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Over the past 18 months, we’ve had numerous conversations with sales leaders wanting to adopt an insight-led approach to selling. Through these conversations, it is very clear that there is ...

Over the past 18 months, we’ve had numerous conversations with sales leaders wanting to adopt an insight-led approach to selling. Through these conversations, it is very clear that there is confusion over how insights come to life in a sales situation. Some of the
people with whom we’ve spoke have the impression that an insight is communicated through a presentation. We believe that there may be situations where that is the case,
but the more likely case will be for an insight to be communicated in a sales conversation. This is important not only because a sales conversation requires a different skill set but also because it requires a different mindset.

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Please shut up. I am trying to share an insight Presentation Transcript

  • 1. © 2014 Richardson. All Rights Reserved. Please Shut Up. I am Trying to Share an Insight By Dario Priolo, Richardson
  • 2. © 2014 Richardson. All Rights Reserved. What is an Insight? 1 There is confusion over how insights come to life in a sales situation Some of the people with whom we’ve spoke have the impression that an insight is communicated through a presentation We believe that there may be situations where that is the case, but the more likely case will be for an insight to be communicated in a sales conversation The sales conversation requires a different skill set but also it requires a different mindset
  • 3. © 2014 Richardson. All Rights Reserved. 2 In reality, your buyer will have questions and possibly doubts about your point of view. As buyers, the notion of someone trying to “sell” to us puts us on the defensive… THE REAL CHALLENGE TAKES PLACE FACE-TO-FACE IN FRONT OF THE CUSTOMER Why are Insights so Tough? This doesn’t mean that your sellers can’t trigger new thinking or ideas, build credibility, add value, and eventually sell something, but sellers must be sensitive to how buyers process information, manage through resistance, and keep the buyer tracking with their point of view
  • 4. © 2014 Richardson. All Rights Reserved. Telling Isn’t Teaching When you train your sellers to deliver insight through a presentation-led approach, you risk putting them into a “telling” mindset. Being in that frame of mind exposes the seller to two significant risks: 1. The first risk is that they are so focused on delivering their pitch that they miss signals that the buyer has questions or isn’t tracking with them. I’ve personally observed sales reps shut down a buyer in the critical early stages of their commercial teaching pitch, effectively asking them to shut up for 20 minutes until they finish talking. 2. The second risk is that the insight isn’t very insightful for the buyer. Telling Isn’t Teaching
  • 5. © 2014 Richardson. All Rights Reserved. 4 It is helpful to think of a customer conversation as a pendulum, and through the course of the conversation, the pendulum swings between asking questions, listening, and sharing insight. There are times in that conversation where you will want to lead with questions, such as when you need to sell understanding or seek confirmation. Then, there are times in the conversation where you lead with an insight, such as when you want to seed new ideas or influence thinking. And of course it is necessary to listen for both verbal and nonverbal cues. Sellers must draw on the right skills at the right time, depending on what you know (or don’t know) and how the buyer responds through the discussion. When You Think Insights think Conversations Not Presentations CONSULTATIVE SELLING SKILLS Question-Led Dialogue • Seek understanding • Seek confirmation RICHARDSON SELLING WITH INSIGHTS™ Insight-led Dialogue • Influence thinking • Seed new ideas
  • 6. © 2014 Richardson. All Rights Reserved. How to Position Your Insight When the Time is Right 5 When the opportunity presents itself to position an insight, we believe that the seller should first start by floating the issue to the buyer and then checking with an open-ended question to test for support. For example, the seller could say something like, “Here’s a challenge that we’ve seen with clients similar to you. What have you considered so far to address this challenge?” Then, if the buyer responds favorably, the seller can dive deeper into their insight, continuing to check along the way to ensure that the buyer is tracking and addressing questions or concerns along the way.
  • 7. © 2014 Richardson. All Rights Reserved. This conversational approach has many advantages over presenting a canned commercial teaching pitch: 1. It gives the seller an early out if the concept won’t fly with the buyer. There are many reasons why a buyer might not even entertain your idea, so why waste valuable time trying to push that issue? 2. Checking along the way helps the seller keep the buyer on track with new thinking. 3. Finally, by asking questions, the seller gathers more and better information from the buyer. This enables the seller to tailor the delivery of the insight message for even more relevance as the conversation evolves. 6 Advantages of Sharing Insights
  • 8. © 2014 Richardson. All Rights Reserved. Thank You • Thank you for viewing this slide share • If you have any feedback or comments, or would like to learn more about Richardson’s award winning sales training products and services, please e-mail me at jim.brodo@richardson.com • You can also connect with me at: LinkedIn - www.linkedin.com/in/jimbrodo/ Twitter - @Richardsonsales Join our blog – http://blogs.richardson.com.com Call us – 215-940-9255 7