CAPE PENINSULA UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY
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CAPE PENINSULA UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY CAPE PENINSULA UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Document Transcript

  • 1 CAPE PENINSULA UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY STUDENT COUNSELLING ANNUAL REPORT 2007 CONTENTS 1. Introduction 2. Highlights and Challenges 3. Vision, Mission, Values and Core Services 4. Staffing 5. Psychotherapy and Individual Counselling 6. Career Counselling 7. Advocacy and Learner Support 8. Peer Help Programme 9. Skills Training and Group Sessions 10. Wellness Project 11. Marketing and Promotion 12. Community Outreach 13. Quality Assurance 14. Strategic Planning and Performance Management 15. Committee Services and Consultations 16. Staff Activities
  • 2 1. INTRODUCTION Student Counseling’s focus during 2007 was on providing a wide variety of services to CPUT students within an overall wellness model. Most of the objectives set by the department for 2007 were achieved, with a number of areas that stand out as highlights. An ongoing challenge is to stay in touch with students’ needs and to form collaborative efforts with other departments and services at CPUT to the ultimate benefit of the students. Student Counselling stays committed to explore new and innovative ways of providing a quality service to the CPUT community in order to facilitate student development, retention, throughput and success. 2. HIGHLIGHTS AND CHALLENGES Student Counseling can report on the following highlights in 2007: • Student Counselling developed an integrated Strategic Plan document for all the campuses of CPUT with detailed objectives for the various core services and projects. The department’s strategic objectives were linked to the broader objectives of CPUT, while each staff member developed individual objectives that adhere to the department’s objectives. • As part of the overall quality assurance review process, regular client satisfaction surveys and evaluations of the various programmes and projects were conducted. • Very successful wellness awareness celebrations were held on the Bellville, Cape Town and Wellington campuses. • Detailed manuals and procedures were developed for the intern training programme for the Counselling Psychology Masters as well as the B. Psych programmes at the Student Counselling department. • The 20 hours per week contract post for the student counselor servicing the two satellite campuses (Mowbray and Tygerberg Hospital) was extended to a full-time contract post, while a Student Welfare Officer post was approved on the Bellville campus. • Staff actively participated in the regional activities of the Society for Student Counsellors in Southern Africa (SSCSA) and three staff members presented a paper at the annual SSCSA conference. • A series of joint case discussions, peer supervision and self-care sessions were scheduled as part of a professional development process for staff. • The Executive Management Committee (EMC) approved the structure of the Student Counselling department.
  • 3 • The Student Counselling policy document was reviewed and written in the new CPUT format. • Student Counselling assisted with the establishment of a Disability Unit at CPUT. • Student Counseling developed and implemented a presentation to first year students on adapting to higher education. This presentation is in addition to the initial contact with first year students where they are informed of the services available to them at CPUT. The presentation provides information and tips on time management, setting goals, motivating self, developing relationships and stress management and can be viewed as an extended orientation programme. • The department developed a DVD to introduce Student Counselling staff and services to first year students in a visually attractive way during orientation 2008. The following challenges need to be addressed in the future and forms part of Student Counselling’s strategic plan for 2008: • Promoting the concept of establishing a dedicated psychometric assessment, placement and research centre at CPUT. • Obtaining a third stream income for Student Counselling from student levies. • Placing the integrated promotional material on the CPUT Webpage as well as implementing the use of other electronic marketing media such as bulk SMS. • Creating more opportunities for staff to conduct formal research in order to encourage publications in accredited journals. • Clarifying the role of Student Counseling in areas such as student learning and wellness and developing stronger links with other departments and services at CPUT in order to collaborate in student development, retention, throughput and success. • Developing a plan for becoming more involved in student leadership groups. • Developing more ways of providing a service to part-time and post graduate students. • Managing the following changes resulting from the merger process: o Assessing the impact of service delivery of faculties moving to other campuses. o Planning for future expansion of services and improvement of physical facilities. • Developing proposals for improved career paths for Student Counselling staff. • Promoting the re-activation of the Student Services Council at CPUT. Contributions by Abie de Villiers and Elisabet Smit 3. VISION, MISSION, VALUES AND CORE SERVICES 3.1 STUDENT COUNSELLING VISION To be the heartbeat of student wellness View slide
  • 4 3.2 STUDENT COUNSELLING MISSION STATEMENT We provide a comprehensive psychological, social and educational service to ensure the holistic well-being, development and success of the student community. 3.3 STUDENT COUNSELLING VALUES Caring Nurturing Respect Integrity Honesty Commitment Open communication Valuing diversity Ethical considerations 3.4 STUDENT COUNSELLING CORE SERVICES AND PROJECTS A detailed strategic plan for each of the core services and projects has been developed. • Individual Counselling and Psychotherapy o Supervision of Masters and B. Psych interns o Continuous professional development of staff • Career Development: o Prospective Students and Resources Venues o CPUT students • Skills Development: o Credit bearing sessions o Non credit bearing workshops • Learner Support and Advocacy o Assessment for Placement Purposes o Disability and Welfare services o Identification of Students at risk o Exam concessions and Academic exclusions • Peer Help Programme • Research & Development • Community Outreach • Wellness Programme • Information on Webpage • Newsletter and Annual Report • First year Orientation and Extended Orientation View slide
  • 5 4. STAFFING Mr Clint Steenveld was appointed as Student Counselor in a full-time contract post from the beginning of 2007 to continue with the specific responsibility of providing student counselling services at the Tygerberg, Mowbray and Granger Bay campuses. Ms Nthabiseng Afrika-Mabuto was appointed as Student Counsellor on the Bellville campus on 1 May 2007 to replace Ms Mpho Mogotsi who resigned at the end of February. Mr Amith Ramballie was appointed as Student Counselor on the Cape Town campus. Ms Faith Sijula was appointed as Student Counsellor on the Cape Town campus towards the end of 2007 to replace Mr Prince Dabula. Ms Charmaine Davids, the psychometrist on the Cape Town campus, left the employ of CPUT. This post was converted to a Student Welfare Officer post for the Bellville campus. Two Counselling Psychology Masters Interns (Ms Michelle Lawrence and Ms Jodi Godden) spent 12 months and 4 months respectively at Student Counseling as part of their practical training. Four B. Psych students from the University of the Western Cape spent a 6-month practical period at the Student Counselling department. Ms Glynis van Niekerk and Ms Bonita Williams were stationed on the Bellville campus, while Ms Melissa Meyer and Mr Sashen Naidoo were placed on the Cape Town campus. The Student Counseling staff for 2007 for the various campuses of CPUT consisted of the following: Dr A B de Villiers HOD Student Counselling, Bellville Campus B. Diac (UNISA), M.A (Clinical Psychology), University of Stellenbosch, PhD, University of Cape Town. Registered with HPCSA as Clinical Psychologist Ms Elisabet Smit HOD Student Counselling, Cape Town Campus MA Counselling Psychology, University of Stellenbosch Registered with HPCSA as Counselling Psychologist Ms Nthabiseng Afrika-Mabuto Student Counsellor, Bellville Campus M. Psych, University of Western Cape, Registered with HPCSA as Educational Psychologist Mr Prince Dabula Student Counsellor, Cape Town Campus MA Counselling Psychology, University of Port Elizabeth Registered with HPCSA as Counselling Psychologist
  • 6 Ms Charmaine Davids Psychometrist, Cape Town Campus M.Ed. Educational Psychology, University of Stellenbosch Registered with HPCSA as Educational Psychologist Ms Yolanda Hanning Student Counsellor, Bellville Campus B.A (Hons), University of Western Cape, M. Ed (Couns Educ) (Penn. State). Registered with HPCSA as Counselling Psychologist Ms Annette Kuhn Administrative Assistant, Cape Town Campus Ms Marzetha Laubscher Administrative Assistant, Cape Town Campus Dr Melleta Louw Student Counsellor, Wellington Campus MA Clinical Psychology, DPhil, University of Stellenbosch Registered with HPCSA as Clinical Psychologist Ms Mpho Mogotsi Student Counsellor, Bellville Campus MA Clinical Psychology, University of Western Cape Registered with HPCSA as Clinical Psychologist Ms Giselle Naidu Student Counsellor, Cape Town Campus MA Counselling Psychology, University of Natal Registered with HPCSA as Counselling Psychologist Ms Nomthandazo Nkibi Student Welfare Officer, Cape Town Campus B.Soc.Sc Hons Psychiatric Social Work, & Post-grad Diploma in Management, University of Cape Town Registered with SACSSP as Social Worker Ms Peggy Nxopo Secretary and Office Administrator, Bellville Campus N.D. Office Administration, (Pentech). Ms Charlene Petersen Student Counsellor, Bellville Campus B.A (Hons), (M.A Ed Psych), University of Western Cape Registered with HPCSA as Educational Psychologist Mr Amith Ramballie Student Counsellor, Cape Town Campus MA Counselling Psychology, University of Zululand Registered with HPCSA as Counselling Psychologist Ms Faith Sijula Student Counsellor, Cape Town Campus M. Psych, University of Western Cape Registered with HPCSA as Educational Psychologist
  • 7 Mr Clint Steenveld Student Counsellor, Mowbray, Tygerberg, Granger Bay MA Clinical Psychology, Rhodes University Registered with the HPCSA as Clinical Psychologist Ms Elmarie van der Walt Student Counsellor, Cape Town Campus MA Counselling Psychology, University of the Free State Registered with HPCSA as Counselling Psychologist 5. PSYCHOTHERAPY AND INDIVIDUAL COUNSELLING This area forms part of the core business of Student Counseling and is comprised of individual counseling and psychotherapy, small therapeutic groups, self-care, the counseling psychology internship programme, self-care and peer supervision. The aim is to improve throughputs, retention rates and pass rates by providing ongoing individual counseling and psychotherapy to students who may be experiencing difficulty in focusing on their studies due to personal or academic problems. During 2007 a steady flow of clients passed through the unit on a daily basis to achieve their personal academic goals. Students who utilize the service tend to return for ongoing guidance and support and are able to access other resources available to them on campus more readily. The Student Counselling department invested in the purchasing of interactive computer programmes such as “Journey into the Wild Divine” a biofeedback device used for anger and stress management. It is available to students in the Resource Venues on the Bellville and Cape Town campuses. The statistics reflect the total number of registered CPUT students (from the Bellville, Cape Town, Mowbray, Tygerberg, Wellington, Granger Bay and Athlone campuses), who reported at Student Counselling for individual counseling and psychotherapy during 2007. The coordinators of this core service on the Bellville and Cape Town campuses respectively were Yolanda Hanning and Elmarie van der Walt. Students reporting for the first time for individual counseling / psychotherapy: N = 1060 Total number of individual counseling / psychotherapy sessions (including follow-up sessions): N = 2826. This is a 1,2% total increase for individual counseling / psychotherapy sessions when compared to the 2006 statistics. Although the total number of new intakes (students reporting to Student Counselling for the first time) were less than during 2006, a greater percentage of students needed follow-up / longer term counseling / therapy in 2007. A total of 407 (38,4%) of the first time reporting students, were from the CPUT student residences, while a total of 52 international students (4,9%) made use of this service.
  • 8 The statistics of the number of individual counseling / therapy sessions with first time reporting students during 2007 are reflected in the following tables: Year level of study of students N % Extended programme 18 1,7 First year 438 41,3 Second year 275 30,0 Third year 213 20,0 Fourth year and higher 116 11,0 TOTAL 1060 100 According to the previous table, 73% of students who made use of the individual counseling / psychotherapy service for the first time, were from the extended programme, first and second year levels, i.e. junior students. Gender of students N % (first time reporters) Male 382 36,0 Female 678 64,0 TOTAL 1060 100 According to the previous table, about two thirds of students who made use of the individual counseling / therapy service for the first time were females. More than half (50,6%) of students who made use of the individual counseling and therapy service, were from the black cultural / race group Faculty representation N % (first time reporters) Applied Sciences 123 11,6 Informatics and Design 111 10,5 Health and Wellness Sciences 65 6,1 Education and Social Sciences 214 20,2 Engineering 202 19,1 Business 345 32,5 TOTAL 1060 100 According to the previous table, the overwhelming majority of students who reported for individual counseling / therapy were from the Business Faculty with the Education & Social Sciences and Engineering Faculties in the second and third places.
  • 9 Main needs / areas of service delivery % (in order of demand) Personal / emotional problems 60,8 Study / academic difficulties 7,8 Career assessment and career counseling / career 6,9 development / course change / course information Financial difficulties 4,6 Coping with trauma / psychological emergencies 4,1 General life skills development 3,1 Academic / residence exclusion or warning 2,3 Contingency fund requests 2,0 Family / domestic difficulties 1,9 Employment / job preparation skills 1,5 Termination of pregnancy counselling 1,3 Exam concession requests and evaluation 1,2 Accommodation difficulties 1,2 Information sharing (e.g. on CPUT policies) 0,8 Disability related 0,5 TOTAL 100 According to the previous table the most prevailing concern (60,8%) for which students approached the student counselors, or student welfare officer, was for problems of a personal nature, which negatively impacted on their ability to focus on their studies. The nature of these personal problems is qualified in the next table. Nature of personal problems for which % students seek help (frequency reported) Interpersonal / relationship difficulties 36,2 Depression and / or suicide ideation / attempt 11,6 Adjustment difficulties / coping with loneliness 10,8 Anxiety / phobia / psychosomatic complaints / 9,9 stress related Fear of failure / motivational problems 8,0 Personal identity difficulties / value conflicts / 6,1 assertiveness issues Bereavement / dealing with loss 4,4 Substance abuse / additions 3,8 HIV / Aids related 3,5 Sexual harassment and rape 2,3 Eating related disorders 2,1 Sexual dysfunction / sexual identity issues 1,4 TOTAL 100
  • 10 According to the previous table the dominant personal problems for which students received counseling / therapy were interpersonal and relationship (e.g. with parents, lecturers, boy-/girlfriend / peers) difficulties, followed by depression, anxiety and stress related problems. This is consistent with statistics of previous years. Contributions by Ms Elisabet Smit and Dr Abie de Villiers Client Satisfaction Survey During the months of May and September 2007, a total of 161 clients who made use of our individual counseling / psychotherapy service on the various campuses were requested to anonymously complete a questionnaire immediately after their session, to provide us with feedback regarding their level of satisfaction with this service. The results were as follows: Main purpose of visit N % Career counseling 51 20.6 Counselling for personal concerns 124 50.0 Financial concerns 8 3.2 Accommodation concerns 17 6.9 Study concerns 34 13.7 Support disability 4 1.6 Visit resource centre 10 4.0 TOTAL 248 100 Source of referral N % Self 82 50.9 Peer/fellow student/friend 25 15.6 Staff member/faculty/clinic 43 26.7 Other 11 6.8 TOTAL 161 100 First as opposed to follow-up visit N % First visit to Student Counselling 88 54.7 Follow up visit to Student Counselling 73 45.3 TOTAL 161 100 Level of satisfaction with the N % individual counseling / therapy service Most satisfied 98 60.9 Satisfied 63 39.1 Dissatisfied 0 0 Most dissatisfied 0 0 TOTAL 161 100
  • 11 In this survey, over 60% of our clients indicated that they were most satisfied with the individual counseling / psychotherapy service provided to them, while the rest were satisfied with the service. Counselling Psychology Masters Intern Programme During 2007 a structured learning programme which included an assessment process was developed for the the Counselling Psychology Internship Programme. An internship manual was developed as a supportive document for the interns. The department also participated in the UWC M. Psych selection process for 2008. As a result of this process, Student Counselling will receive the candidates of choice as intern counselling psychologists in 2009. For 2007, Student Counselling had two Psychology masters students who did their internship at CPUT. The first semester Ms Michelle Lawrence (collaborating university: UWC) was placed on the Bellville campus and Ms Jodi Godden (collaborating university: UKZN) was situated on the Cape Town campus. The latter however terminated her internship in April of that year due to personal circumstances. In the second semester Ms Michelle Lawrence was placed at the Cape Town campus. The Internship encompassed the following aspects: twice weekly supervision with the supervisor, participating in the fortnightly peer supervision with the rest of the psychologists on the staff, presenting a case study to staff, attending training workshops, completing an assignment / portfolio on self development and quarterly evaluations that were sent to the collaborating university. The interns form a very valuable part of the therapeutic team and are involved with all the services offered at CPUT (counselling and psychotherapy with individual clients, career counselling to students and prospective students, offering non-credit bearing life skills workshops, and participating in the case study discussions). The supervisors of the Counselling Psychology Masters interns on the Bellville and Cape Town campuses respectively were Ms Yolanda Hanning and Ms Elmarie van der Walt. Contribution by Ms Elmarie van der Walt and Ms Yolanda Hanning B.Psych Internship Programme The coordinator of this program for 2007 was Ms Giselle Naidu. Student Counselling together with the University of the Western Cape (UWC), provided placement for four students from UWC who had completed a B. Psychology Degree (B. Psych). Two students each were allocated to Bellville and Cape Town respectively. The B. Psych is a fairly new initiative from the department of Psychology governed by the Health Professionals Council of South Africa (HPCSA). The training aims at equipping students with theoretical and practical skills to register as professional psychological counselors. As part of their training the students have to complete a 6 month practical training with an approved training institution.
  • 12 Student Counselling developed a training programme in line with the requirements of the HPCSA and UWC. The programme entailed the following elements: individual counseling, workshops, assessment, career counseling, reading, community project and presentations, supervision sessions and handing in a portfolio. As part of the programme CPUT formed a relationship with the South African Police Services for the interns to provide life skills training to a community project aimed at street children from surrounding areas. Ms Giselle Naidu and Mr Amith Ramballie on the Cape Town campus and Ms Charlene Petersen and Ms Nthabiseng Afrika-Mabuto on the Bellville campus were appointed as supervisors to support the intern counselors. The interns were asked to evaluate the programme and the positive feedback has provided the team with the relevant information needed to improve the quality of the training in the future. Contribution by Ms Giselle Naidu 6. CAREER COUNSELLING Career Counselling for CPUT Students Career counselling for CPUT students takes place individually. Students make an appointment through the secretary with one of the Student Counsellors. The Student Counsellors would do an intake interview and assess whether a psychometric evaluation would be relevant and decide on an appropriate battery of psychometric instruments. The Student Counsellor would schedule a follow-up session for feedback where indicated. During 2007 Student Counselling provided a number of career development sessions to registered CPUT students in the following areas: career assessment and career counseling, course information and course change and employment counseling / job preparation skills. These figures are reported as percentages under Individual Counseling to CPUT students. The coordinators for this area were Mr Prince Dabula/Ms Elmarie van der Walt and Ms Nthabiseng Afrika-Mabuto on the Cape Town and Bellville campuses respectively.. Resources Venue The Resources Venue contains information on different training institutions, careers, companies and various life skills (e.g. emotional well-being, personal development, CV writing). It also hosts computers with computer programmes that prospective students and current students can utilize, e.g. Career Mentor, “Journey of the Wild Divine”, Learnwell. It is designed as a self-help venue, but on the Cape Town campus Ms Marzetha Laubscher assists visitors to find information and to use the computer programmes, while on the Bellville campus the counselors assist the students.
  • 13 The information is updated on an annual basis by writing to training institutions and companies for their newest brochures. Various reference lists are compiled to enable Student Counsellors to give easy-to-use information packages to clients. As part of marketing the venue, letters are sent to schools and other relevant stakeholders to inform them of the Resources Venue as well as Career Counselling services. This year, the Application Office was also informed of the services and they were requested to distribute brochures on the services to prospective students. The Resources Venues on the Cape Town and Bellville campuses were used by the following groups: - staff doing career counselling or offering information sessions to students - current students who needed more information on different training institutions, careers, companies and various life skills - prospective students who needed more information on the different training institutions and careers During 2007, 100 visitors on the Cape Town campus made use of the Resources Venue to access information. This number does not however include the number of clients assisted through staff making use of the Resources Venue, or the many walk-in clients, who were assisted on the spot and who do not complete an intake-form. Career Counselling for Prospective Students A total of 315 prospective students, CPUT alumni and their parents reported to Student Counselling for career assessment, career counseling and career information sessions during 2007. Career counselling sessions to prospective students on the Cape Town campus were presented in the form of workshops to Grade 11 and 12 learners as well as recent school leavers. The workshops took place every second Friday between 19 January and 30 November, depending on demand. Up to 6 learners could register for each workshop and it entailed the following battery: - Campbell Interest and Skills Inventory (CISS) - Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) - Values scale - Meyer Interest Questionnaire (MB10) - Biographical Questionnaire Participants received a file with their results and other relevant information to take home and were invited for free follow-up sessions (which could include the parents). Feedback forms were completed at the end of each workshop and participants were very positive and appreciative of the service received as well as the outcomes of the workshops: 89% were very satisfied and 11% were satisfied.
  • 14 The category and number of learners attending the workshops on the Cape Town Campus Category N Number of workshops 17 Number of Participants 36 Gender : Males 23 Gender : Females 13 Race: White 29 Race: Coloured learners 6 Race: Black 1 Career counselling sessions to prospective students on the Bellville campus were presented as individual counseling sessions for Grade 11 and 12 learners as well as recent school leavers. The career counseling session consisted of an individual counseling session and feedback on the results of the following assessment battery: - Mentor Interest Inventory (Holland codes) - Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) - Values scale - Biographical information and the CPUT Career Development Workbook Participants received a file with their results and other relevant information to take home and were invited for free follow-up sessions (which could include the parents). The CPUT Career Development Workbook was reviewed and updated at the end of 2007. The career counseling service for prospective students on the Bellville campus can be tabled as follows: Type of career counseling service delivery N % Prospective students (individual sessions including 48 26.8 psychometric assessment) Prospective students (career information) 83 46.4 Parents (accompanying their children) 19 10.6 Feedback to applicants on placement assessment 5 2.8 Telephonic counseling 22 12.3 CPUT alumni for career information 2 1.1 TOTAL SESSIONS 179 100 A number of feedback sessions were conducted with applicants who did the psychometric placement assessment, but were not accepted as CPUT students for the 2007 intake. Alternative study options were discussed during these sessions. Contributions by Ms Elmarie van der Walt and Ms Nthabi Afrika-Mabuto
  • 15 7. ADVOCACY AND LEARNER SUPPORT The Student Counselling department continued its involvement with the Extended Programmes in Engineering and Informatics and Design aimed at increasing retention and throughput of students. The coordinators of this core service area were the following: Ms Elmarie van der Walt (Cape Town campus) and Dr Abie de Villiers (Bellville campus). The Identification of Success/Risk Factors Questionnaire was administered on request to various groups of first year students on the different campuses. Databases of the students’ responses on the questionnaire and reports on each class groups were compiled. The reports on the groups’ at-risk profile were sent to the course head and relevant academic staff who had to plan a strategy to deal with the identified academic risk factors of the at risk group. Student Counselling invited students for individual counseling sessions to deal with the identified non-academic risk factors. Psychometric Assessment 2007 The Student Counselling department on the Bellville campus provided a psychometric assessment selection service to three academic departments during 2007 (Ms Charlene Petersen was responsible for this area on the Bellville campus). The assessment battery consisted of an English language proficiency test, various academic aptitude tests (e.g. non verbal reasoning) and an interest questionnaire. The number of first year students tested in each department is shown in the following table: Number of students tested for selection purposes per academic department Academic Department N Dental Technology 132 Radiography (GSH) 58 Clothing, and Textile Technology 15 TOTAL 205 Student Counselling also provided assistance in the administration of the Standardized Assessment Tests for Academic Placement (SATAP) to first year students on the Bellville campus at the beginning of 2007. The purpose of the testing was to identify at- risk students in the areas of English language for academic purposes, mathematics and science and to place students in appropriate intervention and/or extended programmes. Student Counselling on the Cape Town campus conducted psychometric placement evaluations for the six faculties on this campus. The accepted provisional policy for the campus was that those applicants who do not meet the minimum requirements and on whom faculties needed more information, be invited to write the psychometric assessment for placement purposes. The faculty offices received the applications and did the invitations. A psychometrist, Ms Renay Bailey, was employed during the second
  • 16 semester on a contract basis to administer the tests and assist with the procedure. Evaluations took place on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays as from 28 May 2007 till 21 January 2008. The Cape Town campus was requested to also include applicants for Architecture on the Bellville campus in the testing dates, so that candidates from both campuses could experience a uniform placement procedure. The results for each applicant was summarized, together with a recommendation, on an evaluation sheet (as per course) and forwarded to the Faculties for the final placement. The psychometric placement procedure entailed an assessment of the following: - Biographical information, providing additional information on work experience, extra mural activities, leadership exposure, and disability. - Personality strengths - Interests - Proficiency in English (for English second language users) - Aptitudes (relevant to the specific faculty of application) e.g. mathematical, three dimensional spatial perception and analytical reasoning aptitudes. Number of students tested for placement purposes per academic faculty (Prepared by Ms Marzetha Laubscher) Faculty N Applied Sciences 0 Business 154 Education and Social Sciences 0 Engineering 480 Health and Wellness 60 Informatics and Design 1068 TOTAL 1762 Ms Elmarie van der Walt was responsible for the service on the Cape Town campus. Approach to the Psychometric Evaluation of Applicants for Placement Purposes Student Counselling was of the opinion that the approach regarding the psychometric evaluation of applicants for placement purposes was lacking in the following ways: - transparency of placement procedures - consistency in how the results are used / applied across the different faculties - adequate resources to conduct validity research - alignment with retention and throughput strategies and interventions once the students were placed - harmonization of procedures and assessment batteries used across the different campuses As a result Student Counselling has, since 2005, proposed the establishment of a Placement, Assessment and Research Centre or equivalent service dedicated to the
  • 17 assessment task and working in close collaboration with the Faculties, to address the above needs. Student Counselling again presented on this proposal during 2007 to the Deans and informed the Deputy Vice Chancellor: Academic, that Student Counselling was not able to continue with the placement evaluation of candidates for the 2009 intake. Contributions by Ms Elmarie van der Walt and Ms Charlene Petersen Academic and Residence Exclusions / Warnings During 2007 the student counsellors had a total of 76 individual counselling sessions with students who received letters from their faculties that they’ve been academically excluded, or being warned that they might be academically excluded due to unsatisfactory academic progress. For some it also implicated on their ability to stay on in a student residence. Most of these students were recommended to Student Counselling by academics / course heads with the expectation that professional assistance could be given regarding to their appeal against academic and residence exclusion, or alternatively, that alternative career / study options could be explored. Exam Concessions During 2007 a total of 40 students, who had applied / considered to apply for exam concessions, due to specific physical or learning disabilities, were attended to. Most of these students presented with reports from psychologists or medical professionals confirming their disability and proof that exam concessions were granted to them in their matric final exam. Some however, who had never been granted an exam concession before, and who were not in the possession of a valid psychological or medical report, were evaluated by the educational psychologist on the team. For each of these students a report, based on the comprehensive psycho-educational diagnostic assessment, was submitted to the HOD, who then made recommendations to the relevant Faculty Dean. Contribution by Ms Elisabet Smit Welfare Service The Student Welfare Officer, Ms Nomthandazo Nkibi, was involved with welfare issues affecting the academic and general well-being of students. Students’ concerns range from financial, subsistence, accommodation, and familial relationships that have broken down. Where appropriate, the Student Welfare Officer liaised with specialist external welfare agencies that might be in a position to assist. More students presented with poverty related requests during the first semester than the second semester. This could possibly be attributed to factors such as the registration, tuition fees and the need to buy books at this time of the year. Like in the past the Student Welfare Officer assisted students with non psychological issues affecting the academic and general wellbeing of students.
  • 18 The contingency fund continues to be an invaluable resource for CPUT students with financial concerns. Exchanging the system of purchasing food for students for a food voucher system worked well. This meant monitoring that students did indeed buy food with the vouchers. Where appropriate, the Student Welfare Officer relied on referrals either in-house or externally. Partnerships were also formed with departments such as the Residence office, and the Financial Aid office to provide necessary resources for students. A satellite service was established for the Bellville campus according to the need expressed by specific students. This required that the Student Welfare Officer visit Bellville once a week. The arrangement did not always work that well due to the following challenges: - Lack of dedicated office space for the Student Welfare Officer. - Inconsistent attendance of booked appointments on students’ part. - An increased work load on the Cape Town campus meant that only one day a week could be set aside for the Bellville campus. In order to do justice to the Bellville campus students, Student Counselling requested the establishment of a fulltime position on the Bellville campus. This would ensure that the student counsellors on that campus could focus more on the psychological needs of the students. The policy regarding the CPUT Emergency Fund needs to be reviewed to meet the current needs of our students. Although the Student Welfare Officer is not a custodian of this fund, she has to constantly answer queries related to it. Contribution by Ms Nomthandazo Nkibi Disability Service The year 2007 saw many developments in the services to people with disabilities at CPUT due to the efforts of Ms Diane Bell and Mr Ivan van der Heever who made the academic support department aware of their responsibility to students with disabilities. Through a disability forum, Ms Diane Bell garnered support from other departments like Student Counselling, ITS, Marketing and Communications and students with disabilities to have the disability service under management of the Fundani Centre for Higher Education Development. The Executive Management Committee approved a policy on disability and a Disability Unit was established at CPUT. The facilities on the Bellville campus would be replicated on the Cape Town campus. Ms Nomthandazo Nkibi and Ms Elisabet Smit formed part of this forum and later assisted with the establishment of the Unit. A successful meeting was held with the Facilities Director, the Occupational Health and Safety Officer and a disabled student in a wheelchair regarding physical access on the
  • 19 Cape Town campus. The same student also helped in dealing with the transfer of disabled students from Cape Town to Bellville. A recommendation for 2008 is that the role of the Student Welfare Officer in the Disability Unit and continued individual consultation with students with disabilities be clarified. Contribution by Ms Nomthandazo Nkibi 8. PEER HELP PROGRAMME On the Cape Town campus the Peer Help Programme was inactive during 2006 following the resignation of the coordinator of the programme, but the programme was re-activated towards the end of 2007. The 14 peer helpers were selected from a total of 35 applicants to be trained for the Academic Year of 2008. The advertising and short-listing took place from October to November in 2007 and the interviews and selection were completed in November and December 2007. The Coordinator of this programme is Mr. A. Ramballie. The 2007 Peer Help group on the Bellville campus consisted of 15 student volunteers recruited from different faculties. They received intensive training in order to assist other students both individually and in small groups. Their training focused basic counseling skills, group facilitation and behaviour change related to a healthy life style. The group utilized their training in a number of practical sessions and situations. They conducted small group sessions in the residences on sexuality, relationships and behaviour change. The group of peer helpers assisted with the following activities: the annual Open Day career exhibition, the Wellness Week held on campus, and organizing and developing wellness awareness on campus on World Mental Health day on 10 October. The peer helpers also assisted the Health Clinic with health promotion talks at the residences. Each member also received a mentoring assignment where they were expected to act as a mentor for another student. The training sessions conducted over a number of Fridays and Saturdays are listed in the following table: Peer Help training sessions Topic of Session Duration in hours Orientation 1 Wellness and lifestyle management 3 Basic Counselling skills (role as Peer Helper) 3 Mentoring Skills 3 Portfolio preparation session 2 Behaviour change 3 Behviour change workshop preparation 3 Career counseling skills 3 Supervision 5
  • 20 TOTAL 26 Hours A number of supervision sessions were held with the group during this period and peer helpers had to submit a portfolio at the end of 2007. Ms Charlene Petersen was responsible for this area on the Bellville campus. On the Wellington campus a total of 28 new peer helpers received training in Basic Counselling towards the end of 2006. They also received training in Leadership Skills and Conflict Management during 2007. Dr Melleta Louw was responsible for the Peer Help service on the Wellington campus. The peer helpers were actively involved on campus and in the residences during 2007 in the following ways: • Organizing the Wellness Day Event for 2007 • Organizing and presenting a wellness awareness programme with guest speakers for the residences • Organizing and presenting on Health Calendar events on campus Contributions by Mr Amith Ramballie, Ms Charlene Petersen and Dr Melleta Louw 9. SKILLS TRAINING AND GROUP SESSIONS Total number of students seen in skills training and group sessions during 2007 at CPUT : N = 7473 Student Counselling facilitated several life skills training programmes and group sessions on the various campuses (Cape Town, Bellville, Tygerberg, Mowbray, Granger Bay and Wellington). The coordinators of this core service on the different campuses were as follows: Ms Yolanda Hanning (Bellville campus), Ms Elisabet Smit and Ms Giselle Naidu (Cape Town campus), Mr Clint Steenveld (Tygerberg, Mowbray, and Granger Bay campuses), Dr Melleta Louw (Wellington campus). Orientation Approximately 4800 first year students were addressed during Orientation Week on the various campuses. Student Counselling staff on the Cape town campus were invited to introduce their services to class groups, while Student Counseling staff on the Bellville campus conducted a power point presentation to a number of large groups in the auditorium. Students received pamphlets on the services at the Student Counselling stall. Information on the Student Counseling services was also made available to students at registration.
  • 21 For the third consecutive year, Elisabet Smit was invited by the Faculty of Engineering to address the parents of first year students (+ 350) on factors impacting on students’ academic success. Extended Orientation In 2007 Student Counselling decided to include a new option to assist first year students with their introduction and orientation to higher education: living and learning with enhanced awareness. The extended orientation programme was marketed to all academic departments on all campuses. The programme included a 45 minute presentation of Power Point slides and was delivered by various members of the Student Counselling staff body at the beginning of 2007. Reports indicate that the presentation was user- friendly and enjoyed by the student groups that were exposed to it. The presentation included slides that acted to stimulate first-year students into thinking about how they could start laying the foundations for effective and optimal functioning in this new environment. The following themes were addressed: adjustment; goal-setting; motivation; decision-making; planning and time management; effective study and learning skills; seeking and obtaining support; physical wellness; and emotional wellness. Each of these themes is also covered by Student Counselling staff in life skills workshops during the year. This programme also intended to market the services of Student Counselling to first-year students. These services can be the lifeline that these students need during their adjustment period. This proved fruitful in certain instances, in that some students approached the presenter(s) afterwards requesting assistance. Approximately 650 students were reached in this way. Contributions by Dr Abie de Villiers and Mr Clint Steenveld Student Counselling’s involvement with skills training of CPUT students can be separated into credit bearing and non credit bearing life skills programmes. Credit Bearing Life Skills Training Credit bearing life skills training and development is conducted within the academic departments and is presented in close collaboration with lecturers in the Communication programme as part of the overall academic programme. The life skills module included several practical tasks and projects on which students were assessed. The following credit bearing skills training was conducted on the various campuses: Hospitality Management – Business Faculty, Granger Bay Campus For a second year Student Counselling presented a credit bearing life skills training program for the three first year class groups (n = 127) in the week of 30 January – 2 February, namely: ND: Hospitality Management – Food and Beverages, Professional Cookery, and Accommodation.
  • 22 The students on the Granger Bay campus were trained on a total of five topics, namely: Facing the challenges of transition into Higher Education, Motivation; Time management, Problem Solving and Decision Making, and Learning and Study Skills. Special arrangements were made for small group (n = 26) who missed this training in the beginning of the year, to be trained on 25 August. Two professional staff members from Student Counsellling facilitated this training programme. Once again students were given the opportunity to evaluate the training program, by completing a feedback form anonymously. There was a 87,2% overall level of satisfaction with this training program. Foundation Programme - Faculty of Informatics and Design Student Counselling facilitated a total of six life skills topics with 58 students (between February – August 2007) on the Cape Town campus in close co-operation with the academic staff. Additional to the training, students were given a practical task on each topic, which served as reinforcement exercises on their acquired knowledge. The practical tasks were scored by the facilitator and counted towards their mark for the subject Communication. The topics presented were: Assertive Communication, Goal Setting, Time Management, Conflict Management, Problem Solving and Decision Making and Motivation. Life Skills Training for Extended Programmes in the Faculty of Engineering (Civil and Mechanical Engineering) Student Counselling conducted a credit-bearing life skills module for the extended programme students in the Mechanical and Civil Engineering departments on the Bellville campus. The module consisted of a series of classroom-based skills training sessions as well as a number of small group sessions (personal development groups) focusing on the motivational and emotional aspects of learning. The programmes were completed over 2 semesters and comprised of 6 classroom based life skill workshops: (1) Orientation & Adjustment (2) Self-esteem and assertiveness (3) Study habits, Learning skills and Critical thinking skills (5) Self-motivation, Stress management, Time-management, (6) Diversity awareness. These core skills were supplemented with small group processes of 6 sessions, referred to as the personal development groups (PDG). The Life Skills Programme for 2007 met with much success and enthusiasm from its participants. The students, while finding the core life skills component during the first semester useful, benefited most from the personal development groups offered during the second term. The accreditation of the programme was well received by the students who benefited from the self-awareness and self-concept exercises provided during the core life skills component.
  • 23 Following the first test series a Success Factor Questionnaire was administered to the students to identify students with specific needs and who may be at risk of failing the foundation year. Timely feedback was provided to the lecturers regarding the findings and students were informed about the results of the questionnaire. A total of 35 students successfully completed the life skills module in Civil Engineering, while 25 students successfully completed the module in Mechanical Engineering. A total of 81 students completed the credit bearing component of the core life skills module in Mechanical and Civil Engineering in 2007. Contributions by Ms Elisabet Smit, Ms Yolanda Hanning and Dr Melléta Louw Non Credit Bearing Life Skills Training With the non Credit Bearing Life Skills Programme Student Counselling focuses on the development of specific life, interpersonal and leadership skills, with the aim of equipping students with the knowledge and skills to assist them to cope with their studies, adjust to university life and lead to holistic wellbeing. Attendance at these workshops is voluntary. Student Counseling on the Bellville, Cape Town, Mowbray, Granger Bay, Tygerberg Hospital and Wellington campuses facilitated several life skills training programmes to students during 2007. Cape Town Campus Life skills training to groups of students were mainly based on special request / demand from the Faculties. The following were classroom based work, upon invitation from academic staff members, who had identified a specific need amongst students in a particular class group, which they wished to be address by Student Counselling via a skills development workshop. • Sexual Decision making workshop with specific focus on HIV/AIDS and STI’s (two sessions on 4 and 11 May with 30 Town and Regional Planning students) • Managing Emotions Workshop (consisted of four sessions with 27 Somatology first year students). • Time Management workshops (+ 30 Electrical Engineering first year students) • Goal Setting and Learning and Study Skills to + 120 Office Management and Technology students (3 class groups) • Career Development workshop for 11 first years from Food and Nutrition. Approximately 220 students attended the workshops. Wellington Campus
  • 24 The following workshops were offered upon invitation by academic staff to specific class groups, e.g. Office management and Technology and Education, or more informally to smaller groups of students. • Stress Management • Study Methods • How to Recognize the Symptoms of Depression • Study Skills and Exam Writing Techniques • CV-Writing Skills • First Job Interview Approximately 110 students attended the workshops. Mowbray Campus The following workshops were offered upon invitation by academic staff to specific class groups, e.g. Radiography, Education and Emergency Medical Care: • Time Management • Stress Management • Trauma Management • Basic counseling skills Approximately 120 students attended the workshops. In May a total of 28 HIV/Aids students in training to become HIV Peer Educators to the HIV/Aids Unit, were trained on this topic. Four CPUT staff members were trained on 12 and 13 May (n = 4). Bellville Campus The following non credit bearing life skills training and group sessions were presented to students on the Bellville campus. Personal Development Groups (PDG) The personal development groups provide an opportunity for small groups of extended year students (8-12 students) to get together over 6 sessions of about one and a half hours each. The students are provided with an opportunity to explore various aspects of them selves in relation to the process of learning. The relationship between emotions and the learning process is uncovered within small groups to encourage and motivate behaviour change in order to achieve their academic goals. The programme has the very specific focus of providing students with the emotional support and skills to meet the demands of life at the University and is conducted within the academic departments.
  • 25 Topics discussed in the group included Self-awareness, Emotional Learning, Changing Behaviour, Finding the ally within, Setting goals and achieving them and Celebrating the new you. In total 38 students in Mechanical Engineering successfully and 31 students from Civil Engineering successfully completed the PDG programme on the Bellville campus. Multicultural Leadership Foundation Course (MLFC) The MLFC during 2007 attracted a small diverse group of 13 international as well as local students. Five psycho-educational workshops were completed which included the following topics: Self-esteem and assertiveness, conflict management, dealing with prejudice and discrimination, sexuality and gender. Topics were facilitated by the coordinator of the course as well the intern psychologist. The following table provides a list of the topics of the sessions and the duration of the course in hours. Multicultural Leadership Foundation Sessions Topic of Session Duration in hours Self-esteem and assertiveness 2 Conflict management 2 Indoctrination and prejudice 2 Dealing with prejudice and discrimination 2 Sexuality and gender 2 TOTAL 10 Hours Following an evaluation of the course, participants generally felt that the course assisted them in making the necessary adjustment to the university and that it contributed to their general wellbeing as a first year student. Students on the MLFC for 2007 were also given the opportunity to attend the Self-Management Skills (SMS) Course in the 2nd semester. This referral to the SMS course met with much success since the same 13 students went on to also successfully completed course during the same year. Self-Management Skills (SMS) Course The Self-Management Skills (SMS) Course has been specifically designed to provide second year students with a broad base of adaptive skills necessary to achieve academic and social success at CPUT. During 2007 critical life skills offered within the course included:
  • 26 Lifestyle Management, Self-determination, Creative problem solving, Assertiveness and Conflict management, Goal-setting and Motivation, Stress Management, Time Management, Physical Wellness, Financial Management and Career Development. The sessions were conducted on the Bellville campus on Friday afternoons during the second semester. The following table provides information on the topics covered in the SMS course. Self Management Skills (SMS) Training Topics Topic of Session Duration in hours Lifestyle management 2.5 Physical wellness 2.5 Self-determination 2.5 Creative problem-solving 2.5 Assertiveness and conflict management 2.5 Goal setting and motivation 2.5 Stress management 2.5 Time management 2.5 Personal financial management 2.5 Career management 2.5 TOTAL 25 Hours In total 20 students attended the SMS course and 8 students successfully completed the course (attended all 10 sessions). Students who completed the above life skills courses were awarded certificates at a Certificate Function on 2 November 2007 held on the Bellville campus. The following workshops were conducted with about 50 Residence Student Assistants (RSA) on the Bellville campus in 2007 as indicated in the next table: Life Skills Training for Residence Student Assistants (RSA) Topic of Session Duration in hours Communication skills 2 (listening and attending) Referral skills 2 TOTAL 6 Hours Student Counselling trained a group of senior Radiography students on Basic Counselling Skills on the Tygerberg Hospital campus.
  • 27 A presentation on the Role of Student Counseling at CPUT was done to group of 25 SRC members as part of their induction workshop. Basic Counselling and Crisis Intervention Skills training to Staff and Students This training programme (Facilitator: Ms Elisabet Smit) equips participants with the skills and knowledge to meaningfully assist persons (students and staff) who approach you with personal problems, or who are in crisis. The two-day course formed part of Student Counselling’s Peer Helper and HIV/Aids Unit’s Peer Educators training programmes. It was also listed as a training option on the CPUT Human Resources Training and Development Programme. Over the past number of years several staff members from Student Residences, Library, and academic staff, have attended this training course, presented by Student Counselling. Extremely positive feedback has always been received from attendees. Career Preparedness and Employability Skills Development Student Counselling was also involved with the career preparedness and employability skills development of several groups of senior students: • Upon invitation from lecturers from Co-operative Education, a total of 232 students from the Faculty of Business Informatics on the Cape Town Campus (namely from Information Technology, Internal Auditing, Cost and Management Accounting, Financial Information Systems) received training, prior to the start of their experiential learning period, on Oral Presentation Skills and on Managing Conflicts and Frustrations in the workplace • Situational Leadership conducted with Project Management 3 students (n = 6) • Student Counselling presented a number of credit bearing workshops on Preparation for and Handling the First Job Interview, CV Writing and Conflict Management to class groups from three Faculties on the Wellington campus, namely from Office Management and Technology, Education (3 courses), Agriculture and Information Technology. Approximately 250 students attended. Students on all campuses found the workshops both interactive and useful learning sessions. During 2007 there has been an increased emphasis on smaller group interactions to allow students to effectively practice new skills related to the topic so that they can apply it in their own lives outside the sessions. Another benefit has been that small groups allow students to form informal support networks that aid in student development and retention. Contributions by Ms Yolanda Hanning, Ms Giselle Naidu, Ms Elisabet Smit and Dr Melléta Louw 10. WELLNESS PROJECT
  • 28 Balanced, holistic living seems to be at the forefront of wellness or wellbeing. CPUT has recognized, as have many institutions of higher learning that students who develop holistically, usually thrive and feel better equipped to manage their lives. CPUT defines wellness in terms of seven dimensions: Physical, Environmental, Intellectual, Spiritual, Social, Occupational and Emotional. Each dimension is interrelated and development of each dimension can promote wellbeing and health. By embracing a holistic approach to wellbeing, education can move beyond just knowledge gained from text books. Various activities have been implemented throughout the year at a departmental and at inter-departmental levels to engage and develop each student across the various dimensions of wellness. During 2007 Wellness Day celebrations were organized by separate Wellness Committees for the Bellville, Cape Town and Wellington campuses. The Wellness Committees comprised of volunteers from the various Student Affairs departments, as well as representatives of various student leadership groups, i.e. the Student Representative Council (SRC), Peer Helpers and Peer Educators from the HIV/Aids Unit. These committees were chaired by Dr Abie de Villiers (Bellville campus), Ms Elisabet Smit (Cape Town campus) and Dr Melleta Louw (Wellington campus). The Wellness celebrations took place on the Bellville campus from 27 – 29 March, on 28 March on the Wellington campus and on 3 September on the Cape Town campus. The Wellness celebrations are the most visible wellness event of the year, as the purpose of Wellness celebrations is to create awareness of the importance of wellbeing amongst the CPUT population. According to an informal evaluation done amongst attendees, the above objective was achieved. The CPUT community was not only entertained, but they were also educated on the importance of a healthy life style. Students from the smaller service points of our institution were transported by bus to attend the celebrations on either the Bellville, or Cape Town campuses. On the Bellville campus, the Wellness Committee managed to create an atmosphere of fun and excitement in the student quad over the three days where both students and staff could enjoy themselves. Radio Good Hope added to the festivities by broadcasting live from the student quad on the first day. The programme director, Sandra Rozenberg from Radio Good Hope, kept the proceedings on track. The exciting three-day programme ran from 12:00 to 14:00 every day and consisted of music, interactive drumming sessions, a performance by an afro-jazz singer, a ball juggler and roaming clowns. Some other programme highlights, were items by CPUT students such as the aerobics, hip-hop dancing and a judo demonstration. Students also enjoyed matching their skills against the mechanical bull. A number of exhibitors provided students and staff with wellness services such as massages, Kata boxing and yoga classes as well as health information on various topics
  • 29 such as sensible drinking, mental health and TB. A qualified optician provided students with free eye testing. Prizes were handed to the best internal and external exhibitors at the end of the programme. The wellness celebrations on the Wellington campus took place between 9h00 and 13h00 on 28 March, when all classes were adjourned. All activities took place in the central quad, called “Die Poort”, and exhibitors had their stalls here. The idea was that students and staff would experience this period of time as a welcome break in their day and spontaneously mingle and participate in all activities offered. The students spent their time visiting the exhibitions, asking questions, learning and gathering information. This year the Wellington campus concentrated primarily on the physical dimension of the wellness model. The celebrations kicked off with a fun run/walk with high participation levels, perhaps due to the competition element between residences and the incentive of prize vouchers for the best athletes. The fun run was also used as a money-raising event for the local night shelter. This was followed by a heart warming talk by celebrity person Ernst van Dyk (physically challenged wheelchair marathon athlete), who motivated the students to follow their dreams and overcome personal setbacks and barriers. The crowning of Mr and Ms Fit & Healthy was another popular event which brought a bit of style and glamour to the day. In the weeks before Wellness Day, a competition was held to determine the fitness levels of the candidates – a test being designed by a personal fitness instructor of Virgin Active. Interviews were held and they had to fill in a questionnaire on lifestyle. The winners of the competition were tasked to help with the promotion of the Wellness concept on campus during 2007 in conjunction with the SRC and Wellness committee. Other well attended activities were the stress relief neck and head massaging done by two beauty therapists, a line dancing demo class for female students, and free eye testing done by a qualified optician. Blackball Rent-A-Juke Entertainment (mechanical bull, bull strength tester, foozeball table and soccer table) created a fun atmosphere. On the Cape Town campus, the Wellness Committee endeavored to raise the awareness of students to the various dimensions of wellness through an interactive fiesta of life. Greg Alexander was the choreographer and stage manager and professional dancers captured the energy of wellbeing and dazzled the crowd with a show of color and life. The band Afro Fiesta, added to the celebration of the day. Our MC, Sam Roy from Kfm Radio, interacted with the students and reinforced the message of wellness throughout the programme. The atmosphere of the Market Day exhibition stalls and general buzz of activities gave the impression of a University in Great Shape. Pledges for positive change were made that day by many students. Students were encouraged to consider one or more wellness dimensions in which they would like to effect positive change within their own lives. The overwhelming display of painted hands on the Pledge Wall was evidence of a student population developing and growing.
  • 30 The Wellness Fiesta was a celebration of life. Not just any life, but a promotion of a life well lived and a university committed to wellbeing. A happy, healthy university lends itself for a happy healthy society…awake, fully human, and fully alive. This important concept will be promoted on an annual basis in different ways on the different CPUT campuses. Contributions by Ms Elisabet Smit, Dr Abie de Villiers, Dr Melleta Louw and Ms Giselle Naidu 11. MARKETING AND PROMOTION Student Counselling made use of the following promotional material for marketing purposes: • Orientation / Induction Material o posters for exhibitions o Power Point or OHP slides for presentations to 1st years and new CPUT staff • CPUT Webpage • Annual Student Counseling Newsletter • Student Counselling Annual Report • Contribution to Student Guide / Student Diary • Contributions to campus media: o Articles to Student and Staff Newsletters o Talks on Student Radio • Promotional material for certain programs / activities (e.g. peer helping / resources venue / career counselling workshops) in the form of flyers / brochures and posters Ms Elisabet Smit was responsible for developing webpage material for Student Counselling. She attended a workshop on Design and Writing of Webtexts by the Language Centre – University of Stellenbosch on 5 & 6 November and will continue with designing the contents of the webpage. The challenge for 2008 is to integrate and harmonize the Student Counselling promotional material and to place it on the CPUT web site. The annual Student Counselling Newsletter is a way of communicating with students and staff, informing them of the department’s services as well as providing the campus community with psycho-educational information. The third integrated newsletter was published during 2007 and 4 000 copies distributed to staff and students on the various campuses of CPUT. The editorial team consisted of Dr Abie de Villiers (coordinator), Ms Elisabet Smit, Ms Yolanda Hanning, Ms Elmarie van der Walt and Mr Clint Steenveld. Mr Clint Steenveld was responsible for the development of a Student Counseling DVD aimed at introducing the Student Counselling staff and services in a visually attractive way to new first year students during orientation 2008.
  • 31 Contributions by Dr Abie de Villiers and Ms Elisabet Smit 12. COMMUNITY OUTREACH Student Counseling was involved in a number of community outreach project initiatives during 2006. The overall coordinator for this area was Ms Charlene Petersen. Teachers Training in Career Decision- Making Skills The training of Teachers in Career Decision-making was a joint Student Counselling Community outreach project. This project has been running for the past few years and has attracted many teachers from across the Cape Peninsula. In 2007 teachers from 12 different disadvantaged schools were trained extensively in aspects of career decision making. This project was run over 5 weeks in May 2007 and focused on the Self Exploration Model. The model looked at aspects of exploring self awareness, personality, interest, strengths and values as well as information on training institutions, the world of work, financial aid and how to start your own resources venue. Teachers were trained in these aspects so that they could assist learners in further career exposure. Teachers were also required to do a practical intervention with their learners and submit it for practical assignment. The workshops had an interactive and experiential focus and required facilitators to keep the process going. The facilitators of this project were Ms Charlene Petersen, Ms Charmaine Davids, Ms Elmarie van der Walt and Mr Prince Dabula. The Financial Aid, Marketing and Communication department at CPUT also played an important role in making this project successful they provided teachers with bursary booklets, information regarding loans, Information packages with course booklets and application forms. This information could help teachers to start up a basic resource venue at their schools. Teachers who attended the sessions received a certificate. The feedback from teachers was very positive and they feel more empowered to go forth with helping learners to explore their career paths. Career Development The co-ordinator of this project was Mr Prince Dabula and the organizer Ms Charmaine Davids. On 19 May 2007, the Department of Student Counselling presented a Job seeking skills workshop as part of the community project for teachers in the Western Cape region. Seven teachers from the following schools: Vuyiseka SS, Bridgetown HS, Perseverance HS and Thembelihle HS attended the above mentioned workshop. The same teachers were trained by Student Counselling on “Career Decision Making” in 2006. Feedback forms indicate that teachers found the workshop very meaningful and requested that a workshop of this nature should be presented again in the near future. On 24 May 2007 20 girls from various schools were hosted by the department as part of “take a girl child to
  • 32 work” project. The request was made by Rev. Gidi from the Anglican Church in Gugulethu. Career Outreach to Disadvantaged Youth A group of 20 youths from the Steenberg and Lavenderhill area came for career counselling workshop at Student Counselling during April 2007. These learners were all from s disadvantaged background and as part of a community outreach the STEENBERG FOUNDATION NGO GROUP approached the department to assess these learners for possible career choices. These workshops were run over two week session. Students were exposed to explore their self awareness, personality, interest, strengths and values as well as information on careers and courses offered at FET/ Tertiary institutions. The facilitators involved were: Ms Elmarie van der Walt, Ms Charlene Petersen, Ms Michelle Lawrence and Ms Jodi Godden. CPUT Career Open Day The annual CPUT Open Day was held on 10, 11 and12 of May 2007 on the Bellville Campus. This event attracted more than 7842 prospective students from across the Cape Peninsula and well as from areas outside of Cape Town. The students were exposed to more than 70 undergraduate courses. A number of new courses like Mechatronics and Mathematical Technology were introduced to the public Student Counseling used this opportunity to promote their career counselling services as well as resources venue. The Peer helpers were also given exposure as helping agents and they disseminated course information and assisted students with career information. School learners also benefited from this as they could use this opportunity to explore which careers they have an interest in and request information on careers/ and information on courses not offered at our institution were sent to the school learners who do not have access. The career open day served as a marketing tool where CPUT could promote our services to prospective students. Contribution by Ms Charlene Petersen 13. QUALITY ASSURANCE On 25 November 2006, an internal quality assurance review was organised for our department by the CPUT Quality Management Department. The Quality Review panel, under the chairpersonship of Ms Reneé Weideman, consisted of CPUT’s Student Counselling team, some Student Affairs staff, some academic staff and students. The quality assurance measuring instrument of the Society for Student Counselling in Southern Africa (now called the Southern African Association for Counselling and Development in Higher Education), was used as the basis for the quality evaluation. During the review, Student Counselling was applauded for the following:
  • 33 • The fact that our vision, mission, policy statements and strategic planning, complements the mission and strategic plan of the CPUT and the national policy on higher education. • The fact that Student Counselling’s mission and strategic plans are continuously adjusted to the internal and external needs through strategic planning • The comprehensiveness of our core services which incorporates our curative (individual counselling and therapy), but also our strong preventative (wellness and peer helper programs and our advocacy and consultation service) and developmental focus (academic and learning skills, life skills and career development). This is in line with the SSCSA / IACS guidelines) • SC is actively involved with professional and related bodies to promote bench marking • Provide feedback about student needs • An ethical code to guide good practice • Our highly qualified staff, all registered with a professional body, and our satisfactory staff development practice. • Effective and fully integrated administrative systems • Regular meetings and report back on progress made with projects / programs • Regular review of client satisfaction with our service provision / programs The above was also captured in the official quality review report that was compiled by the chair person of the review panel and circulated to relevant CPUT stakeholders. As a response to the suggestions for improvement proposed by the review panel, the following was incorporated in Student Counselling’s 2007 Strategic Plan: • We communicated our willingness to the DVC - Student Affairs, the Registrar and Deans of Faculties to participate in more CPUT committees where our expertise, knowledge and advice could be an asset. • Student Counselling submitted a proposed organogram (departmental structure with some career pathing opportunities for professional staff) to the DVC – Student Affairs. It was incorporated into his official restructuring proposal for all Student Affairs departments. This proposal was endorsed by Executive Management towards the end of 2007. • It was recommended that there should be an authorised job description for each staff member. Counselling received a directive from the Chief Manager HR in this regard. • The quality office recommends a satisfactory provision of professional staff-staff: student ratio. The current situation is far from ideal, namely that of 1:3000. Our proposal to Executive Management to get approval for the appointment of two psychologists on contract as student counsellors to serve to students on the Tygerberg and Granger Bay campuses, was turned down. We were however grateful that approval was granted for the permanent appointment of two psychologists for the Wellington and Mowbray campuses. • The review panel recommended that there be appropriate recognition for quality efforts of staff members to show a form of acknowledgement. HR is in the process of incorporating such recognition system into the institutional performance management
  • 34 system as from 2009. • The recommendation that the classification and categorization of student counsellors be made “professional”, was acknowledged by HR via the performance management system. • The panel recommended that Student Counselling should endeavour to create a third stream income. A proposal to raise a small Student Counselling Levy (R20.00) for each CPUT student has again be presented to the DVC: Student Affairs, but was turned down for the second time. • With regards to recommendations for the improvement of our physical facilities: Arrangement has been made to ensure an office space for a Student Welfare Officer on the Bellville campus. The possibility of soundproof offices for the student counsellors to ensure confidentiality should still be investigated. • The addressing of privacy issues at Student Counselling’s reception area on the Cape Town campus has to be postponed until the HIV/AIDS Unit find alternative office space. • The review panel recommended that our multi-media marketing strategies should improve and that Student Counselling should better account to the challenge of getting their information over to the student population by means of updated information on the institutional webpage, making use of Web-CT, posters, brochures and regular contributions to the student and staff newsletter to raise awareness on our programs and service delivery. We have succeeded in some (e.g. our own newsletter, brochures and contributions to the student and staff newsletters), while objectives with others (e.g. the webpage and Web-CT) have not been met. • The panel proposed additional improvement on Student Counselling’s service delivery at the smaller service points, our part time and international students and our support to students with disabilities. Our proposal to Executive Management to get approval for the appointment of two psychologists on contract as student counsellors to serve to students on the Tygerberg and Granger Bay campuses was turned down. We are however grateful that approval was granted for the permanent appointment of two psychologists for the Wellington and Mowbray campuses. Towards the end of 2007 the Executive Management approved the establishment of a Disability Unit for the CPUT. This office will function as a separate division of the Fundani Centre, although it will have strong links with Student Counselling, especially via the Student Welfare Offices. • Student Counselling made several attempts to embark on more formal research (e.g. in the form of impact studies to determine the extent of student counselling’s service delivery). • Student Counselling promoted the importance of the re-activation of the Student Services Council (SSC), as communication forum, to the DVC – Student Affairs and his HODs. Towards the end of 2007, the SSC’s terms of reference were revisited and we expect re-activation of this important structure during early 2008. • The review panel recommended that a direct line of report be created in order that needs are heard, understood and addressed and contributions acknowledged. At the quality review, Student Counselling still doubted the suitability of their placement under the DVC - Student Affairs. Feedback was requested from the latter re the
  • 35 recommendations made by the review panel with regards to Student Counselling’s positioning. Student Counselling remains a Student Affairs Department. Regular client satisfaction surveys and programme evaluations are being conducted as part of the quality assurance process. Policy and Procedures Dr Abie de Villiers and Ms Elisabet Smit was part of the process of developing new policies for CPUT. They attended a series of meetings with Ms Luclaire Airey of the Quality Management department and provided input on possible parent policies. The Student Counselling department reviewed their policies and procedures document during 2007 and placed them in the new CPUT policy format. The new Student Counseling policy document will be circulated to the CPUT community during 2008 for ratification (Dr Abie de Villiers is the coordinator of this process). Contributions by Ms Elisabet Smit and Dr Abie de Villiers 14. STRATEGIC PLANNING AND PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Strategic Planning Student Counselling held its annual strategic planning session at the Blue Peter Hotel in Blaauwberg on 29 November 2007. Besides action planning for the suggestions for improvement proposed by the quality assurance review report, and an overview on the extent to which set objectives for the previous year were met, Student Counselling staff had the opportunity to present their broad planning for each of the core services and projects they will co-ordinate during 2008 followed by a discussion of the plans and further input. The co-ordinators then submitted their detailed plans with set objectives, performance measures and deadlines to Ms Elisabet Smit, who collated it into the final departmental strategic plan for 2008. The departmental plan is directly aligned to the institutional strategic direction, in that it specifies to which of the six institutional strategic directions each of our core services / projects accounts. The departmental plan has been submitted to and acknowledged by the CPUT Executive Management (via the DVC – Student Affairs’ office) and the Strategic Management and Quality Management departments. Performance Management The HODs had an individual performance planning session with each staff member during February / March and a review session with each in October/November.
  • 36 The individual performance plans, ensured that each staff member set performance objectives under appropriate key performance areas that are aligned with the departmental strategic plan (which in turn is aligned with the institutional strategic directions). Each staff member (and their HOD) knew exactly what is expected of them for the year and that what they contribute is valued, directly relevant and regarded as important and necessary, on both departmental and institutional level. The individual performance plans also included each staff member’s agreed upon training and development needs and a departmental training and development plan was submitted to HR. During the individual performance review session, each staff member had the opportunity to reflect on his/her performance and achievements during the year. The HODs used these reviews as a basis for reviewing the set objectives on the departmental strategic plan and to what extent these objectives were accomplished. Contributions by Ms Elisabet Smit and Dr Abie de Villiers 15. COMMITTEE SERVICES AND CONSULTATIONS Student Counselling staff served as members of the following committees and groups: Staff Member 2007 CPUT Committee and Group Membership Abie de Villiers Student Affairs Heads Meeting as HOD Student Counselling, Bellville campus Chairperson: Joint Student Counselling, Clinic and HIV Meeting (Bellville campus) Chairperson: Wellness Week Committee (Bellville) HIV VCT Drive committee Orientation Committee (Bellville campus) Disability Forum SAACDHE Executive Management Committee Elisabet Smit Student Affairs Heads Meeting as HOD Student Counselling, Cape Town campus Chairperson: CPUT Wellness Committee Quality Assurance Committee Disability Forum Media Forum HIV Committee IEC SRC Elections CPUT Climate Survey Project Ms Nthabiseng Afrika-Mabuto Joint Student Counselling, Clinic and HIV Meeting (Bellville campus) Yolanda Hanning Joint Student Counselling, Clinic and HIV Meeting (Bellville campus) Wellness Week Committee (Bellville campus)
  • 37 Annette Kuhn OPA data Capturer Health and Safety Representative Melleta Louw Chairperson Wellness Committee (Wellington) Mpho Mogotsi Wellness Week Committee (Bellville campus) Giselle Naidu Wellness Committee (Cape Town campus) Nomthandazo Nkibi Disability Forum Employment Equity Committee Wellness Committee (Cape Town campus) Charlene Petersen Joint Student Counselling, Clinic and HIV Meeting (Bellville campus) Wellness Week Committee (Bellville campus) Amith Ramballie Wellness Committee (Cape Town campus) Elmarie van der Walt Enrolment Management Committee (ad hoc) Yvonne Parfitt Bursary Fund Selection Committee SAACDHE Regional Administrative Coordinator Wellness Committee (Cape Town Campus) Services to and Consultations with CPUT Staff The following provides an overview of the regular services Student Counsellors and the Student Welfare Officer provide to staff members on the various campuses of CPUT: • Assistance with the referral of students and consultations re referred students. • Advice and information, e.g. about psychometric assessment and student placement • Close co-operation with other student support services and departments, such as Fundani Centre for Higher Education Development, Faculty Officers, Residences, Co-operative Education and Financial Aid. • Planning faculty based life and interpersonal skills training programs • Other faculty based work, e.g. assistance with the identification of students at possible risk of failure and the planning of appropriate interventions. • Joint research projects, .e.g. on student retention • Assistance to residence managers and supervisors re student matters. • Negotiations with academic staff and Facility management re the establishment of a student counsellor office and student counselling services on the smaller CPUT service points (Mowbray, Tygerberg and Granger Bay campuses) • Consultation with staff on personal issues and crisis / emergency counseling • Joint meetings with the Clinic and HIV/AIDS Unit to discuss collaboration and referrals Student Counselling participated in the Clinic’s Voluntary Counselling and Testing (VCT) for HIV drives during 2007 in February and September by providing their services in pre- and post-test counseling of students and staff on the Bellville campus. 16. STAFF ACTIVITIES
  • 38 The Student Counselling staff attended several SSCSA/SAACDHE Western Cape Regional meetings, which included training sessions, relevant topics, as well as a number of internally arranged HR training courses and courses on the CHEC Regional Management Development Programme. Staff Development and Wellness In 2007 three new activities aimed at staff development and wellness was introduced – case study discussions, peer supervision and self care. A schedule was drawn up for case studies to take place after each joint staff meeting. Three sessions took place, with 6 staff members presenting cases. Peer supervisions sessions were scheduled every fortnight on Cape Town and Bellville campuses and 22 sessions took place. The activities were geared towards shared learning and debriefing for staff members. These activities were also CPD (Continuous Professional Development) accredited by the Professional Board of Psychology and staff could accumulate up to 20 CPD points. Student Counselling staff conducted case study presentations and discussion sessions on the following dates: Case Study Presentations and Discussions by Staff Date Presenters 24 April Dr Abie de Villiers Ms Elmarie van der Walt 14 August Ms Michelle Lawrence Ms Giselle Naidu 16 October Ms Elisabet Smit Mr Clint Steenveld Two self care activities were arranged for the year. One was organised by Ms Yolanda Hanning and took the form of a staff outing and lunch at Kirstenbosch Gardens. The second activity was a “Care for the caregiver” experiential workshop presented by Ms Emma Oliver (as arranged by Ms Elmarie van der Walt). Contribution by Ms Elmarie van der Walt Professional Development and Training Ms Elisabet Smit presented the following: Two day course in Basic Counselling and Crisis Intervention skills to four CPUT staff members on 12 and 13 May and on 7 and 8 June to 13 residence managers and supervisors from the University of the Western Cape upon special request from their HR Training Manager Ms Elisabet Smit acted as HIV Peer Educators port folio judge and presented at the HIV Peer Educators Award Ceremony.
  • 39 Ms Elisabet Smit was nominated on the panel who oversaw the disciplinary appeal hearings of two students on 4 June Ms Elisabet Smit was a member of the task team who planned the CPUT Climate Survey project (under leadership of the Transformation Officer and the Strategic Planning Department) Ms Elisabet Smit did the opening and welcome address at the HIV/Aids Unit’s Candlelight Memorial Service on 21 May Ms Elisabet Smit attended the following: - The SSCSA / SAACDHE Regional meetings and activities – one per term - Psychology CPD Well, University of Stellenbosch - Design and Writing of Webtexts by the Language Centre – University of Stellenbosch (5 & 6 November) - The Use of Graphic Design to effectively communicate information by the Language Centre – University of Stellenbosch (12 September) - Fundamental Ericksonian Hypnotherapy course from MEISA (15 – 18 November) - MS Word Thesis Writing –CPUT HR training course (28 March) - Quality Assurance for HE by CPUT Quality Management Department - Managing Staff Absenteism by CPUT HR department - Cape Able Disability Sensitizing workshop (9 May) - Training on Copyright by DEFRO (15 May) - Performance Management Training Meeting for Cape Town Campus Student Services Staff (25 May) - Presentation on MSCI by Prof Mark Watson (1 August) Dr Abie de Villiers opened the Community Teacher Training and presented certificates at the Certification Ceremony. Dr Abie de Villiers served on the Executive Management Committee (EMC) of the Society for Student Counselors in Southern Africa (SSCSA) as Public and Regional Liaison Officer and editor of the SSCSA Newsletter. Dr Abie de Villiers was co-supervisor for a M. Tech dissertation. Dr Abie de Villiers attended the following: - The SSCSA / SAACDHE Regional meetings - Workshop on High Performance Management on 22 May - Presentation on impact studies by Drs Brand, Cilliers and Van der Westhuisen from the University of Stellenbosch on 5 June. - Presentation on career counseling by Prof Mark Watson on 1 August. - Workshop on Quality assurance organized by CPUT quality department on 3 August. - Self-care workshop conducted by Emma Oliver on 24 August.
  • 40 - Workshop on Solution Focused Brief Therapy approach by Belinda Drucker on 6 September. - Introduction to Psychophonetics as treatment modality for victims of child sexual abuse by Keriesa Botha on 9 October. - On-line publishing workshop by Prof. Pierre de Villiers on 10 October. - Workshop on Solution Focused Brief Therapy in a mental health setting by Dr A MacDonald on 16 November. - Performance management workshop organized by HR of CPUT. - Attended a number of SSCSA meetings, both regional as well as national. - Attended a number of peer supervision and case discussions at CPUT - Participated in the CPD Well Journal Article programme organized by the University of Stellenbosch. Ms Nthabiseng Afrika-Mabuto provided supervision to a B. Psych intern Ms Nthabiseng Afrika-Mabuto attended the following: - Presentation on impact studies by Drs Brand, Cilliers and Van der Westhuisen from the University of Stellenbosch on 5 June. - Video presentation on Temperament organized by Jopie van Rooyen on 4 July. - Presentation on Career Counseling by Prof Mark Watson on 1 August. - Self-care workshop conducted by Emma Oliver on 24 August. - Online publishing workshop by Prof. Pierre de Villiers on 10 October. - Training in international accreditation as MBTI user by Jopie van Rooyen on 19-22 November. Ms Yolanda Hanning provided supervision to a Counselling Psychology masters interns Ms Yolanda Hanning attended the following: - MS Powerpoint Advanced, CPUT staff development programme on 20 April - International lecture by Dr Robert Hare on Psychopathic Behaviour organized by Jopie van Rooyen on 22 June. - Online publishing workshop at UWC, organized by the Public Knowledge project of the University of British Colombia on 28-29 June. - Self-care workshop conducted by Emma Oliver on 24 August. - Workshop on Advanced Research Techniques conducted by Gordon Emmerson on 26-27 September. - Workshop on Ego-state Therapy: Advanced Counselling Skills conducted by Gordon Emmerson on 28 September. - Introduction to Psychophonetics as treatment modality for victims of child sexual abuse by Keriesa Botha on 9 October. - Online publishing workshop by Prof. Pierre de Villiers on 10 October. Dr Melleta Louw attended the following: - Psychology CPD Well, University of Stellenbosch - Hypnotherapy workshop by Prof NC Broekman (30 November)
  • 41 - Personal Leadership by CHEC (14 – 16 March) - Building the Team by CHEC (18 & 19 April) - Project Management by CHEC (20 – 22 August) Ms Michelle Lawrence attended the following: - Solution Focused Brief Therapy in Mental Health Contexts (16 November) - Narrative Therapy Intensive Workshop by Elize Morkel (29 October to 2 November) Ms Giselle Naidu provided supervision to a B. Psych intern Ms Giselle Naidu attended the following: - Learning to think and work, using a solution focused approach: one day introductory workshop (6 September) - Transactional Analysis in Action – 8 workshops by B.H. Kidd - Skills Development Facilitator Programme by Skills Dynamics Africa (13 – 15 November) Ms Nomthandazo Nkibi attended the following: - Rights of persons with Disabilities seminar (27 July) - Solution Focused Brief Therapy in Mental Health Contexts (16 November) - Goal Setting, Feedback and Coaching by CHEC (15 – 17 May) - Employment Equity Committee training workshop by P Morris – CPUT HR (27 August and 3 September) Ms Charlene Petersen provided supervision to a B. Psych intern Ms Charlene Petersen attended the following: - CPD Well programme (case discussions) at the University of Stellenbosch. - Presentation on impact studies by Drs Brand, Cilliers and Van der Westhuisen from the University of Stellenbosch on 5 June. - Video presentation on Temperament organized by Jopie van Rooyen on 4 July. - Presentation on Career Counseling by Prof Mark Watson on 1 August. - Self-care workshop conducted by Emma Oliver on 24 August. - Play therapy courses organized by the Play Therapy Association of SA and conducted by Dr Hannie Schoeman on 3-11 September. - Introduction to Psychophonetics as treatment modality for victims of child sexual abuse by Keriesa Botha on 9 October. - Online publishing workshop by Prof. Pierre de Villiers on 10 October. - Play techniques as medium for treating child sexual abuse at Tygerberg hospital Teddy bear clinic on 11 October. Mr Amith Ramballie provided supervision to a B. Psych intern Mr Amith Ramballie attended the following: - Fundamental Ericksonian Hypnotherapy course from MEISA (15 – 18 November)
  • 42 - Presentation on MSCI by Prof Mark Watson (1 August) Clint Steenveld attended the following: - SSCSA / SAACDHE Regional Training Activities – one per term - A Training workshop – Ethical Problems in Psychology by Inter-Ed (7 June) - Narrative Approach to community and trauma work facilitated by Elize Morkel (17 & 18 May) - Couple Therapy - Using narrative ways of working by Elize Morkel (17 & 18 October) - Consultation Groups (9 monthly sessions) by Elize Morkel - Building Brochures like a Pro by the Language Centre - University of Stellenbosch (14 August) - Hypnotherapy workshop by Prof NC Broekman (30 November) Ms Elmarie van der Walt provided supervision to two Counselling Psychology masters interns Ms Elmarie van der Walt served on the Western Cape Region Committee of the Society for Student Counselors in Southern Africa (SSCSA) as Administrative Coordinator. Elmarie van der Walt presented the following: - A presentation to Grade 11 learners on Self esteem (29 June) upon invitation from Marketing and Communication at Granger Bay campus. - An Induction and Goal Setting session with the newly elected SAACDHE Executive Committee upon invitation Elmarie van der Walt attended the following: - SSCSA / SAACDHE Regional Training Activities – one per term - Psychology CPD Well, University of Stellenbosch - Treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorders from MEISA (29 September) - Learning to think and work, using a solution focused approach: one day introductory workshop (6 September) - Personal Leadership training by the Cape Higher Education Consortium (14 – 16 March) - Hypnotherapy workshop by Prof NC Broekman (30 November) - Presentation on MSCI by Prof Mark Watson (1 August) Research, Conferences and Presentations Ms Yolanda Hanning presented a poster titled, Women in engineering: What inspires them? at the International Colloquium: Empowering Women in Engineering and Technology in Tunisia on 6 to 8 June.
  • 43 Dr Abie de Villiers co-presented a paper titled Being Pro-active with Positive Results: Evaluating the Effectiveness of an Individual Counseling Service at the annual SSCSA Conference hosted by the Vaal-North West Region on 17-20 September. Ms Elmarie van der Walt co-presented a paper titled Being Pro-active with Positive Results: Evaluating the Effectiveness of an Individual Counseling Service at the annual SSCSA Conference hosted by the Vaal-North West Region on 17-20 September. Mr Prince Dabula co-presented a paper titled Being Pro-active with Positive Results: Evaluating the Effectiveness of an Individual Counseling Service at the annual SSCSA Conference hosted by the Vaal-North West Region on 17-20 September. Ms Nthabiseng Afrika-Mabuto attended the annual SSCSA Conference hosted by the Vaal-North West Region on 17-20 September. Ms Yolanda Hanning attended the XVII International Congress for Analytical Psychology IAAP, at the CTICC on 13-17 August. Ms Charlene Petersen attended the XVII International Congress for Analytical Psychology IAAP, at the CTICC on 13-17 August. Research Reports Student Counselling completed the following research reports during 2007: - Individual Counseling Impact Study - Success/Risk Factors Questionnaire Results - Client Satisfaction Surveys Visits Dr Abie de Villiers and Ms Elisabet Smit attended a meeting at the Psychology Department at UWC to discuss the training of B. Psych interns in May. Elisabet Smit was visited by Elmaire van Heerden, Director Student Counselling and Development, Tswane University of Technology. (28 May). She also had a meeting with the student counselors on the Cape Town campus Ms Giselle Naidu visited Kamal Kamalodien – co-ordinator of the UWC B.Psych Programme, re our training programme for B.Psych students from this campus. Ms Giselle Naidu liaised with inspector Hanssen from the SAPS re the inclusion of a community involvement programme in to the B.Psych practical training programme. Nomthandazo Nkibi addressed a delegation from Namibia on Welfare Services at the CPUT on 15 August.
  • 44 Ms Elisabet Smit attended to a delegation from REAP who wanted to establish closer links with Student Counselling re career counseling for and placement of school leavers who had been part of the REAP programme. Dr Abie de Villiers and Ms Elisabet Smit met with a delegation from Namibia on Student Counseling Services at the CPUT in August. This report was compiled and edited by Dr Abie de Villiers and Ms Elisabet Smit