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Leadership power point Leadership power point Presentation Transcript

  • High-Performance Leadership:From Control to Empowerment
  • High-Performance Leadership: Principles of Leadership © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • High-Performance Leadership: Principles of LeadershipPurpose:Provide leaders with tools and skills to change theirbehavior from the traditional practices of controllingand directing to coaching, facilitating, and empowering. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC View slide
  • High-Performance Leadership: Principles of LeadershipObjectives: •Recognize yourself as a leader. •Understand the practices of empowering leaders. •Commit to lead “from the balcony.” •Find balance among the five leadership roles. •Improve personal productivity and use of time. •Understand the fundamentals of teams and leadership within a team environment. •Establish clear performance expectations and develop the ability to confront poor performance. •Become a leader who empowers others. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC View slide
  • Section 1: Principles of LeadershipIn this section, you will:• Grasp the importance of leadership in achieving long-term organizational success.• Realize the five myths of leadership.• Recognize the difference between leadership and management.• Understand the difference between controlling and empowering leadership styles. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • The Leadership FactorLeadership: The most important factors for sustaining long- term business success• Leaders have the power to make things happen and influence the organization.• Leaders are responsible for all of the other factors (understanding customers and markets, developing a strategy, etc.).• Leaders provide the vision, inspiration, and direction to attract and motivate others to be successful.• Leaders create the infrastructure- processes, systems and structure in which the organization can succeed. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • “Leadership is the pivotal force behind successful organizations. To create vital and viable organizations, leadership is necessary to develop a new vision ofwhat they can be, and then mobilize the organization to change towards that vision.” ~Warren Bennis and Burt Nanus Leaders: Strategies for Taking Charge © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Myths of Leadership➢Leadership is a rare skill. For example, “Very few people can lead. I could not get anyone to follow me.”➢Leaders are born, not made. “Leadership is a natural ability. You either have it or you don’t.”➢Effective leaders are charismatic. “Leaders are always popular people who tell funny jokes and really enjoy speaking in front of large groups.”➢Leadership exists only at the top. “CEOs and highly paid executives are leaders. It is not my job to steer this company.”➢Leaders control, direct, and prod. “Leaders sit around and think of new processes to make my job harder.” © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • LeadershipThe higher value within an organization should be placed on the following:• Initiating change• Solving problems and implementing processes• Developing human resources• Achieving long range strategies• Building commitment © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Controllers vs. EmpowerersControllers:What tactics do they use to accomplish their objectives?• Controllers impose external control on their followers/subordinates. For example, a controller would micromanage their employees.What are the effects of their tactics?• The job may be completed, but possibly at a higher cost with employees simply doing the minimum amount of work required. For example, a controller would not nurture team work or may stifle opinions and other ideas. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Controllers vs. Empowerers (cont)Controllers:What are the beliefs behind the behavior?• People cannot be trusted. If you want something done right do it yourself. I am more important than others. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Controllers vs. EmpowerersEmpowerers:What tactics do they use to accomplish their objectives?• Empowerers create an environment in which their people are motivated and committed. For example, an empowerer would encourage brainstorming and feedback.What are the effects of their tactics?• Goals are achieved by empowered and engaged employees when new ideas and processes are formed. For example, a team working for an empowerer takes personal ownership and pride in their work.
  • Controllers vs. Empowerers (cont)Empowerers:What are the beliefs behind the behavior?• People can be trusted. People can succeed and do well at their jobs. I succeed when my team/organization succeeds.
  • High-Performance Leadership:Practices of Empowering Leaders
  • High-Performance Leadership: From Control to EmpowermentProgram Purpose:• Provide leaders with tools and skills to change their behavior from the traditional practices of controlling and directing to coaching, facilitating, and empowering.
  • High-Performance Leadership: From Control to EmpowermentProgram Objectives:• Recognize yourself as a leader.• Understand the practices of empowering leaders.• Commit to lead “from the balcony.”• Find balance among the 5 leadership roles.• Improve personal productivity and use of time. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • High-Performance Leadership:From Control to Empowerment (cont)Program Objectives:• Understand the fundamentals of teams and leadership within a team environment.• Establish clear performance expectations and develop the ability to confront poor performance.• Become a leader who empowers others. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Section Two: Practices of Empowering LeadersIn this section you will learn:• Empowering leaders have a driving passion to realize their vision.• Empowering leaders are egoless and humble.• Empowering leaders build and sustain trust with their followers. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Section Two: Practices of Empowering Leaders(cont)In this section you will learn:• Empowering leaders inspire the commitment and motivation of their followers.• Empowering leaders are organizational and social architects.• Empowering leaders act and institute change from positive beliefs about people and situations. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • The Six Principles of Empowering Leadership• Leaders must have a driving passion to realize their vision.• Leaders build and sustain trust.• Leaders are egoless and humble.• Leaders inspire the commitment and motivation of their followers.• Leaders are organizational and social architects. Leaders drive situations; they do not allow the situation to drive them. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Principle #1: Empowering Leaders to have a Driving Passion to Realize Their Vision.Great leaders have clear goals andknow how to accomplish them. Theyhave a passion for making the visiona reality. This means:• They are always 100% present and focused.• They do not allow events and circumstances to determine what will happen to them. They are concerned with outcomes.• They use their vision to rise above adversity, setbacks, and even failure. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Principle #2: Empowering Leaders are Egoless.Many of the most effectiveleaders are humble. Althoughdogged about achieving theirvisions, they are not interested intheir press clippings or credit. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Principle #3: Empowering Leaders Build and Maintain Relationships of Trust.Leadership is about relationships.Empowering leaders are aware oftheir impact on others and seek tocommunicate and behave in waysthat build trust, self-esteem, and confidence. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Principle #4: Empowering Leaders Unleash the Motivation and Commitment of Their Followers. Leaders define the boundaries and encourage people to be self-governing. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Principle #5: Empowering Leaders are Organizational and Social Architects.The Seven Elements of Organizational andSocial Architects:1. Environment2. Strategy3. Core Process4. Structure5. Systems6. Culture7. Results © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Principle #6: Empowering Leaders Act from Positive Beliefs about People and Situations.Strengthening vs. Weakening beliefs:• At any given moment the human brain receives an overwhelming amount of data that cannot all be absorbed by our senses. The human brain can only process so much; the gaps are filled in by our belief system. Information  Ideas  Beliefs  Actions © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • High-Performance Leadership: The Five Leadership Roles © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • High-Performance Leadership: From Control to EmpowermentPurpose:• Provide leaders with tools and skills to change their behavior from the traditional practices of controlling and directing to coaching, facilitating, and empowering. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • High-Performance Leadership: From Control to EmpowermentObjectives:• Recognize yourself as a leader.• Understand the practices of empowering leaders.• Commit to lead “from the balcony.”• Find balance among the 5 leadership roles.• Improve personal productivity and use of time.• Understand the fundamentals of teams and leadership within a team environment.• Establish clear performance expectations and develop the ability to confront poor performance.• Become a leader who empowers others
  • The Team Model• The model represents the most important elements of a team. It includes why a team exist, what it does, and how people relate with each other.• This model is useful for understanding the relationship between a leader and the people they lead. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Leadership From the Balcony• Charter (Why)• Design (What)• Relationship (How) © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Leadership From the Balcony (cont)1. The balcony is a useful metaphor because it suggests that one is observing, rather than being caught up in the hustle and bustle of the organization. The balcony means that one has a “big picture” view of what is happening2. Leaders add the most value when they are working on improving the three parts of their team and not just doing the day-to-day work. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Five Leadership Roles (cont)1.) Technician• Has a high degree of technical proficiency• Is sought out for expertise• Diagnoses problems using analytical skills• Possesses superior troubleshooting and problem-solving abilities• Enjoys putting out fires• Makes decisions quickly © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Five Leadership Roles2.) Manager• Plans and schedules projects• Directs resources to specific assignments• Decides daily goals and priorities• Tracks progress• Completes report and paperwork• Runs reports and meetings• Maintains discipline and order © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Five Leadership Roles (cont)3.) Architect• Standardizes and documents processes and procedures• Aligns systems to strategies and visions• Challenges practices that are not consistent with the core philosophy• Reinforces positive cultural norms• Meets with others to learn new procedures for operations © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Five Leadership Roles (cont)4.) Trailblazer• Analyzes the organizational environment for trends and changes• Clearly articulates a vision for the future.• Translates vision into objectives• Imparts and enforces simple boundaries• Makes connections with people outside the organization• Encourages risk-taking and innovation © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Five Leadership Roles (cont)5.) Coach• Sets standards for behavior and performance• Empowers people to make decisions and solve problems• Provides information and training• Evaluates and helps individuals grow in their abilities• Acts as a mentor• Conducts performance evaluations © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Five Leadership Roles (cont) Leaders should perform all 5 roles. In traditional organizations, leaders emphasize the manager and technician roles. In high-performance organizations, leaders emphasize the architect, trailblazer and coach roles. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • High-Performance Leadership: Leadership Practices: A Self-Assessment © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • High-Performance Leadership: From Control to EmpowermentPurpose:• Provide leaders with tools and skills to change their behavior from the traditional practices of controlling and directing to coaching, facilitating, and empowering. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • High-Performance Leadership: From Control to EmpowermentObjectives:• Recognize yourself as a leader.• Understand the practices of empowering leaders.• Commit to lead “from the balcony.”• Find balance among the 5 leadership roles.• Improve personal productivity and use of time.• Understand the fundamentals of teams and leadership within a team environment.• Establish clear performance expectations and develop the ability to confront poor performance.• Become a leader who empowers others. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Section Four: Leadership Practices:In this section, you will receive feedback from yourleadership profile.The feedback can be useful for you in the following ways:• Understand your strengths and weaknesses as a leader.• Assess yourself in the five leadership roles.• Know how you are viewed by others in your organization.• Develop personal improvement plans. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Assessment CategoriesFive of the categories reflect the five leadership rolesyou learned in section three. The other twocategories reflect the dimensions of self-leadershipand interpersonal relationships.• The Technician• The Manager• The Trailblazer• The Architect• The Coach• Positive Self Management• Positive Interpersonal Relationships © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Improvement Planning Form• The purpose of this is to set specific goals for the areas you need to develop.• One way to reinforce your personal goals and make them easier to achieve is to share them with an accountability partner. An accountability partner is someone who can support you and hold you accountable for achieving the goals you have set. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • High-Performance Leadership: Personal Productivity © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • High-Performance Leadership: From Control to EmpowermentPurpose:Provide leaders with tools and skills tochange their behavior from the traditionalpractices of controlling and directing tocoaching, facilitating, and empowering. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • High-Performance Leadership: From Control to EmpowermentObjectives:• Recognize yourself as a leader.• Understand and practice leadership themes.• Commit to lead from the balcony.• Find balance among the 5 leadership roles.• Improve personal productivity and use of time.• Understand the fundamentals of teams and leadership within a team environment.• Become a leader who empowers others.• Know how to manage the psychological impact of change. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Section Five: Personal ProductivityIn this section you will:• Develop an understanding of personal productivity and the difference between time management and time leadership.• Outline how you currently use your time.• Isolate the barriers that keep you from managing your time more effectively.• Define the difference between the important and urgent and how to schedule time for the important.• Understand how to improve your time leadership.• Commit to better use your time to take advantage of all five leadership roles. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Overview of Personal Productivity Personal Productivity =our overall effectiveness in getting things done © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Time Leadership Matrix URGENT NOT URGENT I IIImportant • An Emergency • Listening to someone • A Project deadline • Planning for future • Request from boss • Fixing a system III IVNot Important • Someone “pops” in • Busy work • Some meetings • Lots of phone calls • Many phone calls • Some socializing © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • High-Performance Leadership:Fundamentals of High-Performance Teams © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • High-Performance Leadership: From Control to EmpowermentPurpose:• Provide leaders with tools and skills to change their behavior from the traditional practices of controlling and directing to coaching, facilitating, and empowering. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • High-Performance Leadership: From Control to Empowerment (cont)Objectives:• Recognize yourself as a leader.• Understand the practices of empowering leaders.• Commit to lead “from the balcony.”• Find balance among the five leadership roles.• Improve personal productivity and use of time.• Understand the fundamentals of teams and leadership within a team environment.• Establish clear performance expectations and develop the ability to confront poor performance.• Become a leader who empowers others. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Section Six: Fundamentals of High- Performance TeamsIn this section, you will learn:• Understand the definition of a high- performance team and how it differs from traditional work groups.• Identify the three elements of high- performance teams.• Coordinate four types of teams.• Recognize stages of team development. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • High-Performing Team Elements• A shared mission or purpose that motivates and inspires members• Autonomy and authority for task performance• Interdependence and shared leadership• Broadly defined jobs and many responsibilities• Meaningful participation in decision-making• Higher performance than individuals not organized into teams © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • High-Performance Team: Traditional Work Groups Coordinate from above with constant supervision• Organized around functions• Employees do specialized tasks• Supervisory management• Rule-governed• Decisions referred up organization• People viewed as tools of management © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • High-Performance Team: High-Performance Teams: Enable group to become self-governing with facilitative guidance.• Organized around core processes• Employees possess multiple skills• Shared leadership• Principle-governed• Decision made at point of action• People viewed as partners
  • 4 Types of Teams Specialization of TasksHIGH Type I Type II Swim Team Football Team Type III Type IV Bowling Team Volleyball TeamLOW LOW HIGH © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • 4 Types of Teams (cont)Type I• High specialization: Low coordination• Work divided up between various specialties• Each specialty consists of a distinctive set of skills• Little coordination needed between specialtiesExample: a geriatric team providing care foran elderly personType II• Made up of people from different disciplines• Requires a high degree of coordinationExamples: product development teams, hospital emergency room, executive leadership team
  • 4 Types of Teams (cont)Type III• Low in both specialization and coordination• Team members share same skill set but have little need to coordinate or communicate.Examples: phone operators, bill collectors,bank tellersType IV• Members share common skills.• High need for coordination• Generally organized around completing a “whole”Example: manufacturing settings where people are building a product
  • Stages of Team Development Team Reaches its stride andPERFORMING develops into a high-performing team. Team develops rules andNORMING expectations about how the team operates and who does what. Group attempts to work together;STORMING frustrations and disharmony may occur. Group is first put together;FORMING lack direction and unity.
  • High-Performance Leadership: Performance Expectations © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • High-Performance Leadership: From Control to EmpowermentPurpose:• Learn principles and practices of trust and interpersonal communication that result in win-win relationships. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • High-Performance Leadership: From Control to Empowerment (cont)Objectives:• Recognize yourself as a leader.• Understand the practices of empowering leaders.• Commit to lead “from the balcony.”• Find balance among the five leadership roles.• Improve personal productivity and use of time.• Understand the fundamentals of teams and leadership within a team environment.• Establish clear performance expectations and develop the ability to confront poor performance.• Become a leader who empowers others. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Section Seven: Performance ExpectationsIn this module you will:• Learn to confront behavior that fails to meet your expectations.• Understand the importance of discipline and conformity in building high performance.• Develop a set of non-negotiables for those whom you lead.• Practice the skill of harnessing harmful behavior.• Apply the skill to back-home situations. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Rules of Play: Three Attitudes1. Chaos• An interpersonal attitude of alienation and noncompliance3. High Performance• An interpersonal attitude of high trust and collaboration2. Stability• An interpersonal attitude of conformity and compliance © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Rules of Play: Three Attitudes ExamplesExamples:• The conduct of one person is dragging down the performance of other team members.• A negative attitude is adversely affecting performance.• A person has violated company policies or procedures in a way that could cause harm or reduce productivity.• Job performance is below expected standards.• Chronic problems such as wasting time, being inefficient, blaming or “playing games” are interfering with performance. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Non-Negotiables Examples• Follow the one-piece flow system.• Be cross-trained in different functions.• Arrive at work on time and remain in work areas except during breaks.• Treat others with respect.• Comply with dress code. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Non-Negotiables Examples (cont)• Use safety gloves, goggles, and shoes when working with chemicals.• Report dangerous conditions or actions.• Keep your work area clean.• Share team roles and responsibilities.• Participate in team meetings and help solve team problems.• Know how to read and fill out all production reports. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Harnessing Harmful BehaviorHarnessing is a skill we use under two conditions:1. We are in a position of authority with the recipient.2. The individual’s behavior is out of line or harmful to themselves and/or others. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Harnessing Harmful Behavior(cont)Steps:1. State directly and specifically what you see happening.2. State the consequences and your concerns about what you see happening.3. Invite and listen to comments. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Harnessing Harmful Behavior(cont)Steps:4. If necessary, review your expectations regarding the behavior and/or provide needed information and training.5. Ask for a commitment to improve the behavior.6. Acknowledge and let the person know that you appreciate the commitment. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • High-Performance Leadership:Empowering Others for Success © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • High-Performance Leadership: From Control to EmpowermentPurpose:• Provide leaders with tools and skills to change their behavior from the traditional practices of controlling and directing to coaching, facilitating, and empowering. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • High-Performance Leadership: From Control to EmpowermentObjectives:• Recognize yourself as a leader.• Understand the practices of empowering leaders .• Commit to lead “from the balcony.”• Find balance among the five leadership roles.• Improve personal productivity and use of time.• Understand the fundamentals of teams and leadership within a team environment.• Establish clear performance expectations and develop the ability to confront poor performance.• Become a leader who empowers others. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Section Eight: Empowering Others For SuccessSection Eight: Empowering Others For successIn this Section, you will:• Realize the difference between commitment and compliance motivation.• Understand how leadership changes to create commitment.• Recognize the four principles of empowerment.• Identify the elements of empowerment.• Complete a matrix for identifying what people need in order to be empowered.• Adopt a dialogue to transfer power to others.• Craft a model of situational leadership. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Facts About the American Workforce• 96% of employees recently surveyed believe that they cannot attain their personal career goals in their current positions.• 53% of managers report not being happy with their jobs.• 74% of Americans identified work as the main cause of their stress. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Compliance to Commitment Traditional Management Empowering Leadership From Directing and Doing To Developing and Leading•Solving it: “answer man” •Facilitating problem solving•Doing it yourself: “If you want •Effective delegationsomething done right...” •Helping others learn from mistakes•Over-directing and micro-managing •Providing leadership for the goal setting process•Arbitrarily mandating goals •Developing technical confidence•Exerting it: “You can’t do it without capability: “You can do it”me.” •Being a quality coach•Being the quality judge and jury •Supporting as a helpful resource•Playing the “god” role •Linking team to broader•Protecting turf organization systems; bridging•Over-dependence on detailed barrierspolicies •Being tough and clear about a few key directions and principles © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Principles of Empowerment1. Share information widely so people realize what is going on.2. Let people solve problems when and where they occur (instead of coming to you).3. Let those who have to implement a decision participate in making that decision.4. Expand the scope of what people do through designated roles and responsibilities. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Sharing ResponsibilityThe Process of Empowerment © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Elements of Empowerment1. Role description: The first thing that people need is a definition of the responsibilities they will assume.2. Boundary conditions: What should the parameters for people to fulfill their responsibilities be? These include:• Expectations/results can be qualitative or quantitative.• Non-negotiables define limits that cannot be crossed in fulfilling a responsibility. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Elements of Empowerment (cont)• Authority is the level of autonomy that one has in carrying out a task. There are five levels of authority, and just how each one depends on experience and capability.• Level 1: Act when directed.• Level 2: Act after approval.• Level 3: Act after consultation.• Level 4: Act and report.• Level 5: Act autonomously. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Elements of Empowerment (cont)• Time guidelines are any time constraints that guide the task (milestone events, project completion, length of time a person assumes a role, etc.).3. Knowledge and information: People must have knowledge and access to information if they are to take on additional responsibilities.4. Skills: People need additional training and skills to be successful with new responsibilities. For example, they may need to learn how to read a budget or enter data into a computer. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Elements of Empowerment (cont)5. Resources: These can include tools and equipment as well as reports, technical experts, etc.6. Support: Support is emotional and psychological. It is letting people know that you trust their ability to handle a task; it is okay for them to make mistakes and come to you for advice. © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC
  • Making Empowerment HappenAssessing Readiness•Importance of the task•Maturity and experience of the individual•Willingness of the individual to take on more responsibility•Your confidence in the person’s abilities © Copyright 2010 360Solutions, LLC