Benei avraham cmj 130913a

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Powerpoint presentation at 200th Anniversary celebration of the Beni Abraham

Audio and slides for 200th anniversary of the Beni Abraham, 41 Jewish believers in Jesus who met as a community in the East End of London, forerunners of the British and International Messianic Jewish Alliances, and the modern movement of Messianic Judaism

http://blog.mappingmessianicjewishtheology.eu/post/61099297013/beni-abraham-slides-and-audio

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  • Oak Hill Cemetery PontiacOakland CountyMichigan, USAPlot: Section 1 Lot 076Birth: Sep. 21, 1771Bavaria (Bayern), GermanyDeath: Jun. 5, 1850PontiacOakland CountyMichigan, USAFamily links: Children: Mary Frey Webber (1822 - 1903)*
  • M.L.R. 1812/2/317; G.L.R.O., THCS 447; below, list of churches (Episcopal Jews' chap.).Bethnal Green Hospital, London was originally an infirmary built by the Board of Guardians of the Parish of St Matthew, Bethnal Green, and opened in 1900. It was built on a site once part of Bishop Hall Farm, and leased in 1811 by William Sotheby to the London Society for Promoting Christianity amongst the Jews. The site was renamed Palestine Place and became the centre of the Society's activities in London. The foundation stone of a Chapel (later known as the Episcopal Jews Chapel) was laid in 1813 and in the following years schools for boys and girls and 14 houses were built.
  • Parisot, Mr. A. Saul, Mr. A. Hirschfield, Mr. M. Marcus, Treasurer, Mr. D. A. Borrens- tein, Secretary p. The Committee's comments upon this perform ance soar even higher in the regions of spirituality. Having detailed the above particulars in their Monthly Gazetteer, they proceed — " Do the annals of history present us with such an interesting scene as this meeting afforded ? What may we expect as the result of forty Jews assembling together in the name of Jesus Christ, and offering supplications to heaven for their Jewish brethren ? Surely it may be considered as the first fruits of a glorious harvest. How must the angels rejoice at a little company of Jews," (with Mr. Frey their President,) " of one heart and one mind, returning again to their Father's house ? and how readily does He who wept over Jerusalem stretch out his hand to receive his long lost sheep ! A moment's reflection will con vince both Jews and Christians of the important advantages likely to result from this Institution'!!!" This is put forth in the Committee's editorial character. In their own persons as Committee men they officially resume the subject, (Mr. Trey's delinquency, let it be recollected, having been officially before them,) and in a more confident and still loftier strain they pronounce " the ex istence of the Society to be a fact in the history of the Christian Church, of which there has probably been no other example since the Apostolic age; and " they are led," they say, " to recognize, in the extraordinary circum stance, the incohate accomplishment of that gracious promise of the eternal covenant, ' I will pour out upon the house of Israel the spirit of prayer and supplication' .' " There are no circumstances which could possibly belong to any institution in its infancy, which would warrant such anticipations and references as these : and least of all to an institution so constituted as that to which they are here applied : for over and above the develope- ment which has been already made of the Pre-sident's infamy, the characters of the other chief confessors, and their devotional exercises, are delineated by one of the Society's confidential officers who was himself privy to all that he has recorded, and the exhibition is so dis gustingly profligate, that the depravity of it is almost past belief \ Such then are the specified results of the Com mittee's exertions and expenditure for the three Fnmittee's exertions and expenditure for the three ' The witness here referred to is Mr.Goakman, who was superintendant of the London Society's printing-office from July 1810; and from 1813 carrried on that concern in the roof of the Jews Chapel — the grand receptacle, as already in timated, for converts ; so that both the individuals, and all that transpired within that edifice, were under his constant in spection. The author had extracted from his pamphlet sketches of the picked proselytes placed at the head of the above devotional institution. But on reconsidering the points to be proved by these nauseous details, viz. the utter rvorthlessness of the parties, to whose attiring in the garb of sanctity religion is here made to truckle, and the shameless abuse of public bounty in consuming it upon them — they have appeared to him sufficiently established without the intended recital. He, therefore, gladly excuses himself from soiling his pages with the transcript, and refers his readers to the passages as follow: — Goakman's London Society Examined, pp. 36 — 39. 56. 60 — 62. Sailman's Mystery Unfolded, pp. 42 — 49. See also the Observer newspaper of Aug. 31st, 1817 ; where the last scene (as it is presumed) of Mr.Joscphson's career is recorded, viz. his arrest at Oxford for passing forged notes, and the discovery of a religious book full of them in the seat of the gig in which he travelled. years included in the present period : in aug mentation of which, like their predecessors, they claim credit for " many interesting circumstances, which, however it may be regret ted by the public, they still consider it a boun- den duty, from motives of delicacy to individuals, and with a view to the future advantage of the Society, to pass over in silence '." And there are further expectations and earnest hopes, with re spect both to the Chapel, and the New Testament in pure Biblical Hebrew — that " the congregation of Jews at the former may increase as the Society becomes consolidated u ; " and that the latter, which, " if its dispersion be realized, will be one of the most remarkable occurrences of the present times, may, in the divine counsels, be the appointed means of removing the vail which has so long covered the hearts of the ancient people of God \" No funds, however, could support the wanton waste of money which the Committee either sanctioned or connived at. More than one fourth of the whole sum raised was consumed in keeping in motion the machinery of the in stitution y. Another fourth was squandered upon adult Jews and Jewesses, under the pro- cesss of conversion, either in providing them with labour which turned to no account, or in supporting them without it". The Chapel at 
  • Our final stop is on the corner of Brick Lane and Fournier Street. It is a large rectangular brick building that was constructed in 1742 and was once home to the NeuveEglise Huguenot church. In the 1880s it was used as a missionary centre and then became the main Wesleyan Methodist Chapel of East London. When the Jews became the dominant immigrant community in the area it was purchased and rechristened the Spitialfields Great Synagogue, or, MachzikeHadass (Upholders of Faith).[7] When most of the Jews had left the area it was sold and is now the current location of the London Jamme Masjid Mosque. The large sundial on the Fournier Street side is original to the building and has remained there throughout the buildings history. This inscription says Umbra Sumus, which means ‘we are shadows’ in Latin.Frey’s narrative p 125, 11th Ed 1834NEW-YORKPRINTED FOR THE AUTHOR. SOLD BY- J. K. MOORE, CLINTON HALL.D. FANSHAW,>&INTeR.
  • 59 Brick Lane, corner Fournier St, was a plain but quite elegant, rectangular dark brick building with tall arched windows. Even in a heavily built up street like Brick Lane, natural light could flood into the spaces inside. The building was described as having 2 storeys with a plain band between floors, 6 windows with red brick gauged arches and stone keys, recessed windows, a central Palladian window with semi-circular headed windows at sides (1st floor) and 4 segmental headed windows on the ground floor. How was this building used over the centuries?The first community to use 59 Brick Lane were the recently arrived Frenchmen. The Huguenot community built La NeuveEglise as a Protestant Church in 1743, along with a small school. As these Calvinists worked hard and prospered, some of them could afford to build large and handsome Georgian houses around Brick Lane, with glass-ceilinged workshops in the attics, where they set up their weaving looms. They didn’t forget their religious values either. In 1700, there were nine French churches in Spitalfields, although by the end of two generations of English born Huguenots, the French-speaking community was clearly being assimilated through inter-marriage.The next group to use 59 Brick Lane were a different people. The London Society for Promoting Christianity Among the Jews used The Jews’ Chapel, as they called the building in 1809, to encourage the physical restoration of the Jewish people to the Land of Israel and to encourage the Hebrew Christian Messianic movement. The Society only lasted for one decade in Brick Lane.
  • Parisot, Mr. A. Saul, Mr. A. Hirschfield, Mr. M. Marcus, Treasurer, Mr. D. A. Borrens- tein, Secretary p. The Committee's comments upon this perform ance soar even higher in the regions of spirituality. Having detailed the above particulars in their Monthly Gazetteer, they proceed — " Do the annals of history present us with such an interesting scene as this meeting afforded ? What may we expect as the result of forty Jews assembling together in the name of Jesus Christ, and offering supplications to heaven for their Jewish brethren ? Surely it may be considered as the first fruits of a glorious harvest. How must the angels rejoice at a little company of Jews," (with Mr. Frey their President,) " of one heart and one mind, returning again to their Father's house ? and how readily does He who wept over Jerusalem stretch out his hand to receive his long lost sheep ! A moment's reflection will con vince both Jews and Christians of the important advantages likely to result from this Institution'!!!" This is put forth in the Committee's editorial character. In their own persons as Committee men they officially resume the subject, (Mr. Trey's delinquency, let it be recollected, having been officially before them,) and in a more confident and still loftier strain they pronounce " the ex istence of the Society to be a fact in the history of the Christian Church, of which there has probably been no other example since the Apostolic age; and " they are led," they say, " to recognize, in the extraordinary circum stance, the incohate accomplishment of that gracious promise of the eternal covenant, ' I will pour out upon the house of Israel the spirit of prayer and supplication' .' " There are no circumstances which could possibly belong to any institution in its infancy, which would warrant such anticipations and references as these : and least of all to an institution so constituted as that to which they are here applied : for over and above the develope- ment which has been already made of the Pre-sident's infamy, the characters of the other chief confessors, and their devotional exercises, are delineated by one of the Society's confidential officers who was himself privy to all that he has recorded, and the exhibition is so dis gustingly profligate, that the depravity of it is almost past belief \ Such then are the specified results of the Com mittee's exertions and expenditure for the three Fnmittee's exertions and expenditure for the three ' The witness here referred to is Mr.Goakman, who was superintendant of the London Society's printing-office from July 1810; and from 1813 carrried on that concern in the roof of the Jews Chapel — the grand receptacle, as already in timated, for converts ; so that both the individuals, and all that transpired within that edifice, were under his constant in spection. The author had extracted from his pamphlet sketches of the picked proselytes placed at the head of the above devotional institution. But on reconsidering the points to be proved by these nauseous details, viz. the utter rvorthlessness of the parties, to whose attiring in the garb of sanctity religion is here made to truckle, and the shameless abuse of public bounty in consuming it upon them — they have appeared to him sufficiently established without the intended recital. He, therefore, gladly excuses himself from soiling his pages with the transcript, and refers his readers to the passages as follow: — Goakman's London Society Examined, pp. 36 — 39. 56. 60 — 62. Sailman's Mystery Unfolded, pp. 42 — 49. See also the Observer newspaper of Aug. 31st, 1817 ; where the last scene (as it is presumed) of Mr.Joscphson's career is recorded, viz. his arrest at Oxford for passing forged notes, and the discovery of a religious book full of them in the seat of the gig in which he travelled. years included in the present period : in aug mentation of which, like their predecessors, they claim credit for " many interesting circumstances, which, however it may be regret ted by the public, they still consider it a boun- den duty, from motives of delicacy to individuals, and with a view to the future advantage of the Society, to pass over in silence '." And there are further expectations and earnest hopes, with re spect both to the Chapel, and the New Testament in pure Biblical Hebrew — that " the congregation of Jews at the former may increase as the Society becomes consolidated u ; " and that the latter, which, " if its dispersion be realized, will be one of the most remarkable occurrences of the present times, may, in the divine counsels, be the appointed means of removing the vail which has so long covered the hearts of the ancient people of God \" No funds, however, could support the wanton waste of money which the Committee either sanctioned or connived at. More than one fourth of the whole sum raised was consumed in keeping in motion the machinery of the in stitution y. Another fourth was squandered upon adult Jews and Jewesses, under the pro- cesss of conversion, either in providing them with labour which turned to no account, or in supporting them without it". The Chapel at 
  • If you want to compare the value of a £1 0s 0d Income or Wealth , in 1810 there are three choices. In 2011 the relative: historic standard of living value of that income or wealth is £58.22economic status value of that income or wealth is £852.60economic power value of that income or wealth is £3,045.00http://www.measuringworth.com/ukcompare/relativevalue.php
  • Judaism Excelled: Or, The Tale of a Conversion from Judaism to Christianity: Being the Autobiography of Jonas Abraham DavisJonas Abraham Davis - 1 January 1870Wagenseller - Publisher
  • Norris 41 “who, after a variety of vicissitude, which the comm
  • The baptism of Hyam Burn Isaacs, son of Isaac Isaacs of Ipswich (where the latter's father too had resided) at the age of 16 in 1810, attracted much attention and even led to legal proceedings.(v)
  • rcus' Latin Grammar. A Latin Grammar. By the Rev. LEWIS MARCUS, M.A., Queen's College, Cambidge, In- cumbent of St. Paul's, Finsbury, and formerly Head Master of the Grammar School, Holbeach. 12mo. 2s. 6d. cloth. Marcus' Elementary Latin. A Delectus of Progressive Exercises in Construing and Composition, adapted to the Rules of Syntax. By the Rev. L. MARCUS, M.A., Author of 'A Latin Grammar.' 12mo. 2s. 6d. cloth. 1851 England CensusUK CENSUS COLLECTIONView Image NAME: Lewis MarcusSPOUSE: Catherine MarcusBIRTH: abt 1804 - London, EnglandRESIDENCE: 1851 - St Luke Old Street, Middlesex, England
  • Moses Marcus - The village is 8 miles (13 km) north-west of the town ofNorthampton and 18 miles (29 km) south-east of the city ofLeicester, along the A5199, formerly designated as the A50trunk road. The road is known as Welford Road in the village and runs along the top of the ridge on which the village stands giving it extensive views east and west. About 5 miles (8 km) north on the road the A5199 connects with the A14 trunk road, a dual carriageway connecting the M1 and M6 motorways from the Catthorpe Interchange with Kettering, Cambridge, Ipswichand the port of Felixstowe. no title]  B(HH)/45  6 Aug [1821]http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/a2a/records.aspx?cat=154-bhh&cid=-1#-1 TypeordinationDate24/2/1819PlaceMiddlesexChurchWelbeck ChapelClerical StatusdeaconLetters DimissoryNoBaptized 'Scots Church Swallow Street London June 10th. 1810, Mr. Marcus being then 15 years old'ordination Date12/12/1819PlaceNorwichChurchNorwich CathedralClerical StatuspriestLetters DimissoryNoLicensingDate6/8/1821Office/StatusCurateClerical Status LocationSt Sepulchre Northampton//LicensingDate9/7/1823Office/StatusCurateClerical Status LocationBrigstock with Stanion//TitleA Third Letter to the Parishioners of St. Sepulchre, Northampton, in Answer to the Late Publication of the Rev. Mr. Butcher, in the Northampton MercuryAuthorMoses MarcusPublisherauthor, 1822Length33 pagesSubjectsClergyFraud  Contents:TJ, to Clara BosworthHe hopes she continues to enjoy the view from the hill at Blackheath. He asks where her doctor recommends moving her to. His own health has been indifferent since he returned from Kent.Mr Shirley has helped take his services at Creaton and has preached at Spratton. His son has been ordained.Moses Marcus, who was a pupil of Mr T. Fry, is now licensed as the curate of St.Sepulchre.[no title]  B(HH)/46  29 Aug 1821Contents:TJ, to Clara Bosworth at Mr Dale's, Chiselhurst, KentHe is glad to hear of her health. 'May God perfect what he has so mercifully begun ...' etc.Frank Lucas has, 'become decidedly serious' and studies the scriptures. 'He went to hear D. Wilson and Mr Noel and become intimately acquainted with very pious young lawyers ...' 'His concern for the salvation of his relations is remarkable.His poor father was greatly allarmed and enraged at what had taken place in him ...' Sarah is as earnest as her brother.'The gospel is now faithfully preached in two of the churches at Northampton'. Mr Barber is nominated by Mr Tuffnel for the All Saints curacy.Mr Butcher, an attorney, has purchased St. Sepulchre and presented his son who has appointed Moses Marcus, 'a converted Jew' as Curate. The Bishop's arrangements for him have enraged Butcher, but Marcus, following a petition by parishioners, has been confirmed by licence for 3 years. [Mr Butcher - Edward Robert Butcher, afterwards Pemberton, was Vicar between 1821 and 1822. Marcus does not appear in Isham-Longden or Serjeantson] A Letter to the Parishioners of St. Sepulchre, Northampton, Respecting the Fraud which Has Been Committed in a Testimonial to the Bishop of the Diocese: And Proving that the Guilt Does Not Attach to the Writer of this LetterPublisherauthor, 1822Length35 pages A Second Letter to the Parishioners of St. Sepulchre, Northampton, Respecting the Fraud which Has Been Committed in a Testimonial to the Bishop of the Diocese:With Appendix, in Answer to Some Other Charges A Letter to the Parishioners of St. Sepulchre, Northampton, Respecting the Fraud which Has Been Committed in a Testimonial to the Bishop of the Diocese: And Proving that the Guilt Does Not Attach to the Writer of this LetterAuthorMoses MarcusPublisherauthor, 1822Length35 pages   A Third Letter to the Parishioners of St. Sepulchre, Northampton, in Answer to the Late Publication of the Rev. Mr. Butcher, in the Northampton Mercury TitlePolitico-clerical Oppression: The Consequence of Loyal & Disinterested Conduct : an Appeal to the British Public on Behalf of the Rev. M. Marcus ...AuthorMoses MarcusPublisherMarshall, 1821Length24 pages 
  • Phoebe Sane – David Aaronson
  • PHOEBE BORRENSTEIN, Theft > grand larceny, 18th September 1820.Reference Number: t18200918-54Offence: Theft > grand larcenyVerdict: Not GuiltyRelated Material: Associated RecordsCorrections: Add a correctionActions: Cite this text | Print-friendly versionSee original Click to see original953. PHOEBE BORRENSTEIN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July , two gold rings, value, 14 s. , the goods of William Mott .MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.WILLIAM MOTT . I am a jeweller , and live in Bishopsgate-street . On the 27th of July, about five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to my shop, and asked to see some wedding rings. I handed her three cards containing six gold rings each. On turning to shut the sash, I observed she had taken the six rings off one card, sat down, and shot all six into her lap - she had taken her gloves off. I observed a gilt ring, and a paste half-hoop on her hand, both on the same finger - she took them off, and fitted one of my gold rings on - one of them fitted her. She asked the price of putting a posey to it, and said she would write it. I gave her some paper, and she wrote"Love till death." She put six rings on the card, laying them loosely altogether. She then took up a second card of broader rings, and said that she should like a broader one - it was not for herself, but a young friend. On her taking up that card I begged of her to allow me to detach them, as I had observed her detach the others in an unpleasant way. I had observed that she had mixed her gilt ring with my gold ones. She paid no attention to me, butSee original Click to see originalstripped them off into her lap, and kept fitting them on her finger one after another, and at the same time asked me what I would take to mount the paste ring in fine gold, and if I would shew her some patterns; which I declined doing at that moment. I withdrew the third card, and laid it on the back counter - they had not been touched. She gathered the rings upon her lap, and put them on the second card as before, saying that none of them fitted her, and observing I had withdrew the third card, she wished to see it. I then told her there was one exchanged on the first card, and that one was missing from the second. I had only put the rings on the cards on the Friday preceding, and I am certain there was no gilt ring upon it when I handed it to her - it could not miss my eye for a moment if it had been so - it would be as conspicious to the eye of a jeweller, as black from white. I am also certain, no gilt ring was on the second. Miss Ballard was in the shop purchasing a ring, before she came in, and remained there - she did not touch either of the cards. The prisoner, as though not regarding what I had said about the ring being missed, put her hand into her basket, and took out of her handkerchief a 1 l. note making no reply to what I had said. At this moment another Lady came in, and wished to see some pearl and amethyst rings. I shewed her three, neither of them were the size - I begged her to call again on her requesting to see the tray, as I was particularly engaged at that time, and the prisoner said she could not wait. I have not seen that lady since. On her withdrawing she took the prisoner's basket; she had got to the door when the prisoner turned round, and said"Ma'am you have taken my basket!" - she returned the basket. The prisoner then went to the counter, and said if I would take ten shillings worth of halfpence, she would call again in a few moments - that was for the ring which fitted her.Q. Did she give any reason why you was to take halfpence - A. Not the slightest. I told her I must consider that a mere pretence for leaving the shop, for there was a ringmissing, and I thought as she had a 1 l. note, the best way would be for her to pay for it, and leave the shop. She said she did not know any thing about a ring being missing, and she certainly did not take it. I said if she wished me to consider her a customer, she should pay for the ring - as she had a note, and I had plenty of change. She said, she did not wish me to think she came to steal a ring - she would pay for the ring. I gave her 10 s. out of a 1 l. note. I then endeavoured to convince her there was a ring missing, by delivering her that which fitted her, and shewing her there were but four in the card. She said she had not taken it - I said I had no proof of that, and was alone in the house, and could get no proof of it; otherwise I did not doubt, but I should find it on her. I requested her to leave the shop - she said she had no objection to be searched, if I thought she had got it. I said I had no one to search her, and desired her to leave - she said I had grossly insulted her, and her husband should come and see her righted. I understood her husband's name was Collinson - I saw him at the Mansion-house, and found it was Borrenstein.Q. She said her husband should see her righted - A. Yes, I begged her not to interrupt me in my business and leave - I would put up with the loss. She then began to be violent, saying it was a shame I should charge her with taking a ring. I begged Miss Ballard to call in Mr. Nicholson, a neighbour - he came immediately, and said I had better let her go about her business. I said she insisted on being searched - she then said to him, that she wished to be searched - I believe she had loosened part of her dress; she came forward, and said Mr. Mott accuses me of taking a ring, and putting her hand upon the counter placed a gilt ring there, and said"Here is the ring." I am confident that before that there was no ring upon the counter - I then found it was a gilt one, and said"Ma'am this is not the ring, this is a gilt one" - that was a second gilt ring. I had no gilt rings near that spot. I have only a few in the shop, and they are very old, and are kept upon a wire in a drawer. I am certain that ring was not upon either of the cards in her possession - I had shewn her none. Mr. Nicholson then said I had been robbed and swindled too, and advised me to charge an officer with her, which I did. The officer proposed that Miss Ballard should search her; she went backward with her for that purpose - they returned, and Miss. Ballard said she believed she had nothing about her - the officer took her away. I think she first said she lived at Hackney, or that her friends lived there. She afterwards mentioned Blackfriars-road, and at the Compter she said John-street Blackfriars-road - I found she lodged there, and that her husband was a journeyman printer.Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. How many persons serve in your shop - A. One lad besides myself - I have had no servant this two or three months. Before this I had not shown those rings after they were carded.Q. She came as any other lady would - A. Yes, it was unusual for a lady to take them off the card, four of them might have been tried without detaching them. When she laid the rings upon the first card, there were still six, but one was a gilt one - she had put the one which fitted her upon the card with the others, and I put it aside. I wanted her to leave, but she continued to express her indignation at the charge.Q. She insisted on being attended to before the lady who came - A. I requested her to wait and she consented, but in a minute or two said she would not wait.Q. She might have kept a ring by mistake - A. That could not be, because a second was missing.MR. ADOLPLUS. Q. The first card had six rings, all gold - A. Yes; and she returned me but five gold and a metal one; and on the second card only five were returned.Q. Did she wish to be searched until the lady had left the shop - A. No, that lady had stood close to her side, their clothes might touch; the counter is about eighteen feet long. A metal ring was produced at the office as one found on her. This made a third metal ring.ANN BALLARD . I live in Baker's-buildings, Old Bedlam; I was in Mr. Mott's shop when the prisoner came in, I did not particularly direct my attention to her, but to the best of my recollection, she sat herself down in a chair by the counter, and asked for a wedding-ring for a friend of hers, who was going to be married. Mr. MottSee original Click to see originaltook three cards from the window and handed her two, she took the rings off the card into her lap, I think she slipped both cards and put them in her lap together, but my attention was not particularly fixed on her. When Mr. Mott said he missed a ring, she said she did not take it, and the ring she fixed on she would pay for; she took a 1 l. note out of a handkerchief, and said she would go and fetch 10 s. worth of half-pence; that she was going to get it a little way from his shop, and would be back soon. Mr. Mott said he had plenty of silver, and would accommodate her with change. A lady came in and asked to see a ring which was in the window, it did not fit her. Mr. Mott said he should have a variety to-morrow, and as she was going out she took up the prisoner's basket, when she got to the door, the prisoner observed it - she had not been in the shop above ten minutes, and stood next to the prisoner - the prisoner got her basket again. Mr. Mott immediately said he missed two gold rings, and two base ones were substituted for them; she said she did not take them, and it was unknown to her, and requested to be searched. Mr. Mott said he had no female in the house. I afterwards assisted in searching her. I found nothing on her, and she was afterwards given in charge.Cross-examined. Q. She denied it, and behaved as an innocent woman would - A. Certainly. She took her gown and stays off, and shook them; I did not touch her clothes, nor did the maid who was with me.JOSEPH GREGORY . I am a constable; I took the prisoner to the Compter in a coach with Mr. Mott; I found a metal ring in the palm of her hand, in her glove, besides a gold and paste one, which she had on her finger. She was endeavouring to shuffle it down.MR. MOTT. I missed the gold ring, and found a metal one substituted for it before the other woman came into the shop; I missed one from the second card; I could not mistake them for gold rings for a moment, one is rather broader, which matches the second card, but it could not impose on a tradesman for a moment. The other woman did not touch the cards.Prisoner's Defence. I hope you will take my much injured case into your consideration. I went with intent to purchase a wedding ring, having unfortunately lost my own. I met my father in Old-street-road, on the Saturday before, and told him of the accident, he expressed his sorrow, and it being too late, and not being provided with sufficient money, he said I had better leave it till next week, and I bought a gilt ring as a substitute. On the following week, as I was going to my father's at Hackney, I called at the shop of Mr. Mott, when this unfortunate circumstance took place. I hope you will be satisfied I am not a person of that description.SAMUEL AARON . I am the prisoner's father, she is married; she told me she had lost her ring, and I observed she had none on her finger; I know she bought a metal one as a substitute. This was on the Saturday.MR. MOTT. I believe she made this statement at the Mansion-House, but at my shop she said it was for another person.NOT GUILTY .London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.
  • http://libweb2.princeton.edu/rbsc2/exh-cat/(ExB)%200639.739%20no.%2031.pdf
  • But earlv in 1824 David A. Borrenstein opened an office, and with him printing returned to stay. The location of the Theological Seminary at Princeton, the interest of the times in religion, and the feverish activity of town and gown in dis- seminating religious reading matter had brightened immeasurably the business out- look for any prospective local press. And it will be observed that during his four busy years at Princeton, Mr. Borrensteinprinted scarcely anything outside of the religious field. At a period when America was being accused of abject intellectual subserviency to Great Britain, one looks in vain for a Princeton reprint of any of the masterpieces of English prose or poetry that were being read in America. Contemporary Princeton booksellers' ad- vertisements of new books are invariably 12 • > t limited to theological and controversial works, or to pietistic and devotional books, and the conclusion can hardly be evaded that if secular literature had any place in the community's reading it was scarcely through local dealers, and certainly not through local editions. On the other hand, it was the age of religious magazines and religious weeklies, and in this character- istic the age was amply reflected at Prince- ton. From the viewpoint of literature, life here must have been a grave matter in those days. Exactly when or how Mr. Borrensteincame to settle in Princeton has been im- possible to discover; but in May 1824 Dr. James W. Alexander could still speak of his press as a novelty to Princeton chil- dren, "great and small." That the new- comer received definite assurances of sup- port is clear not only from his own words; but from the character of the enterprises on which he immediately embarked. In July 1 824 he issued this notice : The subscriber having established a Printing Office in this place, under the immediate patronage of the Literary IS Gentlemen who reside here, takes this opportunity of respectfully soliciting the favours of his friends and the public gen- erally. He has furnished his Office with new and handsome Types, &c; and ven- tures to assure those who may confide to him the printing of works of any descrip- tion, that every effort and assiduit}^ will be used by him to execute the typographi- cal part with neatness and accuracy. Princeton, N.J. D. A. Borrenstein. July 182i. Already in May he had sent out pro- posals for publishing a weekly paper to be called the "Princeton Religious and Literary Gazette." No copy of this paper can be found, and it probably did not long survive its birth, for in April 1825 its printer began another weekly, the ^'American Journal of Letters, Christian- ity and Civil Affairs," edited bv the Rev- erend Robert Gibson, and published by T. Callaghan Gibson. Well printed though its four quarto pages were, its sixteen col- umns of heav}^ reading matter devoted to the promotion of education, religion, and public affairs, proved too solid an in- tellectual diet to win popularity or even 14 support, and some months later — in Janu- ary 1826 — appeared its successor, the "American Magazine of I^etters and Christianity/' a monthly octavo of sixty- eight pages, excellently printed, as usual, but containing more varied and general reading than its predecessor. Only four issues of this attractive looking periodical seem to have been saved ; and, indeed, it is doubtful whether any more were published. Discouraging though these failures must have been to their promoters, nevertheless they were steadily clearing the way for the "Biblical Repertory," which was to live and become famous under its more popular name the "Princeton Review." The newspaper ambition was however still alive in Borrenstein's mind, and in the summer of 1826, for a group of unnamed proprietors, he began the "New Jersey Patriot," a genuine political weekly news- paper at last, of four folio pages of five columns, and boasting the patronage of "a great number of the literary men of the state." For some reason Borrensteindropped out in the following April, and with difficulty another printer, A. E. Wer- 15 den^ was obtained ; but, three months later, he resumed his connection, and a new — and fatal — editorial policy was announced. The "Patriot" was to be less political and more literary, "religion, morality, letters and political science being entitled to the first consideration for the true patriot," as the announcement phrased it. But this admirable assertion did not elicit the en- thusiastic approval of subscribing pat- riots, true or otherwise; the semi-literary magazine quality, religious or secular, was evidently just what they did not want; and the "New Jersey Patriot" speedily joined the "Packet," the "Gazette," and the "Journal" in the haven of lost argo- sies. Meanwhile his newspaper and magazine projects had by no means monopolized the activities of Borrenstein's press. In Sep- tember 1824, he commenced the issue of "A Series of Tracts on Practical Religion, consisting of Selections from the Works of various Authors." These little pamph- lets were issued monthly^ forming for the year 1824-25 a first volume of two hun- dred and ninety-six pages, and for 1825- 16 26 a second volume of two hundred and ninety-five pages. The advertisement tells us that these tracts would be "to the pious both entertaining and useful/' and that it was the purpose of the printer to furnish "a neat volume" each year ; but, in spite of the spirit of the times, the tracts did not meet sufficient encouragement, and the series ended with the second volume. In no wise daunted, Borrenstein was ready with an- other project for giving the public edify- ing literature. In 1826 he issued two or three booklets illustrating his intention, should it meet with favor, "to print in regular succession all such small works on Practical Christianity as may be either nearly out of print, or which may be worth republishing from English editions." Ex- amples of these were Baxter's "Call to the Unconverted" (1826) and his "Saints' Rest" (1827), Alleine's "Solemn Warn- ings of the Dead" (1826), which gloomy work went into a second edition in 1828, Hannah More's "Sacred Dramas" (1826), and Grace Kennedy's "The Decision, or, Religion must be all, or is nothing" (1827). A distinctly more pretentious 17 work was a translation of Saurin's "Ser- mons" in two volumes (1827), with a beautifully engraved portrait of the author bv Durand. Another feature of this book was the rather clumsy printer's device on the titlepage — the initials D and B of en- twined grapevine tendrils, and surrounded by a wreath of nondescript foliage. At the same time, the Princeton Press, as Mr. Borrenstein called his office, was is- suing a constantly growing stream of ad- dresses and sermons, annual reports for local societies. College catalogues and pro- grammes, the catalogue of the Princeton Library Company (1825), venerable an- cestor of the twentieth century Public Li- brary, and special reprints, or new edi- tions, of standard works like Alexander's "Outlines of the Evidences of Christi- anity" and Paley's "Natural Theology;" and when Mr. S. J. Bayard of Princeton brought to the office the manuscript of his narrative poem "Mengwe" (1825), he gave Mr. Borrenstein the chance to put forth his prettiest piece of printing. But prob- ably the most interesting product of the Princeton Press, and decidedly the most 18 significant from an academic point of view, was Borrenstein's edition of the "Seven Against Thebes" by Aeschylus, the first classical text to bear a Princeton imprint, and one of the earliest American editions of the play. It was published "under the care and direction of the Senior Class of Nassau Hall,'* so the title-page tells us, and is worth noticing not only as a speci- men of early Princeton typography, but also because it is the fruitage of the first advanced classical work done bv Prince- • ton undergraduates. It was prepared un- der the supervision of Professor Robert Bridges Patton who had been elected in April 1825 to the chair of Languages at Princeton. A graduate of Yale in the class of 1817, he was one of that pioneer group of American students in Germany to which Everett and Bancroft belonged, and, taking the degree of Doctor of Phil- osophy at Gottingen in 1821, he was the first member of the Princeton faculty to hold a German degree. He at once in- troduced his graduate students and his advanced seniors to the methods of Ger- man scholarship, organizing along the 19 lines of a German seminar the "Philo- logical Society of Nassau Hall/* and plac- ing at their disposal^ in one of the rooms in Nassau Hall^ his private library of 1 500 volumes. In this room regular meetings were held until his resignation in 1829. His brief career — ^he died in 1839 — was one of enviable reputation and brightest promise. In December 1825, a month after his arrival in Princeton, he had delivered in the college chapel, before the Literary and Philosophical Society of New Jersey, a lecture on "Classical and National Educartion," which may be considered as his in- augural, and which was printed by Bor- renstein for the Society in 1826. In this lecture the reader, not too scornful to be curious of the beginnings of classical scholarship in Princeton, may find ideas stirring that seem to harbinger modern times, ideas even more plainly discernible in the Philological Society's list of its aims, printed in 1828 in the catalogue of its library* In 1827 Borrenstein added a new peri- odical to his record — ^the "New Jersey 20 « ' - Sabbath School Journal/* which ran into at least a third year, as the "New Jersey Sunday School Journal." Whatever one mav think of the content of Borrenstein's publications, at least it must be acknowledged that in form his work is usually pleasing; but his judg- ment failed him in the German New Tes- tament he printed in 1828. It is the most unattractive — as it is also one of the rarest — of his imprints. The copy in the Library of Princeton University is a duo- decimo on bluish grey paper with mottled edges, producing an effect that is the op- posite of artistic. The plates were stereo- typed in Philadelphia. For Messrs. G. and C. Carvill of New York he had printed in 1 827 a New Testa- ment in English, arranged by a student in the Seminary on what was then a novel plan, i.e., in paragraphs instead of verses and chapters. The notes and critical ap- paratus made this the most intricate piece of composition that the Princeton Press liad yet been called upon to do. But there remains to be noticed the jieriodical with whose mechanical begin- 21 ningsBorrenstein's name must always be associated. In 1825 Dr. Charles Hodge of Princeton Seminary formed the plan of issuing quarterly, under the name **The Biblical Repertory," a series of treatises or "dissertations principally in Biblical Literature." The field was unoccupied in America; and Dr. Hodge felt that the Presbyterian Church was falling behind the age in this kind of literature. "The difficulty of procuring books, or the disin- clination to read anything not written in our own language, has led to a lamenta- ble neglect of one interesting department of Theological Learning." The object of the proposed series was to give American students of divinity the benefits of modern English and German theological thought. The first three volumes of the "Repertory" were printed by Borrenstein. But four years* experiment led Dr. Hodge to con- clude that the time had not arrived when such a periodical could be adequately sup- ported in America ; and, beginning with the fifth volume (1829), a new series was started, with a change in the character of the magazine, whereby its scope was 22 broadened and it became more of a re- view of general religious thought, life, and literature. This is not the place to follow the history of the "Repertory" through the long cycle of changes in name and place and printer by which it at last came back to almost the identical spot where its first number was set up; that task has been done by many a librarian, and the desiccated record thereof may be found in the catalogue of any library lucky enough to possess the complete set. But it is pleasant, at least, to remember that it be- gan its life of almost four score years and ten in the humble printing-shop of David Borrenstein. Mr. Borrenstein drops out of the history of Princeton printing as suddenly and silently as he had entered it. His name appears in connection with the Princeton Press until the middle of 1828, and then without warning its place is taken by Wil- liam D*Hart, publisher, and Bernard Con- nolly and Hugh Madden, printers, names so bookishly promising that one cannot help regretting the absolute silence of lo- cal history as to the personalities of their 23 owners. Connolly seems to have left the firm in 1829, taking the Princeton Press imprint with him. Hugh Madden con- tinued to use the Borrenstein types, his most important issue being the first vol- ume in the new series of the ^'Repertory.*' He also covered most of the work for the College and Seminary during the next year or two, but after 1830 his name no longer appears. William D'Hart, who kept a stationery and book store where one could purchase almost anything from hair oil to "Chinese cement/' had been publishing in a small wav since 1827. For a brief time he seems to have been sole owner of a press, but in 1831 he joined forces with Connolly in taking up a new venture in local jour- nalism, the "Princeton Courier and Liter- ary Register/' a weekly which lived about four years under various editors, but with Connolly as printer. When the latter moved to Freehold in the late thirties the "Courier" went out of existence.
  • His father, Lewis Way (1772–1840), was the second son of Benjamin Way of Denham, and elder brother of Sir Gregory Holman Bromley Way.[1] Lewis Way graduated M.A. in 1796 from Merton College, Oxford, and in 1797 was called to the bar by the Society of the Inner Temple. He afterwards entered the church and devoted to religious works part of a large legacy left him by a stranger, named John Way. He founded the Marbœuf Chapel (English Protestant) in Paris, which was completed by Albert. He was active in schemes for the conversion of the Jews, but is said to have been taken advantage of by supposed converts who lodged in his house and absconded with his valuables, hence Thomas Macaulay's lines:Each, says the proverb, has his taste. 'Tis trueMarsh loves a controversy, Coates a play,Bennet a felon, Lewis Way a Jew,The Jew the silver spoons of Lewis Way.He was especially active in the London Society for Promoting Christianity amongst the Jews. At one point he allowed a number of young Jewish men, supposedly Christian converts, to lodge at his house, with a view to training them as missionaries. They responded to his kindness by running away with his valuables. It was this incident which lay behind the youthful verse by T. B. Macaulay:Each, says the proverb, has his taste.'Tis true Marsh loves a controversy, Coates a play, Bennet a felon, Lewis Way a Jew,The Jew the silver spoons of Lewis Way.(Trevelyan, 1.54)
  • Jacob Josephson, born 21 Apr 1782 in Breslau, Prussia (now Wroclaw Poland) and died 6 Dec 1845 in Marrickville Sydney, buried in St Peter’s Petersham was the son of Joseph Lazarus Josephson and Rachel Tachyczowski.Sentenced in Oxford England on 13 Oct 1817 to 14 years transportation for having stolen property and forged bank notes in his possesion.Listed as Hebrew Teacher, 5’ 4” with dark ruddy complexion, black hair and dark eyes.Jacob Josephson, one of 170 convicts transported on the Neptune, December 1817A silver smith and jeweller, he was also a teacher for the Society for the Propagation of Christanity to the Jews. He arrived in Sydney NSW on 15 May 1818 on the Neptune and in October 1818 open a jewellers shop in Pitt St Sydney and received a conditional pardon on the 30 Jun 1820. He was frequently involved in legal and bussines scandals, imprisoned in 1827 for bankruptcy he later became an inkeeper in Penrith and later Newcastle. He purchased Enmore House in 1841, it was built in 1835 by Captain Sylvester Brown, a master mariner with the East India Company, he wrote Robbery Under Arms under the name Rolf Bolderwood.A son of Jacob’s, Joshua Frey Josephson would later become the Mayor of Marrickville Sydney in 1901.Convict Changes HistoryEric Harry Daly on 1st January, 2013 made the following changes:date of birth 21st April, 1782, date of death 6th December, 1845, gender, occupation, crimeRobbery Under Arms is a classic Australian novel by Rolf Boldrewood (a pseudonym for Thomas Alexander Browne). It was first published in serialised form by The Sydney Mail between July 1882 and August 1883, then in three volumes in London in 1888. It was edited into a single volume in 1889 as part of Macmillan's Colonial Library series and has not been out of print since.It is considered to be one of the greatest Australian colonial novels, along with Marcus Clarke's For the Term of his Natural Life.Jacob Josephson (son of Joseph Lazarus Josephson and Rachel Tachyczowski) was born 21 April 1782 in Breslau, Germany(now Wroclaw Poland), and died 6 December 1845 in Marrickville Sydney, Australia. buried at St. Peters, Petersham. He married (3) Emma Moss on 1814 in Hamburg, Germany(Hanseatic League). Notes for Jacob Josephson:born 21 April 1782 in Breslau, Germany(now Wroclaw Poland), 29 at beniabraham foundationReligion: JewishOccupation: HouseholderResidence: Castlereagh Street, SydneyRef: J0955Jacob emigrated to Sydney from England in 15 May 1818, on the 'Neptune', sailed from Downs, England on 20 December, 1817(took 136 days)He was a successful jewellerSentenced Oxford for 14 years on 13 October,1817 for having stolen property in his possession(transported from UK for possessing "forged" banknotes)He had been living at 49 Ridings Mart, Hamborough.Listed as 'Hebrew Teacher'. 5' 4", dark ruddy complexion, black hair, dark eyes. Josephson was in fact 'a teacher of Hebrews' - an official of the Society for the Propagation of Christianity to the Jews Josephson opened a jeweller's shop 3 Pitt Street, Sydney, 3 October, 1818. Conditional Pardon granted 30 June 1820. Frequently involved in legal and business scandals,Josephson was an active member of the Methodist Church and a well-known Sydney character.Imprisoned in 1827 for bankruptcy. Later an innkeeper at Penrith and at Newcastle(1831). Active in affairs of the Sydney Theatre Royal following the death of his son-in-law(1838).Gave 10 pounds to York Street, Synagogue in 1845Aged 72 when he died.Enmore House and grounds, comprising 9 acres(3.6 ha.), was purchased by Jacob Josephson in August 1841. Josephson died at Enmore House in 1845 and his son, Joshua Frey Josephson, inherited the property.Denomination: Church of EnglandParish: Cook's River(St Peter's), PetershamVolume reference for Jacob's death is V1845693 30B; reg. no: 0
  • Jacob Josephson was born in Breslau, Prussia in 1774 and is first known to have worked as a silversmith in Hamburg. In the early years of the nineteenth century he moved to England, first to Norwich, where he was living in 1809, and then to London. Whilst living there found to his advantage that by denouncing his Jewish faith and converting to Christianity, certain doors would open for him, and open they did, as a convert he found favour in the Christian community, and to supplement his earnings he was appointed as a salaried clerk to a parish church. The trust placed with Josephson was unfortunately misplaced and after running up six hundred pounds of credit at the bank, he absconded with the church silver.On the run with his wife in tow, he was arrested in Oxford in 1817, for passing forged bank notes and at Oxford Quarter Sessions he was sentenced to transportation for fourteen years.Josephson arrived at New South Wales on board the Neptune in May 1818, and he is described on the convict indent as: ‘Born Breslau. Hebrew teacher, age 39(?), 5ft. 4ins. In height, dark, ruddy complexion, black hair, dark eyes.Having a trade to support himself, he was freed almost immediately, and opened the shop at 3, Pitt Street, Sydney in October 1818.Interestingly Josephson employed two other silversmiths, whose names may well be known to collectors of silver, firstly that of Jeremiah Garfield (Grimwade 1817), who was transported for fourteen years after being found guilty at the Old Bailey for applying counterfeit marks unto twelve silver spoons in September 1821. He had entered his first mark at Goldsmiths Hall in August 1813, as a plateworker, address given as 25, Bridgewater Gardens, Cripplegate, London, he was formerly an apprentice to John Hudson. He arrived at the colony on the Eliza in November 1822. Garfield lived a sorry existence in the Colony, it would appear that he was incapable of making anything in silver with the exception of waiters, salvers and trays etc. and as there were no rolling mills established in Australia at that time, he could not acquire the raw material to work with and was employed by Josephson only as a house servant. Upon the completion of his sentence, Garfield became a policeman at Bathurst.The other employee of note was the Dublin buckle maker Walter Harley, who had entered his mark in 1784 from an address at 15, Coles Alley, Castle Street. Harley had many clashes with the authorities and was fined in 1787 for transposing hallmarks onto buckles and was transported to New South Wales in 1815 for possessing forged tokens, arriving on the Frances and Eliza. Harley’s convict indent describes him as ’57 years of age, 5’ 7 ½” tall, of sallow complexion with brown hair and hazel eyes.’In 1820, Harley was given a conditional pardon and left the employment of Josephson. He opened a shop in Castlereagh Street, Sydney, but after only a little more than a year and a half, he died, in May 1822.Jacob Josephson never changed his ways. By 1824 he had run up debts of £12,000, an enormous sum in those days, and with no bankruptcy laws in the Colony, he was sent to a debtors’ prison in 1826 and retired from the life of a silversmith. Upon his release he opened an inn and apparently prospered. He died at the age of seventy two on the 6th December 1845.
  • Jacob Josephson was born in Breslau, Prussia in 1774 and is first known to have worked as a silversmith in Hamburg. In the early years of the nineteenth century he moved to England, first to Norwich, where he was living in 1809, and then to London. Whilst living there found to his advantage that by denouncing his Jewish faith and converting to Christianity, certain doors would open for him, and open they did, as a convert he found favour in the Christian community, and to supplement his earnings he was appointed as a salaried clerk to a parish church. The trust placed with Josephson was unfortunately misplaced and after running up six hundred pounds of credit at the bank, he absconded with the church silver.On the run with his wife in tow, he was arrested in Oxford in 1817, for passing forged bank notes and at Oxford Quarter Sessions he was sentenced to transportation for fourteen years.Josephson arrived at New South Wales on board the Neptune in May 1818, and he is described on the convict indent as: ‘Born Breslau. Hebrew teacher, age 39(?), 5ft. 4ins. In height, dark, ruddy complexion, black hair, dark eyes.Having a trade to support himself, he was freed almost immediately, and opened the shop at 3, Pitt Street, Sydney in October 1818.Jacob Josephson never changed his ways. By 1824 he had run up debts of £12,000, an enormous sum in those days, and with no bankruptcy laws in the Colony, he was sent to a debtors’ prison in 1826 and retired from the life of a silversmith. Upon his release he opened an inn and apparently prospered. He died at the age of seventy two on the 6th December 1845.
  • Family backgroundJoshua Frey Josephson was born in Hamburg, Germany, on 27 February 1815, eldest son of Jacob Josephson (d.1845) and his non-Jewish wife widow Emma Wilson, nee Moss. The family converted from Judaism to Christianity and he was christened on 26 March 1815 at Saint Matthew’s, Bethnal Green London. At St Lawrence Chapel Sydney, on 1 December 1838, he married Louisa Jane, the eldest daughter of John and Mary Davies. Louisa died in 1863 and in April 1868 he married Katerina Frederica, née Schiller, at St George. She died in 1884 and he married his third wife, Elizabeth Geraldine, née Brennan, at Springwood in 1891. He died at Woollahra on 26 January 1892, survived by four sons and eight daughters of his first wife, and a daughter of his second wife. He was buried in the Anglican section of Rookwood Cemetery.Occupation & interestsJacob Josephson, father of Joshua, reached Sydney in May 1818 on the Neptune, a convict sentenced to 14 years for forgery. His wife and sons Lewis and Joshua Frey arrived on 12 September 1820 on the Morley. Joshua became an accomplished pianist, flautist and singer and was teaching music by 1834. He performed in concerts at the Theatre Royal organised by his step-brother Barnett Levey. Articled to James Norton, he was admitted as a solicitor on 17 February 1844 and to the New South Wales Bar on 9 June 1855. In February 1856, Josephson took his young family back to England and on a grand tour of Europe. He entered Lincoln’s Inn, was called to the Bar on 30 April 1859 and briefly practised as a barrister. He returned to Sydney in September 1861 and was appointed New South Wales Land Titles Commissioner in 1864. Joshua and his brothers Isaac and Manuel invested in city real estate, developing the railway suburbs out to Concord and Strathfield. He also invested in pastoral ventures in the Bligh, Wellington and Warrego districts, some in association with Thomas Mort. Josephson was appointed District Court Judge in September 1869 and chairman of Quarter Sessions for the Western District from 1869 to his resignation in 1884. He later became a partner in the wool-broking firm FL Barker & Co. On his father’s death, Joshua Josephson inherited Enmore House, designed by John Verge and demolished in 1883. With his wealth and land he was known as the Squire of Newtown but failed to gain a seat on the Newtown Council in 1863. He later built St Killians, Bellevue House, later Aspinall House, Scots College, and lived there until his death.Community activityJosephson was a founding member of St Pauls College, at the University of Sydney, and assisted in the establishment of the Sydney Dry Dock Co., the Hunter River Railway Co. and the Sydney Insurance Co. In the 1860s he was the Director of the Australian Joint Stock Bank, the Sydney Insurance Co, and the Australian Mutual Provident Society. He was a Commissioner for the 1867 Paris Exhibition. He collected Italian art and sculpture, some donated to the Art Gallery of New South Wales. In 1847 he was a founder of the Society for the Promotion of Fine Arts which presented Sydney’s first public art exhibition at the Australian Library. He was president of the Newtown School of Arts.Parlimentary serviceJosephson was elected to the New South Wales Legislative Assembly as the representative for Braidwood from 13 December 1864 to 3 November 1869 when he was appointed judge. He was Solicitor-General from 27 October 1868 to November 1869.ReferencesH. T. E. Holt, 'Josephson, Joshua Frey (1815–1892)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/josephson-joshua-frey-3873/text6167, accessed 7 January 2013.Australian Jewish Historical Society Journal Vol 11(6) 1993City of Sydney Archives: Aldermen's Files; Photos: CRS 44/260Connolly, C N 1983, Biographical Register of the New South Wales Parliament 1856-1901, ANUMitchell Library, State Library of NSW: Pictures Catalogues P2/9Parliament of New South Wales, Former Members, Mr Joshua Frey Josephson
  • David Max Eichhorn (January 6, 1906 – July 16, 1986) was rabbi of Reform Judaism, a director for Hillel, a chaplain in the Army with a long record of service to Jews in the military, an author, and an authority within Reform Judaism on the subjects of interfaith marriage and religious conversion.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Max_Eichhorn
  • Its first home was 59 Brick Lane, Spitalfields [pictured] - an emblematic building which has been by turns a Huguenot chapel, La NeuveÉglise (1743); they then leased it to LJS as the Jews' Chapel (1809); then to a community of Methodists (1819), becoming Spitalfields Chapel (Wesleyan) in 1843; then to the London Hebrew Talmud Torah who sub-let it to the strictly Orthodox MachzikeHadath (Ashkenazis mainly from Lithuania) and it became Spitalfields Great Synagogue (1897, in the time when 10,000 of the 14,000 inhabitants of the parish were Jewish); closed in 1952 (when a new synagogue was opened in Golders Green), it was sold to Bangladeshi Muslims and became a mosque, London Jamme Masjid (1976). Umbra sumus, reads the appropriate inscription above its sundial: we are shadows (Psalm 144.4).In 1813 LJS activities transferred to Cambridge Heath in Bethnal Green, where the Episcopal Jews' Chapel (for Christian worship) and schools for Jewish children were established. A printing press to provide employment for converts had been set up in 1811, and later they were taught bookbinding at the separately-run 'Operative Jewish Converts' Institution' (1831, later an industrial home). The site was named 'Palestine Place' in 1836.After the end of the Napoleonic Wars in 1815, Lewis Way began to advocate the causes of Jewish nationalism, giving a fourfold mission objective: 1) declaring the Messiahship of Jesus to the Jew first and also to the non-Jew2) endeavouring to teach the Church its Jewish roots3) encouraging the physical restoration of the Jewish people to the Land of Israel4) encouraging the Hebrew Christian/Messianic Jewish movement. “Pulvis et umbra sumus. It's a line from Horace. 'We are dust and shadows'. Book IV, ode vii, line 16.
  • Benei avraham cmj 130913a

    1. 1. Powerpoint at www.mmjt.eu @richardsh56
    2. 2. What happened in 1813? • Franz Delitzsch born Delitzsch, Franz Julius, 1813-1890. • Jane Austen wrote “Pride and Prejudice” • Beni Abraham founded • M'Cheyne, Robert Murray, 1813-1843.
    3. 3. Joseph Samuel Christian Frederick Frey (1771–1850) • Narrative of the Rev. Joseph Samuel C. F. Frey, 1834 (3rd ed.) • Hebrew Dictionary • Joseph and Benjamin
    4. 4. Joseph Frey and the LSPCJ
    5. 5. Frey’s Preaching
    6. 6. Opposition http://www.manfamily.org/PDFs/moses%20samuel%20address%20to%20missionaries.pdf
    7. 7. Palestine Place • Episcopal Jews Chapel • School for Hebrew boys and girls • Operative Jewish Converts Institute • Hebrew College for Jewish Missionaries. • Date(s): 1845 to 1855 (F. Jones)
    8. 8. Episcopal Jews’ Chapel 7th Report p.10, in Norris 82
    9. 9. Palestine Place • On the eastern side of Cambridge Road, the 5-a. field belonging to Bishop's Hall was leased in 1811 to the London Society for Promoting Christianity among the Jews, which built the Episcopal Jews' chapel and associated buildings, called Palestine Place by 1836. (fn. 34)
    10. 10. Palestine Place 1868 http://london1868.com/weller45.htm
    11. 11. Palestine Place
    12. 12. Palestine Place to Brick Lane
    13. 13. Christian, Jewish, Muslim
    14. 14. Jews’ Chapel, 59 Brick Lane
    15. 15. Jews’ Chapel
    16. 16. Rules of the Beni Abraham
    17. 17. Rules of Beni Abrham
    18. 18. Dispute Resolution
    19. 19. Committee
    20. 20. Members 1
    21. 21. Members 2
    22. 22. First Anniversary – September 1814
    23. 23. First anniversary meeting 1814
    24. 24. Annual Accounts 1814 £1 = around £100 today (£58.22 – £852.60) The average annual income circa 1800 was less than £20 The average weekly wage was around 6-10 shillings and many people earned far less.
    25. 25. Mrs. Hannah Abraham 1841 Census
    26. 26. Abraham Davis
    27. 27. Hyam Burn Isaac The baptism of Hyam Burn Isaacs, son of Isaac Isaacs of Ipswich (where the latter's father too had resided) at the age of 16 in 1810, attracted much attention and even led to legal proceedings.(v) (v) Report of London Society for 1811, Appendix XI, XII.
    28. 28. Hyam Burn Isaac – Times July 11th 1810
    29. 29. Lydia Elias died Hackney 1859
    30. 30. Lewis Marcus
    31. 31. Benjamin Isaac(s) • Worked as printing apprentice from age of 14 • Illegitimate son of poor working class parents • Well treated but not religious disposition • Developed interest in fine clothes • 21st birthday, shows signs of ingratitude, breaking law, several occasions brought to attention of the police (Darby 2010: 61-62)
    32. 32. Mathew Swabey – Times 5th June 1797
    33. 33. Moses Marcus • Baptized 'Scots Church Swallow Street London June 10th. 1810, Mr. Marcus being then 15 years old' • Ordination 1819 Norwich Cathedral • Curate St Sepulchre Northampton 1821 • A Third Letter to the Parishioners of St. Sepulchre, Northampton, in Answer to the Late Publication of the Rev. Mr. Butcher, in the Northampton Mercury 1822 • Mr Butcher, an attorney, has purchased St. Sepulchre and presented his son who has appointed Moses Marcus, 'a converted Jew' as Curate. The Bishop's arrangements for him have enraged Butcher, but Marcus, following a petition by parishioners, has been confirmed by licence for 3 years. • Relative Margaret Brown here today!
    34. 34. David and Phoebe Borrenstein
    35. 35. Phoebe Borrenstein –Sane or Saul? 10 Jul 1813 - Whitechapel St Mary
    36. 36. Theft of a Wedding Ring? Proceedings of the Old Bailey, 18th September 1820, page 30.
    37. 37. David Borrenstein at Princeton
    38. 38. Borrenstein’s printing
    39. 39. http://archive.org/stream/earlyprincetonp00c ollgoog/earlyprincetonp00collgoog_djvu.txt Samuel J. Bayard's poem Mengwe; a Tale of the Frontier, which was published anonymously in 1825
    40. 40. Stealing spoons from Lewis Way The Christian Disciple and Theological Review, Volume 2, 1815
    41. 41. Lewis Way Each, says the proverb, has his taste. 'Tis true Marsh loves a controversy, Coates a play, Bennet a felon, Lewis Way a Jew, The Jew the silver spoons of Lewis Way. (Macaulay)
    42. 42. Jacob Josephson
    43. 43. 3 Pitt Street, Sydney, October 1818
    44. 44. Silversmith in Australia 1824
    45. 45. Jacob and Emma Josephson England & Wales, Criminal Registers, 1791- 1892 about Jacob Josephson
    46. 46. Deportation Jacob Josephsonreached Sydney in May 1818 on the Neptune, a convict sentenced to 14 years for forgery. His wife and sons Lewis and Joshua Frey arrived on 12 September 1820 on the Morley.
    47. 47. Are they related? • Kelvin Crombie Joshua Frey Josephson
    48. 48. Why did Beni Abraham end? • Todd Endelman – “the gap between the lofty, spiritualised rhetoric of the Society and the dismal, almost pathetic results of its efforts was enormous.” (p 77)
    49. 49. Michael Darby’s theory “This attempt (the amended Rules and Regulations) to gain more independence for the Children of Abraham from the LSPCJ, however, was not successful. The fifty members of the association were expelled by the parent society and were obliged to establish a new organisation late in 1815 or early on 1816” (p.65)
    50. 50. David Eichorn’s Observation “The year 1813 is also important in the history of Jewish missions because it marks the first effort of converted Jews to organize themselves into some sort of mutual aid society. On September 9, 1813, forty- one Hebrew Christians assembled in the Jews Chapel and formed the ‘Beni Abraham’” (1978:24-25)
    51. 51. Umbra Sumus “Pulvis et umbra sumus - Horace. 'We are dust and shadows'. Book IV, ode vii, line 16.
    52. 52. The Messianic Movement – Where is it going?
    53. 53. History Repeats Itself • “Know where you came from, and where you’re going, and before whom you will stand in the future—the Holy One, Blessed be He” (Pirkei Avot 3:1).
    54. 54. The early church • Jewish Christianity in the Book of Acts • Torah-observant Pharisees and Priests • Mission to Israel – Peter • Mission to the Nations – Paul • Jewish-Christian self- definition in the 1st – 4th centuries
    55. 55. The 19th Century • Benei Abraham Episcopal Jews Chapel (1814) • Hebrew Christian Alliance (1866)
    56. 56. Israelites of the New Covenant • Joseph Rabinowitz • Haggadah liv’nei Yisrael Hama’amin b’Mashiach Yeshua Hanotzri
    57. 57. The Modern Messianic Movement • A Jewish form of Christianity • A Christian form of Judaism • 150,000 (?) worldwide of 16m Jewish people • 300+ Messianic Congregations • Jewish identity, faith and practice in light of Messiah
    58. 58. The Modern Messianic Movement • Reformed, amillennial (Maoz) • Dispensational Premilliennial (Fruchtenbaum) • Charismatic, Historic Premilliennial, New Testament Halacha (Juster, Stern) • Jewish religious tradition (Fischer, Schiffmann)
    59. 59. Torah-Positive Streams • ‘Postmissionary Messianic Judaism’ (Kinzer, Nichol, Sadan) • Rabbinic Halacha in the Light of the NT (Shulam) • Messianic Rabbinic Orthodoxy (Brandt, Marcus)
    60. 60. 4 Possible Futures – 1. Dry up • Plateau and decline – a historical curiosity • Fail to involve next generation • Lack of spiritual depth and personal maturity • Need for theological reflection
    61. 61. Harden up • Harden up – Torah observance loses sight of Yeshua • Trinity and Incarnational Christology needed • Unity of Body of Messiah compromised
    62. 62. Blow up • Blow up – increasingly ‘gentilised’ • False teaching on roles of Israel and the Nations • Lack of authenticity
    63. 63. Grow up • Spiritual health • Personal maturity • Numerical growth • Theological maturity • Reconciling love • Until Yeshua returns!
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