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Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies
Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies
Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies
Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies
Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies
Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies
Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies
Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies
Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies
Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies
Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies
Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies
Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies
Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies
Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies
Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies
Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies
Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies
Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies
Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies
Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies
Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies
Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies
Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies
Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies
Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies
Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies
Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies
Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies
Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies
Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies
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Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse: Your Most Powerful Allies

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  • The
  • Faces & Voices of Recovery is working with recovery advocates around the country to bring information like today’s Science of Addiction and Recovery Train the Trainer to help change public perceptions of recovery and build public awareness that people can and do recover from addiction to alcohol and other drugs. One reason that Faces & Voices and I am doing this is so that we can change public attitudes and change public policies so that they support recovery. We are all here today to bring the power and the proof of recovery to our families, friends, policymakers and the media.
  • Recently-held focus groups with people in recovery and allies brought many interesting comments: Question #1 – What is the biggest take-away? The need for me to continue to be a change agent at my agency by being more relationship oriented (through peer support importing ROSC with job coaches, and reaching out to) more in recovery like I use to. Partial recovery as well as full recovery is a reality. Continued care as a standard of treatment/recovery planning. The hope we must instill in each individual after TX. Encouragement is key in assisting and support. The individual has the ability to advocate for themselves and succeed in obtaining services needed to remain productive, responsible, and accountable tax paying citizens the convening takes place. So therefore, peer coaches are key. Need to shift from treatment oriented thinking to recovery oriented thinking. (Change from AC to RM) Change toward ROSC is critically needed and beneficial to those in need. Recovery is more than abstinence from alcohol or drug use; you must have global health and make amends to other people. “ My clients don’t hit bottom, they live on the bottom.” A good reminder that many of our clients don’t need rehabilitation, but benefit more from habitation. TX without walls. People are in charge of their own recovery. Tree story. The issue is long-term recovery. Provide hope for change in continuous recovery using each individual’s strengths to build upon and supporting them to achieve whatever they want in life and recovery. This needs to be done on a continuum of care using hope as the earliest form of intervention. The message of urgency and hope. The importance of forming collaborations to benefit the consumers and the importance of holistic TX. How to identify the difference between recovery and treatment. How not to discharge a client that is in need of support. - Emerging definition Sobriety Global health Citizenship - Holistic approach - Inc. ROSC Contacts Linkage Phone calls Advocate Educate Peer involvement The tree example. The community that the recovery person goes back into needs to get healthy Client coming to TX with a positive urine screen; client turns away. Dealing with mental health and recovery as a whole. That is the battle between peer to peer and peer base recovery groups. Recovery without walls. Individual, Family, Community. Cross the globe approach for recovery. Precarious situation of “business as usual” – ROSC is going to happen. Need to acknowledge the untruth/lie told to selves, families, and communities. TX first, last, and always is all that is needed and then share what can and needs to change to sustain recovery. The treatment without walls. Outcome driven approach – person/family/community. “ Not about the buildings and treatment centers; its about recovery and treatment as one of the resources toward recovery.” “Treatment without walls.” Question #2 – My next step is... 1. Need for me to initiate gender group for women in recovery – to help strengthen relationship skills during the third and fourth stages of recovery due to my experience. Strength, hope, knowledge, etc. that I have not given in GA, but have in the past. Outreach to the community providing support services. “The tree scenario.” Build partnerships with all of the stake holders to develop a consensus. Outreach to community as well as individuals. Stronger advocacy. More “communication” available, more open dialogue with all stake holders, and global recovery focus. Organize an ongoing discussion among Atlanta-based providers who attended this symposium. Advocacy on all levels – policy makers, clinicians, recovering persons. My next step is to begin baby steps by building collaborations and a network within my community that would benefit the CSRs. I have begun mentally to list contacts - faith based health clinics/12-step club houses/ etc, etc. Identify different ways of reaching out to others and keep them in recovery. Decide how much or how far the agency wants to move into peer oriented recovery. Boundaries must be established between counseling/peer. Mindset of professionally trained counselors. Agency should establish standards of behavior for peers and coaches. Educate my program directors, CEO, etc. on ROSC. Follow up with mentor programs within the agency to build peer to peer support. Don’t let the women that leave fall out of our therapeutic community. Do the recovery leave in the black community. Continue to educate/work to change perceptions/establish partnerships in the community. Start conversation with other recovery people about how we can assist others in maintaining recovery based in our personal recovery, paths/obstacles/victories. Work hard to form a ROSC-style collaboration To partner with BHSA (provider groups) to do the messaging and change the thinking toward ROSC.
  • Good Morning. Let’s go ahead and get started. My name is ____________and I’m here today to talk to you about some information that has made a huge difference in my life as a (person in recovery/family member/recovery advocate) about the science of addiction and recovery. (This is a good place to tell a SHORT personal story if you’d like. Just be sure that it relates to what learning the information that you’re going to present in the talk has meant to you.)
  • I don’t understand this slide. When you say “Our” who are you referring to? I know that I moved it around but I didn’t understand it in the original location. I think your notes are great … we could also mention that this would also benefit future treatment and early intervention. During our time together I’m going to be explaining the really great work that has been going on for some time now about the science of addiction and recovery. This is a very exciting time for people in recovery, their families and others who want to help people feel free and able to talk about the alcohol and drug problems they are experiencing. By talking about these problems, we can begin to reduce stigma and make a difference in how people think about addiction and recovery. Being able to talk about it from a science-based perspective will help people feel OK about asking for help and getting treatment if they need it. It will also help us educate and motivate our elected officials change our public policies and laws to treat people both in active addiction or personal recovery with dignity and fairness. I am NOT going to be asking anyone to talk about being in AA or any other anonymous self-help programs. I’m just going to give you the information today that will make it possible for you to talk about addiction and recovery from a science-based perspective.
  • 7 And of course for the recovering person, this information is really a chance to understand their cravings****. This information also gives everyone a common ground to use to talk about when it comes to the recovery process. ****We might add relapse, and have an opportunity for a more active role in choosing the treatment that is best for them
  • Delivered this training to over 150 people in 2 months. Response has been overwhelming. We are developing this into a product line to help grow our agency. Addiction is a brain disease from which people can and do recover.  Science has shown consistently and over time that addiction keeps the brain from functioning normally, much like heart disease keeps the heart from normal functioning Addiction is very much like other illnesses that affect our behavior.  No one chooses to develop hypertension, Type II diabetes, cardiovascular disease or cancer.  However, you can get these illnesses because of your genetic and physical make up and behaviors. In the same way, someone who develops addiction after using alcohol or other drugs didn’t set out to become dependent on them.  Addiction develops because of physical and genetic vulnerabilities and other factors. You can maintain long-term recovery from addiction, just as with other chronic illnesses.  People who receive care for their addiction maintain the same rates of recovery as people with hypertension and diabetes. Recovery from addiction is a life long health issue, requiring people to manage their illness. It’s not a question of morals or willpower; just as with other chronic conditions, addiction recovery is about recovery management throughout your life; if you relapse, that does not mean that your recovery stops.
  • Level of Care at Admission
  • Mission - Building community collaborations to reduce the impact of substance abuse through education, advocacy, and training The Georgia Council on Substance Abuse (GCSA) promotes addiction recovery through advocacy, education and service to: End discrimination surrounding addiction and recovery Open new doors and remove barriers to recovery Ensure that all people in recovery and people seeking recovery be treated with dignity and respect Vision Public policy advocacy – To work closely with state agencies and provider organizations who provide addiction services in order to assist in increasing appropriations, defining insurance benefit packages to include behavioral health services (both public and private) and other financing strategies Consumer advocacy - To ensure that consumers are provided effective behavioral health services that foster self-sufficiency, dignity and respect. Provide consumers with representation through a Georgia chapter of Faces and Voices of Recovery (FAVOR) Information dissemination/communication – To affiliate closely with a state university in order to become a clearinghouse of information relative to addiction treatment and recovery support. Goals will include: Research, including the impact of substance abuse on the lives of Georgians, prevalence, cost-offset study, and identification of gaps in programs and services, targeted surveys and polls Evidence-based and promising practices Program evaluation Professional development – To partner with state certification boards and licensing entities to develop the workforce, both professional and “paraprofessional” levels Focus To impact three facets of addiction: Prevention – promote prevention with a focus on reducing onset and use by children and young adults Treatment – innovations in treatment delivery, promotion of demonstration projects, increasing capacity, expansion of proven interventions to improve outcomes, reduce relapse and/or expand relapse intervals Recovery Support – advocate for pre-treatment and post-treatment resources that support long-term recovery efforts
  • Survey of approx 350 individuals in Oct/Nov 08 1. Public Policy Advocacy – Work closely with state agencies and other substance abuse service providers and organizations to increase funding, define the public and private behavioral health services benefit package to be covered by insurance and other third-party payors, and explore cross-system financing strategies to promote substance abuse prevention, treatment and recovery support. Consumer advocacy - Ensure that consumers receive effective and appropriate behavioral health services that foster self-sufficiency, dignity and respect . Establish and promote consumer representation through a Georgia chapter of Faces and Voices of Recovery (FAVOR) 3. Information dissemination/communication – Affiliate with an in-state university to establish a clearinghouse of addiction treatment and recovery support information: Research on the impact, prevalence, cost-offset of substance abuse in Georgia Studies of service gaps, public and consumer surveys and polls; and Outcome evaluations of local services 4. Workforce development –Partner with state certification and licensing entities to develop further the professional and paraprofessional addiction treatment/recovery support workforce. COMMENTS FROM VISIONING SURVEY/ GACA Fall Conference – 11/08 Additional Objectives: More Faith-based programs Faith-based unrestricted Develop Regional chapters of GCSA Revision on state licensing/certification of treatment providers, including oversight for unlicensed providers Coordinating efforts with GARR/treatment providers We need programs (residential, day treatment, and detox) services for adolescents, youth & teenagers Funding Resources for long-term treatment (28-day) Educate legislators and senate on addiction. Notification of funding opportunities More emphasis on community collaboratives that support recovery Grant-writing White paper/position paper on prevention, treatment and recovery; unite with NASW & LPCGA & MFT to promote and advocate. Plenty of LCSWs and LPCs are recovering Informing zoning commissioners of ADA laws Advocacy – connect with private sector providers – share cost of advocacy Parity issues discussion Coordination of AA volunteers with treatment centers getting clients to AA meeings (discussed at AA convention last week) Please provide positive/negative feedback about GCSA: Addiction is NOT a disease, it’s a SIN! Impressed, but was not very aware of what you do. Who funds it? What do you do? Why do we need it? You need a political effort! I am very excited about Neil’s involvement with the Council & am looking forward to seeing how we can collaborate together (GACA and GARR) Seems more focused on the ATL and large communities which is a minor portion of the state. I see it as a positive organization to be an advocate for all people suffering from addiction The GCSA is definitely need the support of all paraprofessional and professional staff to make aware of needed funding to keep services active Enjoyed the presentation. Neil Kaltenecker did a great job with passion, insight, and knowledge. Please email me information on membership Need to be more active w/ clinicians in the field. News sent out by mail regularly sost to join cheaply. New clinicians don’t have a lot of money Thanks you for standing up for our clients There used to be a national organization – SOAR – “Save Our Addiction Recovery” I would love to be a part of bringing awareness! Please give me a call to set something up New faces, new voices, good start!!! How can I help? Just don’t know much about it. But it now has the right leader Lack of knowledge about GCSA Have not heard about it for a long time. I’d like to be more involved How about contacting local AA chapters on college campuses re: legislative day – getting young people involved and talking to legislators might be helpful (these kids have parents who vote!) Never heard of it before but Neil sounds enthusiastic and motivated
  • Transcript

    • 1. Consumer Advocates in Substance Abuse : Your Most Powerful Allies 2009 NIATx Summit/SAAS National Conference Mike McLemore,MA, CCS, MLAP, CPM Neil Kaltenecker, MS Tammy Peacock, Ph.D., LCSW
    • 2. Objectives <ul><li>Understand the role of consumer advocates working with state agencies </li></ul><ul><li>Identify ways to generate grass roots support for consumer advocates </li></ul><ul><li>The impact of the consumer voice on public policy </li></ul>
    • 3. Consumer Advocacy or Who is REALLY in Charge?
    • 4. Consumer Advocacy <ul><li>Faces and Voices of Recovery, Science of Addiction & Recovery (Train-the-Trainer) </li></ul><ul><li>Georgia Recovery Organizations for Wellness (GROW) </li></ul><ul><li>Alabama Voices for Recovery/FORMLL </li></ul><ul><li>Recovery-Oriented Systems of Care Symposium </li></ul><ul><li>The Recovery Project </li></ul>
    • 5. Faces & Voices of Recovery <ul><li>Changing public perceptions of recovery </li></ul><ul><li>Promoting effective public policy </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstrating that recovery is working for millions of Americans </li></ul>It is our collective strength that will ensure our success, and it is our mission to bring the power and proof of recovery to everyone in America.
    • 6. GROW <ul><li>Georgia Recovery Organizations for Wellness (GROW) </li></ul><ul><li>Develop grassroots advocacy through education, training and support </li></ul>
    • 7. Alabama Voices for Recovery/FORMLL <ul><li>Serves in an advisory role to the Alabama Dept. of Mental Health Substance Abuse Service Division </li></ul><ul><li>Coordinates Recovery Month activities </li></ul><ul><li>Advocates for increased funding for treatment (12 million increase in state funds) </li></ul><ul><li>Educates legislators and the public about addiction and recovery </li></ul><ul><li>Provides a public profile for addiction recovery </li></ul>
    • 8. Legislative Issues <ul><li>Criminal Justice Issues </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sentencing Reform </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Deferred Prosecution & Alternative Sentencing </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Mental Health Parity </li></ul><ul><li>Second Chance Act </li></ul><ul><li>Restoration of Rights </li></ul><ul><li>Financial Aid for Higher Education </li></ul><ul><li>Funding for treatment </li></ul>
    • 9. How Can Advocates Help … <ul><li>Contact legislators regarding legislation and funding </li></ul><ul><li>Increase awareness that recovery happens </li></ul><ul><li>Rally support for your causes through friends, family members and their networks </li></ul><ul><li>Serve on advisory boards </li></ul><ul><li>Provide volunteer support for the organization </li></ul><ul><li>Provide peer support for clients </li></ul><ul><li>Provide input for the development of a recovery oriented system of care </li></ul>
    • 10. How Advocates Can Help …. <ul><li>Visible presence of individuals who are recovering: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Increases awareness that recovery happens </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Decreases the stigma of addiction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Normalizes the fact that everyone is touched by addiction in some way </li></ul></ul>
    • 11. Why don’t people get involved? <ul><li>… . they haven’t been asked. </li></ul><ul><li>Be specific with your request. </li></ul>
    • 12.  
    • 13. Consumer Advocacy <ul><li>Faces and Voices of Recovery, Science of Addiction & Recovery (Train-the-Trainer) </li></ul>
    • 14. Our Goals <ul><li>1) Learn the neurobiology of addiction and recovery. </li></ul><ul><li>2) Understand why it’s important for recovery advocacy and the recovery community </li></ul>
    • 15. Why the science of addiction and recovery is important <ul><li>For the Recovering Person </li></ul><ul><ul><li>helps people on their recovery journeys </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>helps people understand their cravings </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Facilitates the recovery process for person and family members </li></ul>
    • 16. SOAR Talking Points <ul><li>Addiction is a brain disease </li></ul><ul><li>Addiction is very much like other illnesses that affect our behavior  </li></ul><ul><li>You can maintain long-term recovery from addiction, just as with other chronic illnesses </li></ul><ul><li>Recovery from addiction is a life long health issue, requiring people to manage their illness </li></ul>
    • 17. Consumer Advocacy <ul><li>ROSC Symposium </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration with SATTC, SSA and local, well-established consumer-advocacy organization </li></ul><ul><li>Bill White, Lonnetta Albright, Ijeoma Achara </li></ul><ul><li>Win, Win, Win! </li></ul>
    • 18. Where Are We as a State? <ul><li>Public Tx Admissions in GA </li></ul>Source: GA Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS) 1992-2003. http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/SAMHDA-SERIES/00056.xml 29,852 29,820 22,323 19,828 20,375 16,160 12,963 17,161 30,232 36,766 34,087 36,044 - 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 30,000 35,000 40,000 45,000 FY92 FY93 FY94 FY95 FY96 FY97 FY98 FY99 FY00 FY01 FY02 FY03 Year (FY98 to FY03 change) Admissions under 18 (+272%) 18-25 (+122%) 26+ (+189%) Total (+178%)
    • 19. Where Are We as a State? Source: GA Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS) 1992-2003. http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/SAMHDA-SERIES/00056.xml
    • 20. Where are We as a State? <ul><li>Single State Authority </li></ul><ul><ul><li>~$50 mil SAPTBG (unknown impact in 2010) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>~$50 mil in State funds (reduced by 24% in 2010) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>~$25 mil TANF/RFW funds (reduced by $6 mil in 2010) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Other State Agencies Administering SA Tx Funds </li></ul><ul><ul><li>DFCS </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>DJJ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>SBPP </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>DOC </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>DCH </li></ul></ul>
    • 21. Where Are We as a System? <ul><li>Licensing Standards </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Office of Regulatory Services </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Practitioner Certification </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Georgia Addiction Counselors Association (GACA) – NAADAC affiliate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Alcohol and Drug Abuse Certification Board of Georgia (ADACB-GA) – IC&RC Affiliate </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Advocacy </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Georgia Council on Substance Abuse </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Georgia Mental Health Consumer Network </li></ul></ul>
    • 22. ADVOCACY www.gasubstanceabuse.org
    • 23. GCSA Re-launch <ul><li>Survey & Results </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Public Policy Advocacy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Workforce Development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Information dissemination </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consumer Advocacy </li></ul></ul>
    • 24. GCSA Re-launch <ul><li>Public Policy Advocacy </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Legislative Day at the Capitol </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Web-based Legislative Updates </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Weekly Email Blasts & Calls to Action </li></ul></ul>
    • 25. GCSA Re-launch <ul><li>Public Policy Advocacy – Membership on Boards and Committees </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Olmstead Planning Council (appointed by the Governor) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mental Health Planning & Advisory Council (appointed by DHR Commissioner) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Georgia School of Addiction Studies Board </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Kidsnet Georgia Statewide Collaborative </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Southeast Addiction Technology Transfer Center (SEATTC) Advisory Board </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Georgia Brief Assessment, Screening, Intervention, Continuum of Care System (BASICS) Policy Steering Committee </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Georgia Association of Recovery Residences (GARR) Affiliate Board Member </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Alcohol & Drug Certification Board of Georgia (ADACB/GA) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Faces & Voices of Recovery (FAVOR) Southeast Regional Member </li></ul></ul>
    • 26. Regular Legislative Updates <ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>CLICK HERE </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    • 27. Information Dissemination <ul><li>Website Development </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Re-design </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“Roundtable” Button </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Membership </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Blast out training events </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Develop Committees & Projects </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Convene Meetings </li></ul>
    • 28. Workforce Development <ul><li>Annual Youth Summit (4 years) </li></ul><ul><li>The Georgia School of Addiction Studies </li></ul><ul><li>(3 years) </li></ul><ul><li>Annual Legislative Day at the State Capitol (9 years) </li></ul><ul><li>Annual Recovery Resource Fair (2 years) </li></ul>
    • 29. Consumer Advocacy <ul><li>Faces and Voices of Recovery, Science of Addiction & Recovery (Train-the-Trainer) </li></ul><ul><li>Georgia Recovery Organizations for Wellness (GROW) </li></ul><ul><li>Recovery-Oriented Systems of Care Symposium </li></ul><ul><li>The Recovery Project </li></ul>
    • 30. Consumer Advocacy <ul><li>The Recovery Project </li></ul><ul><li>Rally for Recovery – September 12 th , NYC </li></ul><ul><li>www.therecoveryproject.com </li></ul>
    • 31.  

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