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Funding for disabled students in higher education
 

Funding for disabled students in higher education

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    Funding for disabled students in higher education Funding for disabled students in higher education Document Transcript

    • Information Funding higher education for disabled students • You may photocopy this information booklet • You may quote from this information booklet if you acknowledge the source • Skill information booklets are available in standard print, large print, Braille, audio and disk formats • Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy. However, Skill cannot guarantee factual content Skill: National Bureau for Students with Disabilities Chief Executive: Barbara Waters Unit 3, Floor 3, Radisson Court, 219 Long Lane, London SE1 4PR Email: skill@skill.org.uk Website: www.skill.org.uk Tel: 020 7450 0620 Fax: 020 7450 0650 Information service: Tuesdays 11.30am-1.30pm and Thursdays 1.30pm-3.30pm Tel: 0800 328 5050 or Textphone: 0800 068 2422 Email: info@skill.org.uk Skill is a company limited by guarantee (2397897) and a registered charity (801971), also registered in Scotland (SC039212)
    • Funding higher education for disabled students 2009/10 Contents Page 1 1 ............................................................................................2 1 Introduction 3 2 Where do I apply for funding? 3 4 Do I qualify for funding? 5 10 Disability-related funding 18 11 Professional courses 20 Social care funding is devolved to the four countries of the UK. If you are not eligible for support from the NHSBSA, you should contact the relevant social care regulatory body in your country. 22 If you are from Wales, contact Care Council for Wales (CCW) 22 If you are from Scotland, contact Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC) 22 If you are from Northern Ireland, contact Social Services Inspectorate (SSI) 22 Dance and Drama 23 Students on designated Higher Education dance and drama courses at private institutions may qualify for financial support. Dance and Drama Awards can cover some of the costs of tuition fees and there are means-tested grants for living costs. However, if you are offered a place as a private student, you will have to pay the fees yourself. 23 Postgraduate courses 23 See Skill’s information booklet Postgraduate Education for Disabled Students for full details. 23 12 Further information 23 2
    • 1 Introduction This guide is for UK students whose courses started from September 2006 onwards. If you started your course before this, contact your awarding authority to find out about support arrangements. See the Useful Contacts section for details. If you are an international student, read our booklet Information for International Disabled Students. If you are going to study a higher education course at college or university you may need funding to cover your fees, living costs and disability-related costs. This booklet tells you about the student support that is available in higher education and where to apply for it. It covers undergraduate higher education courses, including: • a first or Bachelor’s degree • an undergraduate Master’s degree • a Higher National Diploma (HND) or Higher National Certificate (HNC) • a National Vocational Qualification (NVQ 4 or 5) linked with a degree, a Diploma of Higher Education (DipHE) or other job-related courses such as a Diploma in Social Work (DipSW) • most foundation degrees • some vocational courses. 2 Where do I apply for funding? You should apply to one of the following agencies for higher education government funding: • If you currently live in England and are applying for a new higher education course contact Student Finance England. If you started before September 2008, contact your Local Authority (LA). You can find their details in local directories. 3
    • • If you currently live in Wales contact your Local Authority (LA). You can find their details in local directories or by contacting Student Finance Wales. • If you currently live in Scotland contact the Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS). • If you currently live in Northern Ireland contact your local Education and Library Board (ELB). You can find their contact details in local directories. When we say ‘awarding authority’ it means the funding agency that applies to you. All awarding authorities use standard application forms which you can get from them directly. In most cases you can also apply online. It is important to apply for funding as soon as you can so that funding is available at the start of your course. If you live in England, you can apply online to Student Finance England at the same time as making your UCAS application. 3 How is my income assessed? Your household income - parents If you are considered dependent on your parents, their residual income (the amount left after specific allowances have been deducted from their income) will be assessed. The awarding authority will then decide the amount of loans and grants you can get. Independent student If you are an independent student, your parents’ income will not be taken into account. You are an independent student if you meet one of the following conditions. 4
    • • You have care of a child or children on the first day of the academic year for which you are applying for support, or • You are 25 or over before the start of the academic year for which you are applying, or • You have been married or entered into a civil partnership before the start of the academic year for which you are applying for support, or • You have no living parents, or • You have supported yourself for at least three years before the start of the academic year of your course. Contact your awarding authority if you need more details. 4 Do I qualify for funding? Personal eligibility You must be ordinarily resident, or normally living, in the United Kingdom (UK) three years before the academic year in which your course starts. You can contact the Department for Children, Schools and Families for exceptions to the three-year residence rules. You should also have settled status, which means you should be ordinarily resident in the UK without being subject under the Immigration Act of 1971 to any restrictions on the amount of time you can remain in the UK. Course eligibility Most full-time or sandwich higher education courses in publicly-funded UK institutions are automatically eligible. This includes most initial teacher training (ITT) courses and those offered by the School-Centred Initial Teacher Training scheme. Other courses at the same level may be designated part-time courses, and attract a different package 5
    • of support. Contact your awarding authority to find out if the course you want to do is eligible for support. You can also get this information from the Department for Children, Schools and Families website www.dfes.gov.uk/studentsupport/des_.shtml. Previous study Support will be available for the length of your course, plus one extra year if needed, less any years of previously supported higher education study. With the exception of supplementary grants, further support is not usually available to students who have used up their entitlement to funding. However, maintenance loans will continue to be available to students who do not already have an honours degree from a UK institution, and to students who are on a course leading to a professional qualification in a number of areas, including medicine, dentistry, veterinary science and architecture. You will still be eligible for Disabled Students’ Allowances (DSAs) whether you have studied at undergraduate level before or not. Tuition fees for second degrees The government has withdrawn funding for equivalent or lower qualifications (ELQs) starting. This funding is money that universities and colleges get towards their costs. Universities and colleges will now charge students the full cost of tuition fees if they want to take a second undergraduate degree. The fees will be similar to the amount that international students have to pay, usually £7,000 per year or more. 6
    • However, if you get Disabled Students’ Allowances (DSAs) you will qualify for an exemption, and the maximum you will pay for fees on a second degree course will be £3,225 per year. Repeat study, transferring courses and taking time out Awarding authorities can use their discretion to fund students who have to repeat a year of their course because of their disability. It may be possible to transfer your funding to another course, or even to a different institution. You should consult your awarding authority before changing your course or institution because your entitlement to support may change. You may also suspend your award with the agreement of your awarding authority if you have to take time out, perhaps because of an illness or disability, but plan to restart your course in the future. It may be a good idea to suspend rather than terminate your award in some situations, because if you terminate a student award your entitlement to any future support might be restricted by the ‘previous study’ rules. 5 Funding for full-time students Fees The level of tuition fees and financial support available will vary depending on what part of the UK you are studying in and also where you are from. Studying in England, Wales and Northern Ireland Institutions in England, Wales and Northern Ireland currently charge fees of up to £3,225 per year for an undergraduate 7
    • course. These increase each year in line with inflation. All eligible students can apply for a tuition-fee loan to pay part or all of their fees. Contact your awarding authority for further information. Students who normally live in Wales and choose to study at an institution in Wales will be entitled to a non- means-tested fee grant of up to £1,845. This means that your income is not taken into account and it does not have to be repaid. Studying in Scotland If you are from Scotland, you will not be charged tuition fees in Scotland on your first degree course. If you are from England, Wales or Northern Ireland, you will have to pay tuition fees of up to £1,820 (£2,895 for medicine) per year. These increase each year in line with inflation. You may qualify for a tuition fee student loan to pay part or all of your fees. Contact your awarding authority for further information. It is worth remembering that Scottish degrees tend to be four years long, instead of three years elsewhere in the UK. Financial support All 16-year-old students in England who qualify for Education Maintenance Allowance (EMA) will be guaranteed the top rate of Maintenance Grant if they go into higher education within the next three years. This is called the Higher Education Student Support Guarantee (HESSG). Student Loans for Tuition Fees Full-time students are eligible for loans to cover the costs of tuition fees, depending on your location in the UK as already described. The loan is paid directly to the college or university on your behalf. This means that you will not have to find the money before you start the course or while you are studying. You have to start repaying the loan in instalments after you have finished the course and are 8
    • earning over £15,000 per year. There is no upper age limit on applying for tuition-fee loans. Students who take out loans are allowed ‘repayment holidays’ after graduating. You can choose to take breaks from repaying your loan for up to two years in total. Maintenance grants Full-time students from lower-income households in England, Wales and Northern Ireland may be eligible for non- repayable maintenance grants. How much you can get depends on your income and that of your household. In England the maximum grant is £2,906 and in Northern Ireland the maximum available is £3,406 per year. Contact Student Finance England or your ELB for details. Assembly Learning Grants (Wales) Full-time students from lower-income households in Wales may be eligible for non-repayable maintenance grants, known as Assembly Learning Grants. How much you can get depends on your income and that of your household. The maximum available grant is £2,906 per year. Contact your Local Authority for details Special Support Grant A Special Support Grant is available to some full-time students, such as lone parents and those already receiving certain disability benefits who are eligible to apply for Income Support and/or Housing Benefit. The maximum amount available is £2,906 per year. If you get this grant you are not entitled to other maintenance grants. The advantage of the Special Support Grant is that it 9
    • is not counted as income when calculating mean-tested benefits. Bursaries (Scotland) If you live in Scotland and want to study there full time, you may be eligible to apply for the Young Students’ Bursary (YSB). This is a means-tested, non-repayable grant of up to £2,640 per year. It is paid instead of part of the student loan, so it reduces the amount you need to borrow. The YSB is not available if you are over 25, have been living independently for more than three years, or if you are married (unless you have a dependent child). Contact SAAS for more information. Student Loan for Living Costs You can apply for a student maintenance loan if you are a full-time student from the UK and under 60. Once your awarding authority has decided how much support you are entitled to, you should let them know how much of the loan you wish to borrow. You only start to pay back the loan once you start earning over £15,000 per year. Students who take out loan are allowed ‘repayment holidays’ after graduating. You can choose to take breaks from repaying your loan for up to two years in total. There are two parts to the loan. All students can apply for the first part and are entitled to 75% of the maximum figure. The second part depends on your household income - the higher your income, the less you can apply for. The amount of loan you can receive also varies according to where you live and study. You can get extra weekly loan payments if your course lasts longer than a specific amount of time. These extra payments also depend on your income and where you are living and studying. If you study abroad for at least eight 10
    • weeks as part of your course, you can apply for an overseas rate of loan. The amounts of student loan available for 2009/10 are: Living in London Elsewhere in the Parental Home Loan rate – £6,928 £4,950 £3,838 full year Loan rate – £6,048 £4,391 £3,319 final year Bursaries from colleges and universities Colleges and universities in England and Northern Ireland which charge more than £2,906 in tuition fees per year have to provide additional non-repayable support to students who get the full maintenance grant. The packages vary, but should be at least £319 per year if they are charging tuition fees of £3,225. In 2008/09 the average bursary was around £1,000. You should contact each institution you are interested in to find out exactly which bursaries are available to you. There is also a National Bursary Scheme for students in Wales. Contact Student Finance Wales for more details. 11
    • 6 Funding for part-time students Fees Fee Grant (England, Wales and Northern Ireland) If you are studying at least 50% of the full-time equivalent course, you may be able to apply for a means-tested fee grant and a course grant towards other study costs such as books, materials and travel. Percentage of Max fee Max course Total full-time grant for grant for support equivalent 2009/10 2009/10 50% £805 £260 £1,065 60% £970 £260 £1,230 75% £1,210 £255 £1,465 Part-time students can also apply for a career development loan (CDL). CDLs are available from participating banks. You can borrow between £300 and £10,000 and the government pays the interest while you are studying. If you are from Wales or Scotland and on a low income, you may be eligible for an Individual Learning Account (ILA) to help pay fees. Contact learndirect in Wales or ILA Scotland for more information. If you are from Scotland and studying in Scotland, you can also apply for a part-time loan from SAAS to cover study-related costs such as travel or books. 12
    • 7 Other study Sandwich courses - industrial placement year Students on sandwich courses have to pay tuition fees while they are on an industrial placement, though these are usually lower than the full fee rate. You must spend 10 weeks or more in full-time study to be eligible for support for living costs. If your placement is unpaid and is in the public or voluntary sector you will qualify for the full amount of student support, regardless of the number of study weeks. Open University students The Open University (OU) deals with its own students’ applications for the part-time fee grant, the course grant and DSAs. The OU has its own application form. See Skill’s information booklet Opportunities in open and distance learning for more details. 8 Other financial support Access to Learning Fund (England) Hardship Fund (Scotland) Financial Contingency Funds Scheme (Wales) Support Fund (NI) These schemes are broadly similar across the UK. Each institution administers these funds, which are available to support part-time and full-time students experiencing financial hardship. In England and Wales, mature students, disabled students, final year students and care leavers have priority. In Northern Ireland and Scotland, it is up to the institution how the money is distributed. It can be used to cover the cost of initial diagnostic assessments, for example for dyslexia, but this may depend on your household income. 13
    • Contact the student support officer responsible for financial advice to get an application form. Adult Dependants’ Grant (UK) You may get this additional allowance if you are studying full- time and have adult dependants. In England, Wales and Northern Ireland, this includes your wife or husband or civil partner and other adult family members, if they are financially dependent on you. In Scotland, you can only receive Dependants’ Grant for your husband, wife or civil partner. The grant is calculated by taking into account the income of your dependants as well as your own income. The maximum available in 2009/10 was £2,642 per year. The grant is paid by the awarding authority along with your loan if you live in England, Wales and Northern Ireland or by SAAS if you live in Scotland. Childcare Grant (UK) You are eligible to apply for this grant if you are a full-time student from England or Wales and have dependent children in registered or approved childcare. You can apply before or after the start of your course. You must fill in a form from your awarding authority and enclose documentary evidence of your household income. The amount you get will be based on your actual childcare costs and your income, or that of your dependants. You will receive this grant from the awarding authority along with your loan. In Scotland you can apply to your college or university for help from the Higher Education Childcare Fund and, if you are a lone parent, you can apply for an additional grant from SAAS. 14
    • In Northern Ireland, you should apply to your ELB. You do not qualify for this grant if you receive Lone Parents’ Grant or if you claim the childcare element of Working Tax Credit. Parents’ Learning Allowance (England, Wales and NI) If you are a full-time student with dependent children, you may qualify for help with course-related costs. The amount you can get depends on your income and that of your dependants, including your husband, wife or civil partner. The maximum amount available in 2009/10 is £1,508 per year. It is paid by the awarding authority. 9 Disability and welfare benefits Most full-time students cannot claim welfare benefits. However, if you are disabled, you may still be able to apply for the benefits listed in this section. It is important to let the Benefits Agency or Jobcentre Plus know that you are starting a course. This is a change in your circumstances, so you must tell them even if you believe it will not affect your benefits. Skill produces information booklets on studying and claiming benefits. If you have specific questions, it is best to speak with a welfare rights specialist at your university or college, or your local Citizens Advice Bureau www.citizensadvice.org.uk/index/ getadvice.htm#searchbox. Income Support You may be able to claim Income Support if you qualify for the Disability Premium, Severe Disability Premium or Enhanced Disability Premium. You will qualify for a premium if you receive any part of Disability Living Allowance, Incapacity Benefit at the long-term rate, Severe Disablement 15
    • Allowance, if you are registered blind, or get Disabled Students’ Allowances because you are D/deaf. Income Support is a means-tested benefit. The amount you receive depends on your income. If you are eligible for a student loan, even if you do not take it out, part of it will be considered as income and the amount of Income Support may be reduced. Some income will not be taken into account for the calculation, for example, the Special Support Grant and the allocated amount of student loan or institutional bursaries towards books and equipment. Any Disabled Students’ Allowances you get are not considered as income. Housing Benefit The same eligibility rules are used for Housing Benefit as for Income Support. Housing Benefit can be paid towards the cost of living in halls provided by your university or college, as well as if you live in private rented accommodation. Disability Living Allowance (DLA) Going into higher education should not affect your entitlement to DLA or the amount you get. If you get DLA you can apply for Income Support and Housing Benefit (see above). Incapacity Benefit and Severe Disablement Allowance The Benefits Agency or Jobcentre Plus may review your claim because they may think that since you can study you are also able to work. However, there is no rule which says you cannot claim these benefits while studying. You may need to tell Jobcentre Plus how studying on your course is different from work and highlight any flexibility or support that you get with your studies. Incapacity Benefit is a taxable benefit and it will be treated as income when calculating student support entitlement. 16
    • Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) From 27 October 2008, ESA replaced Income Support and Incapacity Benefit for new claimants who are incapable of work. If you are a full-time student, you may be able to claim income-related ESA if you qualify for a disability premium, for example if you receive any part of Disability Living Allowance. Income-related ESA is a means-tested benefit. The amount you get depends on your income. If you are eligible for a student loan, even if you do not take it out, part of it will be considered as income and the amount of income-related ESA may be reduced. If you get contributory ESA you will be able to study and claim in the same way as Incapacity Benefit. However, you may need to tell Jobcentre Plus how studying on your course is different from work and highlight any flexibility or support that you get with your studies. Contributory ESA is a taxable benefit and it will be treated as income when calculating student support entitlement. Tax Credits The means-tested Child Tax Credit and Working Tax Credit should not be affected by studying as long as you meet the eligibility criteria. Both credits are treated as income when calculating entitlement to other welfare benefits including Income Support and Housing Benefit. 17
    • 10 Disability-related funding Disabled Students’ Allowances Disabled Students’ Allowances (DSAs) help you pay for extra costs you have on your course because of your disability. The four components are: • Specialist equipment - maximum £5,161 per course for full and part-time students. • Non-medical helpers - maximum £20,520 per academic year of the course. For part-time students the allowance depends upon the percentage of study in relation to the full-time equivalent course. The maximum part-time amount that you can claim per year is £15,390. • Other and general expenditure - maximum £1,724 per academic year of the course. For part-time students this allowance depends upon the percentage studied of the full-time course. The maximum amount that you can claim part-time is £1,293. • Disability-related travel costs – there are no maximum amounts. In Scotland there are no DSAs for travel. However, you may be able to claim extra disability-related travel costs from the Students Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS). You should write to SAAS to make a claim, preferably at the same time as you send in your application for the DSAs. You must send SAAS proof of your disability (if you have not already done so) and give details of the additional costs. SAAS may also consider making a 50% advance payment of normal travel costs in certain circumstances. DSAs are non-means-tested. This means your income or your parents’ income is not taken into account when assessing the level of DSAs you will receive. If you 18
    • previously attended a course, this does not affect your eligibility to get DSAs. There is also no upper age limit on applying for DSAs. The allowances you receive are only based on the assessed support you need while studying. DSAs do not fund items or costs related to your disability that you would have regardless of whether or not you were studying. How to apply All awarding authorities use standard forms to work out who qualifies for student support. These forms contain a section on applying for DSAs. When you have completed this form and returned it to your awarding authority, they should send you information about the DSAs. If they do not send you an application form, contact your awarding authority to ask for one. The application forms are also available on the Student Finance websites listed at the back of this booklet. You can apply before you have a confirmed place at a college or university. It is always a good idea to apply as early as possible. Part-time study You can apply for DSAs for part-time study. However, you must not take longer than twice the time normally needed to complete full-time study for the course. See Skill’s information booklet Applying for Disabled Students’ Allowances for further information. 19
    • 11 Professional courses Medical and dental courses For the first four years of study, students taking a five or six- year undergraduate programme are eligible for the same support as other students taking Higher Education courses. Students may then qualify for an NHS or Scottish Executive Health Department means-tested bursary in their fifth and further years. Students who get bursaries are eligible for free tuition. Students taking a four-year Graduate / Professional Entry Programme in Medicine or Dentistry qualify for means-tested bursaries from their second to their fourth year. In this time, they are also eligible for 50% of the full student loan and free tuition. Additional allowances such as Disabled Students’ Allowances (DSAs) and Care Leavers’ Allowance may also be included in the bursaries, depending on individual circumstances. For more information, see Skill’s careers guide Into Medicine. Nursing, midwifery and other related health professions England and Wales Students accepted for an NHS-funded place on a full-time or part-time pre-registration health professional course can apply for an NHS bursary. Students who get NHS bursaries have their tuition fees paid. Degree students may be entitled to a means-tested NHS bursary and a student loan. Extra allowances such as 20
    • Disabled Students’ Allowances (DSAs) and Care Leavers’ Allowance might also be included in the NHS bursary depending on individual circumstances. If you face severe financial hardship, you can apply for funding from the Access to Learning Fund and then the NHS Hardship Grant. Diploma of Higher Education – Nursing or midwifery (DipHE- Nursing) students are entitled to a non-means-tested bursary, which is at a higher rate than the bursary for degree students. The bursary may include extra allowances such as Disabled Students’ Allowances (DSAs) and Care Leavers’ Allowance. Students on these courses are not entitled to apply for a loan, but you can apply for the Access to Learning Fund and the NHS Hardship Grant if you are facing extreme financial difficulty. For part-time nursing and midwifery diploma students, the bursary is a proportion of the full-time amount. Northern Ireland If you are studying a pre-registration nursing or midwifery course full-time on a commissioned Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety (DHSS&PS) placement in Northern Ireland, you will be entitled to get free tuition, a non- means-tested bursary and extra allowances, such as the DSAs. Scotland Nursing students are eligible for support available under the Nursing and Midwifery Student Bursary Scheme (NMSB). This is a non-means-tested bursary and the grant amounts available depend on your age at the start of the course. Bursaries and tuition fees are provided by: • NHS Student Bursaries for students from England 21
    • • the NHS Wales Student Awards Unit for students from Wales • your local Education and Library Board for students from Northern Ireland • the Student Awards Agency for Scotland for students from Scotland. For more information, see Skill’s careers guide Into Nursing and Midwifery. The NHS Students Grants Unit also produces a guide for students on health-related courses called Financial Help for Health Care Students which you may find useful. Social work The NHS Business Services Authority (NHSBSA) manages the bursary scheme for students studying approved degree courses in social work in England. Applicants must meet eligibility criteria set out by the NHSBSA. Social care funding is devolved to the four countries of the UK. If you are not eligible for support from the NHSBSA, you should contact the relevant social care regulatory body in your country. •If you are from Wales, contact Care Council for Wales (CCW) •If you are from Scotland, contact Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC) •If you are from Northern Ireland, contact Social Services Inspectorate (SSI) 22
    • Dance and Drama Students on designated Higher Education dance and drama courses at private institutions may qualify for financial support. Dance and Drama Awards can cover some of the costs of tuition fees and there are means-tested grants for living costs. However, if you are offered a place as a private student, you will have to pay the fees yourself. Postgraduate courses See Skill’s information booklet Postgraduate Education for Disabled Students for full details. 12 Further information Further information from Skill Skill produces a range of information booklets. The following are particularly relevant to higher education: • Applying for Disabled Students’ Allowances • Higher Education in Scotland: guidance for disabled people • Opportunities in open or distance learning • Postgraduate education for disabled students As a disabled student or potential student you can request up to five information booklets free of charge. There is a charge of £2.50 per booklet for additional booklets and to professionals. All booklets can be downloaded as A4 sheets from our website. Click on Information, then Information Sheets, or go direct to www.skill.org.uk/page.aspx? c=10&p=106. 23
    • Into Higher Education Into Higher Education is published in September each year, for students entering Higher Education the following academic year. It includes up-to-date information on the student support arrangements and tuition fees across the UK. It also features case studies of students writing about their own experiences, giving an insight into what it is like to be a disabled student in higher education. £2.50 to disabled students or £15.00 to professionals. Available to order on our website at www.skill.org.uk/shop/shop.asp or by contacting Skill. Official guides to higher education funding Contact details for the organisations who publish these guides are listed in the Useful Contacts section. • A guide to financial support for higher education students in 2009/10 Department for Children, Schools and Families, Local Authority or Student Loans Company. • Financial support for part-time students in higher education in 2009/10 Department for Children, Schools and Families, Local Authority or Student Loans Company. • Bridging the Gap – A guide to the Disabled Students’ Allowances (DSAs) in higher education in 2009/2010 Department for Children, Schools and Families, Local Authority or Student Loans Company. • Childcare Grant and other support for student parents in Higher Education in 2009/10 24
    • Department for Children, Schools and Families or Local Authority • The European Choice: A Guide for Higher Opportunities in Europe Available from www.eurochoice.org.uk • Financial Help for Healthcare Students NHS Student Grants Unit, England • Student Loans – A Guide to terms and conditions 2009/10 Department for Children, Schools and Families Aimhigher booklets: • How to get financial help as a student • Financial help for part-time students • Thinking it through – A Guide to Higher Education Available from: www.aimhigher.ac.uk/home/index.cfm or your local Aimhigher adviser • Educational Grants Directory – published by the Directory of Social Change, price £29.95 13 Useful contacts Aimhigher Website: www.aimhigher.ac.uk Information on what higher education can do for you, how to apply for a course, funding and student life. 25
    • Benefits Enquiry Line for people with disabilities England, Scotland, Wales: Tel: 0800 882 200 Textphone: 0800 243 355 You can find benefit information on the Department for Work and Pensions website at www.dwp.gov.uk. Northern Ireland: Tel: 0800 220 674 (open Monday to Friday, 9am - 5pm) Textphone: 0800 243 787 You can find benefit information on the Department for Social Development NI website at www.dsdni.gov.uk. Bursary Map Website: http://bursarymap.direct.gov.uk Interactive map linking to bursary information for every college and university in England. Professional and Career Development Loans Information Line: 0800 585 505 Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) Castle View House, East Lane, Runcorn WA7 2GJ Tel: 020 7215 5555 Email: replies@bis.gsi.gov.uk Website: www.bis.gov.uk Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF) Sanctuary Buildings, Great Smith Street, Westminster, London SW1P 3PT Tel: 0870 000 2288 Student Support (UK) 0845 602 0583 Student Support (EU) 0141 243 3570 Publications tel: 0845 602 2260 Publications fax: 020 7925 6000 26
    • Phonelines open from Monday to Friday 10am - 4pm Textphone: 01928 794 274 Fax: 01928 794248 Email: info@dcsf.gsi.gov.uk Website: www.dcsf.gov.uk Department for Employment and Learning (Northern Ireland) Student Finance Branch, Room 407, Adelaide House, 39-49 Adelaide Street, Belfast BT2 8FD Tel: 028 9025 7777 (open Monday to Friday, 9am - 5pm) Email: studentfinance@delni.gov.uk Website: www.delni.gov.uk/studentfinance Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety (Northern Ireland) Bursaries Section, Castle Buildings, Stormont, Belfast BT4 3SQ Tel: 028 9052 0706 Website: www.dhsspsni.gov.uk Educational Grants Advisory Service (EGAS) 501-505 Kingsland Road, Dalston, London E8 4AU Tel: 020 7254 6251 Website: www.egas-online.org.uk Advice agency for people looking for funding for further or higher education. Erasmus British Council, 28 Park Place, Cardiff CF10 3QE Tel: 029 2039 7405 Email: erasmus@britishcouncil.org Website: www.erasmus.ac.uk Advice and information on the Socrates-Erasmus programme and funding. 27
    • HM Revenue and Customs (formerly Inland Revenue) England and Wales: Tel: 0845 300 3900 Textphone 0845 300 3909 Northern Ireland: Tel: 0845 603 2000 Textphone: 0845 607 6078 Website: www.hmrc.gov.uk/taxcredits NHS Business Services Authority (Social Work Bursary) Sandyford House, Archbold Terrace Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 1DB Tel: 0845 6101122 Email: swb@ppa.nhs.uk Website: www.ppa.org.uk/swb NHS Careers Helpline Tel: 0845 606 0655 Email: advice@nhscareers.nhs.uk Website: www.nhscareers.nhs.uk NHS Student Bursaries, England Student Grants Unit, Hesketh House, 200-220 Broadway, Fleetwood, Lancashire FY7 8SS Helpline: 0845 358 6655 Fax: 01253 774 490 Email (general): enquiries@nhspa.gov.uk Email (Disabled Students’ Allowances): dsa@nhspa.gov.uk Website: www.nhsstudentgrants.co.uk NHS Wales Student Awards Unit 2nd Floor, Golate House, 101 St Mary Street, Cardiff CF10 1DX Tel: 029 2026 1495 Fax: 029 2026 1499 28
    • National Union of Students (NUS) 2nd Floor, Centro 3, 19 Mandela Street, London NW1 0DU Website: www.nusonline.co.uk Open University Tel: 01908 653 411 Email: reg-fees@open.ac.uk Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS) Gyle View House, 3 Redheughs Rigg, Edinburgh EH12 9HH Tel: 0845 111 1711 Fax: 0131 244 5887 Email: saas.geu@scotland.gsi.gov.uk Website: www.saas.gov.uk Student Loans Company Limited 100 Bothwell Street, Glasgow G2 7JD Tel: 0845 026 2019 Office: 0141 306 2000 Fax: 0141 306 2005 Website: www.slc.co.uk Student Finance England Website: www.studentfinanceengland.co.uk Central system for information on financial support and online applications for grants, loans and Disabled Students’ Allowances (DSAs) in England. Student Finance Northern Ireland Website: www.studentfinanceni.co.uk Information on financial support in Northern Ireland and contact details of local Education and Library Boards (ELBs). 29
    • Student Finance Wales Customer Support Office Tel: 0845 602 8845 Website: www.studentfinancewales.co.uk Provides information and administers financial support for HE students in Wales on behalf of Local Authorities and the Student Loans Company. Training and Development Agency for Schools (TDA) Teaching Information Line Tel: 0845 6000 991 Website: www.tda.gov.uk UK Council for International Student Affairs (UKCISA) Tel: +44 20 7107 9922 Website: www.ukcisa.org.uk Advice service for international students. UNIAID Website: www.uniaid.org.uk/bursaries/index.asp Foyer UNIAID accommodation bursaries for students who are at risk of not being able to enter or complete university because of severe financial hardship. Welsh Assembly Government Higher Education Division 2, 3rd Floor, Crown Building, Cathays Park, Cardiff CF10 3NQ Tel: 029 2082 5111 Fax: 029 2082 5823 Website: www.wales.gov.uk Partially updated November 2009 30