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  • Transcript : Hello everyone, it is my pleasure to be here to kick off this year's PSSVT. My name is Rick McConnell, I run UC market development for us here at Cisco. I must say this is one of my favorite events of the year that we have done every year. I recall numerous different memories, let's say, from prior years, I remember my first PSSVT, I think it was in 2004 or 2005. And Barry O'Sullivan kicked things off and he introduced everybody as wanting to go Irish, as I recall. And in fact, he introduced Charlie Jean Carlo as Charlie O'Jean Carlo, and then he introduced Don Proctor as Don O'Proctor. So this was sort of the theme of the year, it became the theme of the year, Going Irish. And then I recall from last year, when we did the PSSVT, a similar set of circumstances indelible in my mind were Cara Wilson actually said that we should go Medieval. And, you know, if this means drawing and brandishing swords and attacking your competition, then I'm all for it. I think that should be the theme of this year's PSSVT as well, so I think that gets us kicked off with just the right amount of enthusiasm, as we say, in moving through this event. So welcome, I have a lot of content to cover, so I am going to go ahead and get started here and kick it off. Author’s Original Notes: Transcript: Hello everyone, it is my pleasure to be here to kick off this year's PSSVT. My name is Rick McConnell, I run UC market development for us here at Cisco. I must say this is one of my favorite events of the year that we have done every year. I recall numerous different memories, let's say, from prior years, I remember my first PSSVT, I think it was in 2004 or 2005. And Barry O'Sullivan kicked things off and he introduced everybody as wanting to go Irish, as I recall. And in fact, he introduced Charlie Jean Carlo as Charlie O'Jean Carlo, and then he introduced Don Proctor as Don O'Proctor. So this was sort of the theme of the year, it became the theme of the year, Going Irish. And then I recall from last year, when we did the PSSVT, a similar set of circumstances indelible in my mind were Cara Wilson actually said that we should go Medieval. And, you know, if this means drawing and brandishing swords and attacking your competition, then I'm all for it. I think that should be the theme of this year's PSSVT as well, so I think that gets us kicked off with just the right amount of enthusiasm, as we say, in moving through this event. So welcome, I have a lot of content to cover, so I am going to go ahead and get started here and kick it off. Transcript : Hello everyone, it is my pleasure to be here to kick off this year's PSSVT. My name is Rick McConnell, I run UC market development for us here at Cisco. I must say this is one of my favorite events of the year that we have done every year. I recall numerous different memories, let's say, from prior years, I remember my first PSSVT, I think it was in 2004 or 2005. And Barry O'Sullivan kicked things off and he introduced everybody as wanting to go Irish, as I recall. And in fact, he introduced Charlie Jean Carlo as Charlie O'Jean Carlo, and then he introduced Don Proctor as Don O'Proctor. So this was sort of the theme of the year, it became the theme of the year, Going Irish. And then I recall from last year, when we did the PSSVT, a similar set of circumstances indelible in my mind were Cara Wilson actually said that we should go Medieval. And, you know, if this means drawing and brandishing swords and attacking your competition, then I'm all for it. I think that should be the theme of this year's PSSVT as well, so I think that gets us kicked off with just the right amount of enthusiasm, as we say, in moving through this event. So welcome, I have a lot of content to cover, so I am going to go ahead and get started here and kick it off. Author’s Original Notes:
  • Transcript : So with that as background, and share as our focus, share as our objective, Transcript : So with that as background, and share as our focus, share as our objective, Author’s Original Notes:
  • Transcript : let's begin by talking about some of the trends and transitions and collaboration in our industry that we think are going to become more and more pervasive over time. First is mobility, clearly mobility is a very, very high priority. I think it is safe to say now with 4 billion active cellular plans around the globe that the tidal wave of mobility has already come. In fact, if we look at us shipping about a million-and-a-half phones a quarter, and Nokia shipping around a million phones a day, I think it puts in perspective just how pervasive mobility in fact really is. I was struck also by the fact that mobility has moved well beyond voice. I remember from our C-Scape presentation that was done by Dick Lynch, the CTO of Verizon, back in December, he was talking about SMS messaging and I found some of the statistics to be quite amazing. To start with, Verizon did about a billion text messages in the year 2002. By 2004, they were doing a billion per month and by 2008, a billion text messages per day, unbelievable metrics around mobility and the utilization of various different media types extending well beyond just voice. So mobility is a key element of any part of our strategy, and integrating into literally any mobile device over time will become more and more important as part of our overall collaboration strategy. I'll come back and talk more about mobility in a moment. Video must become more pervasive as well, I was up in Minneapolis a few months ago with Andy Monin and others, and it was fascinating to see that I would say two-thirds of the companies that we met with up there had moved to laptops that now included eyeball cameras built into the bezel. Now for those of us who have Macbooks, we've had those for some time, but now with Sony laptops and Dell laptops and others, we are starting to see more video cameras get built in. Video is becoming more common for end-users to utilize in everything from video telephony to various different other usages, obviously from YouTube to video streaming that becomes more critical. Video surveillance is an added piece of our strategy for collaboration overall, and of course TelePresence, with an array of endpoints that extend from the high-end down lower and lower as we go through. And I saw Chuck Stucki on the agenda here for PSSVT to talk more about that during the next several days as well. So video clearly becoming a more common media of communication. Social networking is becoming also more common at work. In fact, I see many of you with Facebook pages. How else would I have known as an example that Laurent Philonenko would have been enjoying the sunset on Friday night other than from his Facebook entry. Or a Joe Burton thinking about buying a time trial bike to begin extending his 200-mile bike rides into 500-mile bike rides so that he can actually get into a more aerodynamic position. So these are what we learn from Facebook, but increasingly what we're also going to be adding are collaborative communities. So Julie O'Brien on Cara Wilson's team is in the process now of getting ready to launch both externally and internally a whole series of collaborative communities that I believe have an incredible opportunity to in some sense change the way we collaborate and we allow our customers to collaborate and communicate between themselves and among themselves as well. Social networking is going to become really much more critical as we go. Server and client virtualization for cost savings and other purposes like IT management, ease of deployment, will become more important as well. In virtually every conversation that I have with customers these days, they're talking about Data Centers, they're talking about server consolidation. And in fact they're talking about thin clients so that they don't have to manage the desktop environment quite so closely across a whole range of different desktops. So virtualization is more important. SaaS may be the number one trend of all. We see in certain studies, like the one recently from RBC capital markets, that an estimated 23% of a $120 billion software market is going to move SaaS by the year 2010 or 2011. These are very significant trends that play well to us through what we are doing as an example in CSG with WebEx and beyond. And then many other macro trends that we have from green to compliance, globalization, intercompany collaboration, all of these aspects are critical trends and what they all point to is an increased need in the environment for collaborative tools. Transcript : let's begin by talking about some of the trends and transitions and collaboration in our industry that we think are going to become more and more pervasive over time. First is mobility, clearly mobility is a very, very high priority. I think it is safe to say now with 4 billion active cellular plans around the globe that the tidal wave of mobility has already come. In fact, if we look at us shipping about a million-and-a-half phones a quarter, and Nokia shipping around a million phones a day, I think it puts in perspective just how pervasive mobility in fact really is. I was struck also by the fact that mobility has moved well beyond voice. I remember from our C-Scape presentation that was done by Dick Lynch, the CTO of Verizon, back in December, he was talking about SMS messaging and I found some of the statistics to be quite amazing. To start with, Verizon did about a billion text messages in the year 2002. By 2004, they were doing a billion per month and by 2008, a billion text messages per day, unbelievable metrics around mobility and the utilization of various different media types extending well beyond just voice. So mobility is a key element of any part of our strategy, and integrating into literally any mobile device over time will become more and more important as part of our overall collaboration strategy. I'll come back and talk more about mobility in a moment. Video must become more pervasive as well, I was up in Minneapolis a few months ago with Andy Monin and others, and it was fascinating to see that I would say two-thirds of the companies that we met with up there had moved to laptops that now included eyeball cameras built into the bezel. Now for those of us who have Macbooks, we've had those for some time, but now with Sony laptops and Dell laptops and others, we are starting to see more video cameras get built in. Video is becoming more common for end-users to utilize in everything from video telephony to various different other usages, obviously from YouTube to video streaming that becomes more critical. Video surveillance is an added piece of our strategy for collaboration overall, and of course TelePresence, with an array of endpoints that extend from the high-end down lower and lower as we go through. And I saw Chuck Stucki on the agenda here for PSSVT to talk more about that during the next several days as well. So video clearly becoming a more common media of communication. Social networking is becoming also more common at work. In fact, I see many of you with Facebook pages. How else would I have known as an example that Laurent Philonenko would have been enjoying the sunset on Friday night other than from his Facebook entry. Or a Joe Burton thinking about buying a time trial bike to begin extending his 200-mile bike rides into 500-mile bike rides so that he can actually get into a more aerodynamic position. So these are what we learn from Facebook, but increasingly what we're also going to be adding are collaborative communities. So Julie O'Brien on Cara Wilson's team is in the process now of getting ready to launch both externally and internally a whole series of collaborative communities that I believe have an incredible opportunity to in some sense change the way we collaborate and we allow our customers to collaborate and communicate between themselves and among themselves as well. Social networking is going to become really much more critical as we go. Server and client virtualization for cost savings and other purposes like IT management, ease of deployment, will become more important as well. In virtually every conversation that I have with customers these days, they're talking about Data Centers, they're talking about server consolidation. And in fact they're talking about thin clients so that they don't have to manage the desktop environment quite so closely across a whole range of different desktops. So virtualization is more important. SaaS may be the number one trend of all. We see in certain studies, like the one recently from RBC capital markets, that an estimated 23% of a $120 billion software market is going to move SaaS by the year 2010 or 2011. These are very significant trends that play well to us through what we are doing as an example in CSG with WebEx and beyond. And then many other macro trends that we have from green to compliance, globalization, intercompany collaboration, all of these aspects are critical trends and what they all point to is an increased need in the environment for collaborative tools. Author’s Original Notes:
  • Transcript: We can't travel, so our travel is very much restricted, but we have these great tools. So we have TelePresence, we have WebEx. And all these things, if you look at our TelePresence business quarter over quarter, our WebEx business quarter over quarter, they're growing. So there's opportunity for us because people think they need to collaborate more. Collaboration for us, and I'll tell you the same old story, is all about not just the technology, but it's also about culture and process. So Cisco decided that we needed to save money by not traveling. We needed to save people's bodies; we needed to save time. And we needed to reach more of our customers by not traveling. That's part of a cultural thing. We put together processes; we really opened up the WebEx portfolio to all of the Cisco team, not just the sales team. That's part of a process on there. In technology, boy we've got great technology, and we've got some really new exciting stuff that we're going to be talking about today. So if we really look at that, all three of those things really allow us to go forward in business and to really take advantage of the opportunities. So I'm staying home more, I'm not traveling as much, what does that mean? That means I have more time to reach out to people in more different parts of the globe. So it's really an opportunity for us, and we need to look at this as, What can we do? How can we make this an opportunity? And I don't know about you, but I like sleeping in the same bed for a couple weeks in a row. I think that's great. I like being at home with my cats and my husband. I think that's wonderful to be able to do that every evening when I'm not working at Cisco, of course. TAYLOR COLLYER: So Alex, is it fair to say, then, that in some ways, this crisis that we're going through in the middle is in some ways the perfect setup for Collaboration? Because Collaboration can help companies change the way they're doing business and actually survive in these down times as well as thrive when the upturn comes? ALEX HADDEN-BOYD: I think Collaboration is the only way that we're going to get out of this. So we have to work together. We have to make our ideas bigger. We have to grow on our ideas. We have to share things. We've got to be global. So Collaboration is really the only way that's going to get us out of it. I feel very strongly about that. I think President Obama and a number of other administrations around the world feel the same way. We're all working together to say, What do we need to do get out of this crisis to really take us to the next level of productivity? To really get us into an environment where all of our businesses are thriving again? Except of course, maybe the insurance business who maybe we'd like some of that bonus money back, please. Author’s Original Notes: Clearing : It actually starts with your culture. It should be inclusive and encourage collaborative decision making--- For example, at Cisco we went from a “command and control” model, to a model in which boards and councils make decisions. The result is that we’re able to focus on 22 corporate-wide priorities today, versus the 3-5 we used to focus on. But it’s not just about your own corporate culture---your collaborative culture should extend externally as well---to your customers, partners, and supply chain. How do you include them in your decision making processes? Are you as transparent with them as you can be? How consistently do you interact with them to make them feel like they’re a part of your culture? [CLICK TO BUILD] Once you have a collaborative culture, you’ve got the strong user base through which to collaboration-enable the processes in which people work. All business processes should include collaborative capabilities so that they aren’t negatively impacted by the restrictions that we see effecting processes today: time, distance, latency. At any point in a business process, whether internal or external, you should be able to connect with the information and/or expertise you need in order to get things done. This is especially true with customer-facing processes---as consumers, we always want to be able to talk directly to a person at anytime if we have a question. [CLICK TO BUILD] Of course, this is all enabled by the tools and technology that are available to us today. Collaboration technology has evolved to a point where it’s no longer just about being able to communicate more effectively---it’s now at a point where you can drive real business benefits, transform the way business gets done and, in many cases, unlock entirely new business models and/or new routes to market. Transition : As we look at the key business imperatives to focus on, it’s important to consider the changes and/or investments you can make on any of these levels (short term or long term) to deliver the value you’re looking for. Let’s take a look at some examples, starting with “Save to Invest”.
  • Transcript : All of those aspects help us to essentially build a borderless enterprise, and this is really what we are communicating to our customers, this ability to construct an enterprise that knows no bounds. That can incorporate partners, that can incorporate a collaboration as a set of tools to be able to extend business operations and extend business leadership. Author’s Original Notes: Transcript : All of those aspects help us to essentially build a borderless enterprise, and this is really what we are communicating to our customers, this ability to construct an enterprise that knows no bounds. That can incorporate partners, that can incorporate a collaboration as a set of tools to be able to extend business operations and extend business leadership. Author’s Original Notes: Transcript: All of those aspects help us to essentially build a borderless enterprise, and this is really what we are communicating to our customers, this ability to construct an enterprise that knows no bounds. That can incorporate partners, that can incorporate a collaboration as a set of tools to be able to extend business operations and extend business leadership. Author’s Original Notes: Clearing : The first is saving money to invest in the future… Save to invest: Intelligently reduce costs to fund investments for improvement Focus on profitability, focus on Capital Efficiency No investments that don’t offer a fast return How can I cut costs out of my business without impacting the bottom line? Unlock Employee Potential Nurture key employees – focus on motivation and morale How do I get them to do more with less? How can I get them to work harder, smarter, and faster? Drive True Customer Intimacy Get much closer to key customers Embrace customers in your decision making processes How can I personalize / customize to match customer needs How can I ensure I’m giving them the best service possible? How can I empower them to get answers fast and easy, without having to dedicate more resources? Distance Yourself From Competitors My partners are my customers---How can I make them a more integral part of my business processes? How can I make better use of my eco-system to drive deeper and faster innovation and productivity? How can I collaborate with partners to generate a higher quality and quantity of leads? And ultimately, what all of these things point to is a transition to a borderless enterprise…where your business is inclusive of your entire ecosystem, and it’s no longer constrained by distance, time, or other inefficiencies in business processes. Transition : So how does collaboration help? At Cisco, we’ve learned that it really takes a holistic approach---it’s not just about throwing technology at the problem.
  • Transcript : So what do we take away from those trends and transitions? Well, I would submit it's a couple of things. The first is that we have seen a huge change in how we all work over the last, let's say, decade or so. I remember that it wasn't long ago that you get into the office at 8 o'clock in the morning, perhaps you leave at 7 or 8 o'clock at night, and then you were done for the day. We have sort of the double-edged sword now. That sword is basically the opportunity for inherent flexibility in how we work, we can work basically anytime, anywhere we want. And oh by the way, the other side of the coin is that we can work anytime and anywhere we want. So the result of all of this is that how we work with social networking in a web 2.0 environment with the collaborative toolset that we are providing is that we will continue to evolve in the way that we work and that change is going to be very rapid. The next point though is that as I made note of upfront, our opportunity in collaboration, given these trends, is absolutely unprecedented. And just remember that however painful it might seem in terms of today's environment and the difficulty and the challenges economically of today's environment, that our opportunity to take share is absolutely unprecedented and we can make this time now in terms of our time for leadership. Transcript : So what do we take away from those trends and transitions? Well, I would submit it's a couple of things. The first is that we have seen a huge change in how we all work over the last, let's say, decade or so. I remember that it wasn't long ago that you get into the office at 8 o'clock in the morning, perhaps you leave at 7 or 8 o'clock at night, and then you were done for the day. We have sort of the double-edged sword now. That sword is basically the opportunity for inherent flexibility in how we work, we can work basically anytime, anywhere we want. And oh by the way, the other side of the coin is that we can work anytime and anywhere we want. So the result of all of this is that how we work with social networking in a web 2.0 environment with the collaborative toolset that we are providing is that we will continue to evolve in the way that we work and that change is going to be very rapid. The next point though is that as I made note of upfront, our opportunity in collaboration, given these trends, is absolutely unprecedented. And just remember that however painful it might seem in terms of today's environment and the difficulty and the challenges economically of today's environment, that our opportunity to take share is absolutely unprecedented and we can make this time now in terms of our time for leadership. Author’s Original Notes:
  • Transcript : So with that as the starting point of trends and transitions looking over this from a two- to three-year perspective, let me now move down into the one- to two-year perspective and talk about our collaboration strategy. Author’s Original Notes: Transcript : So with that as the starting point of trends and transitions looking over this from a two- to three-year perspective, let me now move down into the one- to two-year perspective and talk about our collaboration strategy. Transcript : So with that as the starting point of trends and transitions looking over this from a two- to three-year perspective, let me now move down into the one- to two-year perspective and talk about our collaboration strategy. Author’s Original Notes:
  • Transcript : But we're really going to prove to you why the network is the platform to really allow us to have a seamless collaborative experience by integrating not only our software as a service offering, but also our networking infrastructure, our security, our unified communications and video applications, as well as devices across the board. So all of these things come together, all of them are delivered by the network. Now I told you earlier the same slide I showed up earlier, it hasn't changed at all since then, which is pretty good to know since it was just a few minutes ago.
  • Transcript : Now, I would submit that our collaboration strategy starts with architecture and that in fact this is our key differentiator relative to our competitors' in terms of an architecture that begins at a converged network, runs up through a layer of web services for media routing, works through a layer of applications and then up through clients and devices. And if you think about it, Cisco is unique in our ability to deliver this portfolio from one end to the other, from literally the converged network all the way up through the end devices and clients. And in fact it plays well to allowing the achievement of our vision. Once again our vision simply being the enablement of people to collaborate and communicate anywhere, anytime, from any device. So if that's the vision and this is the means against which we deliver it, there are a couple of points that I think are worth noting about this architecture that should play well to our customers. The first is perhaps that the architecture is very much open, that it allows for connectivity from not just Cisco applications and devices but a variety of applications and devices. I would submit to you that over time, we are going to see more and more devices that are non-Cisco devices connecting into our backend communications core. Our objective of course should be to sell as many desk phones and other devices as we can, but while doing that, we need to establish a construct with this architecture that makes customers very comfortable in the creation of a communications core. And in having established that communications core with Cisco to enable literally any device, whether it be a Cisco device, a mobile phone, a Microsoft Office Communicator client, a Sametime client or others, to then connect into that communications core. And in that way, we should be driving toward a one-to-one correlation of knowledge workers to the number of seats that we sell to connect to this communications core to provide a common fabric of communications. And in so doing, this architecture allows for that kind of flexibility. A second point is that it's extensible, this architecture, that you don't have to deploy all of these modules in one piece. You can start with voicemail perhaps and then add TelePresence, add Contact Center, or start with Contact Center and then add other applications. So by being modular, it brings together the value and advantage of a system while nonetheless enabling that architecture to be extended to include other applications later on. And finally at the bottom layer, this notion that it's not just about on-premises any more, it includes a hybrid model that ranges from on demand to on-premises and allows for flexibility in that deployment model to various different end-users. Author’s Original Notes: Mash-ups mean that we can now develop software that’s openly available on websites to allow different capabilities to be mashed together to create an entirely new applications. It’s sort of SOA (Services-Oriented Architecture) for the consumer environment. Transcript: Now, I would submit that our collaboration strategy starts with architecture and that in fact this is our key differentiator relative to our competitors' in terms of an architecture that begins at a converged network, runs up through a layer of web services for media routing, works through a layer of applications and then up through clients and devices. And if you think about it, Cisco is unique in our ability to deliver this portfolio from one end to the other, from literally the converged network all the way up through the end devices and clients. And in fact it plays well to allowing the achievement of our vision. Once again our vision simply being the enablement of people to collaborate and communicate anywhere, anytime, from any device. So if that's the vision and this is the means against which we deliver it, there are a couple of points that I think are worth noting about this architecture that should play well to our customers. The first is perhaps that the architecture is very much open, that it allows for connectivity from not just Cisco applications and devices but a variety of applications and devices. I would submit to you that over time, we are going to see more and more devices that are non-Cisco devices connecting into our backend communications core. Our objective of course should be to sell as many desk phones and other devices as we can, but while doing that, we need to establish a construct with this architecture that makes customers very comfortable in the creation of a communications core. And in having established that communications core with Cisco to enable literally any device, whether it be a Cisco device, a mobile phone, a Microsoft Office Communicator client, a Sametime client or others, to then connect into that communications core. And in that way, we should be driving toward a one-to-one correlation of knowledge workers to the number of seats that we sell to connect to this communications core to provide a common fabric of communications. And in so doing, this architecture allows for that kind of flexibility. A second point is that it's extensible, this architecture, that you don't have to deploy all of these modules in one piece. You can start with voicemail perhaps and then add TelePresence, add Contact Center, or start with Contact Center and then add other applications. So by being modular, it brings together the value and advantage of a system while nonetheless enabling that architecture to be extended to include other applications later on. And finally at the bottom layer, this notion that it's not just about on-premises any more, it includes a hybrid model that ranges from on demand to on-premises and allows for flexibility in that deployment model to various different end-users. Transcript: Now, I would submit that our collaboration strategy starts with architecture and that in fact this is our key differentiator relative to our competitors' in terms of an architecture that begins at a converged network, runs up through a layer of web services for media routing, works through a layer of applications and then up through clients and devices. And if you think about it, Cisco is unique in our ability to deliver this portfolio from one end to the other, from literally the converged network all the way up through the end devices and clients. And in fact it plays well to allowing the achievement of our vision. Once again our vision simply being the enablement of people to collaborate and communicate anywhere, anytime, from any device. So if that's the vision and this is the means against which we deliver it, there are a couple of points that I think are worth noting about this architecture that should play well to our customers. The first is perhaps that the architecture is very much open, that it allows for connectivity from not just Cisco applications and devices but a variety of applications and devices. I would submit to you that over time, we are going to see more and more devices that are non-Cisco devices connecting into our backend communications core. Our objective of course should be to sell as many desk phones and other devices as we can, but while doing that, we need to establish a construct with this architecture that makes customers very comfortable in the creation of a communications core. And in having established that communications core with Cisco to enable literally any device, whether it be a Cisco device, a mobile phone, a Microsoft Office Communicator client, a Sametime client or others, to then connect into that communications core. And in that way, we should be driving toward a one-to-one correlation of knowledge workers to the number of seats that we sell to connect to this communications core to provide a common fabric of communications. And in so doing, this architecture allows for that kind of flexibility. A second point is that it's extensible, this architecture, that you don't have to deploy all of these modules in one piece. You can start with voicemail perhaps and then add TelePresence, add Contact Center, or start with Contact Center and then add other applications. So by being modular, it brings together the value and advantage of a system while nonetheless enabling that architecture to be extended to include other applications later on. And finally at the bottom layer, this notion that it's not just about on-premises any more, it includes a hybrid model that ranges from on demand to on-premises and allows for flexibility in that deployment model to various different end-users. Author’s Original Notes:
  • Transcript : And if we play that architecture outright, we see numerous different elements that the network can enable. We take a look at what we're doing with Jabber as an example, bringing in Jabber into our Presence opportunity that extends not just from inside the firewall, but also out to the cloud in federating Presence. And not just among our own sets of applications, and our own sets of end-users, but also to a much broader global opportunity of incorporating Presence from a variety of different sources. We look at what we're doing with MediaNet in video, a great example of how we're extending the converged networks that we are creating to include video. And include a video experience that in fact can be fabulous by leveraging the architecture that we've created and with respect to clients, which I'll say more about in a moment. But in the client services framework, again this opportunity to provide a layer of connectivity that connects the converged network to literally any client and any device. These are just some examples of how the network- based architecture that we've constructed can differentiate us from our competitors and allow for a whole host of different services in the back end that can add value to a variety of applications and be delivered through a number of different devices and clients. Author’s Original Notes: Transcript : And if we play that architecture outright, we see numerous different elements that the network can enable. We take a look at what we're doing with Jabber as an example, bringing in Jabber into our Presence opportunity that extends not just from inside the firewall, but also out to the cloud in federating Presence. And not just among our own sets of applications, and our own sets of end-users, but also to a much broader global opportunity of incorporating Presence from a variety of different sources. We look at what we're doing with MediaNet in video, a great example of how we're extending the converged networks that we are creating to include video. And include a video experience that in fact can be fabulous by leveraging the architecture that we've created and with respect to clients, which I'll say more about in a moment. But in the client services framework, again this opportunity to provide a layer of connectivity that connects the converged network to literally any client and any device. These are just some examples of how the network- based architecture that we've constructed can differentiate us from our competitors and allow for a whole host of different services in the back end that can add value to a variety of applications and be delivered through a number of different devices and clients.
  • Transcript : Now, as I move from there into one layer deeper into the product roadmap and some aspects of that product roadmap, I wanted to bring you up to speed on a number of the different aspects of this roadmap as we look at them today. With respect to clients as an example, we're working very diligently and focusing on, in fact, the client services framework. Now, I'll talk more about that client services framework in just a moment although most of you are probably familiar with it at this juncture, but nonetheless by delivering that client services framework, we will enable connectivity into the UC back-end services from both Microsoft Office Communicator and more importantly from WebEx connect in early second half of this calendar year in 2009. We'll then extend that to include more services such as visual voicemail or video with the Toledo offering at the beginning of 2010. With respect to conferencing, we already are proposing MeetingPlace with WebEx, MeetingPlace for audio, WebEx for web as our primary conferencing offering that is available today. We offer that through WebEx in the cloud with MeetingPlace on-premises and those two layers connecting together. As we extend beyond that, we look to what we are doing with WebEx, a new suite of applications as part of the V27 train that will be announced and coming out in the April timeframe. And then finally this notion of an ASR Extender, which is basically a product that we're adding into the ASR, a capability we're adding into the ASR, to allow for multiple internal WebEx streams or sessions to be basically compiled into a single stream that goes out to the WebEx cloud. So for performance and bandwidth management, it will facilitate companies to manage WebEx in a more productive and efficient way, and we'll be moving that from the ASR into other types of servers as we look into 2010. With respect to mobility, most of you are now familiar with the WebEx iPhone client that's now available on App Store. WebEx clients will be added in the second half of 2009 for RIM and Nokia as well. We'll also have updates to our UC, CUMC Mobile Communicator client in the second half of 2009 for RIM, Nokia and then also adding in an iPhone set of capabilities for UC as well. As we look to Presence, we first move Jabber into the cloud for federation of Presence capabilities first in the cloud in the second half of 2009, and then in 2010 we allow for that Jabber capability to get integrated into CUP, our Presence server for UC to bring that Jabber capability on-prem. And then last but not least is video, and the video capabilities essentially begin in the second half of this year with an integration -- actually the first half of this year with the integration to CUBC with WebEx. And what that would simply enable is that all types of video getting integrated and communicated as part of a WebEx session, doesn't just have to be WebEx video in order to use that video in a WebEx session, but rather it will extend that video to numerous other different forms of video as well. And then as we look to the second half of this year, single button click to get into a WebEx session and a TelePresence session, which is really quite valuable as well. The ability to schedule in advance a WebEx session with a TelePresence session, walk into a room and with single button click launch your WebEx session and your TelePresence sessions simultaneously. Those are just some of the aspects of our product strategy that we are integrating into the current environment and leveraging the architecture that I described. Author’s Original Notes: Transcript: Now, as I move from there into one layer deeper into the product roadmap and some aspects of that product roadmap, I wanted to bring you up to speed on a number of the different aspects of this roadmap as we look at them today. With respect to clients as an example, we're working very diligently and focusing on, in fact, the client services framework. Now, I'll talk more about that client services framework in just a moment although most of you are probably familiar with it at this juncture, but nonetheless by delivering that client services framework, we will enable connectivity into the UC back-end services from both Microsoft Office Communicator and more importantly from WebEx connect in early second half of this calendar year in 2009. We'll then extend that to include more services such as visual voicemail or video with the Toledo offering at the beginning of 2010. With respect to conferencing, we already are proposing MeetingPlace with WebEx, MeetingPlace for audio, WebEx for web as our primary conferencing offering that is available today. We offer that through WebEx in the cloud with MeetingPlace on-premises and those two layers connecting together. As we extend beyond that, we look to what we are doing with WebEx, a new suite of applications as part of the V27 train that will be announced and coming out in the April timeframe. And then finally this notion of an ASR Extender, which is basically a product that we're adding into the ASR, a capability we're adding into the ASR, to allow for multiple internal WebEx streams or sessions to be basically compiled into a single stream that goes out to the WebEx cloud. So for performance and bandwidth management, it will facilitate companies to manage WebEx in a more productive and efficient way, and we'll be moving that from the ASR into other types of servers as we look into 2010. With respect to mobility, most of you are now familiar with the WebEx iPhone client that's now available on App Store. WebEx clients will be added in the second half of 2009 for RIM and Nokia as well. We'll also have updates to our UC, CUMC Mobile Communicator client in the second half of 2009 for RIM, Nokia and then also adding in an iPhone set of capabilities for UC as well. As we look to Presence, we first move Jabber into the cloud for federation of Presence capabilities first in the cloud in the second half of 2009, and then in 2010 we allow for that Jabber capability to get integrated into CUP, our Presence server for UC to bring that Jabber capability on-prem. And then last but not least is video, and the video capabilities essentially begin in the second half of this year with an integration -- actually the first half of this year with the integration to CUBC with WebEx. And what that would simply enable is that all types of video getting integrated and communicated as part of a WebEx session, doesn't just have to be WebEx video in order to use that video in a WebEx session, but rather it will extend that video to numerous other different forms of video as well. And then as we look to the second half of this year, single button click to get into a WebEx session and a TelePresence session, which is really quite valuable as well. The ability to schedule in advance a WebEx session with a TelePresence session, walk into a room and with single button click launch your WebEx session and your TelePresence sessions simultaneously. Those are just some of the aspects of our product strategy that we are integrating into the current environment and leveraging the architecture that I described. Author’s Original Notes: Transcript : Now, as I move from there into one layer deeper into the product roadmap and some aspects of that product roadmap, I wanted to bring you up to speed on a number of the different aspects of this roadmap as we look at them today. With respect to clients as an example, we're working very diligently and focusing on, in fact, the client services framework. Now, I'll talk more about that client services framework in just a moment although most of you are probably familiar with it at this juncture, but nonetheless by delivering that client services framework, we will enable connectivity into the UC back-end services from both Microsoft Office Communicator and more importantly from WebEx connect in early second half of this calendar year in 2009. We'll then extend that to include more services such as visual voicemail or video with the Toledo offering at the beginning of 2010. With respect to conferencing, we already are proposing MeetingPlace with WebEx, MeetingPlace for audio, WebEx for web as our primary conferencing offering that is available today. We offer that through WebEx in the cloud with MeetingPlace on-premises and those two layers connecting together. As we extend beyond that, we look to what we are doing with WebEx, a new suite of applications as part of the V27 train that will be announced and coming out in the April timeframe. And then finally this notion of an ASR Extender, which is basically a product that we're adding into the ASR, a capability we're adding into the ASR, to allow for multiple internal WebEx streams or sessions to be basically compiled into a single stream that goes out to the WebEx cloud. So for performance and bandwidth management, it will facilitate companies to manage WebEx in a more productive and efficient way, and we'll be moving that from the ASR into other types of servers as we look into 2010. With respect to mobility, most of you are now familiar with the WebEx iPhone client that's now available on App Store. WebEx clients will be added in the second half of 2009 for RIM and Nokia as well. We'll also have updates to our UC, CUMC Mobile Communicator client in the second half of 2009 for RIM, Nokia and then also adding in an iPhone set of capabilities for UC as well. As we look to Presence, we first move Jabber into the cloud for federation of Presence capabilities first in the cloud in the second half of 2009, and then in 2010 we allow for that Jabber capability to get integrated into CUP, our Presence server for UC to bring that Jabber capability on-prem. And then last but not least is video, and the video capabilities essentially begin in the second half of this year with an integration -- actually the first half of this year with the integration to CUBC with WebEx. And what that would simply enable is that all types of video getting integrated and communicated as part of a WebEx session, doesn't just have to be WebEx video in order to use that video in a WebEx session, but rather it will extend that video to numerous other different forms of video as well. And then as we look to the second half of this year, single button click to get into a WebEx session and a TelePresence session, which is really quite valuable as well. The ability to schedule in advance a WebEx session with a TelePresence session, walk into a room and with single button click launch your WebEx session and your TelePresence sessions simultaneously. Those are just some of the aspects of our product strategy that we are integrating into the current environment and leveraging the architecture that I described. Author’s Original Notes: Clients: Both clients based on Jabber (presence and IM); on prem subset of off prem; Connect will use CSF; On-prem will point to cloud through CSF; CSF in Connect in June (soft phone, hard phone control, one the phone presence); CSF2 is Toledo (H1 ‘10) – common UE (video, visual voice mail) Conferencing: WebEx w/ MP Audio today (staying within capacity limits); WebEx Accelerator (June); Toledo (MCS) -- (WebEx Node for ASR 1000) Mobility: WebEx client now, UC client June (CUMC functionality); no client convergence Presence: CUP subsumed by Jabber Video: CUVC remains core of platform;
  • Transcript : Now, without going into too much more detail around the client architecture, it is simply worth noting that this particular aspect of how we're approaching clients is so critical. And the reason is simply because the number of devices and the number of clients will extend and increase day by day. And the result of that is that we cannot be doing custom work associated with every client. What we want to do is create our client services framework, CSF as we often refer to it, as a middleware layer to allow connectivity of literally any client, ultimately, to RBAC and services. Those backend services being the ability to place a phone call, the ability to have a video call, the ability to show a call log. The ability to go in and show visual voicemail display, all of these aspects are backend services that we will continue to create, continue to enhance. By then providing the middleware layer, that provides simply the connectivity to any of those clients. And whether it's through cookie CUCIMOC, through our Cisco Unified Communications Integration for Microsoft Office Communicator, name that I love. CUCIMOC, that allows for connectivity of an Office Communicator client directly into our back-end services. This is a way to essentially relegate Microsoft in many ways to simply an IM client and have us, without creating any infrastructure overhead or administrative overhead, use the architecture that our customers have already deployed with Cisco to simply connect in a different kind of client, their Office Communicator client into those back-end services. The same thing would hold true whether it's WebEx connect or CUPC or other potential third-party clients. So this CSF, this Client Services Framework, is really a very essential part of our overall strategy of delivering that architecture that I showed earlier to any device and any client. Author’s Original Notes: Transcript: Now, without going into too much more detail around the client architecture, it is simply worth noting that this particular aspect of how we're approaching clients is so critical. And the reason is simply because the number of devices and the number of clients will extend and increase day by day. And the result of that is that we cannot be doing custom work associated with every client. What we want to do is create our client services framework, CSF as we often refer to it, as a middleware layer to allow connectivity of literally any client, ultimately, to RBAC and services. Those backend services being the ability to place a phone call, the ability to have a video call, the ability to show a call log. The ability to go in and show visual voicemail display, all of these aspects are backend services that we will continue to create, continue to enhance. By then providing the middleware layer, that provides simply the connectivity to any of those clients. And whether it's through cookie CUCIMOC, through our Cisco Unified Communications Integration for Microsoft Office Communicator, name that I love. CUCIMOC, that allows for connectivity of an Office Communicator client directly into our back-end services. This is a way to essentially relegate Microsoft in many ways to simply an IM client and have us, without creating any infrastructure overhead or administrative overhead, use the architecture that our customers have already deployed with Cisco to simply connect in a different kind of client, their Office Communicator client into those back-end services. The same thing would hold true whether it's WebEx connect or CUPC or other potential third-party clients. So this CSF, this Client Services Framework, is really a very essential part of our overall strategy of delivering that architecture that I showed earlier to any device and any client. Author’s Original Notes: Clearing : As you talk with customers, you’ll find there are three types of communication clients that enter the conversation: CUPC, WebEx Connect, and 3 rd party EIM clients like Sametime, MOC, or Jabber. Today, there is no single client solution (Cisco or otherwise) on the market that meets all the needs of our diverse customer base Because of that, Cisco offers both the CUPC and WebEx Connect clients: CUPC has premise-based UC functionality including: presence, soft phone, video, visual voicemail, and basic IM Connect has cloud-based collaboration functionality including: IM, Doc mgmt, Team space, calendar, wikis, web 2.0 widgets And for customers who have already made a decision to standardize on a Microsoft Office Communicator or IBM Sametime, we offer great integrations that enable them to still take advantage of Cisco UC services inside of those clients The key thing to understand is that all three of these clients will continue to exist because that’s what customer demand has dictated for us. There are some important ways, however, in which these clients will evolve in the next couple years: First off, we will be unifying the user experience both Connect and CUPC, such that all features/functionality of CUPC and Connect come together into a single client The end result will be called “Cisco WebEx Connect” Separately, CUPC will continue to exist as a standalone premise-based client ensuring that we still have a solution for customers who require an on-prem-only solution While the CUPC product will not contain some of the same cloud-based functionality as Connect (i.e., teamspaces, document management, etc), your customers should feel confident and secure in selecting either CUPC or Connect today, as both have a roadmap going forward. You can also expect us to continue to develop and drive deeper integration into 3rd party clients like MOC and SameTime Our client strategy is CUPC Core Everywhere. What is “CUPC Core” Headless CUPC with UI taken off of it so you can take it and put it under other clients: Full chart—what is it, what does it offer. Other clients can take advantage of all Cisco Enterprise Voice features: dial plan, CAC, advanced voice services Classic best of both worlds: Enterprise-class, network-based voice features from CUPC, with on-demand features from Connect (Teamspace, doc mgmt, etc.) The CUPC core underneath-best of both worlds. All Cisco UC desktop Clients built off a common client middleware platform Cisco UC Enable leading 3rd party IM Clients Provide access to same desktop UC features to development community
  • Transcript : Another very good example of how we are leveraging this architecture is in the contact center. Now the contact center five years ago was really an island of communication, we sold it to different buyers. It had very little to do in many ways with UC and it often didn't even use the same architecture, different databases, different administrative tools, different agent desktops. And while to some extent that is still the case, absolutely the contact center is converging into the balance of the Unified Communications portfolio. And Expert Advisor is one good way that that's being delivered. It's not just about Contact Center agents, it's about the ability to extend Contact Center expertise or Contact Center questions and queries by customers into subject matter experts, and then from there into perhaps other experts around the company. Now, how is that going to be done? That's going to be done by being able to access a myriad of different clients and devices through perhaps the client services framework or a variety of other ways, you have to extend and be able to extend that Contact Center beyond just the Contact Center Agent Desktop into a variety of other different devices and clients. And this can be done through the Unified Communications architecture that we have constructed. Video use in the contact center will become more and more common as well. Think about -- and this isn't so much as talking to and seeing a contact center agent. This is more about perhaps uploading a video, so think of the video of what your car looked like after an accident and wanting to get that using 3G video over a mobile phone to an advisor, to an insurance adjuster immediately. So the ability to do that, the ability to upload videos from perhaps kiosks or soft phones or other kinds of web services or web devices. Also the ability in self-service mode to push videos down to customers so that they can actually see instructional videos of what might occur during a particular call or a question that they might have and how a contact center or company can anticipate what that customer might want to see, so that they don't have to have as many agents per call. So video will become more common, again, using the architecture that we have constructed. And finally, reporting and business intelligence become more important as well, moving from reporting 1.0 which was about things like hold times and talk times and those sorts of metrics which are still very important for contact center management, but now extending into other areas of business intelligence. For example, not just how long was a particular agent on the phone, but perhaps what was their order volume, how many orders did they book, what was the dollar amount of those bookings or perhaps their other different metrics associated with the business itself that can be tracked as part of these business intelligence metrics. One good example perhaps is to not just work very hard to get a person or customer who is calling off the phone, but rather to make sure that that person didn't have to call back. And this kind of business intelligence can assist us in going through that process. Now there are a ton of materials on this and in fact simultaneous to what we are doing here at PSSVT, there is a Contact Center virtual learning event. It's been running since February 25th, already there are something like 90+ VoDs of less than 10 minutes each on various different topics. I would encourage you to go take a look at them and begin to leverage those opportunities and those tools as you see fit in your respective businesses and with your customers.
  • Transcript : And then to finish off in terms of strategy and roadmap, where are we investing as we look forward in areas in which our customers want. First, interoperability continues to be critical, we have to be successful in integrating to a number of different applications, a number of different devices, certainly a common theme that I've been talking about here today. And whether it's SAP applications, or Oracle applications, or Microsoft or IBM desktops, or various different mobile devices, Nokia, RIM, iPhone, these integrations become I think especially critical in very heterogenous environments. User experience of course continues to be quite essential, an ability to enable a user experience on any device, any client, to be incredibly compelling. Same fonts, same colors, same menu structure, so that if I start on a desk phone and I pick up a soft phone, I know how to use it in advance. If I move from that soft phone to a mobile device, I can expect certain functionality to exist on that mobile device, and therefore I know what to look for, I know how to use these various different products, and I make that compelling. We are now starting every product development cycle with user experience, not doing it as an afterthought 80% of the way through the development cycle. So user experience is a critical focus item for us. And then lastly, but not lastly in terms of importance, is TCO. In this environment, we are simply not going to sell things unless we can show an improved total cost of ownership for our customers. And the result of that is whether it's around virtualization or coresidency or improved provisioning tools or whatever else it might be such as monitoring tools and other overall management focused items so that people can manage our networks more effectively, manage their communications environment more effectively. The opportunity here is around is improving TCO, and we have to be able to demonstrate this to our customers in order to get them moving in this economic environment. But I would submit to you that if we can lead with architecture to show our differentiation at Cisco and we can provide a roadmap and a vision and an understanding on their part around how we enable interoperability in a heterogenous world, how we can deliver a very compelling user experience and how we can save them money in OPEX along the way,
  • Transcript : So we announced Cisco WebEx meeting center on the iPhone. A joint development project between the Voice Technology Group and the Collaboration Software Group on there. So what's in that experience? Well, you've got web conferencing from WebEx, from the cloud. You've got audio conferencing from MeetingPlace, from premises. You've got your device and installation experience from Apple. It's not from Cisco. So we fit into their device and installation experience, how you order through the App Store. That's an Apple thing. That's not a Cisco thing. So we had to fit into that particular model. And then guess what? The meeting experience, the quality of that meeting experience is delivered from WebEx, from Cisco WebEx collaboration cloud. And I will reveal later exactly what that is. TAYLOR COLLYER: Okay. ALEX HADDEN-BOYD: At the same time, there's a 3G network experience that's coming from AT&T in this particular case here in the United States. And there's a wi-fi experience, because guess what? That iPhone and that meeting center application runs on wi-fi. And that's using Cisco. So all of these different components go in to make up the experience, and that's why you can't say ever that it's just an all Cisco all the time world. It's how we actually developed this experience. Now, this actually won best of show at MacWorld. I think it shocked all of us. TAYLOR COLLYER: Have we ever won best of show at MacWorld, ever, as Cisco? To the best of your knowledge? ALEX HADDEN-BOYD: I don't know if Cisco has ever been at MacWorld before, much less I know that we have never won best of show before. Apple is very excited about this as an application. They're featuring this is one of their top 10 business applications on there. So we've had more than 75,000 downloads since we've done that. TAYLOR COLLYER: To me, one of the great things about this, too, is that it's a perfect proof point. If ever anybody asks you, How does a Cisco collaboration architecture differ or can you give me a proof point of what it can do? It seems like this would be the thing that you could hold up and say, look, this is really the proof point. ALEX HADDEN-BOYD: Yes, absolutely, and it's all those different networks. It's our network, it's coming from the cloud, it's coming from our premises network, from MeetingPlace. It's coming from the AT&T mobile network. It's coming from the wi-fi network. So all of those things go into making up part of that experience. And that's what the customer cares about. Actually, the customer doesn't care about the fact that it's coming from wi-fi or it's coming from AT&T. They might when they get their bill, you know, but they really care about, Do I have a great experience on this device? Am I able to ride on the train and actually participate in my meeting, not only sharing the slides, but also hearing the audio at the same time. That's what the customer cares about. And that's really what we're delivering with collaboration.
  • Transcript : All right, well with no other questions from any of the participants, I think we can go ahead and conclude and thank you for listening today. If you have any more questions, we have some resources available from an IT architecture standpoint. The wwwin/it/architecture will lead you to our page which will help you understand the makeup of IT architecture within Cisco. Reach out to me or my colleagues and we'll be happy to assist you in selling to our customer architects.

CISCO CISCO Presentation Transcript

  • Seizing The Opportunity with Cisco Collaboration Marlon T. Ceniza Network Consultant Cisco Systems, Inc. [email_address]
  • Collaboration Trends & Transitions
  • Technology Trends & Market Transitions
    • Mobility is a top priority
    • Video will become pervasive
    • Social networking at work
    • Server/client virtualization
    • SaaS & Hosted Solutions
    • Macro: Green, Globalization, Intercompany Collaboration, etc.
  • Collaboration Is The Platform For Business Collaboration Is The Platform For Business Culture Technology Process
  • Companies need Better Collaboration Now! Distance Yourself From Competitors Drive True Customer Intimacy Unlock Employee Potential Save to Invest Transition To A Borderless Enterprise
  • What do these Market Transitions Mean for Us?
    • How we work will continue to change … rapidly
    • 2. Our opportunity in collaboration is unprecedented
    Collaborate Connect Communicate
  • Cisco Collaboration Strategy
  • Cisco Collaboration Network Architecture
    • Cisco leverages the Network as the Platform to deliver a seamless collaborative experience by integrating Software as a Service, Networking Infrastructure, Security, Unified Communications and Video, Applications and Devices.
  • Cisco Collaboration Architecture Collaborative Experiences Policy Applications & Mashups Security Web Services On Premises (Cisco Intelligent Network) Directory & Identity Web Portals Custom Applications WebEx Connect LOB Applications On Demand (Cisco WebEx MediaTone Network) Federation Data Sharing Presence Routing & Queuing IM & Chat Custom Data Location Business Apps Other Services Call Control Voice File Mgmt Video Email Data Services HR Apps
  • Differentiated, Network-Enabled Collaboration Experiences Conferencing: WebEx Accelerator Appliance Clients: Client Services Framework Presence: Jabber Integration into WebEx Cloud and Cisco UC Video: MediaNet SaaS: Thin Clients; Ubiquitous Network Access
  • Transition from Products to Architecture
    • WebEx Connect/UC Integration Common UE Framework
    • Connect/CSF I
    • Connect/CSF II
    • Native Clients for Nokia, RIM and iPhone
    • WebEx Meeting Center on iPhone Available now
    • WebEx on Nokia & RIM
    • UC
    • Combine WebEx Web With MeetingPlace Audio
    • Available now
    • WebEx Meeting Applications V27
    • ASR Extension
    • Integrate Jabber Into WebEx Cloud & Cisco UC
    • WebEx Cloud:
    • On-Premises:
    • Integrated Experience Across TelePresence, UC, & WebEx
    • WebEx/CUVC:
    • WebEx/TP/Phone:
    Mobility Video Presence Conferencing Clients
  • Collaboration Architecture for Clients Client Service UC Core Cisco UC Infrastructure Services Call Control Data Store Presence Call History Conferencing Messaging Audio Call Ctl Video IM Agg VM Presence Dir Svc Future Svc Call History Conf … 3rd Party EIM Client (Sametime, MOC, Jabber) Cisco WebEx Connect Cisco Unified Personal Communicator    
  • Evolution of the Contact Center Customer Ent. Contact Center App Customer Service Reps Subject Matter Experts Power Users 1 800 XYZ Partner SMEs Expert Advisor
    • Video-enabled customer service
      • “ Push” informational videos
      • Upload videos
      • Video played during self-service
    • Variety of endpoints supported
    • New self- and assisted- service contact center Apps
    Video Reporting/ Business Intelligence Reporting 1.0 Vendor-Specific Tools Custom Reports Predefined KPIs/Metrics Centralized Data and Reports Personalized Information Portal Customer Experience Mgmt Client/Server Web Based/Distributed Static Output Interactive and Collaborative Data Lock-In Extendable Framework Reporting 2.0
  • Collaboration Investment Priorities User Experience TCO Interoperability Easier to Install, Manage, Maintain: Server Virtualization Client Virtualization Co-residency Provisioning Tools Monitoring Tools
  • It’s about the Experiences Web Conferencing from WebEx Audio Conferencing from MeetingPlace Device and Installation Experience from Apple 3G Network Experience WiFi Network Experience from Cisco 802.11 Meeting Experience from Cisco WebEx Collaboration Cloud
  •