David Gillborn om rasism på Leda Mångfalt!

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David Gillborn, professor i Critical Race Studies vid universitetet i Birmingham föreläser om rasism på LedaMångfalt! den 16 januari 2013. Leda Mångfalt! är en chefsutbildning för ökad jämställdhet …

David Gillborn, professor i Critical Race Studies vid universitetet i Birmingham föreläser om rasism på LedaMångfalt! den 16 januari 2013. Leda Mångfalt! är en chefsutbildning för ökad jämställdhet och mångfald i museernas, konst- och kulturinstitutionernas publika verksamhet. Arrangeras av DIK, JÄMUS/Statens Historiska museer och Riksutställningar i samverkan med Ledarna och Riksförbundet Sveriges museer. http://riksutstallningar.se/ledamangfalt

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  • 1. Racism, Education & Policy: international perspectives on thecomplexity, controversy and politics of racial justice David Gillborn Professor of Critical Race Studies 16 January 2013
  • 2. Lecture Overview Defining the key terms (race, racism) Context: demographics Racism in Education o teachers o policy-makers ‘Race’ Flashpoints & Controversies
  • 3. ‘Race’ and Racism• Biological assumptions• Social race ‘Race’ is defined differently o in different societies o in the same society over time
  • 4. ‘Race’ and RacismTraditional Perspective• racism is an exceptional occurrence• willingly enacted• driven by race hatred.
  • 5. ‘Race’ and RacismTraditional Perspective• racism is an exceptional occurrence• willingly enacted• driven by race hatred.Critical Perspective• racism is extensive and taken-for-granted• enacted through ‘colour blind’ policy and rhetoric• sustained by actions that are assumed to apply fairly to all.
  • 6. UK population profiles
  • 7. UK population profiles White British
  • 8. UK population profiles White White British British
  • 9. 5+ A*-C incl. English & maths by ethnic group (percent, all students, both sexes, 2011)Source: DfE 2012 (SFR 03/2012) tables 1 & 2a
  • 10. Understanding race inequality Deficit Models Social Justice Perspective ‘Ability’ / intelligence Intersectional inequalities… (class, gender, disability…) Effort.. hard work Family structure Racism
  • 11. ‘Race’ and Racism in EducationQualitative research on the views and actions ofWhite teachers in relation to Black students:
  • 12. ‘Race’ and Racism in EducationWhite teachers Black students • Under-estimate academic ability; • Over-estimate challenge & threat; • Discipline Black students more severely; • Disproportionately place Black students in bottom teaching groups; • View Black families as disrupted & unsupportive.
  • 13. ‘Race’ and Racism in EducationColour-Blind Policy…. Racist impacts?
  • 14. ‘Race’ and Racism in EducationColour-Blind Policy…. Racist impacts?‘The gifted and talented scheme will identifychildren by looking at ability, rather thanattainment, to capitalise on the talents of theindividual child, regardless of ethnic background’Departmental rebuttal on BBC News On-Line (2002)
  • 15. ‘Gifted & Talented’ White Black Caribbean Black African
  • 16. ‘Gifted & Talented’ White Black Caribbean Black African
  • 17. ‘Gifted & Talented’ White Black Caribbean Black African
  • 18. Intersectional Issues
  • 19. Intersectional IssuesRacism is always intersectional
  • 20. Intersectional IssuesRacism is always intersectionalIntersectional issues do not explain racism
  • 21. Education & the Black Middle Class (with Nicola Rollock, Stephen J. Ball & Carol Vincent)
  • 22. Education & the Black Middle Class (with Nicola Rollock, Stephen J. Ball & Carol Vincent)Low achievement seen as the norm for Black studentsParents’ own professional assessments were rejected orignored‘Special needs’ assessments were: o withheld when parents requested them, o suggested as a means of managing racist harassment.
  • 23. Race & Controversy: flashpoint issues
  • 24. Race & Controversy: flashpoint issues Is colour-blind policy the only fair way?
  • 25. Race & Controversy: flashpoint issues Successful anti-racist / multicultural schools • Strong leadership on social justice and race equality; • Clear policies that address racism; • Involve minoritized students, parents & communities; • Review curricular and pastoral approaches; • Ethnic monitoring as a key part of institutional review.
  • 26. Race & Controversy: flashpoint issues Freedom of Speech versus Race Hatred
  • 27. Race & Controversy: flashpoint issues Freedom of Speech versus Race Hatred Limits on speech are common
  • 28. Race & Controversy: flashpoint issues Freedom of Speech versus Race Hatred Limits on speech are common Who is the best judge of harm?
  • 29. Racism, Education & Policy
  • 30. Racism, Education & Policy De-centre Whiteness
  • 31. Racism, Education & Policy: international perspectives on thecomplexity, controversy and politics of racial justice David Gillborn Professor of Critical Race Studies 16 January 2013
  • 32. ‘she needs to work harder.’a discrepancy was emerging, in that she would get aB for a piece of work that she had spent time doing [athome] and then she would get a D or an E [for timedwork in class]. So I then contacted the school andsaid, ‘look there’s a problem here’, and they just said,‘well, she needs to work harder.’ (...) I ended uphaving a row with [a senior teacher] because sheaccused me of being ‘a fussy parent’, and what shesaid was that my daughter was working to her level,which was the timed essay level, she was working toa D.(Paulette, Psychologist)
  • 33. not the racism at the schoolthe Head of year was quite shocked and quite encouraging interms of our conversation; calling and saying, you know, Reallysorry. Weve let you down, weve let [your son] down, we didntknow this was happening (...)But nothing happened. (...)My sons class teacher had said to my son that Im asking toomuch but not to tell me (...) I got this telephone call out of the blueone Sunday afternoon from his class teacher suggesting that hehave some test - I cant remember exactly how this conversationwent because it was such a shock, (it was five oclock on Sundayafternoon) that there might be some reason for his under-performing - not the racism at the school that I told them about -but there might be some reason that he might have some learningdifficulties.(Felicia, Senior Solicitor)
  • 34. they had done absolutely nothingSo for instance going in and having meetings, her head of yearsays ‘oh, you know, I understand now. We’ll do this, we’ll dothat’ and then that just doesn’t happen. (...)when [my daughter] was diagnosed with autism I together withother professionals had been in to school to talk to the Senco[Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator], to talk to the Head ofYear and they had done absolutely nothing.So there were constant visits to try to get them to take somekind of action to help [her]. You know, at first I thought it was menot being forceful enough, but as I said I was accompanied by aclinical psychologist who tried to get them to help as well andthey failed.(Lorraine, Researcher, Voluntary Sector)
  • 35. The E. Bacc Penalty: 5+ A*-C incl. English & maths vs English Bacc by ethnic group (percent, all pupils) 2011 65.3% 83.4% 73.2% 80.6% 78.8% 81.2% 84.3% Indian Bangl. White Bl. Pak. White & Black British African Bl. Caribbean Carib E. Bacc penalty = proportion of students successful in old measure who fail to secure the E. Bacc
  • 36. Free School Meals (FSM) Understanding achievement in contextNon- Free School Meals (N-FSM)
  • 37. Achievement by Ethnicity (overall vs FSM)
  • 38. 5+ A*-C incl. English & maths by ethnic group (percent, all students, both sexes, 2011)Source: DfE 2012 (SFR 03/2012) tables 1 & 2a
  • 39. 5+ A*-C incl. English & maths by ethnic group (percent, FSM only, both sexes, 2011)Source: DfE 2012 (SFR 03/2012) tables 1 & 2a