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Kat and leah final viking pp
 

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    Kat and leah final viking pp Kat and leah final viking pp Presentation Transcript

    • BY: KATRIANNA AND LEAH
    • Table of Contents Map……..p1 Religion……….p14 Background……..p2 Religion Continued………..p15 Social Structure………p3 Clothing………p16 Housing……….p4 Art and Music……….p17 Housing Continued………p5 Art and Music Continued………...p18 Food……….p6 Fun Facts………..p19 Family Life……….p7 Conclusion……………p20 Marriage ………p8 Site bibliography…………p21 Marriage Continued……..p9 Picture Bibliography………..p22 Marriage Extra……..p10 Picture Bibliography Childhood………p11 Continued………..p23 Childhood Extra………p12 Book Bibliography………….p24 Education………..p13 Credits………..p25
    • Map Here is a map where Ancient Vikings would settle or raid different areas, which are highlighted according to each century. The reasons why Vikings would attack other empires is because they came from a colder area of the world so it was hard for them to farm fresh food and animals. But, if they could take over a warmer and richer area then they had more resources to work with. Vikings also needed a good spot that may have already been deserted to hide their treasures and goods. Their sailing skills were amazing and they would mark down different coasts that were useful, to perhaps sail once again. After months out at sea their new village or territory. The ships would sail mainly near they would find a good area to London, Ireland, or France. Vikings would usually raid or trade and settle there raid, trade, kidnap, or kill. They grew good at these by using new leaving some men behind to rule tactics from enemy rulers that they held captive.
    • Background Vikings were known as raiders, merchants, and thieves who killed many innocent civilians. However, what many people don’t know is that they weren’t always that way. Actually, they began as pleasant sailors wondering the sea to catch different fish. They were called Norsemen. The Norsemen suddenly had trouble catching enough food to feed their families and to sell. In a fast amount of time this small group of sailors and explorers turned into a raging group of plundering Vikings that took over and killed anyone and their land in site. Even though at the time they were the tallest group of people, and had fierce and tactical strategies on the battle field, they were also excellent sailors and had their own ways of living. From their warm clothing, and supplies they could last a few months at sea, during extreme temperatures. Vikings are quite important in our history today, because they were some of the leaders to new parts of the world and gave valuable routes around coastlines to travel upon. They had perseverance, indomitable spirit, and lethal weapons. This era was called the Viking Age, which was recorded from the late 700’s to the mid 1080’s.
    • Social Structure Kings came from ancient royal families but the royal blood didn’t always keep them in power. To decide upon a new King King, the free subjects would vote for the best ruler. But, Kings that lose their support of the chieftains may be killed Chieftains or exiled. Chieftains or nobles were landowners and warriors as fierce Vikings. The freemen had some large Women farms and could own up to about 30 slaves. They were also fishermen, boat builders, or craftsman. And, slaves Free Men unfortunately had the hardest jobs, having to follow their master’s every command until they could finally pay off their debt, which most of them never Slaves accomplished. All of the slaves were from Scandinavia, and some were born into Viking families as future slaves. Slaves had no rights to vote or take part in government affairs. Though, women Vikings were greatly respected. The richer women had the ability to have slaves and assistants, and carried keys around their waist to all of the household locks.
    • Housing There were many different types of Vikings houses that were usually settled in groups so it was easy to find food or supplies. Low wooden or stone longhouses, were made from reeds, straw, or timber, but sometimes turf was used, and the walls were supported by wooden ports to help with all of the weight from the roof. The Small buildings next to a Viking home was either for barns, smithies, a bath house, a smoke house, or they preserved fresh meat (fish). On richer lands, several farms would be in a group settlement so that they could earn more money by selling a higher and richer quantity to the freemen.
    • Housing Continued Although Vikings could build and live a structured lifestyle, they also had some buildings that had culture behind them. When they would invade a land they would also have structures that they decided to keep such as: churches, smithies, and family homes. The food that they would farm was placed in wooden or iron barrels. The cutlery and plates were made from wood or iron, which was made from a method called smithys. Smithys were a kind of pot that were heated over fires, holding liquid, to create different shapes like a blacksmith would do. Inside a Viking house was a few beds on the back corners, a cooking table, and a low fire to cook, that had rocks circling around it. Outside of their homes they would wash their clothes and garments in a bucket of water, and then dry them on a light cord that had wood beneath it. If it were to rain, they would leave the clothing spread out, inside their house, next to the fire pit. The men would slaughter the animals, work in the garden or fields, and cut wood for daily fires to keep warm. But, if they needed some water to cook or clean with they would got to a nearby river, and fetch for it with a bucket. Most of the young children would take on this task. However, only the wealthier Vikings could afford a lot of land to supply them with resources, and the poor had to sleep on stacks of branches with barely any blankets or padding.
    • Food In the poor seasons, food became scarce so they could only eat porridge and bread made from barely and oats because it wasn’t warm enough to grow wheat. The sheep, cattle, pigs, and goats provided meat and dairy for winter months. Vikings held great feasts for celebrations or trading and military expeditions, and the host would earn great honour and respect. There they would eat meat such as: beef, pork, or lamb would be roasted or stewed in the kitchen and served in the hall. Then the food would be heavily seasoned with garlic or mustard. For day to day food they would usually began with stew that was made from vegetables and meat. (peas, carrots, lamb, turnips, etc.)
    • Family life Even nowadays almost every Scandinavian new each other in each country, having known their ancestors. Every Viking family member played their part and respected those who were brave and loyal. If a family member was harmed others would seek revenge, and try to hunt down the one who had committed the crime. This could lead into fights, which could have sometimes continued for generations, and unfortunately event into countless murders. The father had the most power in the family. If he thought a baby was weak he could let it die. But, he had the most responsibility to farm, garden, chop many blocks of wood to prepare for winter, and take care of the smithy. When a Viking farmer died, the oldest son would inherit the farm, and the rest of the family would be forced to move to another farm. Mothers also played an important part. She would wash and dry clothes, prepare and cook dinner, clean the house, and care and teach the children. If the husband (Viking) would leave on an sea expedition or for battle, the sons would be a replacement of their farther, for the time being. But, if they had no male children then they would request for a neighbour or cut down on their resources. The children, if younger then the age of about eight, would get to play, learn, or take on smaller tasks like fetching a bucket of water or help wash clothes. The older female children would be sent to help their mother, learn some reading and writing, and educate the younger siblings. The older male children would learn to battle from their father, and help their father with daily tasks. (Mainly in the fields) There was only a small amount of education because fighting was more important to them. Children who were older had to work hard, and were sometimes sold to other farms for punishment.
    • Marriage Most children by the age of 12 to 16 are married. The women were expected to run the household, immediately after marriage. Yet, sometimes had help from the other family members too. Marriage was decided between two families, but the women had a say. Once the couple was married it meant that the two families were ‘united’ and had to celebrate events together and take care of each other.
    • Marriage Continued... Women didn’t completely become part of her new husband’s family, at the beginning. She would instead continue to live with her family, but if he was abusive or didn’t work hard to support them then she could divorce him. So, this harder for the man. A divorce took place when witnesses of the women being mistreated came and said words while they sat in their bed. If they had young children together, the children would automatically go to the mother after the divorce was final. However, older children would be divided between the two parents according to wealth. The women would also inherit most of her husband’s belongings, so at the time divorcees had the most power of all women. Also, the children had rights to inherit all of their fortune after they had divorced.
    • Marriage Extra BIRTH BABIES -THE BABY WOULD -COULD BE KILLED BY LAW ALWAYS GO TO THE FREE -WELCOME BABIES WERE MOTHER GIVEN NAME SPRINKELED -IF A SLAVE HAD A BABY WITH WATER AND PUT THE BABY BELONGED TO ONTO THE FATHERS KNEE THE SLAVES OWNER
    • Childhood  Babies were given little Thor’s-hammer charms in order to keep them safe from sickness and evil spirits. Names: Boys, took fathers name so Eric the son of Karl would be Eric Karlsson. Girls, took mothers or grand-mothers name. Children didn’t go to school, they would help there parents work instead. They learned Viking history, Laws and religion from verbal stories and songs. They would play with toys such as wooden boats and whistles.
    • Childhood Extra Vikings Both Canadians -Must go to war -Are educated by -Live in the school system -Play with toys longhouses -Live in houses -Learn from stories -don’t go to or apartments and songs school -Have technology (sometimes) -Know how to -Know the values -Help parents work trade of money (sometimes) -learn from -Most have a high parents school degree
    • Education The education of ancient Vikings wasn‟t similar as today‟s learning and education. Viking children wouldn‟t leave to school at a designated place or at a certain time. Instead, they would stay home, learning to read or write in different Scandinavian languages. These lessons would be taught by parents or relatives. But, wealthier families who didn‟t care to teach their children themselves, would hire tutors to help children learn to read and write, and music and art. Once the child reached a certain age they would continue their daily lessons, but be assigned household work. If they were female they would learn to make clothing, cook, and do the laundry. If they were male they would help their father on the farm, and continue the manly duties. (Chopping wood, catching and slaughtering animals, making fires, etc.) However, boys would mainly be taught to fight with swords and different assortments of weapons, because the Vikings found it more important to learn how to battle than to be educated. Not everyone was educated though, if their parents were too busy or hadn‟t learned to read and write themselves. So, some adults could never write or read, which was very important if they were to travel.
    • Religion At the start of the Viking Age Vikings had many beliefs in different gods which is called a polytheistic religion. (Because they believed in more than one religion or god) They believed that by sacrificing rulers of their clans, they would earn the god‟s trust so that there would be no evil forces to come their way. But, one of these sacrifices was called “blot”. This happened when the Vikings were sent some sort of message or sign from the gods that they needed to kill an animal, or sometimes human. There were many different types of blot that occurred in almost each month of the year, but the steps to perform the blot are as follows. The first step was to kill the animal and take out all of the blood and internal organs. Then, by placing the blood of the animal inside a large wooden bowl, it would be taken and placed on „horg‟. The Vikings that sacrificed the animal, and other citizens and priests would all knee in front of the horg and repeat sacred words that the priests would chant. Now, it was time for the priests to take the bowl of blood form the horg, and run it over a flame several times by continuously chanting the same words. They would then repeat the process but with the animal‟s internal organs. Once all of the limbs of the animal reached a good temperature, the blood of the animal would gently be tossed onto those who had chanted. This would then conclude the blot ceremony and the Vikings would be free from all worries preformed by the gods. But, Instead of building places to pray and worship their gods, the Vikings would use the outdoors to willing ling pray when needed. Sometimes they would create temples but only the wealthy had the ability to do so. The ruler or King of the clan of Vikings decided that families must pray and say grace before they were to feast, and on certain holidays or ceremonies. As the 10th century began, Vikings suddenly turned to the Christian religion. Though, some stuck to the polytheistic religion new cultures and events were introduced. But, by the end of the Viking Age almost all of them had become Christians. This meant that they also believed in new gods and creatures including: Bestla (the giantess), Bor (son of Buri), Odin, Vili, Ve, (sons of Bor and Bestla) Angrboda (the frost giant) Loki, (married to Angrboda) Fenrir, Jormungand, Hel, (children of Angrboda and Loki) and Thor.
    • Religion continued In North Mythology, Thor the god of the thunder, was said to be the most powerful god of them all. He is one of Odin’s and Jord’s sons, he’s married to Sif, the fertility goddess, with his sons Mani and Modi, and his daughter Thrud. He also had an assistant names Thialfi, who is also a messenger for all the gods. He was usually classified as a humongous man with a read long beard, and eyes made of lightening. Although his appearance was frightful he was portrayed as the protector towards mortals and all gods. The Vikings believed that when a thunderstorm occurred, it was really Thor who was riding among the cloud in heaven on his golden chariot, by large white goats named Tanngrisni and Tanngnost. But, when there were lightening flashes, it was because Thor was upset and had thrown his hammer called Mjollnir. The Mjollnir was said to have the ability to cast lightening bolts, and when thrown to come right back to Thor. He also had iron gloves to lift the hammer with, which he would use when preparing to fight other gods. He wore a large belt called Megingjard that was two times his godly strength, and the hall Bilskirnir was in “the place of might” in his honor. From one of the tales according to the Norse mythology, Alviss (a dwarf) requested Thor’s daughters hand in marriage, and that she had excepted. Thor couldn’t have had his daughter marry Alviss, so he decided to question why Alviss should marry her if he has no wisdom because he is so short. Thor continued to question him until the sun had rose and all of the dwarves were turned into stone because Alviss had run out of time to explain himself.
    • Clothing The clothes were made of wool, linen, and animal skins. Skilled women made there own clothing from sheep's wool. The wool was cleaned in order to spin it. The Vikings died the wool to bright colors such as green, yellow, red, purple, and, brown. Men wore tunics and trousers and women wore long dresses with a long apron.
    • Art and Music Vikings music was very different from ours today. For example, reports have stated that written music and letters about some of the ancient songs were apparently terrible, and reminded some of insane animals. However, the instruments when played, were much more peaceful and somewhat like the ones we have today. There were: pan flutes, horn pipes, lyres, rebec, and a lur. A pan flute was mainly created from cow horns and many other animal bones put together forming a rectangular shape. A pair of horn pipes were a like the Scottish bag pipes, other than the fact that there was no bag, just bones. And there were the string instruments including: a lyre, which was played by linking strings together, similar to a modern guitar. A rebec which was somewhat like violin and a harp put together, except it was made from a different material. But, the last instrument which was the lur was made from oak wood that would lead into two directions near the middle, having holes, and link together again at the end. However, the musicians were either skalds, or jesters who were partly mistreated. Skalds, on the other hand, had the opportunity to travel across seas to send a song or poem from one Viking to another, and they had to be a talented speaker and singer. (Somewhat like a messenger) The art of the Vikings, however was much different. Artists would carve designs on most of the religious temples and churches to state which religion was welcomed there. They would also create drawings and paintings from clay to show animals on rune stones, to represent those who had died. In families, Vikings also hanged ornaments usually made from either silver or gold that would be hung around and outside of homes. Sometimes, Vikings would come across different lands that had jewellery, paintings, and different crafts that they would bring back from places such as: India, Africa, Greece, Rome, etc. The last form of art was large ivory or wooden carvings of specific gods, or signs to show who’s territory it was.
    • Art and Music Continued  The festivals and holidays of the Ancient Vikings include: Jul,(celebration of the ending year, in winter from December 20th-January 2nd/Christmas) Thurseblot,(smaller festival in honor of the god Thor, occurring just before Spring) Disting, (Before spring occurs, near the end of winter) Valisblot, (a feast honoring Odin‟s sons) Ostara,(Festival celebrating the spring goddess and fertility and birth) Walpurgis, Einharjar, Sigurdsblot, Midsummer, Lithasblot, Mabon, and Winter night. One of the festivals was called “Midsummer”. Midsummer was celebrated by the Vikings when the sun was at it‟s height. (i.e. it was the sunniest time of the year) During this period, Vikings would travel and begin raiding different empires. This meant that midsummer was in honor of the newly Viking power over land. It was also said to be one of the longest time of the year, and the days following midsummer would slowly last for a shorter time, so days weren‟t as long. (The sun began to go down earlier in the day) They believed that the god Baldur had died (been sacrificed to show honor) and is reborn on Jul. (Christmas) Also, the god Sigurd was said to have been captured on Midsummer by hid brothers Hagan and Günter. As a matter of fact, midsummer is still celebrated by Scandinavians each year at the beginning or end of June, and can last for two days.
    • Fun Facts! -M e d i c i n e f o r t h e s i c k , w a s m a d e f r o m h e r b s p r e p a r e d b y w o m e n -S l a v e s c o u l d b u y t h e i r f r e e d o m , i f t h e y h a d e n o u g h m o n e y -W o m e n b r u s h e d t h e a n i m a l s b e f o r e t h e y u s e d t h e m t o m a k e clothing -V i k i n g s w e r e e n t e r t a i n e d b y h o r s e r a c e s a n d f i g h t s ( a l i k e b u l l s ) -V i k i n g s a t e o l d e r h o r s e s , w h o w e r e n o l o n g e r u s e f u l -S l a v e s w e r e s a c r i f i c e d w h i l e a t t e n d i n g t h e i r o w n e r ’ s f u n e r a l -V i k i n g s s o m e t i m e s s h o w e d o f f t h e i r s k i l l s b y r o w i n g a l o n g s i d e ships -A c t i v i t i e s s u c h a s , w r e s t l i n g , r a c i n g , a n d f e n c i n g w o u l d o c c u r even at festivities -A s p o r t a n d h e a l t h y e x e r c i s e f o r V i k i n g s w a s t h r o w i n g r o c k s l o n g distances -C r e a t e d i c e s k a t e s b y t y i n g t w o b o n e s t o g e t h e r w i t h a s o f t s h e e t underneath
    • Conclusion Ancient Vikings are very important in our history. They are the ones who helped shape the world we have today. Even though they may have been destructive, they were still people and they had their own religion, culture, language, and way of living life.
    • Site bibliography  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thor  http://www.arild-hauge.com/elife.htm  http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ancient/vikings/food_01.sht ml  http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/primaryhistory/vikings/fami ly_life/  http://www.historyworld.net/wrldhis/PlainTextHistories.as p?historyid=ab86  http://www.viking.no/e/life/ewomen.htm  http://www.wizardrealm.com/norse/holidays.html
    • Picture Bibliography  http://www.flickr.com/photos/9899582@N05/4586634699/  http://www.flickr.com/photos/cavemanlawyer15/141477569/  http://www.flickr.com/photos/magnera/3585916393/  http://www.flickr.com/photos/mararie/254885635/  http://www.flickr.com/photos/photodeus/2911819360/  http://www.google.ca/imgres?imgurl=http://bsajuniors.net/year2blog/files/2009/03/viking- picture.jpg&imgrefurl=http://bsajuniors.net/year2blog/&usg=__3L6L9AJn_EooGfx3h78FQXuK8Qg=&h=208&w= 269&sz=13&hl=en&start=16&um=1&itbs=1&tbnid=nbvIa1wERTFN5M:&tbnh=87&tbnw=113&prev=/images%3Fq%3 DViking%2Bfood%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DN%26rlz%3D1R2GGLF_enCA377%26ndsp%3D20%26tbs%3Di sch:1  http://www.google.ca/imgres?imgurl=http://s3.hubimg.com/u/254046_f520.jpg&imgrefurl=http://hubpages.com/ hub/Who-Were-The- Vikings&usg=__46Wx4il8WLvy8QVS8MQNRSODNHM=&h=408&w=520&sz=67&hl=en&start=21&um=1&itbs=1&t bnid=uksp855pNUg5mM:&tbnh=103&tbnw=131&prev=/images%3Fq%3DAncient%2BViking%2Bhomes%26start%3 D20%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DN%26rlz%3D1R2GGLF_enCA377%26ndsp%3D20%26tbs%3Disch:1  http://www.google.ca/imgres?imgurl=http://www.doyle.com.au/images/viking_waxe.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www. doyle.com.au/battleclontarf.htm&usg=__Wxyh8tLj4MIvnXLOTij2vzJAejA=&h=373&w=294&sz=15&hl=en&start=3 &um=1&itbs=1&tbnid=hDPdzBqV4OCiiM:&tbnh=122&tbnw=96&prev=/images%3Fq%3DAncient%2BVikings%26u m%3D1%26hl%3Den%26rlz%3D1R2GGLF_enCA377%26tbs%3Disch:1  http://www.google.ca/imgres?imgurl=http://z.about.com/d/architecture/1/0/-/F/russia-novgorod- at.gif&imgrefurl=http://architecture.about.com/od/countriescultures/ig/Russia- Architecture/Novgrad.htm&usg=__VWqejBmEdSAmr5ZoTRfUiHmP- ys=&h=240&w=395&sz=54&hl=en&start=7&um=1&itbs=1&tbnid=Nk7FYgKHRX- 11M:&tbnh=75&tbnw=124&prev=/images%3Fq%3DAncient%2BViking%2Bhomes%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26rlz% 3D1R2GGLF_enCA377%26tbs%3Disch:1  www.englishmonarchs.co.uk/images/viking_ship_...  www.kidspast.com/images/vikings.jpg  www.monarchy.nl/viking/viking2.gif
    • Picture Bibliography Continued  http://homepage.eircom.net/~bronzeagehorns/images/midsize/swanbone_flutes.jpg  http://www.flickr.com/photos/lincolnian/220854545/  http://www.google.ca/imgres?imgurl=http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_pE0YU3UwpLY/R8h7oE2J_CI/AAAAAAAAAGw/azFvT4ewLkY/ s400/vikings.jpg&imgrefurl=http://uncyclopedia.wikia.com/wiki/Accounting&usg=__Ig67RPDYBjcGnzZE67J1XG0fc3w=&h=350 &w=262&sz=29&hl=en&start=28&um=1&itbs=1&tbnid=apyUW4GpEAZuaM:&tbnh=120&tbnw=90&prev=/images%3Fq%3DVikin gs%26start%3D20%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DN%26rlz%3D1R2GGLF_enCA377%26ndsp%3D20%26tbs%3Disch:1  http://www.google.ca/imgres?imgurl=http://canadianmysteries.org/development/sites/vinland/images/site/165665_2.jpg&imgref url=http://canadianmysteries.org/development/sites/vinland/vikinglife/society/indexen.html&usg=__XWMUi0_ttPk_3YSioh5Wy spCxZk=&h=250&w=310&sz=21&hl=en&start=3&um=1&itbs=1&tbnid=1q3Xazhbkf6pYM:&tbnh=94&tbnw=117&prev=/images%3 Fq%3DViking%2Bgovernment%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26rlz%3D1R2GGLF_enCA377%26tbs%3Disch:1  http://www.google.ca/imgres?imgurl=http://caroljonas.com/USERIMAGES/viking.kids.jpg&imgrefurl=http://caroljonas.com/pag e3.htm&usg=__phppMY0MH9mk77jg1UZ21G- Qyj0=&h=438&w=432&sz=60&hl=en&start=1&um=1&itbs=1&tbnid=j6O3DuHLwN0YuM:&tbnh=127&tbnw=125&prev=/images% 3Fq%3DViking%2Bchildren%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26rlz%3D1R2GGLF_enCA377%26tbs%3Disch:1  http://www.google.ca/imgres?imgurl=http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/walk/print/images/prints/viking_end1.jpg&imgrefurl=http:// www.bbc.co.uk/history/walk/print/obprint1.shtml&usg=__EX4JB0ISnwgdcCc7ON_macYotkc=&h=356&w=615&sz=112&hl=en&st art=3&um=1&itbs=1&tbnid=0kTDRuEm- ZEItM:&tbnh=79&tbnw=136&prev=/images%3Fq%3DViking%2Beducation%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26rlz%3D1R2GGLF_enCA 377%26ndsp%3D20%26tbs%3Disch:1  http://www.google.ca/imgres?imgurl=http://www.dailygalaxy.com/photos/uncategorized/2007/06/25/viking_longship.jpg&imgre furl=http://www.dailygalaxy.com/my_weblog/2007/06/sea-stallion--a.html&usg=__7WxyXvZff2-3f7zv9My4YD- q_js=&h=665&w=800&sz=210&hl=en&start=1&um=1&itbs=1&tbnid=XAvJ8NSeQNQAsM:&tbnh=119&tbnw=143&prev=/images% 3Fq%3DAncient%2BVikings%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26rlz%3D1R2GGLF_enCA377%26tbs%3Disch:1  http://www.google.ca/imgres?imgurl=http://www.historicimpressions.com/HunterL.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.historicimpressio ns.com/Medieval.htm&usg=__7KB10gZfb0QPuuzq7uxnpK2mAjI=&h=593&w=248&sz=26&hl=en&start=3&um=1&itbs=1&tbnid= d9P2mK8RKu0FtM:&tbnh=135&tbnw=56&prev=/images%3Fq%3DViking%2Bcross%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DX%26rlz %3D1R2GGLF_enCA377%26tbs%3Disch:1  http://www.google.ca/imgres?imgurl=http://www.hurstwic.org/history/articles/daily_living/pix/dressing_baby_sketch.jpg&imgre furl=http://www.hurstwic.org/history/articles/daily_living/text/clothing.htm&usg=__GYB8hTVkbDXpA5VcwEdKuOYn0dQ=&h= 300&w=226&sz=18&hl=en&start=15&um=1&itbs=1&tbnid=bqo2eD24Ta8pxM:&tbnh=116&tbnw=87&prev=/images%3Fq%3DViki ng%2Bchildren%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DN%26rlz%3D1R2GGLF_enCA377%26ndsp%3D20%26tbs%3Disch:1
    • Book Bibliography  Livesey, Robert, Smith, A.G. The Vikings. Toronto: Stoddart Publishing Co. Limited, 1989.  Pearson, Anne. The Vikings. Great Britain: Hamlyn’s children’s books, 1993.  Steele, Philip. The Viking World. London: Lorenz Books, 1998.
    • Credits Title Page………………………………………..………………………………………………………………....Kat and Leah Map………………………………………………………................................................................…………..Kat Background………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..……..Kat Social Structure………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..Leah Housing…………………………………………………….…………………………………………………………………….Leah Housing extra……………………………………….....................................................................….……Kat Food………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...…….Leah Family Life…………………………………………………………………………………………….……………………..……Kat Marriage………………………………………………………....................................................................Leah Marriage Continued.............................................................................................................Leah Childhood…........................................................................................................................Leah Childhood Continued………………………………………...................................................................Leah Education…………………………………………………................................................................…….....Kat Religion………………………………………………………................................................................……..Kat Religion Continued……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..Kat Clothing…………………...........................................................................................................Leah Art and Music…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….….…..Kat Art and Music Continued………………………………………………………………………………………..…………..Kat Fun Facts……………………………………………………………………………………………………….……Leah and Kat Site Bibliography……………………………………………………………………………………….…………Kat and Leah Picture Bibliography……………………………………………………………………………………………..Kat and Leah Book Bibliography……………………………………………………………………………………………………..……….Kat Books……………………………………..…………..................................................................Leah and Kat Pictures…………………………………………………………………………………………………….…………Leah and Kat Sites…………………………………………....................................................................……..Kat and Leah Credits………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..Kat and Leah