are not satisfied with the outcome of these procedures, you could then do the following: 17
  • 18. • You can contact your local councillor or MSPs (both your constituency and 7 regional list MSPs) and ask them to pursue your case. You can contact your local councillor via your Local Authority whose contact details are available in your local phone book, or by contacting the Council of Scottish Local Authorities (COSLA) – see contact details on Page 25. Contact details for your MSPs are available from the Scottish Parliament website or helpline – see Page 28 for contact details. • The Scottish Public Services Ombudsman (SPSO) can handle complaints about the following devolved public bodies, amongst others: o Scottish Executive departments o Local Authorities, including social work and education departments o Careers Scotland o Scottish Enterprise o Highlands and Islands Enterprise o Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA) o Scottish Further Education Funding Council (SFEFC) o Scottish Higher Education Funding Council (SHEFC) o Local enterprise companies o Students Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS) o Colleges o Universities You could take your case to the SPSO if your complaint is about poor service, administrative failure, or failure to provide a service, as long as you have first completed the public body’s internal complaints procedures. You should complain to the SPSO within one year of the matter of complaint taking place. You take your complaint to the SPSO by using the official complaints form, which you can get a copy of 18 from the SPSO website or office – see Page 28 for contact
  • 19. details, and enclosing copies of all relevant correspondence. If you have difficulty putting your complaint in writing, you can phone the SPSO for assistance and advice. You can also authorise someone else such as a relative, your Councillor or MSP to take your case to the SPSO on your behalf. • The Parliamentary Ombudsman deals with all UK-wide public bodies such as: o Disability Rights Commission o Inland Revenue o Department for Work and Pensions (including Jobcentre Plus). Any complaints to the Parliamentary Ombudsman must be made through your Member of Parliament (MP), using the appropriate form and enclosing copies of all relevant correspondence. You can get contact details for your MP by contacting the House of Commons website or helpline – see Page 27 for details. 14. Useful publications Skill information booklets and publications Skill produces a range of information booklets and publications covering disability issues in post-16 education, training and employment. These include, amongst many others, the following: • The Disability Discrimination Act (1995) (including Part 4: Education 2001) • Disability Discrimination Post-16 Education: The 5 Step Test • Examination Arrangements for Disabled Students • Studying and Claiming Benefits as ‘Incapable of Work’ • Income Support for Disabled Students • Housing Benefit and Council Tax Benefit for Disabled Students • Scotland: Opportunities at 16 19
  • 20. All information booklets are available on the Skill website and on paper. Please contact Skill’s Information Service for further details - see contact details on Page 28. Disability Conciliation Service – a brief guide Available from the Disability Rights Commission – see contact details on Page 22. A Guide for Disabled Students and Learners: Part 4 of the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 – Post-16 Available from the Disability Rights Commission – see contact details on Page 22. Appeals: How the System Works Available from the Scottish Qualifications Authority – see contact details on Page 28. Inland Revenue Customer Service Standards Outlines the Inland Revenue’s service commitments to the public. Available from your local Inland Revenue office, or on the website: www.hmrc.gov.uk/servicestandards Child Tax Credit and Working Tax Credit: How to appeal against a tax credit decision or award This leaflet explains in detail how to make an appeal against a Child Tax Credit or Working Tax Credit notice. Available from your local Inland Revenue office or on the website: www.hmrc.gov.uk/leaflets/credit.htm Know Your Rights: A Way Through the Complaints Maze A booklet for people with mental health problems on how to complain about treatment received. Available from the Scottish Association for Mental Health (SAMH), Tel: 0141 568 7000, or on the website: www.samh.org.uk/pdfs/KYR7b.pdf 20
  • 21. A Modern Complaints System: the New Scottish Public Services Ombudsman Available on the website: www.scotland.gov.uk/library5/government/amcs-00.asp If You Think our Decision is Wrong Information on how to make a complaint if you think a benefits decision is wrong. Available from your local Jobcentre Plus, Benefits Enquiry Line and on the website: www.dwp.gov.uk/contact/complaintsappeals.asp A Guide to Disputes, Supersession and Appeals Detailed information on the complaints/appeals procedure if you are unhappy with a benefits decision. Available from your local Jobcentre Plus and the Benefits Enquiry Line. Jobseekers’ Charter Sets out the level of service you can expect when dealing with the Jobcentre Plus and explains how to go about making a complaint. Available from Jobcentre Plus and at the following website: www.jobcentreplus.gov.uk/cms.asp? Page=/Home/Customers/OurCharter Students Awards Agency for Scotland Charter Sets out the standard of service you can expect from SAAS, and what to do when things go wrong. Available by contacting SAAS – see below for details, or on the website: www.student-support-saas.gov.uk/ 21
  • 22. Useful contacts • Legal advice and support Disability Conciliation Service Website: www.dcs-gb.net Website with information about how conciliation works. Referral to the DCS must be through the DRC – see below. Disability Law Service 39-45 Cavell Street, London E1 2BP Tel: 020 7791 9800, Text: 020 7791 9801, Fax: 020 7791 9802 Advice line 10.30 am – 1 pm and 2.30 pm – 5 pm E-mail: advice@dls.org.uk Website: www.dls.org.uk Free legal advice for disabled people and their families/carers throughout Britain. Disability Rights Commission (DRC) DRC Helpline, FREEPOST MID 02164, Stratford upon Avon CV37 9BR Tel: 08457 622 633, Fax: 08457 778 878, Text: 08457 622 644. E-mail: enquiry@drc-gb.org Website: www.drc-gb.org Works to eliminate discrimination against disabled people and promote equality of opportunity. Refers cases to the Disability Conciliation Service. Sometimes helps disabled people take DDA cases to court. See Skill information booklet The Disability Discrimination Act 1995: A Guide for disabled people for further details on the DRC. ENABLE 6th Floor, 7 Buchanan Street, Glasgow G1 3HL 22
  • 23. Tel: 0141 226 4541, Fax:0141 204 4398 Email: enable@enable.org.uk Provide legal and advocacy services for people with learning disabilities. Law Society of Scotland 26 Drumsheugh Gardens Edinburgh EH3 7YR Tel: 0131 226 7411, Fax: 0131 225 2934 E-mail: lawscot@lawscot.org.uk Website: www.lawscot.org.uk Holds list of solicitors in Scotland with some or considerable experience in disability-related areas of law. Legal Services Agency 134 Renfrew Street, Glasgow G3 6ST Tel: 0141 353 3354 Wednesday - Thursday 11am-1pm Legal Services Agency is charity that provides a comprehensive casework service. In particular, the Legal Services Agency deals with issues around mental health, disability rights and social work powers, amongst others. Royal National Institute for the Blind (RNIB) Dunedin House, 25 Ravelston Terrace, Edinburgh EH4 3TP Tel: 0131 311 8500, Helpline: 0845 766 9999 Email rnibscotland@rnib.org.uk Website: www.rnib.org.uk The RNIB Rights Services offer information, advice and representation in cases taken under the DDA and where necessary, also advocate on behalf of individuals to resolve a particular problem. RNID Scotland Crowngate Business Centre, Brook Street, Glasgow G40 3AP Freephone: 0808 808 0123, Text: 0808 808 9000 23
  • 24. Fax: 0141 554 5837 E-mail: information@rnid.org.uk Website: www.rnid.org.uk The RNID Casework Service provides legal advice in relation to specific queries related to the DDA, and deaf related welfare rights issues. In some situations, the Casework Service may be able to help you bring your case to court or tribunal, and provide you with representation. Scottish Independent Advocacy Alliance 138 Slateford Road, Edinburgh EH14 1LR Tel: 0131 455 8183 Email: enquiry@siaa.org.uk Website: www.siaa.org.uk A national organisation who provide information about how advocacy works and local advocacy services across Scotland. Scottish Legal Aid Board 44 Drumsheugh Gardens, Edinburgh EH3 7SW Tel: 0131 226 7061. Email: general@slab.org.uk Website: www.slab.org.uk The Scottish Legal Aid Board can provide funding to help people who qualify, to get legal advice and representation, and can provide contact details for solicitors who take legal aid cases. • Other useful contact organisations Benefits Enquiry Line Tel: 0800 882200, Text: 0800 243355 Monday-Friday 8.30am – 6.30pm, Saturday 9am – 1pm 24
  • 25. Care Commission HQ House Compass, Drive Riverside 11, Dundee 4NY DD1 Tel: 0845 6030890 Email: web.enquiries@carecommission.com Citizens Advice Bureau (CAB) A local CAB can give information and advice on many issues including social security benefits and employment. You can look in the telephone book to find details of your local office or visit their website at www.nacab.org.uk/cabdir.ihtml Commission for Racial Equality Scotland The Tun, 12 Jackson’s Entry, off Holyrood Road, Edinburgh Tel: 0131 524 2000, Fax: 0131 524 2001, Text: 0131 524 2018 Email scotland@cre.gov.uk Website: www.cre.gov.uk Can provide advice and information where you have experienced race-related discrimination. Council of Scottish Local Authorities (COSLA) Rosebery House, 9 Haymarket Terrace, Edinburgh EH12 5XZ Tel: 0131 474 9200, Fax: 0131 474 9292 Email: enquiries@cosla.gov.uk Website: www.cosla.gov.uk Can provide contact details for your Local Authority and Councillor. Equal Opportunities Commission Scotland St Stephens House, 279 Bath Street, Glasgow G2 4JL Tel: 0845 601 5901, Fax: 0141 248 5834 Email: scotland@eoc.org.uk Website: www.eoc.org.uk Can provide advice and information where you have experienced gender-related discrimination. 25
  • 26. Highlands and Islands Enterprise Cowan House, Inverness Retail and Business Park, Inverness IV2 7GF Tel: 01463 234171, Fax: 01463 244469 Email: hie.general@hient.co.uk Website: www.hie.co.uk House of Commons Information Office House of Commons Information Office, House of Commons, Westminster, London SW1A 0AA Tel: 020 7219 4272, Fax: 020 7219 5839 Text: 08001 020 7219 4272 E-mail: hcinfo@parliament.uk Website: www.parliament.uk Can provide contact details for MPs Minister for Enterprise and Lifelong Learning Scottish Executive Enterprise and Lifelong Learning Department, Meridian Court, 5 Cadogan Street, Glasgow, G2 6AT. Tel: 0141 248 2855, Text: 0141 242 5475 Responsible for all post-16 learning in Scotland. National Union of Students Scotland 29 Forth Street, Edinburgh EH1 3LE Tel: 0131 556 6598, Fax: 0131 557 5679 Email: nus-scot@dircon.co.uk Website: www.nusonline.co.uk Parliamentary & Health Service Ombudsman Millbank Tower, Millbank, London SW1P 4QP Tel: 0845 015 4033, Fax 020 7217 4000 Email: phso.enquiries@ombudsman.org.uk 26 Website: www.ombudsman.org.uk
  • 27. Scottish Consumer Council Royal Exchange House, 100 Queen Street, Glasgow G1 3DN Tel: 0141 226 5261, Fax: 0141 221 0731 Minicom: 0141 226 8459 Website: www.scotconsumer.org.uk Scottish Enterprise 5 Atlantic Quay, 150 Broomielaw, Glasgow G2 8LU Tel: 0141 248 2700, Fax: 0141 221 3217 Helpline: 0845 607 8787 Email: network.helpline@scotent.co.uk Website: www.scottish-enterprise.com Scottish Further and Higher Education Funding Councils Donaldson House, 97 Haymarket Terrace, Edinburgh EH12 5HD Tel: 0131 313 6500 Email: info@sfc.ac.uk Website: www.sfc.ac.uk Scottish Parliament Information Service The Scottish Parliament, Edinburgh EH99 1SP Tel: 0131 348 5000 / 0845 278 1999 (Local Rate) Text: 0845 270 0152, Fax: 0131 348 5601 Email: sp.info@scottish.parliament.uk Website: www.scottish.parliament.uk Can provide contact details for your local MSPs. Scottish Public Services Ombudsman 4 Melville Street Edinburgh EH3 7NS Freepost: EH641 Edinburgh EH3 0BR Tel: 0870 011 5378, Fax: 0870 011 5379, Text: 0790 049 4372 Email: enquiries@scottishombudsman.org.uk Website: www.scottishombudsman.org.uk 27
  • 28. Scottish Qualifications Authority Ironmills Road, Dalkeith, Midlothian EH22 1LE Tel: 0845 279 1000 Email: customer@sqa.org.uk Website: www.sqa.org.uk Skill Scotland: National Bureau for Students with Disabilities Norton Park, 57 Albion Road, Edinburgh EH7 5QY Tel: 0131 475 2348, Fax: 0131 475 2397 Skill Scotland Information Service Freephone/Text: 0800 328 5050 Monday-Thursday 1.30-4.30pm Email: admin@skillscotland.org.uk Website: www.skill.org.uk Skill Scotland produces information booklets and publications covering further and higher education, employment, training and volunteering for disabled people. Skill Scotland can provide information on your rights in education and can discuss your own situation and possible action which you can take. Social Security and Child Support Commissioners Scotland 23 Melville Street, Edinburgh EH3 7PW Tel: 0131 225 2201, Fax: 0131 220 6780 Website: www.osscsc.gov.uk Deal with appeals on points of law from tribunals in social security, tax credit, child support, housing benefit and council tax benefit cases. UPDATE: Scotland’s National Disability Information Service 27 Beaverhall Road, Edinburgh EH7 4JE Tel: 0131 558 5200, Fax: 0131 558 5201 Minicom: 0131 558 5202 Email: info@update.org.uk Website: www.update.org.uk Can provide information about disability organisations, nationally 28 or in your local area
  • 29. August 2005 29